RtB section 8 – Institutionalized

Up to “Round the Bend”.

Back to Section 7 – Malcolm Arnold.

In which Lucia recalls her commitment to various asylums and her father’s attempts to save her. She emerges from night back to day and walks to the river.

Significant characters and themes in this section:

  • James Joyce (1882-1941) was an extremely famous writer and Lucia Joyce’s father.
    • The Joyce family, 1924
      The Joyce family, 1924

      The River Liffey is a river in Ireland which, in Finnegans Wake, is referred to many times, and is metaphorically linked to the female protagonist (who is, in some senses, Lucia).

  • Nora Barnacle (1884-1951) was James Joyce’s wife and Lucia Joyce’s mother.
  • Giorgio Joyce (1905-1976) was the son of James and Nora, and Lucia’s older brother. Moore suggests that he may not have been James’ son, but the result of an affair between Nora and a lover. Moore also suggests that an incestuous affair took place between Giorgio and Lucia. This incestuous relationship is a theory of Moore’s, not attested to by the historical record, but not contradicted by it, either.
  • World mythology, especially Greek.
  • The Pilgrim’s Progress, by John Bunyan.
  • Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass by Lewis Carroll, classic children’s books whose themes include childhood, madness, wordplay, and doubled characters.

 

  • Page 911 (continued)
  • Paragraph 121
    As she at last continues on her way she thinks about Sir Malcolm’s parting comment, about how she should give his best wishes to her father if she happened to run into him. That was the ending of the Work in Progress after all, when Anna Livia Plurabelle, the spirit of the River Liffey, runs at last into her daddy who has mythologically become the ocean; has become the source to which all dazzling streams and rushing rivers must eventually return.

    • As she-atlas continuals on her weigh she tinks abellt Stir Mealgum’s poorthing kindmeant, abate how sea shored grive his baste washes to her flather if she hopend to rain into jhim.

      • “she-atlas” – “She at last”, “she-atlas” (a female book of maps).
      • “continuals” – “Continues”, “continual”.
      • “weigh” – “Way”, “weigh” (measure weight; lift an anchor).
      • “tinks” – “Thinks”, “tink” (small metallic sound), “tinkers”.
      • “abellt” – “About”, “a bell”, “a belt”.
      • “Stir Mealgum’s” – “Sir Malcolm’s”, “stir meal gums”.
      • “poorthing” – “Parting”, “poor thing”.
      • “kindmeant” – “Comment”, “kind(ly) meant”.
      • “abate” – “About”, “abate” (grow less).
      • sea shored” – “She should”, “sea shore”.
        • Possible allusion to the tongue-twister “She sells shells by the sea shore”.
      • “grive” – “Give”, “grieve”.
      • “baste washes” – “Best wishes”, “baste washes”, “waste bashes”.
      • “flather” – “Father”, “flat her”, “lather”.
      • “hopend” – “Happened”, “hope end”.
      • “rain” – “Run”, “rain”.
      • “jhim” – “Him”, “Jim”.
    • Dhad wish the enring of the Wark In Par’dess ovter all, win Inna Lovea Pealobelle, the sprayit of the Rover Lifey, runs at lost intwo her Babbo hoohas missologically becalm the nocean; has beclaim the sauce tow-hitch all danzzlings treams anc rushing revers must heaventually retorren.

      • “Dhad” – “That”, “dad”.
      • “wish” – “Was”, “wish”.
      • “enring” – “Ending”, “en-ring” (encircle).
      • “Wark In Par’dess” – “Work in Progress”, “walk in the park”, “wark” (British dialect “pain”) “Paradise”.
      • “ovter all” – “After all”, “overall”.
      • “win” – “When”, “win”.
      • “Inna Lovea Pealobelle” – “Anna Livia Plurabelle” (character in Finnegans Wake who is cognate with Lucia), “in a love appeal O belle”.
      • “sprayit” – “Spirit”, “spray it”.
      • “Rover Lifey” – “River Liffey“, “rover life”.
      • “lost” – “Last”, “lost”.
      • “intwo” – “Into”, “in two”.
      • “hoohas” – “Who has”, “hoo-ha” (commotion; slang “vagina”).
      • “missologically” – “Mythologically”, “miss O logic ally”.
      • “becalm” – “Become”, “becalm(ed)”.
      • “nocean” – “Ocean”, “notion”.
      • “beclaim” – “Become”, “be claim”, possibly “reclaim”.
      • “sauce” – “Source”, “sauce” (condiment; slang “booze”; impertinence).
      • “tow-hitch” – “To which”, “tow-hitch”.
      • “danzzlings treams” – “Dazzling streams”, “dancing dreams”. Possibly “treamsgal” (Scottish Gaelic “nonsense”.
      • “anc rushing revers” – “And rushing rivers”, “a crushing reverse”.
      • “heaventually” – “Eventually”, “heaven” “tu” (French “you”) “ally”.
      • “retorren” – “Return”, “torrent”.
  • Paragraph 122
    Once she had begun these periods of confinement, he had been the only one who cared about her, the only member of her family who kept in touch with her and worked upon her process of recovery. While Giorgio and Nora had been, frankly, glad to see the back of her, her father had sought help wherever he could find it, even with old Jung in Switzerland whom she had utterly despised. Her daddy had only wanted what was best for her. He had been desperately afraid for her from the first day of her incarceration. Having with his escalating blindness and his difficulty finishing his work, he had encouraged her to work on her illuminated alphabets, on her lettrines, paying for someone to publish them and thinking that she didn’t know about his well-intentioned vanity press machinations.

    • Wince she hard beglum desperiods of cantfindment, hce hid burn the lonly one who clared apouter, the unlie remember of her formerly who kwept in tough wit’her and Warked upIn her Proguess of rescovery.

      • “Wince” – “Once”, “wince”.
      • “hard” – “Had”, “hard”.
      • “beglum” – “Begun”, “be glum”. Possibly “Belgium”.
      • “desperiods” – “These periods”, “desperate”.
      • “cantfindment” – “Confinement”, “can’t find meaning”, “mental”.
      • “hce” – “He”, “HCE” (character in Finnegans Wake, cognate with James Joyce himself).
      • “hid” – “Had”, “hid”.
      • “burn” – “Been”, “burn” (what fire does; Scots “a small river”).
      • “lonly” – “Only”, “lonely”.
      • “clared” – “Cared”, “(John) Clare”. Possibly “cleared”, “dared”.
      • “apouter” – “About her”, “a pouter”.
      • “unlie” – “Only”, “un- lie”.
      • “remember” – “Member”, “remember”.
      • “formerly” – “Family”, “formerly”.
      • “kwept” – “Kept”, “wept”.
      • “tough” – “Touch”, “tough”.
      • “wit’her” – “With her”, “wither”, possibly “her wit”.
      • “Warked upIn her Proguess” – “Worked upon her process”, “Work in Progress“, “walked up in her pro guess”.
        • “Pro guess” probably referring to the woeful state of psychiatric diagnoses at this time.
      • “rescovery” – “Recovery”, “rescue”, “discovery”.
    • While Jeergio and Nhorror heed ban, frankuntimely, gload to see the backcover, her faither head-sort healp whereriver he kid fond it, hevain with old/young in Swizzerland hom she had mutterly despraised.

