RtB section 7 – Malcolm Arnold

Up to “Round the Bend”.

Back to Section 6 – Ogden Whitney.

In which Lucia meets composer Malcolm Arnold.

Significant characters and themes in this section:

  • Sir Malcolm Arnold (1921-2006) was an English composer from Northampton, who spent some time in Saint Andrews Hospital in the late 70s/early 80s.

    Sir Malcolm Arnold
    Sir Malcolm Arnold
  • World folklore, especially that concerning monsters, ghosts, witches, etc.
  • Page 908 (continued)
  • Paragraph 108
    She decides to follow the advice of her portly savior and try to make her way back into daylight, setting off between the trees with their luminous fairy-like encrustations, humming what she thinks might once have been a Beatles composition, just to keep her spirits up. She pictures herself in a boat on a river with tangerine trees and marmalade skies, which is a cheerier proposition than the lunatic asylum woodlands which in reality she cautiously attempts to find her path amidst. After a time it seems to her that she can hear a wild and distant music off in the arboreal darkness, carried to Lucia in gusts upon the evening breeze. Closer to her, she detects the sounds of ragged breathing and of bracken splintering underfoot, so that she pauses on the edge of a small clearing until she can make her mind up whether the approaching presence is agreeable or otherwise.

    • She concides to fellow the headvoice of her deportly salvia and triter murke her why beckento deylight, certing off betune the tries with their liminous feary-luc womencrustations, hymming washy thinks white mince have been a Bleatles’ camposition, jester keep her spillits up.

      • “concides” – “Decides”, “coincides”, “considers”.
      • “fellow” – “Follow”, “fellow”.
      • “headvoice” – “Advice”, “head voice”.
      • “deportly” – “Portly”, “deportment” (conduct), possibly “deport”.
      • “salvia” – “Savior”, “salvia” (type of plant; a psychoactive variety features in the chapter “The Jolly Smokers”).
      • “triter” – “Try to”, “more trite”.
      • “murke” – “Make”, “murk”.
      • “why” – “Way”, “why”.
      • “beckento” – “Back into”, “beckon to”.
      • “deylight” – “Daylight”, “the light”, “dey” (British dialect “dairymaid”).
      • “certing” – “Setting”, “certain”, “certifying”.
      • “betune” – “Between”, “be tune”.
      • “tries” – “Trees”, “tries”.
      • “liminous” – “Luminous”, “liminal”.
      • “feary-luc” – “Fairy-like”, “fear-y Lucia”.
      • “womencrustations” – “Encrustations”, “women crust”, “stations”.
      • “hymming” – “Humming”, “hymn”.
      • “washy” – “What she”, “(wishy-)washy”.
      • “white mince” – “Might once”, “white mice”, “mince”.
      • “Bleatles’” – “Beatles“, “bleat”.
      • “camposition” – “Composition”, “camp”, “cam(era) position”.
        • The song is identified in the next sentence.
      • “jester” – “Just to”, “jester”.
      • “spillits” – “Spirits”, “spill it”.
    • She fictures hersylph in a beat on a raver with dangerin tease and murmurlate spies, which is a cheeryher propersituation dunder lunardecked asilent weirdlands which in surreality she caughtusly atemps to flinder path amist.

      • “fictures” – “Pictures”, “fiction”, possibly “fractures”.
      • “hersylph” – “Herself”, “her sylph”.
      • “beat” – “Boat”, “beat”.
      • “raver” – “River”, “raver”.
        • The Beatles are strongly associated with the hippie counterculture of the 1960s. This was an outgrowth of the beat counterculture of the 1950s, and a forerunner of the rave counterculture of the 1990s.
      • “dangerin tease” – “Tangerine trees”, “danger in tease”.
      • “murmurlate spies” – “Marmalade skies”, “murmur late spies”.
        • This is a paraphrase of the beginning of the Beatles song “Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds“: “Picture yourself on a boat on a river / with tangerine trees and marmalade skies.” Lucia seems to identify with Lucy.
      • “cheeryher” – “Cheerier”, “cheery her”, “cherry”.
      • “propersituation” – “Proposition”, “proper situation”.
      • “dunder” – “Than the”, “dunder(head).
      • “lunardecked” – “Lunatic”, “lunar decked”.
      • “asilent” – “Asylum”, “a silent”.
      • “weirdlands” – “Woodlands”, “weird lands”.
      • “surreality” – “Reality”, “surrealism”.
      • “caughtusly” – “Cautiously”, “caught us (in a) lie”.
      • “atemps” – “Attempts”, “atemporal”.
      • “flinder” – “Find her”, “flinders”.
      • “amist” – “Amidst”, “a mist”.
    • Ofter a tome it streems to her bhan shee can horr a waild and distuned musesick off in the orbereal darkmess, clarried to Lucia in gosts upine the evilin’ brays.

