RtB section 9 – The Nene Hag

Up to “Round the Bend”.

Back to Section 8 – Institutionalized.

In which Lucia meets the Nene Hag, who inspires some unwelcome reflection on the similarities between the monster and Lucia.

Overlooking the Nene River, near St. Andrews (Google Street View, July 2015)
Overlooking the Nene River, near St. Andrews (Google Street View, July 2015)

 

Significant characters and themes in this section:

  • James Joyce (1882-1941) was an extremely famous writer and Lucia Joyce’s father.
    • The River Liffey is a river in Ireland which, in Finnegans Wake, is referred to many times, and is metaphorically linked to the female protagonist (who is, in some senses, Lucia).
  • World mythology, especially Greek.
  • Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass by Lewis Carroll, classic children’s books whose themes include childhood, madness, wordplay, and doubled characters.
  • Page 913 (continued)
  • Paragraph 132
    She is considering this possibility when there is a commotion in the turbid river-waters at her feet, with monstrous gassy bubbles thick as fruit-bowls effervescing to the surface only to disintegrate and burst in beads of silvered crystal there amidst the beautiful expanded diamond rings of ripple. Something of immense proportions is emerging from the depths beneath her and she takes a step back from the riverbank for fear of getting splashed and having all the nurses think she’s pissed herself, bedad!

    • Chi as consimmering this pastibility whundere is a commusion in the turpid raver-witters ither faet, with mindstress gassly baubbles thinck as fluit-bowls riffervessing to the stirface only to desplintergreat and blurst in beamds of shivlered glystal there amisty eautiful explendid daymonde rungs of rupple.

      • “Chi as” – “She is”, “chiasmus” (a rhetorical figure), “chi” (Greek letter; life force) “as”.
      • “consimmering” – “Considering”, “con simmering”.
      • “pastibility” – “Possibility”, “past ability”.
      • “whundere” – “When there”, “wonder”, “hundred”, “under”.
      • “commusion” – “Commotion”, “confusion”, possibly “communion”.
      • “turpid” – “Turbid” (disturbed, cloudy), “torpid” (unmoving), “turgid” (swollen; bombastic).
      • “raver-witters” – “River-waters”, “raver wit”, “witter” (to speak at length about trivia; obsolete “knowing”).
      • “ither” – “At her”, “ither” (Scots “other”). Possibly “zither”.
      • “faet” – “Feet”, “fate”, “fae” (fairy).
      • “mindstress” – “Monstrous”, “mind stress”, possibly “mind’s tress”.
      • “gassly” – “Gassy”, “glassy”, “ghastly”.
      • “baubbles” – “Bubbles”, “baubles”.
      • “thinck” – “Thick”, “think”.
      • “fluit-bowls” – “Fruit-bowls”, “fluid”.
      • “riffervessing” – “Effervescing”, “River Liffey“.
        • Possible reference to Charles Vess, noted fantasy artist whose usual themes are nature and fairyland.
      • “stirface” – “Surface”, “stir face”.
      • “desplintergreat” – “Disintegrate”, “the great splinter”.
      • “blurst” – “Burst”, “blurt”.
      • “beamds” – “Beads”, “beams” (of light).
      • “shivlered” – “Silvered”, “shivered”.
      • “glystal” – “Crystal”, “glyph”. Possibly “glyster” (obsolete “suppository”).
      • “amisty” – “Amidst the”, “a misty”.
      • “eautiful” – “Beautiful”, “eau” (stream; French “water”).
      • “explendid” – “Expanded”, “splendid”.
      • “daymonde” – “Diamond”, “day” “monde” (French “world”).
      • “rungs” – “Rings”, “rungs”.
      • “rupple” – “Ripple”, “rumple”.
  • Page 914
    • Slimething of immerse plopoceans is imargine frother deepths beneither and she torques a steep buck from the reverblink fear for o’ gertain splaced and hahahaving all the noisies tink she’s pisst hersellf, by Daed!

      • “Slimething” – “Something”, “slime thing” (partially alluding to Moore’s work on Swamp Thing).
      • “immerse” – “Immense”, “immerse”.
      • “plopoceans” – “Proportions”, “plop” (sound of something dropping in water) “oceans”.
      • “imargine” – “Emerging”, “imagine”, possibly “margin”.
      • “frother” – “From the”, “froth”.
      • “deepths” – “Depths”, “deeps”.
      • “beneither” – “Beneath her”, “be neither”.
      • “torques” – “Takes”, “torque” (rotational force; metal braided collar).
      • “steep” – “Step”, “steep”.
      • “buck” – “Back”, “buck” (meanings include “beech tree”; “to move in a jerking manner”; “lye for washing clothes”).
      • “reverblink” – “Riverbank”, “reverie blink”, “reverb link”.
      • “fear for” – “For fear”.
      • “gertain” – “Getting”, “certain”.
      • “splaced” – “Splashed”, “displaced”.
      • “hahahaving” – “Having”, “ha ha ha” (laughter – Lucia worries about being laughed at).
      • “noisies” – “Nurses”, “noisiest”, possibly “nosy”.
      • “tink” – “Think”, “tinkle” (childish “piss”).
      • “pisst” – “Pissed”, suggest??
      • “hersellf” – “Herself”, “sell her”.
      • “by Daed” – “Bedad” (dated “by God”), “by Daedalus“, “bye Daddy”.
  • Page 914
  • Paragraph 133
    The smooth meniscus of the liquid reality is shattered in jigsaw-puzzle of broken reflections as an object of enormous size erupts from the slow-moving river. Going purely by the look of it she first supposes it to be some sort of cross between an alligator and a long-submerged old-fashioned racing-car with a large bonnet. Then, as this peculiar affair continues rising upwards on the end of what appears to be a scaly trunk, Lucia recognizes that it is the hideous and elongated cranium of a gigantic water-creature quite unprecedented in her previous experience.

    • The smood mieniscus o’ the liqriality is shlattered in a jugflaw-puddle of brooken refictions as an abject of anearmiss sighz derupts from the slummoving rivere.

      • “smood” – “Smooth”, “mood”.
      • “mieniscus” – “Meniscus” (liquid surface; crescent moon), “mien” (demeanor). Possibly “discus”.
      • “liqriality” – “Liquid reality” (? Suggest??), “liquor”, “rialta” (Irish “regular”), “rial” (historical “type of English gold coin”).
      • “shlattered” – “Shattered”, “slattern” (slut).
      • “jugflaw-puddle” – “Jigsaw-puzzle”, “(a) flaw(ed) jug (breaks, leaving a) puddle”.
      • “brooken” – “Broken”, “brook” (stream; to tolerate).
      • “refictions” – “Reflections”, “re: fictions”.
      • “abject” – “Object”, “abject” (hopeless, often seen in the phrase “abject terror”).
      • “anearmiss” – “Enormous”, “a near miss”.
      • “sighz” – “Size”, “sighs” (the Nene Hag is often melancholy).
      • “derupts” – “Erupts”, suggest??
      • “slummoving” – “Slow-moving”, “slumbering”, “slum”.
      • “rivere” – “River”, “revere”. Possibly “rivere” (Latin “you may be being led”?).
    • Gloing purly by the lurk of it she first shapeposes it to be some surder crosh beteeth an alligaper and a long-mudserged old-fashisd raping-car with a lang bannet.

      • “Gloing” – “Going”, “glowing”.
      • “purly” – “Purely”, “surly”, “purly” (obsolete “the ground on the edges of a forest”).
      • “lurk” – “Look”, “lurk”.
      • “shapeposes” – “Supposes”, “shape poses”.
      • “surder” – “Sort of”, “surd” (a voiceless consonant; obsolete “deaf”), “sunder”. Possibly “surfer”, “Surtur“, “Urđr“.
      • “crosh” – “Cross” (both in the sense of “mixture” and “annoyed”), “crush” (to mangle; affection).
      • “beteeth” – “Between”, “be teeth”.
      • “alligaper” – “Alligator”, “all agape”.
      • “mudserged” – “Submerged”, “mud surged”. Possibly “serge” (type of cloth; ceremonial candle).
      • “old-fashisd” – “Old-fashioned”, “fascist”.
      • “raping-car” – “Racing-car”, “raping”.
      • “lang” – “Long”, “language”, “possibly “languid”.
      • “bannet” – “Bonnet” (British “hood of a car”), “banner”, possibly “ban it”.
    • Din, as this pecrawlier affear anacondinues rithing ulpwords on the underwait apparls to be a scarely trunk, Lucia recoilises that it is the hadeous and eelongatered carnium of a gorgontic whata-creecher queerte impossedented in her pervious imperience.

      • “Din” – “Then”, “din”. Possibly “Dis“.
      • “pecrawlier” – “Peculiar”, “crawlier”.
      • “affear” – “Affair”, “a fear”.
      • “anacondinues” – “Continues”, “anaconda”.
      • “rithing” – “Rising”, “writhing”.
      • “ulpwords” – “Upwards”, “gulp words”.
      • “underwait” – “End of what”, “under wait”.
      • “apparls” – “Appears”, “apparel”.
      • “scarely” – “Scaly”, “scarily”.
      • “recoilises” – “Recognizes”, “recoils”.
      • “hadeous” – “Hideous”, “Hades” (Greek god of the Underworld).
      • “eelongatered” – “Elongated”, “eel long gator red”.
      • “carnium” – “Cranium”, “carnal”, possibly “carnage”.
      • “gorgontic” – “Gigantic”, “gorgon” (class of monster in Greek mythology).
      • “whata-creecher” – “Water-creature”, “what a screech here”.
      • “queerte” – “Quite”, “queer”.
      • “impossedented” – “Unprecedented”, “impossible”, possibly “posse”.
      • “pervious” – “Previous”, “pervy us”.
      • “imperience” – “Experience”, “imperial”.
  • Paragraph 134
    Swaying some several yards above her on the end of its long, snaking neck the creature stares down at Lucia from the bleak depths of its sunken eyes, which glisten and to her resemble wet sea-shells and pebbles at the bottom of a bucket. Slime and waterweeds and bicycles hang dripping from its muddy scalp. Its teeth, beneath their emerald crust of algae, are the sharpened ribs of a blue whale. There is a rusted pram tucked under one of them that makes Lucia feel a moment’s melancholy for her own aborted baby. It takes her a little while to understand that the Leviathan is grinning at her. When at last it speaks it is the bubbling gas of drowned things rising through thick mud.