      • “Jeergio” – “Giorgio”, “Jeer”.
      • “Nhorror” – “Nora”, “horror”.
      • “heed ban” – “Had been”, “heed ban”.
      • “frankuntimely” – “Frankly”, “Frankenstein”, “untimely”.
      • “gload” – “Glad”, “gloat”.
      • “backcover” – “Back of her”, “back cover”.
      • “faither” – “Father”, “faith”, “fate her”.
      • “head-sort” – “Had sought”, “head-sort” (suggesting “head-shrinker” (psychiatrist)).
      • “healp” – “Help”, “heal”.
      • “whereriver” – “Wherever”, “where river”.
      • “kid fond” – “Could find”, “fond (of the) kid”.
      • “hevain” – “Even”, “he (strove in) vain”.
      • “old/young” – “Old Jung”, “(both) old (and) young”.
        • Carl Jung (1875-1961), famous psychiatrist who briefly treated Lucia Joyce in 1934.
      • “Swizzerland” – “Switzerland”, “wizard”, suggest?? Possibly “The Whizzer” (Marvel Comics superhero from the 1940s).
      • “hom” – “Whom”, “homo” (Latin “man”; slang “homosexual”).
      • “mutterly” – “Utterly”, “mutter” (speak unclearly; German “mother”).
      • “despraised” – “Despised”, “dis- praised”.
    • Her daedy had oneirly wanthead wit wishbest far her.

      • “daedy” – “Daddy”, Daedalus” (Greek mythological figure associated with The Labyrinth and escape).
      • “oneirly” – “Only”, “oneiric” (pertaining to dreams).
      • “wanthead” – “Wanted”, “want head”.
      • “wit” – “What”, “wit”.
      • “wishbest” – “Was best”, “best wishes”.
      • “far” – “For”, “far”.
    • He hart bane deskwritely afrayed for her Form D fwirst die of her inglasseration.

      • “hart” – “Had”, “heart”.
      • “bane” – “Been”, “bane”.
      • “deskwritely” – “Desperately”, “writing desk”.
      • “afrayed” – “Afraid”, “frayed”.
      • “Form D” – “From the”, “Form D”, “performed”.
        • I have found no reference to a specific “Form D”, but this can be taken to stand in for the large amounts of paperwork that James Joyce filled out at various times for Lucia’s sake.
      • “fwirst” – “First”, “worst”.
      • “die” – “Day”, “die”.
      • “inglasseration” – “Incarceration”, “in glass” (possible allusion to “glasshouse” (British slang for prison)).
    • Heaveon with his asculating bindness andes difficlimbty Finneshannys Worke, he had inkouraged hereto workd on her illooninmated helpabits, on her lepprines, baying for shamwin to paybless them and dhrinking that she dhidden’t nowabout his will-intensioned vanitiprous maginations.

      • “Heaveon” – “Having”, “heaven”, “heave on”.
      • “asculating” – “Escalating”, suggest?? Possibly “osculating” (to kiss), “asculta” (Romanian “to hear”).
      • “bindness” – “Blindness”, “bind -ness” (condition of being bound).
      • “andes” – “And his”, “Andes” (mountain range).
      • “difficlimbty” – “Difficulty”, “I climb”.
      • “Finneshannys Worke” – “Finishing his Work (In Progress)”, “Finnegans Wake“, “finny” “shanny” (type of fish).
      • “inkouraged” – “Encouraged”, “ink courage”.
      • “hereto” – “Her to”, “heretofore”.
      • “workd” – “Work”, “word”.
      • “illooninmated” – “Illuminated”, “I loony mated”.
      • “helpabits” – “Alphabets”, “help a bit”.
      • “lepprines” – “Lettrines”, “lepers”, “rine” (British dialect “To concern”).
        A Lucia Joyce lettrine
        A Lucia Joyce lettrine
        • These “lettrines” were fancy illuminated capitals that Lucia designed at James’ urging, starting in 1929. He seems to have felt that they would provide her the artistic outlet that she no longer had in dance.
      • “baying” – “Paying”, “baying” (at the moon?).
      • “shamwin” – “Someone”, “sham win” (Lucia did not “win” publication fairly), possibly “shaman”.
      • “paybless” – “Publish”, “pay (for their) bless(ing)”.
      • “dhrinking” – “Thinking”, “drinking”.
      • “dhidden’t” – “Didn’t”, “hidden”.
      • “nowabout” – “Know about”, “about now”.
      • “will-intensioned” – “Well-intentioned”, “will in tension”.
      • “vanitiprous” – “Vanity press”, “leprous”, suggest?? Possibly “van I tip rouse”.
      • “maginations” – “Machinations”, “imagination”.
        • To describe the publishing of Lucia’s lettrines as “vanity press” on the part of James Joyce is perhaps an oversimplification, but correct in broad strokes, according to Shloss, chapter 9.
  • Paragraph 123
    He felt guilty, that was what it was, despite the fact that very little of the whole affair was actually his fault. He thought that he had somehow magically imprisoned her within his murky and impenetrable narrative; believed that if he could just get to the finish of it, then Lucia too might find her way back into some state of illumination. As he had quite literally descended into darkness, he’d been waiting for a flicker of light, of Lucia, at the far end of her long tunnel. He had seen her bubbles rising in the wake of his career and written: “She is drowning. Agenbite. Save her. Agenbite.” Or something like that, anyway. Again the bite and then again a bit of agony that come with age and bitterness at seeing his beloved daughter sink beneath the surface, falling from her lifeboat with nobody to be racing to her rescue.

    • He falt girlty, that weighs wit it wise, despike the fict that vary letterle o’ the hole offear was unctually his failt.

      • “falt” – “Felt”, “fault”. Possibly “falt” (Scottish Gaelic “hair”).
      • “girlty” – “Guilty”, “girly”.
      • “weighs” – “Was”, “weighs” (upon his conscience).
      • “wit it wise” – “What it was”, “wit is wise”.
      • “despike” – “Despite”, “the spike”.
      • “fict” – “Fact”, “fiction”.
      • “vary” – “Very”, “vary”.
      • “letterle” – “Little”, “letter”, “lettrine”.
      • “hole” – “Whole”, “hole”.
      • “offear” – “Affair”, “of fear”.
      • “unctually” – “Actually”, “unctuous” (greasy).
      • “failt” – “Fault”, “fail”, “fáilte” (Irish “welcome; joy”).
    • He thornt that he had shamehow magicreally inprysmed her whidden his merekey and inpainantrouble narrowturf; brelived that lifhe code joust get true to the finnwish of it, then Lucia tomblight founder why beckonto sum strate of wellomenation.

      • “thornt” – “Thought”, “thorn”.
      • “shamehow” – “Somehow”, “shame how”.
      • “magicreally” – “Magically”, “magic really”, possibly “magical realism”.
      • “inprysmed” – “Imprisoned”, “in prys med” (medications forced upon her?), “prism” (refracting Lucia’s light?).
      • “whidden” – “Within”, “hidden”.
      • “merekey” – “Murky”, “mere key” (the simple solution James Joyce sought).
      • “inpainantrouble” – “Impenetrable”, “in pain and trouble”.
      • “narrowturf” – “Narrative”, “narrow turf”.
      • “brelived” – “Believed”, “be relieved”, “relived”.
      • “lifhe” – “If he”, “(River) Liffey, “life”.
      • “code” – “Could”, “code”.
      • “joust” – “Just”, “joust” (suggesting perhaps Don Quixote, associated with impossible struggles and madness).
      • “true” – “Through”, “true”.
      • “finnwish” – “Finish”, “Finnegan“.
      • “tomblight” – “Too might”, “tomb light”.
      • “founder” – “Find her”, “founder” (stumble; fail).
      • “why” – “Way”, “why”.
      • “beckonto” – “Back into”, “beckon to”.
      • “sum” – “Some”, “sum”.
      • “strate” – “State”, “straight” (difficulty).
      • “wellomenation” – “Illumination” (alluding to her lettrines), “well omened”.
  • Page 912
    • (paragaraph 123 continued)
      • As he had quote literarally decentered into daathness, he’d been waitongue for a fliquor oflight, of Lucia, at the finagend of her ling turnall.
      • “quote” – “Quite”, “quote”.
      • “literarally” – “Literally”, “literarily”, possibly “rally”, “ally”.
      • “decentered” – “Descended”, “de- centered”.
      • “daathness” – “Darkness”, Daath” (a conjectured “lost node” of the cabalistic Tree of Life representing “knowledge”, as discussed in issue #20 of Moore’s Promethea).
      • “waitongue” – “Waiting”, “tongue”.
      • “fliquor” – “Flicker”, “liquor”.
      • “oflight” – “Of light”, “flight”.
      • “Lucia” – Remember that “Lucia” means “light”.
      • “finagend” – “Far end”, “Finnegan“.
      • “ling” – “Long”, “linguist”.
      • turnall” – “Tunnel”, “turn all”.
        • This is riffing in the popular phrase “the light at the end of the tunnel”.
    • He had scene her blubbles ruesing in the wabe of his careern and writhen:

      • “scene” – “Seen”, “scene”.
      • “blubbles” – “Bubbles”, “blub” (drowning noise).
      • “ruesing” – “Rising”, “rue sing”.
      • “wabe” – “Wake”, “Wake“, “wabe” (nonce-word from Lewis Carroll’s nonsense poem Jabberwocky.  In its original publication, the notes define it as “the side of a hill (from its being soaked by rain)” In its appearance in Through the Looking Glass it is defined as follows:

        “And ‘the wabe‘ is the grass plot round a sun-dial, I suppose?” said Alice, surprised at her own ingenuity.
        “Of course it is. It’s called ‘wabe‘, you know, because it goes a long way before it, and a long way behind it–”
        “And a long way beyond it on each side”, Alice added.
        “Exactly so.”

      • careern” – “Career”, “careering” (moving uncontrollably), “careen” (to lurch or sway violently).
      • “writhen” – “Written”, “writ he”, “writhe”, possibly “hen”.
    • “Cias drawnin. Agenbite. Sieve her. Agenbite.”

      • This quotation (in un-mangled form) appears in Ulysses episode 10. It is also quoted bu Shloss (chapter 12), where she applies it to the sitiation of James and Lucia Joyce. Ulysses was written well before Lucia had obvious mental problems, but given Moore’s Eternalist views, that’s no reason for it not to reflect them.
      • “Cias” – “She is”, “(Lu)cia’s”.
      • “drawnin” – “Drowning”, “drawn in”, possibly “drawing”.
      • “Agenbite” – This word appears (as given here) in Ulysses. No direct translation is given there, though several interpretations are considered in the Notes to the last sentence of this paragraph. Wiktionary gives the meaning “remorse”, linking it to the Old English word of that meaning “ayenbite”.
      • “Sieve” – “Save”, “sieve”.
        • Possible allusion to Edward Lear’s nonsense poem The Jumblies, which begins “They went to sea in a sieve”, despite a sieve being obviously useless as a boat. This resonates with the theme of drowning.
    • Or simthink lake doubt, endyway.

      • “simthink” – “Something”, “sim(ulate) think(ing)”.
      • “lake” – “Like”, “lake”.
      • “doubt” – “That”, “doubt”.
      • “endyway” – “Anyway”, “end”, “in the way”.
    • Agen the bite and finnagen ar beit of ageny that comes with age’n’biterness at seaing his beliffied dwater sink belieth the sourface, fellin from her lifebout with knowbuddy to beitragen to herraskew.

      • “Agen the bite” – “Again the bite”, “agenbite”.
      • “finnagen” – “And then again”, “Finnegan“.
      • “ar beit of ageny” – “A bit of agony”, “agenbite”, arbeit (macht frei)” (German for “Work makes you free”, notably seen as a motto over the gates of Nazi labor camps) “agency”.
      • “age’n’biterness” – “Age and bitterness”, “agenbite”.
      • “seaing” – “Seeing”, “sea -ing” (going out to sea).
      • “beliffied” – “Beloved”, “be Liffey -ed” (James Joyce “made” Lucia (symbolically) into the River Liffey).
      • “dwater” – “Daughter”, “water”.
      • “belieth” – “Beneath”, “belief”.
      • “sourface” – “Surface”, “sour face”.
      • “fellin” – “Fallen”, “fell in”.
      • “lifebout” – “Lifeboat”, “bout (with) life”.
      • “knowbuddy” – “Nobody”, “know buddy” (intellectual companion? Something James Joyce felt he should have been more of to Lucia?).
      • “beitragen” – “Be racing”, “agenbite”, “betray again”.
      • “herraskew” – “Her rescue”, “her, askew”.
  • Paragraph 124
    Lucia had initially cum to Saint Andrew’s during nineteen thirty-five and had quite liked it but was back in France, stuck in a sanatorium, then Germany invaded during nineteen thirty-nine. Of course, by then her brother had insisted that Helen his wife be locked up in a loony bin as well. It wqs a thing he did with women when he didn’t want to fuck them any more.

    • Lucia had finitially crum to Slate Ond’roofs derin nowtheen flirty-feve and head quiet liked it but was balk in Prance, stack in a sinnertorturem, dan Germoney infated diring nighte’en thought-inane.

      • “finitially” – “Initially”, “finally”.
      • “crum” – “Cum”, “crumb”.
      • “Slate Ond’roofs” – “Saint Andrew’s”, “slate on the roofs”.
      • “derin” – “During”, “Therein”, possibly “daring”.
      • “nowtheen flirty-feve” – “Nineteen thirty-five”, “now then, flirty fever”.
        • Lucia’s first stay in Saint Andrew’s was from December 14, 1935 to February 22, 1936.
      • “head quiet” – “Had quite”, “quiet head”.
      • “balk” – “Back”, “balk” (hindrance, disappointment; failure).
      • “Prance” – “France”, “prance”.
      • “stack” – “Stuck”, “stack” (compactly spaced bookshelves).
      • “sinnertorturem” – “Sanatorium”, “sinner, torture them”.
        • Lucia was in Clinic Villa les Payes between March 23 and April 25, 1936. She was then transferred to the Delmas Clinic in Ivry, where she remained until 1951.
      • “dan Germoney” – “Then Germany”, “danger money” (hazard pay).
      • “infated” – “Invaded”, “fated”.
      • “diring” – “During”, “dire”. Possibly “Der Ring (des Nibelungen)”, Wagner opera popular in Nazi Germany.
      • “nighte’en thought-inane” – “Nineteen thirty-nine”, “night even thought inane”.
        • Germany actually invaded France in 1940. The error may have come from hasty reference to the subtitle of Shloss’ chapter 14: “Occupied France 1939-1945”. (The chapter starts in 1939, when Germany was busy invading other countries, and worries about a Fremch invasion were prominent.)
    • Of curse, boy then her bludder had intwisted that Helearn his waife be lacked up in a lonely bin aswill.

      • “curse” – “Course”, “curse”.
      • “boy” – “By”,,”boy”
      • “bludder” – “Brother”, “blubber” (to cry childishly; fat), “bladder”, possibly “blood”, “blunder”.
      • “intwisted” – “Insisted”, “twisted in”.
      • “Helearn” – “Helen”, “he learn(ed)” (possibly about an infidelity on her part).