      • “Ofter” – “After”, “ofter” (oftener), possibly “otter”.
      • “tome” – “Time”, “tome”.
      • “streems” – “Seems”, “streams”.
      • “bhan shee” – “That she”, “banshee” (Irish folklore “female spirit whose cry foretells death”).
      • “horr” – “Hear”, “horror”.
      • “waild” – “Wild”, “wailed”.
      • “distuned” – “Distant”, “dis-tuned”.
      • “musesick” – “Music”, “muse sick”.
      • “orbereal” – “Arboreal”, “orb ethereal”.
      • “darkmess” – “Darkness”, “dark mess”.
      • “clarried” – “Carried”, “clarion”, “Clare”.
      • “gosts” – “Gusts”, “ghosts”.
      • “upine” – “Upon”, “you pine”, “supine”.
      • “evilin’” – “Evening”, “evil in”.
      • “brays” – “Breeze”, “brays” (donkey sounds).
  • Page 909
    • Clearser to her, she detexts the zounds of roggerd breedhing and of brocken splantering hinderfoot, so dout she poises un the hedge of a smell quearin’ untell she can Wake her wind-up wuther the accrouching prescience is hungreeable or botherwise.

      • “Clearser” – “Closer”, “clear sir”, “clears her”.
      • “detexts” – “Detects”, “de-texts” (deconstructs the text?).
      • “zounds” – “Sounds”, “zounds” (archaic swear, contraction of “God’s wounds”).
      • “roggerd” – “Ragged”, “rogered” (slang “fucked”), possibly “rugged”.
      • “breedhing” – “Breathing”, “breeding”.
      • “brocken” – “Bracken”, “broken”.
      • “splantering” – “Splintering”, “planter”, possibly “splattering”.
      • “hinderfoot” – “Underfoot”, “hind foot”, “hinder”.
      • “dout” – “That”, “doubt”.
      • “poises” – “Pauses”, “poise”.
      • “hedge” – “Edge”, “hedge”.
      • “smell” – “Small”, “smell”.
      • “quearin’” – “Clearing”, “queer in”.
      • “untell” – “Until”, “un-tell”.
      • “Wake” – “Make”, “(Finnegans) Wake“.
      • “wind-up” – “Mind up”, “wind up” (British “to play a prank”).
      • “wuther” – “Whether”, “Wuther(ing Heights)”.
      • “accrouching” – “Approaching”, “crouching”.
      • “prescience” – “Presence”, “prescience” (forethought).
      • “hungreeable” – “Agreeable”, “hungry able”.
      • “botherwise” – “Otherwise”, “bother wise”.
  • Paragraph 109
    Into the space between the trees there stumbles a pear-shaped fellow with receding hair who seems to be at once drunk, out of breath and in fear for his life. He doesn’t seem to pose much of a danger, and besides, Lucia recognizes him. It is another of the patients from Saint Andrew’s, but unlike John Clare or J. K. Stephen this man is one of Lucia’s contemporaries. Reassured, she steps out of concealment to announce her presence with a discreet cough, at which the balding chap looks fit to jump out of his epidermis.

    • Intru di splace batwing the treece there stembles a poer-shaped fall-ow with recidivising harr who sheems to be atwains drownk, out of berth and in fer furies life.