    • Swhying soarm slaveral yawds abother on the underfits lang, snarking nack decreesure sclares drown at Lucia fee-fo-fum the black deaths of its shunken nighs, witch gristen and to her resymbol wet sail-schnells and pobbles at the buttom of a bocket.

      • “Swhying” – “Swaying”, “‘why’-ing”.
      • “soarm” – “Some”, “soar”.
      • “slaveral” – “Several”, “slaver” (drool), possibly “slave”.
      • “yawds” – “Yards”, “yaw” (rotation), “yawn(ing wide)”.
      • “abother” – “Above her”, “a bother”.
      • “underfits” – “End of its”, “under fits”.
      • “lang” – “Long”, “language”, “languid”.
      • “snarking” – “Snaking”, snark” (Lewis Carroll monster; snide remarks).
      • “nack” – “Neck”, “knack”, possibly “nackt” (German “naked”).
      • “decreesure” – “The creature”, “decree sure”, “decrease your”.
      • “sclares” – “Stares”, “scales”, “(John) Clare”.
      • “drown” – “Down”, “drown”.
      • “fee-fo-fum” – “From”, fee-fo-fum” (giant’s phrase from traditional fairy tale).
      • “black deaths” – “Bleak depths”, “Black Death” (bubonic plague).
      • “shunken” – “Sunken”, “shrunken”.
      • “nighs” – “Eyes”, “nigh”, possibly “night”.
      • “witch” – “Which”, “witch”.
      • “gristen” – “Glisten”, “gristle”.
      • “resymbol” – “Resemble”, “re- symbol”.
      • “sail-schnells” – “Sea-shells”, “snail shells”, “sail” “schnell” (German “fast, quick, again”).
      • “pobbles” – “Pebbles”, “pobble” (Manx “people, populace”). Possibly “pobblebonk” (type of Australian frog).
      • “buttom” – “Bottom”, “butt”.
      • “bocket” – “Bucket”, “bockety” (Ireland “unsteady, wobbly”). Possibly “bock” (type of dark beer).
    • Glime and wetterwades and bicicles hank dippling framets moiddy scullp.

      • “Glime” – “Slime”, “grime”.
      • “wetterwades” – “Waterweeds”, “wetter wades”.
      • “bicicles” – “Bicycles”, “icicles”.
      • “hank” – “Hang”, “hank” (mess, tangle).
      • “dippling” – “Dripping”, “rippling”, “dappling”.
      • “framets” – “From its”, “frame”.
      • “moiddy” – “Muddy”, “moidyn” (Manx “maiden, virgin”), “moider” (to muddle).
      • “scullp” – “Scalp”, “skull”.
    • Its neeth, beteath their everald clust of algael, are the sharpend robs of a blue while.

      • “neeth” – “Teeth”, “beneath”. Possibly “neet” (Not in Employment, Education, or Training).
      • “beteath” – “Beneath”, “be death”, “bet each”, “teeth”.
      • “everald” – “Emerald”, “ever old”, “alder” (type of tree).
      • “clust” – “Crust”, “cluster”.
      • “algael” – “Algae”, “all gel”. Possibly “Gael” (native speaker of Gaelic).
      • “robs” – “Ribs”, “robs” (steals from).
      • “blue whil” – “Blue whale”, “while”.
    • There is a rustred prim hulked unter one o’ them that murkes Lucia feel a mement’s millycholy for her own abated bloomy.
      • “rustred” – “Rusted”, “rust-red”, “trusted”.
      • “prim” – “Pram” (baby carriage), “prim”.
      • “hulked” – “Tucked”, “hulk”.
      • “unter” – “Under”, “inter”.
      • “murkes” – “Makes”, “murk”.
      • “mement’s” – “Moment’s”, “meme”, “remember”, “me mental”, possibly “remnants”.
      • “millycholy” – “Melancholy”, “Molly” (see below) “see holy”.
      • “abated” – “Aborted”, “abated”.
      • “bloomy” – “Baby”, “Bloom”.
        • Commenter barrynorton points out that “milly[…] bloomy” is Molly Bloom, from Ulysses.
    • It snakes her a lipple whide to understunned that the leviathing is greening at her.

      • “snakes” – “Takes”, “snakes”.
      • “lipple” – “Little”, “lip”, possibly “lippy” (cheeky).
      • “whide” – “While”, “wide”, “hide”.
      • “understunned” – “Understand”, “under stunned”.
      • “leviathing” – “Leviathan”, “thing”. Possibly “levia” (Latin “Oh fickle ones!).
      • “greening” – “Grinning”, “green”.
    • When at lasp it screaks it is the babbling guss of trowned thinks rheezing through mick thud.

      • “lasp” – “Last”, “gasp”.
      • “screaks” – “Speaks”, “creaks”.
      • “babbling” – “Bubbling”, “babbling” (sound a brook makes; nonsense speech).
      • “guss” – “Gas”, “guss” (Swedish “girl”; German “downpour”).
      • “trowned” – “Drowned”, “town”, “trow” (archaic “trust”; dated “flat-bottomed boat”; dated Scotland “troll”).
      • “thinks” – “Things”, “thinks” (thoughts).
      • “rheezing” – “Rising”, “wheezing”.
      • “mick thud” – “Thick mud”, “mick” (slang “Irishman”) “thud” (sound of falling).
  • Paragraph 135
    “Good afternoon. Am I correct in thinking that you would be Anna Livia Plurabelle, the musical and dancing spirit of the River Liffey?”

    • “Glug altermoon.

      • Since the Nene Hag’s speech is printed in bold, and I’m already using bold to emphasize parts of these notes, I have added italics to her speech to distinguish them from other notes.
      • Glug” – “Good”, “glug” (watery sound).
      • altermoon” – “Afternoon”, “alter noon”.
    • Ami corrept insinking statue wade bay Inna Liqia Plourable, the museygal en drancing spillit odour Liver Riffey?”

      • Ami” – “Am I”, “ami” (French “friend”), “Ami” (German slang “American”).
      • corrept” – “Correct”, “corrupt”.
      • insinking” – “In thinking”, “I’m sinking”.
      • statue” – “That you”, “statue”.
      • wade” – “Would”, “wade”.
      • bay” – “Be”, “bay” (type of tree; body of water mostly surrounded by land).
      • Inna Liqia Plourable” – Anna Livia Plurabelle” (character in Finnegans Wake who is cognate with both Lucia and the River Liffey), “in a liquid, pourable”.
      • museygal en drancing” – “Musical and dancing”, “muse-y” (thoughtful; relating to the Muses) “gal entrancing”, possibly “gallon”, “calendar”.
      • spillit” – “Spirit”, “spill it”.
      • odour” – “Of the”, “odour” (This and the next sentence contain many words alluding to the strong scent of the Nene Hag).
      • Liver Riffey” – “River Liffey“, “live her riff”, “liver”, “Riffe” (German “reefs”).
  • Paragraph 136
    Lucia sniffs, surprised by how invigorating she finds the exquisite strident tongue, and tosses back her graying hair as though asserting her authority.

    • Lucia snuffs, sourprized by how infrigorating she fends the axquasite stungent tang, and trosses back her glaying hoar as though assorting her authowritey.

      • “snuffs” – “Sniffs”, “snuff” (to put out (like a candle); to kill; fine-ground tobacco).
      • “sourprized” – “Surprised”, “sour (yet) prized”.
      • “infrigorating” – “Invigorating”, “frig” (to masturbate), possibly “infuriating”.
      • “fends” – “Finds”, “fends”.
      • “axquasite” – “Exquisite”, “aquatic”, “axe” “qua” (in the capacity of) “site”. Possibly “quasit” (type of small demon).
      • “stungent” – “Strident”, “stringent”, “pungent”.
      • “tang” – “Tongue”, “tang” (obsolete “tongue”; sharp aroma; type of fish; type of seaweed; slang “vagina”).
      • “trosses” – “Tosses”, “tresses”.
      • “glaying hoar” – “Graying hair”, “glaymore” (large sword), “hoar” (white; aged), “playing whore”, possibly “flaying”.
      • “assorting” – “Asserting”, “assorted”, “a sorting”.
      • “authowritey” – “Authority”, “author writes me”.
  • Paragraph 137
    “I am indeed the fluid and anthropomorphic personage of whom you make inquiry. Who might you be, my good woman, and so forth and so forth?”

    • “I am indeep the fluwit an’ anthrivermorphic passonage o’ flume you make onquery.

      • “indeep” – “Indeed”, “in deep”.
      • “fluwit” – “Fluid”, “flow wit”, “flu” (influenza).
      • “anthrivermorphic” – “Anthropomorphic”, “and thrive”, “river”.
      • “passonage” – “Personage”, “passion age”, “possibly “parsonage”.
      • “o’ flume” – “Of whom”, “flume” (a channel with water running through).
      • “onquery” – “Inquiry”, “on query”.
    • Who my tubey, my gut wormin, and so firth and slo forth?”

      • “my tubey” – “Might you be”, “my tube-y”.
      • “my gut wormin” – “My good woman”, “my God”, “worms in my gut”.
      • “and so firth and slo forth” – “And so forth and so forth” (long-winded way of saying “etc.”), Firth of Forth” (estuary of the river Forth in Scotland), “slow”.
  • Paragraph 138
    The freshwater abomination tilts its massive head upon one side and scrutinizes Lucia with interest as it replies.