        Giorgio and Helen (photo by Man Ray)
        Giorgio and Helen (photo by Man Ray)
      • “waife” – “Wife”, “waif”.
      • “lacked” – “Locked”, “lacked”, possibly “lackey”.
      • “lonely” – “Loony”, “lonely”.
      • “aswill” – “As well”, “a swill”, “will”.
        • Helen Kastor Joyce was intermittently hospitalized for depression during the late 1930s, as her marriage to Giorgio began to break down. Shloss comments: “For the second time in his life, he jettisoned a young woman by labeling her mad” (Shloss, chapter 13). Helen’s brother Robert smuggled her out of France in spring of 1940.
    • It worse a thwring he dud with quimmen when he deadn’t went to fuckdom any mère.

      • “worse” – “Was”, “worse”.
      • “thwring” – “Thing”, “wring”, “throwing (away)”.
      • “dud” – “Did”, “dud”, possibly “dude”.
      • “quimmen” – “Women”, “quim” (vulgar “cunt”; “woman”).
      • “deadn’t” – “Didn’t”, “dead (not)”.
      • “went” – “Want”, “went (away)”.
      • “fuckdom” – “Fuck them”, “-dom” (domain), “dom” (slang “sexually dominant”).
      • “mère” – “More”, “mère” (French “mother”).
  • Paragraph 125
    Her daddy, at his wit’s end, had conspired to get the other three members of the Joyce family to Switzerland and safety. But although he wrote a hundred letters and tried frantically to get Lucia out of occupied France, he was severely thwarted by the bureaucracy and sheer intransigence on the part of the Vichy Government, or Perrier as Lucia supposes we should more refreshingly refer to them these days. The poor man must have been so frightened for her, what with Germany’s declared agenda of exterminating the physically and mentally disabled for their own good. As it was, on the thirteenth of January, nineteen forty-one, with his poor daughter still trapped helplessly behind enemy lines, her father perished from peritonitis that resulted from a duodenal ulcer, itself caused or made worse by all the stress he was under. Needless to saym neither Giorgio or Nora ever had a thing to do with her once he was out of the picture. She had never heard a word from them again.

    • Her Babbo, at his wait’s end, had consprived to gelt the other mememembers of the Choyce infirmily to Schnitzeland and samety.

      • “wait’s end” – “Wit’s end”, “end of waiting”.
      • “consprived” – “Conspired”, “cons deprived”.
      • “gelt” – “Get”, “gelt” (slang “money” (in this context, bribes); obsolete “lunatic”).
      • “mememembers” – “Three members”, “meme”, “remembers”.
        • This count does not include James Joyce himself, see note below.
      • “Choyce” – “Joyce”, “choice”.
      • “infirmily” – “Family”, “infirmary”, “not firmly”.
      • “Schnitzeland” – “Switzerland”, “Schnitzel” (German “cutlet”).
      • “samety” – “Safety”, “same-ness”, “sanity”.
        • After considerable bureaucratic hurdles, James, Nora, Giorgio, and Stephen (Giorgio’s son) escaped to Switzerland in December 1940. James had intended all along to bring Lucia with them, but the German authorities withdrew permission at the last minute.
    • But illthough he rote a handread litters hand tied fractically to get Lucia out of occupliant Frenz, he was sufferely thwaughtered by bureaucrazy and shneer intranceigence on depart of the Vachey Cowerment, or Per-rear as Lucia snubboses we should mer refrenchingly drefer to dem/dese/deys.

      • “illthough” – “Although”, “ill thought”.
      • “rote” – “Wrote”, “rote” (repetition).
      • “handread” – “Hundred”, “hand read”.
      • “litters” – “Letters”, “litter” (trash).
      • “hand tied” – “And tried”, “(my) hands (are) tied” (a common excuse given by unhelpful bureaucrats).
      • “fractically” – “Frantically”, “fractally”, “fractious ally”.
      • “occupliant Frenz” – “Occupied France”, “o see you pliant”, “Franz” (a stereotypical German name). Possibly “friends”.
      • “sufferely” – “Severely”, “suffer lie”.
      • “thwaughtered” – “Thwarted”, “slaughtered”, possibly “daughter”.
      • “bureaucrazy” – “Bureaucracy”, “bureau of crazy”.
      • “shneer intranceigence” – “Sheer intransigence”, “sneer” “in trance gents”.
      • “depart” – “The part”, “depart”.
      • “Vachey Cowerment” – “Vichy Government” (the term for the “French” government during German occupation), “vache” (French “cow”, “harsh”) “cowering men”, “cow preferment”.
      • “Per-rear” – “Perrier” (French brand of bottled water), “per rear”.
        Vichy Water as it appeared in the film Casablanca
        Vichy Water as it appeared in the film Casablanca
        • The joke here is that, prior to WWII, the Vichy region of France was most famous for its bottled “Vichy water“.
      • “snubboses” – “Supposes”, “snub bosses”.
      • “mer refrenchingly” – “More refreshingly”, “merry French”. Possibly “unflinchingly”.
      • “drefer” – “Refer”, “drench”, suggest??
      • “dem/dese/deys” – “Them these days”, “dem/dese/deys” (a parody of schoolboy grammar conjugation, which seems to be about third person plural pronouns in the Bronx).
    • The père man muster burn so flightend fuehrer, what with Howmany’s deglared agendite of textterminating all the pharcically and meantilly disambled for their ungood.

      • “père” – “Poor”, “père” (French “father”).
      • “muster” – “Must have”, “muster”.
      • “burn” – “Been”, “burn”.
      • “flightend” – “Frightened”, “flight end”.
      • “fuehrer” – “For her”, “Fuehrer” (German “leader”, primary title of Adolf Hitler).
      • “Howmany’s” – “Germany’s”, “how many?”.
      • “deglared” – “Declared”, “de- glared”.
      • “agendite” – “Agenda”, “agenbite” (see paragraph 123 and notes).
      • “textterminating” – “Exterminating”, “text terminating”.
      • “pharcically” – “Physically”, “farcially”.
      • “meantilly” – “Mentally”, “mean” “tilly” (Ireland “an extra product given to the customer at no additional charge”).
      • “disambled” – “Disabled”, “dis- ambled” (imprisoned?).
      • “ungood” – “Own good”, “un- good” (bad) (possible reference to George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four which featured “ungood” as part of its “Newspeak” vocabulary).
    • Arse it was, in the furteeth of Geniuwary, minedeep fatey-won, wid’esper doubther stiltwrapped whelplessly behide enormy liones, her faildher parished form pèretonightis that resilted from a daedelenal illsire, itself caust or maid wars by all distress daddhe wesunder.

      • “Arse” – “As”, “arse”.
      • “furteeth” – “Thirteenth”, “fur teeth”.
      • “Geniuwary” – “January”, “genuis wary”, possibly “genuine”.
      • “minedeep fatey-won” – “Nineteen forty-one”, “deep mine” “fate won”.
      • “wid’esper” – “With his poor”, “widow” “esper” (psychic), “wide” “esperanza” (Spanish “hope”).
      • “doubther” – “Daughter”, “doubt her”.
      • “stiltwrapped” – “Still trapped”, “stilt wrapped”.
      • “whelplessly” – “Helplessly”, “whelp” (offspring).
      • “behide” – “Behind”, “be hide”, possibly “beside”.
      • “enormy liones” – “Enemy lines”, “enormous lions”.
      • “faildher” – “Father”, “failed her”.
      • “parished” – “Perished”, “parish”.
      • “form” – “From”, “form”.
      • “pèretonightis” – “Peritonitis”, “père” (French “father”) “tonight is”.
      • “resilted” – “Resulted”, “re- silted” (probably referring to the imagery of James Joyce as the ocean, see paragraph 121).
      • “daedelenal” – “Duodenal”, “Daedalus”.
        • In Greek mythology, Daedalus was the father of Icarus. Icarus, by improperly using his father’s gifts of intellectual invention, fell to his death. Shloss compares Lucia to Icarus on multiple occasions.
      • “illsire” – “Ulcer”, “ill sire”.
      • “caust” – “Caused”, “caustic”.
      • “maid wars” – “Made worse”, “maid wars”.
      • “distress” – “The stress”, “distress”.
      • “daddhe” – “That he”, “daddy”.
      • “wesunder” – “Was under”, “we sunder”.
    • Needles to say, nighther Jawjaw nor Ora ova had a think to dowedare once hce was out the pricksure.