      • “Intru di splace” – “Into the space”, “intrudes”, “displace”.
      • “batwing” – “Between”, “bat wing”
      • “treece” – “Trees”, “Treece” (name, see below).
      • “stembles” – “Stumbles”, “stem bless”.
      • “poer-shaped” – “Pear-shaped”, “poet”, “poor”.
      • “fall-ow” – “Fellow”, “fall – ow!”.
      • “recidivising harr” – “Receding hair”, “recidivist” (one who commits a new crime after allegedly reforming) “harr” (British dialect “sea mist”; Scotland “a wind from the east”).
      • “sheems” – “Seems”, “sheets” (associated with ghost costumes; “three sheets to the wind” = “drunk”).
      • “atwains” – “At once”, “a twain”, “at wains” (wagons).
      • “drownk” – “Drunk”, “drowning”.
      • “berth” – “Breath”, “berth” (resting place).
      • “in fer” – “In fear”, “infer”.
      • “furies” – “For his”, Furies” (Greek mythological spirits of vengeance, known for their unflagging pursuit).
    • He daresn’t seem to puss milch of a dandandandandanger, and besight, Lucia recognices him.

      • “daresn’t” – “Doesn’t”, “dares not”.
      • “puss” – “Pose”, “puss” (possible reference to “Puss in Boots”), “pussy” (slang “vagina”; slang “coward”).
      • “milch” – “Much”, “milch” (giving milk; obsolete “weeping, pitiful”).
      • “dandandandandanger” – “Danger”, “dun dun dun dun dun” (five musical beats in a row).
      • “besight” – “Besides”, “be sight”.
      • “recognices” – “Recognizes”, “nice”.
    • It is annoydher of the payshunts from Paint Anddraw’s, but unlook Juan Glare or Jokey Stabhen this mon is when of Lucia’s contimpanis.

      • “annoydher” – “Another”, “annoyed her”.
      • “payshunts” – “Patients”, “pay shunts” (perhaps indicating that relatives pay to shunt away troublesome family members).
      • “Paint Anddraw’s” – “Saint Andrew’s”, “paint and draw”.
      • “unlook” – “Unlike”, “un look”.
      • “Juan Glare” – “John Clare”, “Don Juan” (famous fictional lover) “glare”.
      • “Jokey Stabhen” – “J. K. Stephen”, “joke-y stab hen”.
        • “Hen” can be slang for “woman”, so the sense of the alternate reading is “ludicrous Ripper suspect”.
      • “mon” – “Man”, “mons (veneris)” (female pudenda).
      • “when” – “One”, “when”.
      • “contimpanis” – “Contemporaries”, “timpanis” (orchestral drums).
    • Heassured, she stems out of cancelment to ennunciate her persence with a misgreet coff, at which the badling cheep looks frit to chump out of his harpidormus.

      • “Heassured” – “Reassured”, “he assured”.
      • “stems” – “Steps”, “stems”.
      • “cancelment” – “Concealment”, “cancel mental”.
      • “ennunciate” – “Announce”, “enunciate” (speak clearly), possibly “Annunciation” (announcement of the coming of Jesus Christ).
      • “persence” – “Presence”, “person-hood”, “persistence”, “per sense”.
      • “misgreet” – “Discreet”, “miss greet”.
      • “coff” – “Cough”, “coffin”.
      • “badling” – “Balding”, “bad -ling” (small bad person?), possibly “battling”.
      • “cheep” – “Chap”, “cheep” (bird sound), possibly “cheap”.
      • “frit” – “Fit”, “frit” (British “frightened”).
      • “chump” – “Jump”, “chump”.
      • “harpidormus” – “Epidermis” (skin), “harp I” “dormouse” (possible Alice reference).
  • Paragraph 110
    “Sorry if I startled you. I am Lucia Joyce, and I assume that you must be my fellow mental-patient, the illustrious Sir Malcolm Arnold. I think I have passed you in the corridors, perhaps close to those awful elevator doors that frighten me so dreadfully. Might I ask if you are receiving guests at present?”