    • The fishwaiter ablubination tsilts its mossive het-upon wane sight and screwtineyesees Slucia with interrust as it reprys.

      • “fishwaiter” – “Freshwater”, “fish waiter”.
      • “ablubination” – “Abomination”, “blub” (sinking sound). Possibly “ablution” (act of ritual washing), “agglutination” (linguistic act of combining two words into one with few to no other changes).
      • “tsilts” – “Tilts”, “stilts”.
      • “mossive” – “Massive”, “mossy”.
      • “het-upon” – “Head upon”, “het” (dialect “heated”), possibly “het(erosexual)”.
      • “wane sight” – “One side”, “sight wane(s)”.
      • “screwtineyesees” – “Scrutinizes”, “screw-in eye sees”, possibly “tin”, “tine”.
      • “Slucia” – “Lucia”, “sluice” (floodgate).
      • “interrust” – “Interest”, “inter rust”.
      • “reprys” – “Replies”, “reprise”, “prys”.
  • Paragraph 139
    “My name is Nina Livia Plurabelle and I am the immortal essence of the River Nene. Within my mile-long gut are the plumed hats of slaughtered cavaliers and wash-lost jewels of kings. I have head tell of you, there on the sodden pages of a book torn up and cast upon my sluggish bosom encrustation, hurled again into my fin’s wake. Reading in between the lines, it struck me that we both had a great any things in common, you and I.”

    • “My nume is Nenna Leavya Pitabel undyam the immertail essluence o’ the Rêver Nun.

      • nume” – “Name”, “numinous”.
      • Nenna Leavya Pitabel” – “Nina Livia Plurabelle”, “Nene leave you pitiable”, “nenna” (Neapolitan “girl”; Icelandic “to bother”). Possibly “non-leavened pita bread”.
        • This is a close analogue of “Anna Livia Plurabelle“, the character from Finnegans Wake who is cognate to both Lucia and the River Liffey.
      • undyam” – “And I am”, “undy” (underwear), “undine” (water spirit), “yam”.
        • Possible allusion to Popeye’s “I yam what yam”.
      • immertail” – “Immortal”, “immerse tail”, possibly “shimmer”.
      • essluence” – “Essence”, “effluence” (something that flows out).
      • Rêver Nun” – “River Nene”, “rêver” (French “dream”) “nun”.
    • Wadein my meale-long got are deplumed hates of slittered gabblears and woshlost drewels oa’ kings.

      • Wadein” – “Within”, “wade in”.
      • meale-long” – “Mile-long”, “meal”. Possibly “mealy”.
      • got” – “Gut” “got”.
      • deplumed hates” – “The plumed hats”, “deplumed hates” (perhaps suggesting that partisan hatred has been defanged by death?).
      • slittered” – “Slaughtered”, “littered”, “slit (throats)”.
      • gabblears” – “Cavaliers” (Royalist soldiers in the English Civil War see chapter “Sleepless Swords“), “gabble” (to talk foolishly) “ears”, possibly “arse”.
      • woshlost” – “Wash-lost”, suggest??. Possibly “Shloss” (author of major Lucia Joyce biography) .
        • The Wash is a large estuary fed by the River Nene, among others.
      • drewels” – “Jewels”, “drew” (possibly alluding to Lucia’s lettrines, perhaps – see notes in previous section, paragraph 122).
      • oa’ kings” – “Of kings”, “oak (r)ings”.
        King John losing the jewels
        King John losing the jewels
        • In the chapter, “The Trees Don’t Need to Know“, Marjorie learned of the Hag’s knowledge of “the lost crown jewels of Bad King John”. This is actual history (or at least folklore).
    • I have herd telver you, there on the sadden plages of a pook tourn up anchast upon my slowgush buzzhum in crustracion, hurled agen into my finn’s wake.

      • herd” – “Heard”, “herd”.
      • telver” – “Tell of”, “elver” (young eel; Norwegian “rivers”; Hungarian “to whack”).
      • sadden” – “Sodden”, “sadden”.
      • plages” – “Pages”, “plages” (French “beaches”; obsolete “regions”; Norwegian “plagues”).
      • pook” – “Book”, “pooka” (a fairy in animal form).
        • It would seem that at some point a copy of Finnegans Wake went into the Nene River.
      • tourn” – “Torn”, “turn”, possibly “thrown”.
      • anchast” – “And cast”, “anchor”. Possibly “anchas” (Spanish feminine plural “proud”).
      • slowgush” – “Sluggish”, “slow gush”.
      • buzzhum” – “Bosom”, “buzz hum”.
      • in crustracion” – “Encrustation”, “in crustacean”.
      • agen” – “Again”, “agenbite” (see notes to paragaph 123, previous section).
      • finn’s wake” – “Fin’s wake”, “Finnegans Wake“.
    • Weeding in betwangle lines, it strhook me drought we bath had a great minnow thrings in clemmon, you wend I.”

      • Weeding” – “Reading”, “weeds”.
      • betwangle lines” – “Between the lines”, “tangled (fishing?) lines”.
      • strhook” – “Struck”, “hook”. Possibly “STR” (strength)
      • drought” – “That”, “drought”.
      • bath” – “Both”, “bath”.
      • minnow” – “Many”, “minnow”.
      • thrings” – “Things”, “rings”. Possibly “throngs”.
      • clemmon” – “Common”, “Clemmy” (Clementine), “inclement”, suggest??
      • you wend I” – “You and I”, “you wend (towards) I” (you are becoming like me).
  • Paragraph 140
    Lucia peers at the great towering serpent’s umbrella-folded two limbs with their many-jointed pterodactyl fingers and discolored webbing. She regards the giant barnacle-like encrustations on the creature’s chest, a rusty orange in their coloration, that she thinks must be vestigial nipples, and feels moderately offended that this hideous termagant might think to have something in common with the remarkably accomplished daughter of the twentieth century’s greatest writer.

    • Luci apeers at the greyt tlowering stirpaint’s umberella-faulded twolimbs with their mangy-jointide ptarryductoil fungers and diskillered wobbing.

      • “Luci apeers” – “Lucia peers”, “Lucy appears”.
      • “greyt” – “Great”, “grey”.
      • “tlowering” – “Towering”, “lowering” (threatening).
      • “stirpaint’s” – “Serpent’s”, “stir paints”.
      • “umberella-faulded” – “Umbrella-folded”, “umber” (reddish-brown, introducing a theme of rust-colored words) “fault”. Possibly “fall dead”.
      • “twolimbs” – “Two limbs”, “forelimbs”, suggest??
      • “mangy-jointide” – “Many-jointed”, “mangy” “join tide”.
      • “ptarryductoil” – “Pterodactyl”, “tarry duct oil”, possibly “duc” (French “duke”) “toil”, “duck” (perhaps alluding to early Moore song “The March of the Sinister Ducks“).
      • “fungers” – “Fingers”, “fungus”.
      • “diskillered” – “Discolored”, “this killer”, possibly “Dis”, “red”.
      • “wobbing” – “Webbing”, “wobbling”. Possibly “wobbegong” (type of shark).
  • Page 915
    • She reglards the joyant barenuckle-like enfrustations on the screature’s chast, ar resty ormange in their dulouration, that she sinks rust be vesturgial nibbles, and fells murderately affended that this squideous tarnagant mud think to have scumthing in commonstrosity with the raymurkably accomplashed waughter of the tweenteeth dentury’s greytest rater.

      • “reglards – “Regards”, “regla” (Spanish “measuring stick; menstruation), possibly “glares”.
      • “joyant” – “Giant”, “joy ant”, “joyant” (dated “joyful”).
      • “barenuckle-like” – “Barnacle-like”, “bare-knuckle” (boxing without gloves).
      • “enfrustations” – “Encrustations”, “frustrations”.
      • “screature’s” – “Creature’s”, “screech your”.
      • “chast” – “Chest”, “chaste”.
      • “ar resty” – “A rusty”, “arresting”.
      • “ormange” – “Orange”, “or mange”.
      • “dulouration” – “Coloration”, “duration”, possibly “dolor” (sorrow).
      • “sinks” – “Thinks”, “sinks”.
      • “rust” – “Must”, “rust”.
      • “vesturgial” – “Vestigial”, “urges”, possibly “Vesta” (Roman goddess whose priestesses were famously virginal).
      • “nibbles” – “Nipples”, “nibble”.
      • “fells” – “Feels”, “fells” (cuts down).
      • “murderately” – “Moderately”, “murder ate lie”.
      • “affended” – “Offended”, “Affe” (German “ape, monkey”).
      • “squideous” – “Hideous”, “squid-like”.
      • “tarnagant” – “Termagant” (old, shrewish woman), “tarn” (mountain lake).
      • “mud” – “Might”, “mud”.
      • “scumthing” – “Something”, “scum thing” (probable allusion to Moore’s Swamp Thing).
      • “commonstrosity” – “Common”, “monstrosity”.
      • “raymurkably” – “Remarkably”, “ray (of light through the) murk”.
      • “accomplashed” – “Accomplished”, “splashed”.
      • “waughter” – “Daughter”, “water”.
      • “tweenteeth” – “Twentieth”, “between teeth”.
      • “dentury’s” – “Century’s”, “dentures”.
      • “greytest” – “Greatest”, “grey test”.
      • “rater” – “Writer”, “rated”.
  • Paragraph 141
    “Speaking only for myself, I can’t see the resemblance. I don’t have colonies of water-snails around the corners of my mouth, nor do I have a three-wheeled pram caught in my teeth like metal spinach. Unless you have also enthralled Paris with your skills as an interpretive dancer, which I frankly find unlikely, then I fear there are no obvious similarities between us.”