      • “Needles” – “Needless”, “needles” (syringes; irritates).
      • “nighther” – “Neither”, “night her”.
      • “Jawjaw” – “Giorgio”, “jaw jaw” (repetitious talk).
      • “Ora” – “Nora”, “ora” (Italian “hour”; “now”; “breeze”)
      • “ova” – “Ever”, “ova” (egg).
      • “think” – “Thing”, “think”.
      • “dowedare” – “Do with her”, “do we dare?”.
      • “hce” – “He”, “HCE” (Finnegans Wake character who was cognate with James Joyce).
      • “pricksure” – “Picture”, “prick-sure” (cocksure).
    • She head nova herd award finnemagen.

      • “head nova” – “Had never”, “head Nova”.
      • “herd” – “Heard”, “herd”.
      • “award” – “A word”, “award”.
      • “finnemagen” – “From them again”, “Finnegan me”.
  • Paragraph 126
    When they’d told Lucia that her dad was dead she’d said he was an imbecile and asked what he thought he was doing, slipping underneath the ground. She hadn’t been upset by his demise, confident that he was a subterranean immortal. She’d merely been unhappy at the thought that he had passed away still thinking that he’d failed to save her, still believing that his little girl was drowning, agenbite, agenbite. If only she could have told him that she wasn’t going down for the third time and tide at all: Lucia was simply turning to a fish, was what it was. She’d been transforming into something silvery and elegant that could survive in this new inhospitable element; something with lanterns on its brow that could exist in this tremendous pressure.

    • Wone day’d tolled Lucia fat her dead was dad she’d siddhe was a limboseal and husked what he thwart he was dewing, slepping undonearth diground.

      • “Wone day’d” – “When they’d”, “one day”.
      • “tolled” – “Told”, “tolled” (referencing John Donne “Ask not for whom the bell tolls”).
      • “fat her” – “That her”, “father”.
      • “dead was dad” – “Dad was dead”.
      • “siddhe” – “Said he”, “Siddhartha” (one of the names of Buddha), “sidhe” (Irish/Scottish folklore “fairy”).
      • “limboseal” – “Imbecile”, “limbo seal”.
      • “husked” – “Asked”, “husked” (said in a husky voice; to remove corn husks).
      • “thwart” – “Thought”, “thwart”.
      • “dewing” – “Doing”, “dew”.
      • “slepping” – “Sleeping”, “slipping”.
      • “undonearth” – “Underneath”, “undone earth”.
      • “diground” – “The ground”, “dig round”.
        • Shloss relates, chapter 14:
        • “Cet imbécile,” she remarked, “qu’est ce qu’il fait sous la terre? Quand est ce qu’il se décide à sortir? II vous regarde tout le temps.” (“That imbecile. What is he doing under the earth? When will he decide to leave? He’s watching you all the time.”)

    • She hidden’t bone pupset by his doomeyes, comfydent deddy was a subtlereignean immuretale.

      • “hidden’t” – “Hadn’t”, “hidden”.
      • “bone” – “Been”, “bone”.
      • “pupset” – “Upset”, “papa”, “puppy”.
      • “doomeyes” – “Demise”, “doom(ed) eyes”.
      • “comfydent” – “Confident”, “comfy that”.
      • “deddy” – “Daddy”, “dead”.
      • “subtlereignean” – “Subterranean”, “subtle reign”.
      • “immuretale” – “Immortal”, “immure” (bury) “tale”.
    • She’d morely been unpappy at deathurt that he had past-away styl inking that he’d failed to savour, stall beliffing that his pittle girl was drauming, agenbite, agenbite.

      • “morely” – “Merely”, “more lie”.
      • “unpappy” – “Unhappy”, “un- pappy” (not (a good) father).
      • “deathurt” – “The thought”, “death hurt”.
      • “past-away” – “Passed away”, “(the) past (is) away”.
      • “styl” – “Still”, “style”.
      • “inking” – “Thinking”, “inking” (writing; the process of inking over penciled comic book artwork).
      • “savour” – “Save her”, “savour” (enjoyment; flavor).
      • “stall” – “Still”, “stall”.
      • “beliffing” – “Believing”, “be Liffey”.
      • “pittle” – “Little”, “pitiful”, “piddle” (urine).
      • “drauming” – “Drowning”, “dreaming”.
      • “agenbite” – See paragraph 123.
    • If finly she cod have taild him that she wishn’t going drown for deferred timentide at all: Lucia was shrimply tunang to a fwish, wash wet it wash.

      • This sentence is full of fish puns, to emphasize Lucia’s metaphor.
      • “finly” – “Only”, “finny” (having fins, like a fish).
      • “cod” – “Could”, “cod(fish)”.
      • “taild” – “Told”, “tailed”.
      • “wishn’t” – “Wasn’t”, “wish”.
      • “going drown for deferred timentide” – “Going down for the third time” (that is, drowning), “time and tide” (proverbially, they “wait for no man”), “drown deferred”.
      • “shrimply” – “Simply”, “shrimp”.
      • “tunang” – “Turning”, “tuna”.
      • “fwish” – “Fish”, “wish”.
        • The second appearance of “wish” suggests that Lucia’s transformation may be more wish fulfillment than actual.
      • “wash wet it wash” – “Was what it was”, “wet wash”.
    • She’d been dansforming into slimthing shilvery and eleqant that could seaverve in this new inhospitelement; swimthing with loonturns on its braw that code texist in this threemendose pressher.

      • “dansforming” – “Transforming”, “dance”.
      • “slimthing” – “Something”, “slim”, possibly “slime”.
      • “shilvery” – “Silvery”, “shivery”.
      • “eleqant” – “Elegant”, “eloquent”.
      • “seaverve” – “Survive”, “sea” “verve” (spirit, energy, especially artistic energy).
      • “inhospitelement” – “Inhospitable element”, “environment”, “in hospital”.
      • “swimthing” – “Something”, “swim”.
      • “loonturns” – “Lanterns”, “loony turns”.
      • “braw” – “Brow”, “braw” (Scots “fine, handsome, good”).
        Anglerfish
        Anglerfish
        • Lucia is comparing herself to deep sea fish that have luminescent lures near their mouths, such as various kinds of Anglerfish.
      • “code” – “Could”, “code”, “cod(fish)”.
      • “texist” – “Exist”, “text”, “sexist”.
      • “threemendose pressher” – “Tremendous pressure”, “three men dose, press her” (referring to Lucia’s various doctors).
  • Paragraph 127
    With these various notions tumbling through her awareness, Lucia proceeds upon her way between the spindly and benighted trees, like a split-beam experiment dressed in a flower-patterned frock and an old-lady cardigan.

    • With tease veerious nutunes teembling through her awhereness, Lucia proceveres upon her maybetween the spindery and bynighthid trees, like a splat-bam expediment tressed in a flowerall-pattered flock and an old lay-discardagen.