    • “Sherry if I stopled you.
      • “Sherry” – “Sorry”, “sherry”.
      • “stopled” – “Startled”, “stop”, possibly “stoppered”, “tippled”.
    • I am Lucyhere Jusst, and I assame that you mayst by me felemental-portient, the illusious Sir Maycome Arsold.

      • “Lucyhere Jusst” – “Lucia Joyce”, “Lucy just here”.
        • Commenter Ian Thomson thinks this is Lucia identifying herself as Lucy from the Beatles’ “Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds” (which is more explicitly referenced above in paragraph 108).
      • “assame” – “Assume”, “as same”, “ass am he”.
      • “mayst by me” – “Must be my”, “may stand by me”.
      • “felemental-portient” – “Fellow mental-patient”, “elemental portent”, possibly “portentous”.
      • “illusious” – “Illustrious”, “illusion”.
      • “Maycome Arsold” – “Malcolm Arnold”, “may come are sold”, “arsehole”.
    • I think I have past you in the carridowns, perhoops cluss ter doze mawful evelator dours that fightin me so deadfeelly.

      • “past” – “Passed “, “past”.
      • “carridowns” – “Corridors”, “carry down”, “downs” (hills).
      • “perhoops” – “Perhaps”, “through hoops”.
      • “cluss ter” – “Close to”, “cluster”.
      • “doze” – “Those”, “doze”, possibly “dozen”.
      • “mawful” – “Awful”, “maw full”.
      • “evelator” – “Elevator”, “eve(ning) later”, “Eve la” “tor” (mountain).
      • “dours” – “Doors”, “dour”.
      • “fightin” – “Frighten”, “fight in”.
      • “deadfeelly” – “Dreadfully”, “I feel dead”.
        • Shloss, chapter 15, writing about Lucia’s dislike of Saint Andrews: “The center of her reverie became the elevator, whose doors Lucia hated: “That horrible gate, I never want to see it!””
    • Mai Tai ask if you are preceiving ghuests at pissant?”

      • “Mai Tai” – “Might I”, “mai tai” (type of cocktail).
      • “preceiving ghuests” – “Receiving guests”, “perceiving ghosts” (which he arguably is, since from his point of view, Lucia is dead).
      • “pissant” – “Present”, “pissant” (insignificant person).
  • Paragraph 111
    The composer, for it is indeed the very man, steps now somewhat closer to Lucia and squints at her suspiciously. Away amidst the windy howl and mutter of the distance the implacable and wheezing music mounts perceptibly; grows slightly louder; drums a little nearer.

    • De composer, for it is undeed the veery mentien, stoops now seemwet clouser to Lucia and squinks at her suspissoffly.

      • “De composer” – “The composer”, “decompose”.
      • “undeed” – “Indeed”, “undead”, “un- deed”.
      • “veery” – “Very”, “eerie”, “I veer”.
      • “mentien” – “Man”, “mention”, suggest?? Possibly “tien” (French “your”).
      • “stoops” – “Steps”, “stoops”.
      • “seemwet” – “Somewhat”, “seem wet”.
      • “clouser” – “Closer”, “louse”, possibly “clouds her”.
      • “squinks” – “Squints”, “squink” (a short, high-pitched metallic sound).
      • “suspissoffly” – “Suspiciously”, “piss off!”.
    • Aweigh amast the wendihowl and muerter of the dethsdance the umpluckable and weirzing mazic ments percepticly; glows frightly louter; draums a lutehole nearher.