    • “Smirking only for myscoff, I can’t see the resymbolance.

      • “Smirking” – “Speaking”, “smirking” (This and “scoff”, below, emphasize Lucia’s smugness in her superiority).
      • “myscoff” – “Myself”, “my scoff”.
      • “resymbolance” – “Resemblance”, “symbol”, possibly “lance”.
    • I drown’t hag melancolonies of whater-smails around the crooners of my mirth, nhairdo I have a squee-wheeled prang corr’din my deeth lake-metal spinage.

      • “drown’t” – “Don’t”, “drowned”.
      • “hag” – “Have”, “hag”.
      • “melancolonies” – “Colonies”, “melancholy”.
      • “whater-smails” – “Water-snails”, “what are mails”.
      • “crooners” – “Corners”, “crooners”.
      • “mirth” – “Mouth”, “mirth”.
      • “nhairdo” – “Nor do”, “hairdo”, possibly “Nair” (hair removal product).
      • “squee” – “Three”, “quee” (squeaking noise).
      • “prang” – “Pram”, “prang”(slang “vehicular accident”).
      • “corr’din” – “Caught in”, “corroding”, possibly “corridor din”.
      • “deeth” – “Teeth”, “death”.
      • “lake-metal” – “Like metal”, “lake”, suggest??
      • “spinage” – “Spinach”, “spin age”.
    • Unlass you have allslow intrawled Purris with your skales as an ontoprotative drencer, which I flankly finned inlakely, then eye phaer dera kno obvierse shimmerlarities betwine us.”

      • “Unlass” – “Unless”, “un- lass” (that is, the Nene Hag is no longer female).
      • “allslow” – “Also”, “all slow”.
      • “intrawled” – “Enthralled”, “in trawled”.
      • “Purris” – “Paris”, “purr”.
      • “skales” – “Skills”, “scales”.
      • “ontoprotative” – “Interpretive”, “on top (of the) rota”. Possibly “onto” “prototype”.
      • “drencer” – “Dancer”, “drencher”.
      • “flankly” – “Frankly”, “flank lie”.
      • “finned” – “Find”, “finned”.
      • “inlakely” – “Unlikely”, “in lake lie”.
      • “eye” – “I”, “eye”.
      • “phaer” – “Fear”, Phaedra” (Greek mythological figure, a woman who was spurned in love, leading to tragedy).
      • “dera” – “There are”, “deranged”.
      • “kno” – “No”, “know”.
      • “obvierse” – “Obvious”, “obverse”.
      • “shimmerlarities” – “Similarities”, “shimmer”.
      • “betwine” – “Between”, “be twine”, “entwine “.
  • Paragraph 142
    The sub-aqueous enormity inclines its long flat head upon one side. Its junkyard mouth dilates into a yawning grin as it stares down at Lucia. The river-monster chortles with a rumbling accompaniment of swallowed television sets and feline skeletons cacophonously clattering about somewhere within her.

    • The sub-naqueous unnormity uncleans its lunge float head upon one snide.

      • “sub-naqueous” – “Sub-aqueous”, “naquela” (Portuguese “in that”). Possibly “nacreous” (of mother of pearl).
      • “unnormity” – “Enormity”, “un- normal”.
      • “uncleans” – “Inclines”, “unclean”.
      • “lunge” – “Long”, “lunge”.
      • “float” – “Flat”, “float”.
      • “snide” – “Side”, “snide”.
    • Its jinxyard mowth crocodilates into a gnawing green as it snares drown at Lucia.

      • “jinxyard” – “Junkyard”, “jinx”.
      • “mowth” – “Mowth”, “maw” “mow (with tee)th”.
      • “crocodilates” – “Dilates”, “crocodile”.
      • “gnawing” – “Yawning”, “gnawing”.
      • “green” – “Grin”, “green”.
      • “snares” – “Stares”, “snares”, possibly “sneers”.
      • “drown” – “Down”, “drown”.
    • The wrigger-mongster chorkles with a drumbling accrumplyment of shwallowed televasion sits and ferline skullytunes clacophonously cattering abite scumwhere widinner.

      • “wrigger-mongster” – “River-monster”, “wriggle amongst”.
      • “chorkles” – “Chortles” (a word coined by Lewis Carroll as a portmanteau of “chuckle” and “snort”), “chork” (Scots “to make a squelching sound). Possibly “hork” (to vomit).
      • “drumbling” – “Rumbling”, “drumming”.
      • “accrumplyment” – “Accompaniment”, “crumply”.
      • “shwallowed” – “Swallowed”, “shallow”, possibly “wallow”.
      • “televasion sits” – “Television sets”, “tell evasion sits”.
      • “ferline” – “Feline”, “fur-lined”.
      • “skullytunes” – “Skeletons”, “skull tunes”. Possibly “skully” (New York City street game).
      • “clacophonously” – “Cacophonously”, “clack”.
      • “cattering” – “Clattering”, “cat”.
      • “abite” – “About”, “a bite”, possibly “agenbite” (see notes to paragaph 123, previous section).
      • “scumwhere” – “Somewhere”, “scum”.
      • “widinner” – “Within her”, “with dinner”, possibly “widow”.
  • Paragraph 143
    “Oh, and I suppose that you were never once a little mermaid combing out her golden hair? I dare say that you never loved a beautiful young man so badly that you’d chased his clotted semen halfway to the ocean for the want of him? Perhaps you were far more prescient than I, and did not let your lack of a reciprocated love transform you into something dark and angry that abides alone amidst the basins and undercurrents at the river bottom, where the shafts of light are feeble and occasional. I don’t imagine for one moment that you ever were so desperate as to cling the depleted husks of those that had by accident upon a drunken evening fallen into you and drowned within your airless and implacable embrace?”

    • “Oh, and I slurpose that you were nipper wince a plippy meremaid chroming out her goldenhair?

      • slurpose” – “Suppose”, “slurp”, “pose”.
      • nipper” – “Never”, “nipper” (slang “child”).
      • wince” – “Once”, “wince”.
      • plippy” – “Little”, “drippy”, possible reference to “Plippy-Ploppy Cheesenose”, a name suggested by Delirium in Neil Gaiman’s Sandman.
      • meremaid” – “Mermaid”, “mere maid”.
      • chroming” – “Combing”, “chrome”, possibly “crooning”.
      • goldenhair” – “Golden hair”, “maidenhead” (hymen; virginity).
    • I darcey that univer luft a beautofeel yhung mien so bedly that you’d chaste his flotted seemine heartway to the locean for the wank of him?

      • darcey” – “Dare say”, “Darcy” (probable reference to Mr. Darcy, major romantic character from Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice).
      • univer” – “You never”, “universal”.
      • luft” – “Loved”, “luft” (German “air”).
      • beautofeel” – “Beautiful”, “beau to feel”.
      • yhung” – “Young”, “hung” (having a large penis).
      • mien” – “Man”, “mien” (demeanor).
      • bedly” – “Badly”, “lie (in a) bed”.
      • chaste” – “Chased”, “chaste”.
      • flotted” – “Clotted”, “floated”.
      • seemine” – “Semen”, “see mine”.
      • heartway” – “Halfway”, “heart”, “partway”.
      • locean” – “Ocean”, “lotion”. Possibly “loce” (Latin “O place!”).
      • wank” – “Want”, “wank” (masturbate). Possibly “wink” (as in “for the sight of him”).
    • Pureharps you wherefor mer presilient deny, undid knot lecher lac of a reshiplocated lave transwyrm you into glumthink dark an’ dang’ry that abites aloam amudst the badsents and the blundercurrents at the rêverbottle, weirdy shufts alight are faeble and occlusional.

      • Pureharps” – “Perhaps”, “pure harps”.
      • wherefor mer” – “Were far more”, “wherefore” (archaic “why”) “mer(maid)”.
      • presilient” – “Prescient”, “resilient”.
      • deny” – “Than I”, “deny”.
      • undid knot” – “And did not”, “undid knot”.
      • lecher” – “Let your”, “lecher”
      • lac” – “Lack”, “lac” (French “lake”). Probable allusion to Lancelot du Lac, notable doomed lover from Arthurian mythology.
      • reshiplocated” – “Reciprocated”, “re: ship located”.
      • lave” – “Love”, “lave” (wash).
      • transwyrm” – “Transform”, “wyrm” (dragon, sea serpent). Possibly “trans” (as the Hag’s gender seems rather fluid).
      • glumthink” – “Something”, “glum think” (that is, depression).
      • dang’ry” – “Angry”, “danger-y” (dangerous).
      • abites” – “Abides”, “bites”, “agenbite” (see notes to paragaph 123, previous section).
      • aloam” – “Alone”, “loam” (type of fertile soil).
      • amudst” – “Amidst”, “mud”.
      • badsents” – “Basins”, “bad (people are) sent”, “bad scents”.
      • blundercurrents” – “Undercurrents”, “blunder”.
      • rêverbottle” – “River bottom”, “rêver” (French “to dream”) “bottle”.
      • weirdy” – “Where the”, “weirdy” (weird person).
      • shufts” – “Shafts”, “shufti” (brief glance).
      • alight” – “Of light”, “alight” (land upon; on fire).
      • faeble” – “Feeble”, “fable”, “fae” (fairy).
      • occlusional” – “Occasional”, “occlusion” (visual obstruction).
    • Ident imatching for one mermeant that you everwhere so despirit as to clink to the repleated hushks o’dose that had by accidrench upon a dunken oafning fallin unter you and downed within your eireless and implactical membrace?”