      • “tease” – “These”, “tease”.
      • “veerious” – “Various”, “veering us”.
      • “nutunes” – “Notions”, “new tunes”.
      • “teembling” – “Tumbling”, “teeming”.
      • “awhereness” – “Awareness”, “a where-ness”.
      • “proceveres” – “Proceeds”, “perseveres”, possibly “procedures”.
      • “maybetween” – “Way between”, “maybe tween”.
      • “spindery” – “Spindly”, “spidery”.
      • “bynighthid” – “Benighted”, “by night hid”.
      • “splat-bam” – “Split-beam”, “splat bam” (comic book sound effects).
      • “expediment” – “Experiment”, “expedient”, “ex- pediment”.
        The split-beam experiment
        The split-beam experiment
        • The split-beam (or “double-slit”) experiment was a landmark in modern physics, first performed in 1801. It demonstrates the wave-like qualities of light (important to Lucia’s symbolic identification with water). Ultimately, it demonstrated that quantum particles did not have strictly defined locations in the same way that normal humans experience such things (again, symbolically important to the unstuck-in-spacetime Lucia).
      • “tressed” – “Dressed”, “tresses”.
      • “flowerall-pattered” – “Floral-patterened”, “flower all patter”, possibly “coveralls”.
      • “flock” – “Frock”, “flock”.
      • “old lay-discardagen” – “Old lady cardigan”, “old lay” “discard agenbite”.
  • Paragraph 128
    Ahead of her she spies a most unusual phenomenon, in that while it is still most definitely nighttime on the bracken-littered path where she is walking, sum few dozen yards away there is an opening in the foliage that looks out onto a bright and sunlit afternoon. This most peculiar effect reminds her of an eerie and haunting image by Rene Magritte, a scene that is both day and night, although she found the artist’s other work disturbing, most especially the horribly inverted mermaid sprawled there gasping at the tide-line.

    • Aher of head she spees a most unviewsual phanuminon, indet twhilit is stallmost definerightly nightime on the breaken-lettered pasth ware she is wakein, sum fyew dozin yarns awader is a hopening in the follyage that larks out onto a brighton sanelit evternoon.

      • “Aher of head” – “Ahead of her”, “a hair of (her) head”.
      • “spees” – “Spies”, “pees”, “speer” (Scotland “to ask”).
      • “unviewsual” – “Unusual”, “un-view”.
      • “phanuminon” – “Phenomenon”, “phantom”, “numinous”.
      • “indet” – “In that”, “indent”. Possibly “indet” (Latin “he/she/it will place, introduce, impart”).
      • “twhilit stallmost” – “While it’s still most”, “twilight almost”, “twilit stall”.
      • “definerightly” – “Definitely”, “define rightly”.
      • “nightime” – “Nighttime”, “nigh time”.
      • “breaken-lettered” – “Bracken-littered”, “break N lettered”, possibly “break and enter”.
      • “pasth” – “Path”, “past”.
      • “ware” – “Where”, “(be)ware”.
      • “wakein” – “Walking”, “wake in” (multiple senses of “wake”, including Finnegans), “waking”.
      • “sum” – “Some”, “sum” (adding; Latin “I am”).
      • “fyew” – “Few”, “Yew”.
      • “dozin” – “Dozen”, “dozing”.
      • “yarns” – “Yards”, “yarns” (thick threads; stories).
      • “awader” – “Away there”, “a wader”.
      • “hopening” – “Opening”, “hope”, “possibly “happening”, “hop on in”.
      • “ina the” – “In the”, “innate”, possibly “ina” (Irish “in which”).
      • “follyage” – “Foliage”, “folly” (mistake; ornamental building (often associated with gardens)) “age”.
      • “larks” – “Looks”, “larks” (songbirds; frolics).
      • “brighton” – “Bright and”, “Brighton” (seaside resort town in England).
      • “sanelit” – “Sunlit”, “sane lit(erature)”.
      • “evternoon” – “Afternoon”, “every noon”.
    • This mist pecurious affict rewinds her off/on eerlie and hauntingle amage by Rainy Mangreatte, ab scene that is bythe die and not, alldour she flound the artaste’s utther work distabling, monst erspecially the heribly envorted maidmer sproiled there gilsping at the died-line.

      • “mist” – “Most”, “mist”.
      • “pecurious” – “Peculiar”, “curious”, possibly “pecunious” (wealthy).
      • “affict” – “Effect”, “afflict”.
      • “rewinds” – “Reminds”, “rewinds”.
      • “off/on” – “Of one”, “on/off”.
      • “eerlie” – “Eerie”, “early”, “here lies” (typical gravestone inscription).
      • “hauntingle” – “Haunting”, “haunches tingle”. Possibly “nightingale”.
      • “amage” – “Image”, “a mage”.
      • “Rainy Mangreatte” – “René Magritte“, “rainy great man”.
        Golconda
        Golconda
        • René Magritte (1898-1967), Belgian surrealist artist. “Rainy” may allude to one of his better known works, Golconda (1953), depicts a scene of men wearing bowler hats in mid air, perhaps falling from the sky like raindrops.
      • “ab scene” – “A scene”, “obscene”.
      • “bythe” – “Both”, “blythe” (probably referring to Noël Coward’s Blythe Spirit, a comic play about a ghost). Possibly “bythë” (Albanian “butt”).
      • “die and not” – “Day and night”, “die and not” (referring to Moore’s Eternalist view of the afterlife).
        The Empire of Light
        The Empire of Light
      • “alldour” – “Although”, “all dour”.
      • “flound” – “Found”, “flounder”. Possibly “lost and found”.
      • “artaste’s” – “Artist’s”, “our taste”.
      • “utther” – “Other”, “utter”.
      • “distabling” – “Disturbing”, “destabilizing”.
      • “monst erspecially” – “Most especially”, “monster special lie”.
      • “heribly” – “Horribly”, “her”. Possibly “herbily”.
        The collective invention
        The collective invention
        • Lucia naturally identifies with (and is horrified by) the inverted mermaid, as she has envisioned her own fishy transformation, see paragraph 126.
      • “envorted” – “Inverted”, “envy”, “vortex”, possibly “environment”.
      • “maidmer” – “Mermaid”, “maid mere”. Note that the word itself is inverted.
      • “sproiled” – “Sprawled”, “spoiled”.
      • “gilsping” – “Gasping”, “gills”.
      • “died-line” – “Tied-line”, “died”.
  • Paragraph 129
    Smiling broadly now Lucia strides on into the anomalous sunshine, elegantly pulling back a couple of stray thorn branches to emerge from the asylum woodland, out onto a grassy slope inclining down towards a river fringed by pale green rushes. It appears that she’s become disoriented on her wander through the woods and is now on the open ground due south of the distinguished mental hospital with its natural defenses, near the Bedford Road that Bunyan must’ve made his walking pilgrimage along, where the slow ribbon of the River Nene winds through a madhouse garden.

    • Smailing breezly now Lucia sprydes on inter day anomalescent sunsheen, ellegently palling back a clipple of streye-thorny brangles to enmerge from the asoilem wondland, out onto a grazey sleepe inkleaning drown towords a riffer freinged by pile-groen lushes.