      • “Aweigh” – “Away”, “(anchors) aweigh”.
      • “amast” – “Amidst”, “a mast”.
      • “wendihowl” – “Windy howl”, “wendigo” (evil cannibal spirit in Natibe American folklore).
      • “muerter” – “Mutter”, “muerte” (Spanish “death”), possibly “murder”.
      • “dethsdance” – “Distance”, “death’s dance“.
      • “umpluckable” – “Implacable”, “un- pluck-able” (pluck probably in the sense of plucking the strings of a musical instrument).
      • “weirzing” – “Wheezing”, “weird zing”, possibly “rising”.
      • “mazic” – “Music”, “maze”, “magic”.
      • “ments” – “Mounts”, “(mo)ments”, “mental”.
      • “percepticly” – “Perceptibly”, “per septic lie”, possibly “skeptic”.
      • “glows” – “Grows”, “glows”.
      • “frightly” – “Slightly”, “fright lie”.
      • “louter” – “Louder”, “lout her”.
      • “draums” – “Drums”, “comes”, “drams” (measure, possibly of liquor or medication), possibly “drama”.
      • “lutehole” – “Little”, “lute hole”.
      • “nearher” – “Nearer”, “near her”.
  • Paragraph 112
    “Ah! Miss Joyce! Forgive me. I see now that it is you, as real and substantial as myself. I was confounded briefly by your presence, having heard that you had died last year, in nineteen eighty-one. Upon reflection, though, I realize that you are no doubt a victim of the chronic timelessness that seems to obtain in this institution, as am I myself. You are most certainly neither a ghoul nor an ifrit, such as the awful throng that currently pursue me.”

    • “Ah!

    • Kiss Chayce!

      • “Kiss” – “Miss”, “kiss”.
      • “Chayce” – “Joyce”, “chase”. Possibly “(Edgar) Cayce“.
    • Forgruff me.

      • “Forgruff” – “Forgive”, “for gruff”.
    • I saneow thatitties you, azrael undaze sotstantial as myshelf.

      • “saneow” – “See now”, “sane ow”.
      • “thatitties” – “That it is”, “tha” (Scottish Gaelic “there are”) “titties”.
      • “azrael” – “As real”, “Azrael” (Angel of God).
      • “undaze” – “And as”, “un-daze”.
      • “sotstantial” – “Substantial”, “sot” (drunk).
      • “myshelf” – “Myself”, “my shelf”.
    • I was confrownded b’liefly by your prosehence, hawing bhird dateyou had dayed list year, in nighturn fatey-one.

      • “confrownded” – “Confounded”, “con frown dead”.
      • “b’liefly” – “Briefly”, “belief lie”.
      • “prosehence” – “Presence”, “prose hence”.
      • “hawing” – “Having”, “hawing” (as in “hemming and hawing”).
      • “bhird” – “Heard”, “bird” (“a little bird told me”).
      • “dateyou” – “That you”, “date you”.
      • “dayed” – “Died”, “day”.
      • “list” – “Last”, “list”.
      • “nighturn fatey-one” – “Nineteen eighty-one”, “nigh turn (of) fate”, “night urn”.
        • Moore (or Arnold) is mistaken; Lucia died in December 1982.
    • Urpon refluxion, dough, I rolleyes that you err no droubt a vactime of the chronoc turmlessness that somes to abtain in dis instigration, asham I mereself.

      • “Urpon refluxion” – “Upon reflection”, “urp” (burping noise) “reflux” (leaking of stomach acid into the throat).
      • “dough” – “Though”, “dough”.
      • “rolleyes” – “Realize”, “roll eyes”.
      • “err” – “Are”, “err”.
      • “droubt” – “Doubt”, “drought”.
      • “vactime” – “Victim”, “vac(ation) time”, possibly “vacuum”, “vacant”.
      • “chronoc” – “Chronic” (both in the sense of “recurring” and “relating to time), “chrono-“.
      • “turmlessness” – “Timelessness”, “sturm” (German “dazed”).
      • “somes” – “Seems”, “some”.
      • “abtain” – “Obtain”, “abstain”.
      • “dis instigration” – “This institution”, “disintegration”.
      • “asham” – “As am”, “ashamed”.
      • “mereself” – “Myself”, “mere” (only; pond; mirror) “self”.
    • You are mist curtainly nitehere al ghul nor an afrait, serch as the wayfill thwrong that scurreltly persuist me.”