      • Ident” – “I don’t”, “identity” (both in the sense of “self”, and reinforcing the notion of Lucia and the Hag being “the same”).
      • imatching” – “Imagine”, “I (am) matching (you)”.
      • mermeant” – “Moment”, “mermaid”, “meant”.
      • everwhere” – “Ever were”, “everywhere”. Possible allusion to Neil Gaiman’s Neverwhere.
      • despirit” – “Desperate”, “the spirit”, “dispirited”.
      • clink” – “Cling”, “clink” (slang “prison”).
      • repleated” – “Depleted”, “replete”, “repeated”.
      • hushks” – “Husks”, “hush”.
      • o’dose” – “Of those”, “overdose”.
      • accidrench” – “Accident”, “drench”.
      • dunken” – “Drunken”, “dunk in (the river)”.
      • oafning” – “Evening”, “oaf ninny”, possibly “opening”.
      • fallin” – “Fallen”, “fall in”.
      • unter” – “Into”, “onto”, “unto”, “utter”, “inter”.
      • downed” – “Drowned”, “downed”.
      • eireless” – “Airless”, “Eire” (Ireland) “-less”.
      • implactical” – “Implacable”, “impractical”.
      • membrace” – “Embrace”, “membrane”, possibly “mermaid”, “meme brace”.
        • Obiwanspicoli notes: “You’ll recall these are all things that the Nene Hag did as told in “The Trees Don’t Need to Know” pages 698-700.”
  • Paragraph 144
    Gasping indignantly, Lucia first opens her mouth then closes it again, unable to compose an adequate riposte. With the inevitable thud of a descending anchor, it occurs to her that this is almost certainly because the words this frightful mirror-image speaks are miserably true. When Lucia had lived all alone down at the bottom of her well of loneliness, look at how desperately she’d clung to Samuel Beckett. On reflection, she had started out her life, like everybody, as a babbling and dancing stream, only to end up as a dank and brooding river of such slowness that it verged upon stagnation. She is humbled by these realizations, and as she looks up toward the looming and grotesque sea-serpent with the sun behind it, Lucia’s eyes brim with repentant tears.

    • Glosping indigatme, Lucia farst gapens her mooth then gloses it agen, annable to calmpose an eduquate quiposte.

      • “Glosping” – “Gasping”, “gloss” (shine; explanatory text (like this!)). Possibly “glossolalia” (speaking in tongues).
      • “indigatme” – “Indignantly”, “(getting) in (a) dig at me”.
      • “farst” – “First”, “farce”.
      • “gapens” – “Opens”, “gapes”.
      • “mooth” – “Mouth”, “moo” (cow sound). Possibly “tooth”, “vermouth”.
      • “gloses” – “Closes”, “gloss” (see above). Possibly “glose” (German “I smolder”).
      • “agen” – “Again”, “agenbite” (see notes to paragaph 123, previous section).
      • “annable” – “Unable”, suggest?? (Possibly “Anne of Green Gables”?)
      • “calmpose” – “Compose”, “calm pose”.
      • “eduquate” – “Adequate”, “educate”.
      • “quiposte” – “Riposte”, “quip”.
    • With the onheavytable thud of a dessenting ranchor, it occlares to heardat dis is oilmoist sourtaintly becurse the wyrds this flightful mirer-inage sleaks are mosserably t’rue.

      • “onheavytable” – “Inevitable”, “on heavy table”.
      • “dessenting” – “Descending”, “dissenting”.
      • “ranchor” – “Anchor”, “rancor” (anger).
      • “occlares” – “Occurs”, “O Clare!”, possibly “occludes”.
      • “heardat” – “Her that”, “heard at”.
      • “dis” – “This”, “Dis“.
      • “oilmoist” – “Almost”, “oil moist”.
      • “sourtaintly” – “Certainly”, “sour taint lie”.
      • “becurse” – “Because”, “be curse”.
      • “wyrds” – “Words”, “wyrds” (fates).
      • “flightful” – “Frightful”, “flight full”, “flighty”.
      • “mirer-inage” – “Mirror-image”, “mired in age”.
      • “sleaks” – “Speaks”, “leaks”.
      • “mosserably” – “Miserably”, “moss”, possibly “most intolerably”. Possibly “possibly”.
      • “t’rue” – “True”, “to rue”.
    • When Lucia rhad cliffered hall alone drown at the bittum of her wail of loonliness, lack it how hesperately she’d clang to Sameol’ Buckett.

      • “rhad cliffered” – “Had lived”, “Radcliffe” (significance??), “Liffey“, possibly “Clifford”.
      • “hall” – “All”, “hall”
      • “drown” – “Down”, “drown”.
      • “bittum” – “Bottom”, “bit ’em”. Possibly “tummy”, “bitumen” (pitch).
      • “wail” – “Well”, “wail”.
      • “loonliness” – “Loneliness”, “loony -ness”.
      • “lack” – “Look”, “lack” (recalling “lac” in the previous paragraph).
      • “hesperately” – “Desperately”, “he”. Possibly “Hesperides” (nymphs of the evening in Greek mythology).
      • “clang” – “Clung”, “clang (loud metallic sound).
      • “Sameol’ Buckett” – “Samuel Beckett“, “same old bucket”.
    • Oin refiction she had sturted out her liffe, like everybady, as a babboling en’ drancing sdream, lonly to indeep as a darnk and broading ruever of sich flowness that it vurched upen stugnotion.

      • “Oin” – “On”, suggest??. Possibly “Oin” (Tolkien dwarf name), “oin” (Basque “foot”), “oín” (Old Irish “one”).
      • “refiction” – “Reflection”, “re- fiction”.
      • “sturted” – “Started”, “spurted”.
      • “liffe” – “Life”, “Liffey“.
      • “everybady” – “Everybody”, “every baby”.
      • “babboling” – “Babbling”, “babbo” (Italian “daddy”).
      • “en’ drancing” – “And dancing”, “entrancing”.
      • “sdream” – “Stream”, “dreams”.
      • “lonly” – “Only”, “lonely”.
      • “indeep” – “End up”, “in deep”.
      • “darnk” – “Dank”, “dark”, possibly “drank”.
      • “broading” – “Brooding”, “broadening”.
      • “ruever” – “River”, “rue”.
      • “sich” – “Such”, “sich” (German “herself”).
      • “flowness” – “slowness”, “flow”. Possibly “(Loch) Ness” (home of famous alleged aquatic monster).
      • “vurched” – “Verged”, “lurched”. Possibly “vrucht” (Dutch “fear”).
      • “upen” – “Upon”, “you pen”.
      • “stugnotion” – “Stagnation”, “stuck notion”.
    • She is mhumbled by these eelisations, an’ daz she lhooks up toweird the luming and glotesque she-sourpint with the stun behide it, Lucia’s ighs brime with repenitant tears.

      • “mhumbled” – “Humbled”, ” mumbled”.
      • “eelisations” – “Realizations”, “eels”.
      • “an’ daz” – “And as”, “daze”.
      • “lhooks up” – “Looks up”, “hooks up”.
      • “toweird” – “Toward”, “too weird”.
      • “luming” – “Looming”, “luminous”.
      • “glotesque” – “Grotesque”, “glow”.
      • “she-sourpint” – “Sea-serpent”, “she sour pint”.
      • “stun” – “Sun”, “stun”.
      • “behide” – “Behind”, “be hide”. Possible reference to Strange Case of Doctor Jekyll and Mister Hyde.
      • “ighs” – “Eyes”, “sighs”.
      • “brime” – “Brim”, “brine” (salt water, metaphorically tears).
      • “repenitant” – “Repentant”, “penitent”, possibly “penis”.
  • Paragraph 145
    “Forgive me, noble sister of the shining gravel and the drifting weeds, for my pretensions and my haughtiness. The truth is that I’ve been too long on land, amongst dry people with their arid conversations, so that sometimes I forget I am a river, just the same as you. Confined here in this solid realm of passing time and inconvenient mortality I am seldom reminded of my true aquatic, silty nature. I became oblivious to the things that rivers know: the fact that while their rushing waters foster the illusion of perpetual movement, in the winding bends and contous that are their essential and unique identity they are eternal and unchanging. More than this, they know that somewhere in their endless and enduring depths they carry the remains of every harsh word or incident that’s ever fallen with a splash into their waves. As I envision it, we are the two of us resplendent waterways, both endless and sublime. Please accept my apologies, and understand that the ineffable and lyrical quintessence of the River Liffey knows you for a fellow traveler, as cold as she herself is but more wise, and I had no excuse for speaking to you in the way I did.”

    • “Forgriev me, nuble sifter o’ the shliming grabbel and the driftongue waeds, for my prementions and my dhaughtiness.

      • “Forgriev” – “Forgive”, “for grieve”.
      • “nuble” – “Noble”, “nubile”.
      • “sifter” – “Sister”, “sifter”.
      • “shliming” – “Shining”, “slimy”.
      • “grabbel” – “Gravel”, “grab”, “gabble”.
      • “driftongue” – “Drifting”, “drip tongue”.
      • “waeds” – “Weeds”, “wads” (of semen?). Possibly “wæd” (Old English “garment”).
      • “prementions” – “Pretensions”, “premonitions”, “pre- mentions”.
      • “dhaughtiness” – “Haughtiness”, “daughter”. Possibly “doughtiness” (bravery).
    • Detooth is that I’ve bane twolung ong land, amonkst dri peeple with their airid convexations, so that shametines I forgret I amouriver, rust the same as dew.

      • “Detooth” – “The truth”, “de- tooth” (to remove the teeth from).
      • “bane” – “Been”, “bane”.
      • “twolung ong land” – “Too long on land”, “two lungs one gland”, possibly “England”.
      • “amonkst” – “Amongst”, “a monk’s”.
      • “dri peeple” – “Dry people”, “drip”, “peephole”.
      • “airid” – “Arid”, “air id”, “rid”.
      • “convexations” – “Conversations”, “convex”, “vexatious”, “conventions”.
      • “shametines” – “Sometimes”, “shame times”.
      • “forgret” – “Forget”, “egret” (type of water bird), “forge”, “for great”.
      • “amouriver” – “Am a river”, “amour” (French “love”) “ever”.
      • “rust” – “Just”, “rust”.
      • “dew” – “You”, “dew”.
    • Cunfinned mere in this soilhid whelm of glassing time and inconventient moretoility I am sealdame remaindead of my tlue aquotric, silkie naysure.