      • “Smailing” – “Smiling”, “sailing”.
      • “breezly” – “Broadly”, “breezily”, possibly “brightly”.
      • “sprydes” – “Strides”, “spry does”.
      • “inter day” – “Into the”, “inter” (bury; confine; Latin “between”) “day” (so, “between the days”).
      • “anomalescent” – “Anomalous”, “luminescent”.
      • “sunsheen” – “Sumshine”, “sun sheen”.
      • “ellegently” – “Elegantly”, “elle” (French “she”) “gently”, possibly “leg”.
      • “palling” – “Pulling”, “palling”, “possible allusion to “pallbearers”.
      • “clipple” – “Couple”, “clip”, “cripple”.
      • “streye-thorny brangles” – “Stray thorn branches”, “eye horny bangles”, “brambles”.
      • “enmerge” – “Emerge”, “enmesh”.
      • “asoilem” – “Asylum”, “a soil M”, “assail ’em”.
      • “wondland” – “Woodland”, “wonderland” (alluding to Alice).
      • “grazey” – “Grassy”, “graze -y” (for grazing).
      • “sleepe” – “Slope”, “sleep”.
      • “inkleaning” – “Inclining”, “ink leaning”.
      • “drown” – “Down”, “drown”.
      • “towords” – “Towards”, “to words”.
      • “riffer” – “River”, “Liffey“.
      • “freinged” – “Fringed”, “ringed”, “feined”, possibly “friend”, “reigned”, “reined”.
      • “pile-groen” – “Pale green”, “pile groan”.
      • “lushes” – “Rushes”, “lush” (teeming with life; luxuriant; sexy; drunkard).
    • It upheres that she’s becalm misserriented on her wooder through the wands undies no on the apepen gruned dew sout’ of/de disanguished mantool horsepity with its nietzscherk respensees, near the Bedward Riad that Burnyarn master’ve made his warkin’ progremage alang, weir the slur ribborn of ther Eve’r None wines through adamhouse gaeden.

      • “upheres” – “Appears”, “up here is”
      • “becalm” – “Become”, “becalm(ed)”, “be calm”.
      • “misserriented” – “Disoriented”, “misser” (one who misses), possibly “miss ‘er”.
      • “wooder through the wands” – “Wander through the woods”, “wooder” (more wood, perhaps in reference to erections?) “wands” (Tarot suit).
      • “undies no” – “And is now”, “no undies”.
      • “apepen” – “Open”, “ape pen”.
      • “gruned” – “Ground”, “Grüne” (German “greenness”).
      • “dew sout’” – “Due south”, “dew’s out”. Possibly “sout” (obsolete “soot”).
      • “of/de” – “Of the”, “of/de” (“de” means “of” in most Romance languages).
      • “disanguished” – “Distinguished”, “this anguished”.
      • “mantool horsepity” – “Mental hospital”, “man tool horse pity”.
      • “nietzscherk respensees” – “Natural defenses”(? Suggest??), “knee-jerk responses”, “Nietzsche work”, “pensées” (French “thoughts”).
      • “Bedward Riad” – “Bedford Road”, “bedward” (towards bed) “riot”. Possibly “riadh” (Scottish Gaelic “interest (financial)”).
        • Saint Andrews is located on Bedford Road.
      • “Burnyarn” – “Bunyan”, “burn(ing) yarn” (passionate story).
      • “master’ve” – “Must’ve”, “master”.
      • “warkin’ progremage” – “Walking pilgrimage”, “Pilgrim(‘s Progress)“, “Work in Progress“. Possibly “ogre mage”.
      • “alang” – “Along”, “a lang(uage)”.
      • “weir” – “Where”, “weir” (adjustable river-dam; fence for catching fish).
      • “slur ribborn” – “Slow ribbon”, “slurry borne”, “slur rib born” (possibly an allusion to the claim that Eve was created from Adam’s rib?).
      • “ther Eve’r None” – “The River Nene“, “there ever none”, “Eve”.
      • “wines” – “Winds”, “wines”.
      • “adamhouse gaeden” – “A madhouse garden”, “Adam house Eden.
  • Paragraph 130
    Squinting up into the sky she judges that from the position of the swollen golden sun it is a little after two o’clock. She hopes Patricia won’t be worried for her, what with missing lunch and all, but then again her friend and nurse is clearly used to her by now and knows that frequent expeditions into the interior are simply part of the responsibility that comes with being Lucia Joyce. It is light’s nature to seek out the darkest corners, after all.

    • Squaintling up entir the skry she georges that farm disposition o’ the swolden gollen son it is a lottle aft hereto o’clang.

      • “Squaintling” – “Squinting”, “quaintly”, possibly “squatting”, “is a quaint language”.
      • “entir” – “Into”, “entire”.
      • “skry” – “Sky”, “scry”.
      • “georges” – “Judges”, “Giorgio”.
      • “farm” – “From”, “farm”.
      • “disposition” – “The position”, “disposition”.
      • “swolden” – “Swollen”, “olden”. Possibly “wolde” (obsolete “would”).
      • “gollen” – “Golden”, “golem”. Possibly “Gollum” (Tolkien character), “gollende” (Norwegian “gloating”).
      • “son” – “Sun”, “son” (connecting with Giorgio, above).
      • “lottle” – “Little”, “lot”. Possibly “lottery”.
      • “aft hereto o’clang” – “After two o’clock”, “aft hereto clang”.
    • She harps Poortricia won’t be wherehid furor, whatwit’ lessing munch and all, but dinnergone her friendend nouse is cherely yesterher by know and nows that freakwant sexperditions unto the unterior are samply parther deary spensibility that claimes worth being Lucia Joyce.

      • “harps” – “Hopes”, “harps”.
      • “Poortricia” – “Patricia”, “poor Tricia”.
        • Patricia was last heard of way back in paragraph 4.
      • “wherehid” – “Worried”, “where (has Lucia) hid”?
      • “furor” – “For her”, “furor”.
      • “whatwit’” – “What with”, “why a twit”, “what wit”.
      • “lessing munch” – “Missing lunch”, “less munching”.
      • “dinnergone” – “Then again”, “dinner gone”.
      • “friendend” – “Friend and”, “friend(ship) end”, possibly “frightened”.
      • “nouse” – “Nurse”, “no use”, possibly “noose”.
      • “cherely” – “Surely”, “chère” (dear (feminine)), possibly “chere” (obsolete “cheer”).
      • “yesterher” – “Used to her”, “yesteryear”.
      • “know” – “Now”, “know”.
      • “nows” – “Knows”, “now -s”.
      • “freakwant” – “Frequently”, “freak want”.
      • “sexperditions” – “Expeditions”, “sex perdition” (Lucia does get a lot of sex while she’s out…)
      • “unto the unterior” – “Into the interior” (“interior” here both in the sense of “remote from the coast; unexplored territory” and in the sense of “inside the mind”), “unto”.
      • “samply” – “Simply”, “sample”.
      • “parther” – “Part of”, “part her”, possibly “partner”, “panther”.
      • “deary spensibility” – “The responsibility”, “dreary spends”, possibly “dearie”, “diary”, “the airy”.
      • “claimes” – “Comes” (in multiple senses), “claims”.
      • “worth being Lucia Joyce” – “With being Lucia Joyce”, “(it is) worth being Lucia Joyce”.
    • Utters light’s nowture to seacowed the direquest carnors, evtor all.