      • “mist curtainly” – “Most certainly”, “curtain (of) mist”.
      • “nitehere” – “Neither”, “night here”.
      • “al ghul” – “A ghoul”, “al ghul” (Arabic “the ghoul”). Possible reference to Batman villain Ra’s al Ghul.
      • “afrait” – “Ifrit” (genie), “afraid”.
      • “serch” – “Such”, search”.
      • “wayfill” – “Awful”, “way fill”.
      • “thwrong” – “Throng”, “wrong”.
      • “scurreltly” – “Currently”, “scurries”, “secretly”, possibly “scurrilous”.
      • “persuist” – “Pursues”, “persist”.
  • Paragraph 113
    Lucia is momentarily bewildered by his obvious contention that this year is nineteen eighty-two, when she herself had thought it to be somewhere between nineteen sixty an the early nineteen seventies, just going by the atmosphere and quality of light. The knowledge that she is to meet with her demise at age seventy-four is not a shock or disappointment to her, since she is increasingly convinced that she has passed away at that age numerous times before and doubts that this time shall ne any worse or better.

    • Lucia is memeantorally bewooldered by his habvious condiction that this yhere is neinbeen latey-too, wenchy hourself hed thaught it to be homewhere retween findteens sexty an’ diurly feminineteen severintease, dust gloing by the glitmosphere and queerlighty o’ lit.

      • “memeantorally” – “Momentarily”, “me mean to rally”, “meme ant orally”.
      • “bewooldered” – “Bewildered”, “be wool” (woolgathering?).
      • “habvious” – “Obvious”, “ha”, “hab” (habit; habitat), possibly “vice”.
      • “condiction” – “Contention”, “condition”, “con diction”.
      • “yhere” – “Year”, “here”.
      • “neinbeen latey-too” – “Nineteen eighty-two”, “nein” (German “no”) “been late I too”.
      • “wenchy” – “When she”, “wench -y”.
      • “hourself” – “Herself”, “hours elf”.
      • “hed” – “Had”, “head”, “he’d”.
      • “thaught” – “Thought”, “haughty”.
      • “homewhere” – “Somewhere”, “home where”.
      • “retween” – “Between”, “re- tween”.
      • “findteens sexty” – “Nineteen sixty”, “find teens sexy”.
      • “an’ diurly” – “And the early”, “diurnally” (daily).
      • “feminineteen severintease” – “Nineteen seventies”, “feminine teen sever in tease”, “feminist”, possibly “severe”, “ease”.
      • “dust” – “Just”, “dust”.
      • “gloing” – “Going”, “glowing”.
      • “glitmosphere” – “Atmosphere”, “glitter”, “grit”.
      • “queerlighty” – “Quality”, “queer light”.
      • “lit” – “Light”, “lit” (literature?).
    • The nowledgible daet she histo met with her demaze at age somethingbe-four is nuttershock or dethappointment to her, sence she is uncrazingly convanced that she has parsed awry at dot age nomoreus chimes befloor handouts thit thus dime sha’ll be any verse or vet’er.

      • “nowledgible” – “Knowledge”, “knowledgeable”, “now legiblea’, possibly “ledge”.
      • “daet” – “That”, “date”.
      • “histo” – “Is to”, “history”.
      • “met” – “Meet”, “met”, possibly “tome”.
      • “demaze” – “Demise”, “the maze”.
      • “somethingbe-four” – “Seventy-four”, “something be”, possibly “before”.
        • If Lucia had died in 1981 (as Arnold mistakenly claimed in the previous paragraph) this would, indeed have been her age. In fact, she was 75.
      • “nuttershock” – “Not a shock”, “nutter” (crazy person).
      • “dethappointment” – “Disappointment”, “death appointment”.
      • “sence” – “Since”, “sense”.
      • “uncrazingly” – “Increasingly”, “un- crazingly”.
      • “convanced” – “Convinced”, “con advanced”.
      • “parsed awry” – “Passed away”, “parsed awry” (misunderstood).
      • “dot age” – “That age”, “dotage” (senility).
      • “nomoreus” – “Numerous”, “no more us”.
      • “chimes” – “Times”, “chimes”.
        • Possible reference to Shakespeare’s Henry IV Part 2, in which Falstaff, reminiscing with some other old men about their youth says “We have heard the chimes at midnight”.
      • “befloor” – “Before”, “be floor”.
      • “handouts” – “And doubts”, “handouts”.
      • “thit thus” – “That this”, “hit thus”.
      • “dime” – “Time”, “dime”.
      • “sha’ll” – “Shall”, “she’ll”.
      • “verse or vet’er” – “Worse or better”, “verse” vet her”.
  • Paragraph 114
    Seeing the anxiety in the man’s eyes at the approaching music, Lucia becomes herself afraid and thinks to ask about the nature of its origins.