      • “Cunfinned” – “Confined”, “cunt”,”un-finned”.
      • “mere” – “Here”, “mere” (only; lake; mirror), “more”.
      • “soilhid” – “Solid”, “soiled”, “soil hid”.
      • “whelm” – “Realm”, “(over)whelm”.
      • “glassing” – “Passing”, “glass”, “gassing”.
      • “inconventient” – “Inconvenient”, “in convent (pa)tient” (Lucia is permanently confined once “pa” is subtracted from “patient”).
      • “moretoility” – “Mortality”, “more toil it, I”.
      • “sealdame” – “Seldom”, “seal dame” (see notes about “selkie” below).
      • “remaindead” – “Reminded”, “remain dead”.
      • “tlue” – “True”, “blue”.
      • “aquotric” – “Aquatic”, “a” “quo” (Latin “that”; part of phrase “quid pro quo”) “trick”. Possibly “quote”.
      • “silkie” – “Silty”, “selkie”, “silky”.
        Selkie image on a stamp from the Faro Islands
        Selkie image on a stamp from the Faro Islands
        • A selkie is a Scots folklore variant of the mermaid legend. A selkie normally appears as a seal, but can remove their sealskn, thus turning human. In most of the tales, a male fisherman steals a female selkie’s (“seal dame”, above) sealskin thus obliging her to marry him until she can recover her sealskin (perhaps via “a (quid pro) quo trick”, above).
      • “naysure” – “Nature”, “nay sure” (unsure?).
  • Page 916
    • Paragraph 145 (continued)
      • I beclam upliveious to the thrings that livers know: the fict that whel their rushen waters faster the illucian of papatual mythment, in the widning blends and cantours that are their esscentral and unaque undintity they are reternal and inchanging.

      • “beclam” – “Became”, “becalm”, “be clam”.
      • “upliveious” – “Oblivious”, “up live I o(r) us”.
      • “thrings” – “Things”, “rings”.
      • “livers” – “Rivers”, “living ones”, “liver”, “lover”.
      • “fict” – “Fact”, “fiction”.
      • “whel” – “While”, “wheel”, “well”, possibly “Hel“.
      • “rushen” – “Rushing”, “rushes”.
      • “faster” – “Foster”, “faster”.
      • “illucian” – “Illusion”, “Lucia”, Lucian” (of Samosata, primary historical source for information about Moore’s deity, Glycon).
      • “papatual” – “Perpetual”, “papa”.
      • “mythment” – “Movement”, “myth meant”.
      • “widning” – “Winding”, “widening”.
      • “blends” – “Bends”, “blend”.
      • “cantours” – “Contours”, “can tour”, “cantor” (ceremonial singer), “cant torus”.
      • “esscentral” – “Essential”, “S central”.
      • “unaque” – “Unique”, “un- aqua”.
      • “undintity” – “Identity”, “undine” (water spirit) “titty”.
      • “reternal” – “Eternal”, “return all”. Possibly “renal” (relating to kidneys).
      • “inchanging” – “Unchanging”, “in changing”. Possibly “inch aging”.
    • Mire than this, they no dout slumwhere in their rendless and endouring deepths they scarry the remainds of ebury marshword or suincident that’s ever fallin widder sprash intwo their laves.

      • “Mire” – “More”, “mire”.
      • “no dout” – “Know that”, “no doubt”. Possibly “dout” (archaic “to douse”).
      • “slumwhere” – “Somewhere”, “slum”.
      • “rendless” – “Endless”, “rend -less”
      • “endouring” – “Enduring”, “dour”.
      • “deepths” – “Depths”, “deep”
      • “scarry” – “Carry”, “scary”. Possible allusion to children’s book author Richard Scarry.
      • “remainds” – “Remains”, “remainder”, “minds”.
      • “ebury” – “Every”, “bury”.
      • “marshword” – “Harsh word”, “marsh -ward”.
      • “suincident” – “Incident”, “suicide”.
      • “fallin” – “Fallen”, “fall in”, possibly “falling”.
      • “widder” – “With a”, “widow”.
      • “sprash” – “Splash”, “crash”.
      • “intwo” – “Into”, “(broken) in two”.
      • “laves” – “Waves”, “laves” (washes).
    • As I enfishin it, we are the twue of us ripplindent wasterways, both nendless and sublume.

      • “enfishin” – “Envision”, “fish”, “fishing”.
      • “twue” – “Two”, “true”.
      • “ripplindent” – “Resplendent” (shining), “ripple indent”.
      • “wasterways” – “Waterways”, “waste away”, “waster ways”.
      • “nendless” – “Endless”, “Nene”. Possibly “nendus” (Latin “which is to be woven”).
      • “sublume” – “Sublime”, “sub-” “lume” (French “light”).
    • Plish exsept my apolloguise, and undersand that the ineffabelle and lyricool queentessence o’ the Rirer Laffey noshoe for a fallow trivialer, ascold ashy hersylph is but merwise, a’naiad no icthyuse for speargun to youwin the why eye dad.”

      • “Plish” – “Please”, “splash”.
      • “exsept” – “Accept”, “except”, “ex-” “sept” (clan).
      • “apolloguise” – “Apologies”, “Apollo guise”.
      • “undersand” – “Understand”, “under sand”.
      • “ineffabelle” – “Ineffable”, “belle”.
      • “lyricool” – “Lyrical”, “lyre cool”.
      • “queentessence” – “Quintessence”, “queen”.
      • “Rirer Laffey” – “River Liffey“, “rire” (French “to laugh”) “laugh”.
      • “noshoe” – “Knows you”, “no shoe”, “no-show”.
      • “fallow trivialer” – “Fellow traveller”, “fallow trivia”.
        • Fellow traveller” may be an allusion to the US Cold War; at that time the term was applied to those who, without actually being Communists, nonetheless sympathized with Communists, so were almost as bad.
      • “ascold” – “As cold”, “a scold”.
      • “ashy” – “As she”, “a shy”.
      • “hersylph” – “Herself”, “sylph” (air spirit).
      • “merwise” – “More wise”, “in mermaid fashion”.
      • “a’naiad” – “And I had”, “a naiad” (water spirit).
      • “icthyuse” – “Excuse”, “icthy-” (related to fish) “use”.
      • “speargun” – “Speaking”, “spear-gun”.
      • “youwin” – “You in”, “you win”.
      • “why” – “Way”, “why”.
      • “eye” – “I”, “eye”.
      • “dad” – “Did”, “dad”. Possible allusion to Richard Dadd, 19th century British painter of fairies (and insane murderer).
  • Paragraph 146
    The Nene Hag, for it is most definitely she, beams down at Lucia entirely amiably.

    • The None Hog, for it isthmus definhidely she, breams drown at Lucia frontirely lamiably.

      • “None Hog” – “Nene Hag”, “none hog”.
      • “isthmus” – “Is most”, “isthmus” (narrow strip of land between two land-masses, bordered by water).
      • “definhidely” – “Definitely”, “the fin hide(s a) lie”.
      • “breams” – “Beams”, “bream” (type of fish).
      • “drown” – “Down”, “drown”.
      • “frontirely” – “Entirely”, “frontier”, possibly “front tire lie”.

        Lamia
        Lamia
      • “lamiably” – “Amiably”, lamia” (monster with the head and torso of a woman but the body of a serpent).
  • Paragraph 147
    “Think nothing of it. I can plainly see that you’ve been long without the fellowship of other rivers. Can’t I tempt you to stay longer with me? It must take only a moment’s cold carelessness, or possibly a lifetime’s desperation. If you were to lean towards me just a little farther, and perhaps to strike your cranium on a stone on the way, it would all be over in the blinking of an eye. Then we could have such lovely conversations underneath the water, me and her, and when you had run out of things to say then I should let you go, as I did all the rest, bubbling away towards the Wash with the forgotten jewelry of Bad King John. It is a very fashionable way to go, I’m told, for ladies of literary inclination. But then females of that sort are often wild, verging near wolf, whereas with you there’s something fishy going on.”

    • “Thing nothink of it.

      • Thing nothink” – A simple Spoonerism.
    • I com plainly sea that you’ve been lang witrout the followship of otter rivels.

      • com plainly” – “Can plainly”, “complain”.
      • sea” – “See”, “sea”.
      • lang” – “Long”, “language”.
      • witrout” – “Without”, “wit rout”, “trout”.
      • followship” – “Fellowship”, “follow ship”.
      • otter” – “Other”, “otter”.
      • rivels” – “Rivers”, “rivals”.
    • Can’t I topt you to stay lunger wimmy?

      • topt” – “Tempt”, “topped”, “to opt”.
      • lunger” – “Longer”, “lung”.
      • wimmy” – “With me”, “whimsy”, “wimmen”.
        • This may be a reference to Wimmen’s Comix, an influential feminist underground comic book from 1972-1992. Moore’s wife, Melinda Gebbie, was a contributor.
    • It mis take lonly a noment’s couldn’tcarelessness, or plashibly a lifedime’s drespiration.

      • mis take” – “Must take”, “mistake”, “possibly “just takes”.
      • lonly” – “Only”, “lonely”.
      • a noment’s” – “A moment’s”, “anomie” (alienation), “nomen” (Latin “name”).
      • couldn’tcarelessness” – “Carelessness”, “couldn’t care less”.
      • plashibly” – “Possibly”, “plausibly”, “splashy”. Possibly “please sibling”.
      • lifedime’s” – “Lifetime’s”, “dime”.
      • drespiration” – “Desperation”, “d(rown from lack of) respiration”.
    • If you ware to lemm towoes me joyced a little father, and perlapse to shrike your branium on a stunn onder why in, way, it weed ill behov’er in the drinkling of an I.