      • “Utters” – “It is”, “utters” (speaks), “uttermost”.
      • “light’s” – Remember, Lucia means “light”.
      • “nowture” – “Nature”, “now” “ture” (Italian “coffer-dams”), “nurture”.
      • “seacowed” – “Seek out”, “sea-cow” (manatee), “(the) sea (is) cowed”.
      • “direquest” – “Darkest”, “dire quest”, “the request”.
      • “carnors” – “Corners”, “carnivores”, “carnous” (fleshy).
      • “evtor” – “After”, “evor” (Breton “buckthorn”), “tor” (hill; tower).
  • Paragraph 131
    She decides that she will take a walk down to the water’s edge, where she can lose herself within her river-dream for a short while. She finds a strip of solid ground amongst the reeds where she can stand and gaze across the river to the sunlit Bedford Road beyond, and further still to where great sculpted masses of white clouds move silently above the distant fields and villages, dragging their shadows like collapsed grey parachutes behind them. Cycling along a carriageway towards the hospital she spies the strangest figure, an old negro man with white hair, riding on a bicycle that has white tires and pulls a little junk-cart in its wake. It strikes her that she cannot see or hear another vehicle upon the road, nor are there pylons or prefabricated huts or any other symbol of modernity in view. Perhaps she has trespassed unwittingly on an entirely different period of time?

    • Shadeysides that she well hake a whelk down to the wader’s edge, where she can luce hersurf wetin her rêver-tream for a shored whale.

      • “Shadeysides” – “She decides”, “shady sides”.
      • “well” – “Will”, “well”.
      • “hake” – “Take”, “hake” (kind of fish; dialectical “hook”).
      • “whelk” – “Walk”, “whelk” (type of sea snail).
      • “wader’s” – “Water’s”, “wader”.
      • “luce hersurf” – “Lose herself”, “Lucia her surf”.
      • “wetin” – “Within”, “wet in”.
      • “rêver-tream” – “River-dream”, “rêver” (French “to dream”) “stream”.
      • “shored whale” – “Short while”, “shored (that is, beached) whale”.
    • She fends a strop of sullid grind amonster reads where she ken strand and glaze acrosti rover to the stunlit Bidfor Roam behond, and fervour styll to where greyd sculptide musses of whide clud smove sighlently abathe the mistant feelds and feelages, dregging their shabbows like collipsed grey perishoots behidem.

      • “fends” – “Finds”, “fends (for herself).
      • “strop” – “Strip”, “strop” (strap; bad temper).
      • “sullid grind” – “Solid ground”, “sullied grind”.
      • “amonster” – “Amongst”, “a monster” (we’ll see one soon…)
      • “reads” – “Reeds”, “reads”.
        • Possible allusion to Cerebus, in which cheap illustrated novels were called “reads”.
      • “ken” – “Can”, “ken” (know).
      • “strand” – “Stand”, “strand”.
      • “glaze” – “Gaze”, “glaze” (as in “glazed eyes”?).
      • “acrosti” – “Across the”, “acrostic”.
      • “rover” – “River”, “rover”.
      • “stunlit” – “Sunlit”, “unlit”, possibly “stun”.
      • “Bidfor Roam” – “Bedford Road”, “bid for roam” (attempt to escape?).
      • “behond” – “Beyond”, “behind”, possibly “be hound”.
      • “fervour” – “Further”, “fervor”.
      • “styll” – “Still”, “style”.
      • “greyd” – “Great”, “greyed”.
      • “sculptide” – “Sculpted”, “sculpt tide”, possibly “scull” (small rowboat), “skull”.
      • “musses” – “Masses”, “musses”.
      • “whide” – “White”, “wide”.
      • “clud smove” – “Clouds move”, “clud” (Old English “stone; hill”), “smooth”, suggest??
      • “sighlently” – “Silently”, “sigh lent lie”.
      • “abathe” – “Above”, “a bathe(r)”.
      • “mistant” – “Distant”, “misty”.
      • “feelds and feelages” – “Fields and villages”, “feels” (strong emotions), “foliage”.
      • “dregging” – “Dragging”, “dredging”.
      • “shabbows” – “Shadows”, “Shabbos” (Judaism “Sabbath”), possibly “shabby bows”.
      • “collipsed” – “Collapsed”, “coll” (to hug). Possibly “lisped”, “ipse dixit” (argument from authority).
      • “perishoots” – “Parachutes”, “perish shoots”.
      • “behidem” – “Behind them”, “hide them” (something that wartime paratroopers had to do with their parachutes).
    • Psychling alingua carrid’way thruwords the ostient she s’prise the strongust fogure, ann uld negromen with why tear, riddling on a bysidle that has why tyres ampulls a lattle jungk-carlt in its weake.

      • “Psychling” – “Cycling”, “psych(iatry)”, possibly “Psyche” (Greek mythological figure).
      • “alingua” – “Along the”, “a lingua” (language).
      • “carrid’way” – “Carriageway” (road), “carried away”.
      • “thruwords” – “Towards”, “through words”.
      • “ostient” – “Hospital”, “patient”, “Orient”, suggest??
      • “s’prise” – “Spies”, “surprise”.
      • “strongust” – “Strangest”, “strong lust”.
      • “fogure” – “Figure”, “fog your”.
      • “ann uld” – “An old”, “annulled”.
      • “negromen” – “Negro man”, “nigromancy” (obsolete “necromancy”), “romen” (Middle English “to roam”).
        • This is, of course, Black Charley / Henry George, seen in several previous chapters, most notably “Blind, But Now I See”.
      • “why tear” – “White hair”, “why tear”.
      • “riddling” – “Riding”, “riddling”.
      • “bysidle” – “Bicycle”, “by sidling”.
      • “why tyres” – “White tires”, “why tyres” (British spelling of “tires”).
      • “ampulls” – “And pulls”, “ampules” (pills).
      • “lattle” – “Little”, “latter”. Possibly “latte”.
      • “jungk-carlt” – “Junk-cart”, “Jung” (who Lucia thought was “junk”) “carl” (archaic “churl”).
      • “weake” – “Wake” (in, as usual, multiple senses), “weak”.
    • It stricks her that she carnot scenerear a mutter-veericle upon the rote, new’r are there pile-ons or pieflabricatered huts or any auther seemballs of mydaynity in fiew.

      • “stricks” – “strikes”, “stricken”.
      • “carnot” – “Cannot”, “Carnot”, possibly “carnal”.
        • Nicolas Carnot (1796-1832) was a French engineer and physicist whose work was important to the development of automobiles.
      • “scenerear” – “See nor hear”, “scene rear”, “scenery”.
      • “mutter-veericle” – “Motor-vehicle”, “mutter veer”. Possibly “icicle”, “ridicule”.
      • “rote” – “Road”, “rote” (repetition).
      • “new’r” – “Nor are”, “newer”.
      • “pile-ons” – “Pylons” (in this context, towers to support electric cables), “pile-on”.

        Electrical pylons visible from Saint Andrews
        Electrical pylons visible from Saint Andrews along Bedford Road
      • “pieflabricatered” – “Prefabricated”, “catered pie (leads to) flab”.
        • Electrical pylons were still present as of 2017 (see picture), but I was unable to document the “prefabricated huts”.
      • “auther” – “Other”, “author”.
      • “seemballs” – “Symbols”, “seem balls” (eyes?).
      • “mydaynity” – “Modernity”, “my day (and) night”, “nighty”.
      • “fiew” – “View”, “few”.
    • Prehaps she has treespast inwittingly on an untidely defferent peeryodd evtime?

      • “Prehaps” – “Perhaps”, “pre-” (before) “haps” (happens).
      • “treespast” – “Trespassed”, “trees past”.
      • “inwittingly” – “Unwittingly”, “in wit tingly”.
      • “untidely” – “Entirely”, “untidy”, “tide”.
      • “defferent” – “Different”, “deferent” (showing deference).
      • “peeryodd” – “Period”, “peer” yod” (tenth letter of the Hebrew alphabet; first letter in the name of God), “very odd”, “eerie”.
      • “evtime” – “Of time”, “every time”, suggest??

Forward to Section 9 – The Nene Hag.