      • ware” – “Were”, “(be)ware”, possibly “wares”.
      • lemm” – “Lean”, “lemming”, possibly “lemma” (proposition).
      • towoes” – “Towards”, “to woes”, possibly “two of us”.
      • joyced” – “Just”, “Joyce”.
      • father” – “Farther”, “father”.
      • perlapse” – “Perhaps”, “relapse”.
      • shrike” – “Strike”, “shrike” (butcherbird).
      • branium” – “Cranium”, “brain”.
      • stunn” – “Stone” “stun”, suggest??
      • onder why” – “On the way”, “wonder why”.
      • way” – “Why”, “way”.
      • weed” – “Would”, “weed” (water weeds; clothes worn for burial).
      • ill behov’er” – “All be over”, “ill behoove her”.
      • drinkling” – “Twinkling”, “drinking”.
      • I” – “Eye”, “I”.
    • Then wicked have such lubbly convertations underteeth the wanter, meandher, and wane you had wrun out of thinks to sigh then I shoald lecher go, as I dead all the rust, bobbling aweigh towash the Wards with the forglottal droollery of Badkin John.

      • wicked” – “We could”, “wicked”.
      • lubbly” – “Lovely”, “lubberly” (lacking in seamanship), possibly “blub” (drowning noise) “lie”.
      • convertations” – “Conversations”, “convert nations”.
      • underteeth” – “Underneath”, “under teeth” (possibly a reference to the tongue).
      • wanter” – “Water”, “want her”.
      • meandher” – “Me and her” (“you and I” might be more accurate here, unless Moore means to indicate that the Hag is dissociated enough to be referring to Lucia in the third person), “meander”.
      • wane” – “When”, “wane”.
      • wrun” – “Run”, “wrung (dry)”.
      • thinks” – “Things”, “thinks” (thoughts).
      • sigh” – “Say”, “sigh”.
      • shoald” – “Should”, “shoals” (shallows; schools of fish).
      • lecher” – “Let you”, “lecher”.
      • dead” – “Did”, “dead”.
      • rust” – “Rest”, “rust”.
      • bobbling” – “Bubbling”, “bobble”.
      • aweigh” – “Away”, “(anchors) aweigh”.
      • towash the Wards” – “Towards the Wash“, “to wash the wards”.
      • forglottal” – “Forgotten”, “for glottal”, possibly “forge lottery”.
      • droollery” – “Jewelry”, “drool”, “drollery”.
      • Badkin John” – “Bad King John”, “bad kin”, possibly “bodkin” (dagger).
        • See notes about King John and his lost jewels at paragraph 139, above.
    • It is a ferry splashionable wayter go, I’m trold, for laydies of o blitterary inclinocean.

      • ferry” – “Very”, “ferry”.
      • splashionable” – “Fashionable”, “splash”.
        • A distressing number of the influential female writers in English of the 20th century did commit suicide. This was discussed somewhat by Lucia in section 5, paragraph 88.
      • wayter” – “Way to”, “water”.
      • trold” – “Told”, “troll”.
      • laydies” – “Ladies”, “lay (down and) die”.
      • o blitterary” – “Of literary”, “obliterate”.
      • inclinocean” – “Inclination”, “ocean”.
    • But then fameills of that sport are oftun willd, vergin’ near wolf, quereas with you there’s fomething vichy gugling on.”

      • fameills” – “Females”, “fame (brings) ills”, possibly “families”.
      • sport” – “Sort”, “sport” (play; mutant).
      • oftun” – “Often”, “oft un-“, “of tun” (cask). Possibly “tuna”.
      • willd” – “Wild”, “(strong)-willed”.
      • vergin’ near wolf” – “Verging near wolf”, “Virginia Woolf”.
        • Virginia Woolf was 20th century British modernist author, mentioned previously in section 5, paragraphs 86-88. Of particular relevance here, she committed suicide by walking into a river and drowning herself.
      • quereas” – “Whereas”, “queer as” (possibly referring to the British folk saying “There’s nowt so queer as folk.”).
      • fomething” – “Something”, “foam”.
      • vichy” – “Fishy”, “Vichy” (a type of bottled water associated with the Nazi occupation of France; earlier referenced in section 8, paragraph 125).
      • gugling” – “Going”, “gurgling”.
  • Paragraph 148
    Seeming somewhat nervous, Lucia takes a step back from the water’s edge as she replies. She’s never had a geuinely suicidal notion in her life. Even when she was staying with her aunts in Ireland and would muck about and turn the gas taps on, she always left the windows open so that nothing dreadful happened. Actually, it hadn’t even been a call for help so much as it being a flourish of theater, an extension of her dance upon the new stage of psychiatry. She struggles to convey this to the genial but lethally enticing creature as it sways above her, politely declining its no doubt kindly intentioned invitation to a watery grave while also making an attempt to stay on friendly terms with the enormous river-monster and not give offence.

    • Sanding slimewhet mervous, Lucia qakes a slop buck foam the witter’s dredge as she reploys.

      • “Sanding” – “Standing”, “sand”, “sanding” (as in smoothing).
      • “slimewhet” – “Somewhat”, “slime wet”, “whet” (sharpen; increase appetite).
      • “mervous” – “Nervous”, “mer(maid)” “vous” (French “you”), possibly “marvelous”.
      • “qakes” – “Takes”, “quakes”.
      • “slop” – “Step”, “slop” (spilled liquid).
      • “buck” – “Back”, “buck” (to resist).
      • “foam” – “From”, “foam”.
      • “witter’s” – “Water’s”, “writer’s”, “witters” (speaks trivially), possibly “winter’s”.
      • “dredge” – “Edge”, “dredge”.
      • “reploys” – “Replies”, “deploys”, “re:” (about) “ploys”.
    • She’s never harb a doyouinely suitidal nocean in her liff.

      • “harb” – “Had”, “harbor” (calm sheltered water near shore; to hold).
      • “doyouinely” – “Genuinely”, “do you(rself) in”.
      • “suitidal” – “Suicidal”, “tidal”.
      • “nocean” – “Notion”, “ocean”.
      • “liff” – “Life”, “River Liffey“.
    • Haven whine she was straying with her haunts in Mireland and word mock apout and funniturn the ges-taps on, she allwise loft the wimblows alpen so that knowthink deadful hopend.

      • “Haven” – “Even”, “haven” (refuge).
      • “whine” – “When”, “whine”, possibly “while”.
      • “straying” – “Staying”, “straying” (see note at end of sentence).
      • “haunts” – “Aunts”, “haunts” (commonly-traveled areas; ghosts).
      • “Mireland” – “Ireland”, “mire(d on) land”.
      • “word” – “Would”, “word”.
      • “mock apout” – “Muck about”, “mock a pout”.
      • “funniturn” – “Turn”, “funny turn” (polite way of referring to an episode of madness). Possibly “furniture”.
      • “ges-taps” – “Gas taps”, “Gestapo“.
      • “allwise” – “Always”, “all wise”.
      • “loft” – “Left”, “loft”.
      • “wimblows” – “Windows”, “wind blows”, “whim”.
      • “alpen” – “Open”, “alpine”.
      • “knowthink” – “Nothing”, “know think”.
      • “deadful” – “Dreadful”, “dead”.
      • “hopend” – “Happened”, “hope end”.
        • In 1935, Lucia visited Ireland for six months. She didn’t actually stay with “aunts”, but did stay for a time with two female cousins in the city of Bray. Near the end of this time, she “strayed” often, staying away for many hours and, eventually, days. As noted, she often left the gas taps on (Shloss, Chapter 12):

          The suicidal gestures recurred night after night, as Lucia’s turning on the gas tap became a ritual that was met by her cousin’s repeated resourcefulness in turning it off. [Her cousin] noticed that Lucia just as scrupulously opened her window so that fresh air could counteract the toxic effects of the gas.

    • Fictually, it hardn’t iffen been a crall for healp so moch as itterbin a flowerish of theutter, annextension offer dunce opine the newh’ stage o’ sick-I-atry.

      • “Fictually” – “Actually”, “fictionally”.
      • “hardn’t” – “Hadn’t”, “hard”.
      • “iffen” – “Even”, “Liffey“.
      • “crall” – “Call”, “crawl”.
      • “healp” – “Help”, “heal”, possibly “alp”.
      • “moch” – “Much”, “moch” (Irish “early”).
      • “itterbin” – “It’d been”, “sitter bin”, suggest??. Possibly “Ytterbium” (chemical element).
      • “flowerish” – “Flourish”, “flower -ish”.
      • “theutter” – “Theater”, “the utter”.
      • “annextension” – “An extension”, “annex tension”.
      • “offer” – “Of her”, “offer”.
      • “dunce” – “Dance”, “dunce”.
      • “opine” – “Upon”, “opine”.
      • “newh’ stage” – “New stage”, suggest?? Possibly “new half” (trans woman). Stage here can be read as both “period of life” and “place for performance”.
      • “sick-I-atry” – “Psychiatry”, “Sick (am) I”.
        • Moore’s interpretation of Lucia’s mental state follows Shloss, chapter 12: “By this time [James] Joyce recognized Lucia’s suicide threats as a form of theatrics.” Regardless of her true intentions, she did send her father a suicide note in 1935, and the threat was taken seriously. Even Shloss admits, “Lucia did feel suicidal.”
    • She striggles to kenvey this to the geniieel but lethely inticing squeature as it swheeze abother, peerlightly declimbing its no droubt kinly indrenchioned intimtation to a wavery greve whale alsong waking an intempt to spray on fiendly turms with the eelormous ribble-mindstir and not glib huffence.

      • “striggles” – “Struggles”, “wriggles”. Possibly “striga” (Venetian “witch”), “strig” (botany “to remove the footstalk of a plant).
      • “kenvey” – “Convey”, “ken” (knowledge).
      • “geniieel” – “Genial”, “genie eel”, “genii” (guardian spirits).
      • “lethely inticing” – “Lethally enticing”, “into Lethe” (Greek mythological river in the land of the dead).
      • “squeature” – “Creature”, “squeal”, possibly “squeeze”.
      • “swheeze” – “Sways”, “wheezes”, possibly squeeze”.
      • “abother” – “Above her”, “a bother”.
      • “peerlightly” – “Politely”, “peer lightly”.
      • “declimbing” – “Declining”, “de-” (down from) “climbing”.
      • “droubt” – “Doubt”, “drought”.
      • “kinly” – “Kindly”, “kin -ly” (in the manner of a relative).
      • “indrenchioned” – “Intentioned”, “drenched”.
      • “intimtation” – “Invitation”, “intimation”.
      • “wavery greve” – “Watery grave”, “wavering” “greve” (Italian “heavy”; “vulgar”), “wavy”.
      • “whale alsong” – “While also”, “whale song”.
      • “waking” – “Making”, “waking”.
      • “intempt” – “Attempt”,”in tempt(ation)”.
      • “spray” – “Stay”, “spray”.
      • “fiendly” – “Friendly”, “fiend lie”.
      • “turms” – “Terms”, “turmoil”. Possibly “turms” (obsolete “groups of people”).
      • “eelormous” – “Enormous”, “eel or mouse”.
      • “ribble-mindstir” – “River-monster”, “ribbit” (frog sound) “mind stir”, “Ribble” (name of a river), possibly “riddle”.
      • “glib” – “Give”, “glib”.
      • “huffence” – “Offence”, “huff” (expression of annoyance) “hence”.
  • Paragraph 149
    “Much as I’m flattered by your offer of a fatal submersion, I must most respectfully decline as they’re expecting me for tea in the asylum at around five-thirty. Possibly some other time, when I have less upon my plate and can more easily include a drowning in my schedule. It’s been a tremendous pleasure meeting you, teratologically speaking. I sincerely hope you will be blessed with many happy, shining rivulets in years to come. With that, I must bid you a fond farewell until we run into each other at some future date.”

    • “Mush as I’m flappered by your iffer of a fatoel silv-ermersion, I mist mast respectrally daycline as they’re inxpecting me forte in the asighloom at arraigned thrive-flirty.

      • “Mush” – “Much”, “mush”.
      • “flappered” – “Flattered “, “flapper”.
      • “iffer” – “Offer”, “Liffey“.
      • “fatoel” – “Fatal”, “foetal”.
      • “silv-ermersion” – “Submersion”, “silver emulsion” (used to manufacture early movie film).
      • “mist mast” – “Must most”, “mist mast”.
      • “respectrally” – “Respectfully”, “spectral lie”.
      • “daycline” – “Decline”, “day”, possibly “incline”.
      • “inxpecting” – “Expecting”, “inspecting”.
      • “forte” – “For tea”, “forte” (strength, talent).
      • “asighloom” – “Asylum”, “a sigh loom(s)”, “a loom (on which to weave) sigh(s)”.
      • “arraigned” – “Around”, “arraigned”.
      • “thrive-flirty” – “Five-thirty”, “thrive (on being) flirty”.
    • Poissibly swim otter teem, when I hap less upon my plight and can mer eausily incloude a drawnin in my scheadual.

      • “Poissibly” – “Possibly”, “poisson” (French “fish”), possibly “poise”.
      • “swim” – “Some”, “swim”.
      • “otter” – “Other”, “otter”.
      • “teem” – “Time”, “teem”.
      • “hap less upon my plight” – “Have less upon my plate” (am less busy), “hapless plight”.
      • “mer” – “More”, “mer(maid)”.
      • “eausily” – “Easily”, “eau” (French “water”; Lincolnshire dialect “stream”).
      • “incloude” – “Include”, “in cloud”.
      • “drawnin” – “Drowning”, “drawn in”, possibly “drawing”.
      • “scheadual” – “Schedule”, “dual scheme”.
    • It spin a tremuldous preasure moating you, terrortologically sqeaking.

      • “It spin” – “It’s been”, “it spin(s)”.
      • “tremuldous” – “Tremendous”, “tremulous”. Possible reference to a Lewis Carroll poem that used the word “tremulous” in reference to fear of sharks.
      • “preasure” – “Pleasure”, “pressure”.
      • “moating” – “Meeting”, “moat thing”.
      • “terrortologically” – “Teratologically” (monstrously), “terror to logically”.
      • “sqeaking” – “Speaking”, “squeaking”.
    • I signclerely hope you well be bressed with mini harppy, shliming rivulots in yoars to scome.

      • “signclerely” – “Sincerely”, “sign clearly”.
      • “well” – “Will”, “well”.
      • “bressed” – “Blessed”, “breast”. Possibly “bressen” (Dutch “gaps, openings”).
      • “mini” – “Many”, “mini(ature)”.

        Harpy
        Harpy
      • “harppy” – “Happy”, “harpy” (Greek mythological monster, half bird, half woman).
      • “shliming” – “Shining”, “slimy”.
      • “rivulots” – “Rivulets”, “(love you) lots”.
      • “yoars” – “Years”, “yours”, possibly “oars”.
      • “scome” – “Come”, “scum”.
  • Page 917
    • Paragraph 149 (continued)
      • Wi’ drat, I moist bide you a fanfare wail entoil we run intoe reach other at shum fateyour daed.”

        • “drat” – “That”, “drat” (expression of annoyance).
        • “moist” – “Must”, “moist”.
        • “bide” – “Bid”, “bide” (remain, put up with).
        • “fanfare wail” – “Fond farewell”, “fanfare wail”.
        • “entoil” – “Until”, “entoil” (snare in a net).
        • “intoe” – “Into”, “in toe”.
        • “reach” – “Each”, “reach”.
        • “shum” – “Some”, “shun”, possibly “sum”, “hums”, “sham”.
        • “fateyour” – “Future”, “your fate”.
        • “daed” – “Date”, “dead”, “Daedalus“, possibly “dad”, “deed”.
  • Paragraph 150
    The fearsome kraken shrugs good-naturedly but with an air of disappointment, as if to suggest that it’s Lucia’s loss. The shrug becomes an undulating curtsy and amidst a white and mighty foaming the appalling river-apparition once again submerges, pulling back its great Atlantic-cable throat and letting its gigantic skull sink down below the murky surface. Sighing with relief, Lucia turns and skips back up the grassy gradient towards the institution woods.

    • Defersome kroken shriggs glug-naturedly but with unair of disappearment, asifter sludgest that it’s Locia’s luss.

      • “Defersome” – “The fearsome”, “defer (to) some”.
      • “kroken” – “Kraken” (sea monster).
      • “shriggs” – “Shrugs”, “rigged”, suggest??
      • “glug-naturedly” – “Good-naturedly”, “glug” (drowning sound).
      • “unair” – “An air”, “un- air” (that is, drowning), possibly “unfair”.
      • “disappearment” – “Disappointment”, “disappear”.
      • “asifter” – “As if to”, “a sifter”.
      • “sludgest” – “Suggest”, “sludge”, possibly “guest”, “jest”.
      • “Locia’s luss” – “Lucia’s loss”, “local lust”.
    • The shlug bequirms an underlating carpsy and amidst a mhite and wighty flowming the apprilling riggler-upparocean once again shrugmerges, ‘palling back its greyd Alun’tic-cable throap and leaden its gigantique skaell slink dun bellow the surky merface.

      • “shlug” – “Shrug”, “slug”.
      • “bequirms” – “Becomes”, “squirms”.
      • “underlating” – “Undulating”, “under”.
      • “carpsy” – “Curtsy” (old-fashioned formal female bow), “carp” (type of fish; to complain).
      • “mhite and wighty” – “White and mighty”, “mite”, “wight” (archaic “person”; type of undead creature).
      • “flowming” – “Foaming”, “flow mine”.
      • “apprilling” – “Appalling”, “thrilling”, possibly “appealing”.
      • “riggler-upparocean” – “River-apparition”, “wriggler upon ocean”, possibly “upper”.
      • “shrugmerges” – “Submerges”, “shrug merges”.
      • “‘palling” – “Pulling”, “appalling”, “palling” (becoming less interesting).
      • “greyd Alun’tic-cable” – “Great Atlantic-cable”, “a greyed lunatic”.
      • “throap” – “Throat”, “rope”
      • “leaden” – “Letting”, “leaden” (heavy).
      • “gigantique” – “Gigantic”, “antique”.
      • “skaell” – “Skull”, suggest?? Possibly “skælla” (Old Swedish “to rattle”), “skraeling” (Old Norse term for Native American).
      • “slink” – “Sink”, “slink”.
      • “dun” – “Down”, “dun” (brownish).
      • “bellow” – “Below”, “bellow”.
      • “surky merface” – “Murky surface”, “sulky mer(maid) face”.
    • Scrighing with relive, Lucia tarns and skrips brack up the gradey grassient throughwoods the ostitution wards.

      • “Scrighing” – “Sighing”, “scrying”.
      • “relive” – “Relief”, “relive” (something Lucia does a lot in this chapter, and a central theme of the book as a whole).
      • “tarns” – “Turns”, “tarn” (mountain lake, possible reference to Poe’s The Fall of the House of Usher).
      • “skrips” – “Skips”, “strips”.
      • “brack” – “Back”, “bracken”.
      • “gradey grassient” – “Grassy gradient”, “graded sentient”.
      • “throughwoods” – “Towards”, “through (the) woods”.
      • “ostitution” – “Institution”, “prostitution”. Possibly “ostentation”.
      • “wards” – “Woods”, “wards”.

Forward to Section 10 – Cemetery.