    • Seething the panxiety in the mansighs at the uppreaching muzzic, Lucia begums hersilverfrayed and thrinks to arseabout the natsure of its horrorgins.

      • “Seething” – “Seeing”, “seething”, “see thing”.
      • “panxiety” – “Anxiety”, “Pan” (Greek god), “panic”.
      • “mansighs” – “Man’s eyes”, “man sighs”.
      • “uppreaching” – “Approaching”, “reaching up”.
      • “muzzic” – “Music”, “muzzle”, possibly “muezzin”.
      • “begums” – “Becomes”, “be gums”, possibly “by gum” (euphemism for “by god!”).
      • “hersilverfrayed” – “Herself afraid”, “her silver frayed”.
        • Possible reference to “silver cord“, a structure which some occultits claim connects the body to the soul. Possible reference to graying hair.
      • “thrinks” – “Thinks”, “thrinks” (drinks), possibly “the inks”.
      • “arseabout” – “Ask about”, “arse about” (behave clownishly).
      • “natsure” – “Nature”, “not sure”.
      • “horrorgins” – “Origins”, “gin horrors” (evoking delerium tremens).
  • Paragraph 115
    “I am surprised and likewise very much dismayed, Sir Malcolm, to discover that you are pursued by an unholy gathering of supernatural torments. My recent acquaintance Mister Ogden Whitney tells me that this foggy and nocturnal territory is known as The Unknown, although to my ear that sounds highly paradoxical. Would the wild hunt of poltergeists and goblins that is evidently at your foot-heels be responsible for the delirious and rising melody that I hear closing in upon us as we speak?”

    • “I am slurprised and lickwise voury munch dismead, Slur Malchy, to duskover doubtchew are poorsod by an unhooly gannering o’ sippernatural tormentals.

      • “slurprised” – “Surprised”, “slurp rised”.
      • “lickwise” – “Likewise”, “lick wise”.
      • “voury munch” – “Very much”, “devour munch”.
      • “dismead” – “Dismayed”, “this mead”.
      • “Slur Malchy” – “Sir Malcolm”, “slur” “alky” (alcoholic), “malky” (Scottish slang “to assault”).
      • “duskover” – “Discover”, “dusk over” (that is, it is now full night).
      • “doubtchew” – “That you”, “doubt” “chew” (both in the sense of “masticate” and “consider”).
      • “poorsod” – “Pursued”, “poor sod”.
      • “unhooly” – “Unholy”, “hooligan”, possibly “hooly” (archaic “wholly”).
      • “gannering” – “Gathering”, “ganner” (Low German “gander”), suggest??
      • “sippernatural” – “Supernatural”, “sipper”.
      • “tormentals” – “Torments”, “elementals”, “mental (patients)”.
    • My threecent alchquaintance Myster Herbden Popney tales me that this fogly and nichturnall terrortree is nown as The Unnow, alto to me here that senz haili papadoxical.

      • “threecent” – “Recent”, “three cent”.
        • Possible reference to the cheapness of early comic books, though they were never that inexpensive.
        • Obiwanspicoli notes: “Ogden was her third encounter after Clare and Stephen”.
      • “alchquaintance” – “Acquaintance”, “alchemic quaint once”.
      • “Myster Herbden Popney” – “Mister Ogden Whitney”, “mysterious Herbie Popnecker”.
      • “tales” – “Tells”, “tales”.
      • “fogly” – “Foggy”, “ugly”. Possibly “fugly” (fucking ugly).
      • “nichturnall” – “Nocturnal”, “nicht” (German “night”) “urn all”.
      • “terrortree” – “Territory”, “terror tree”.
      • “nown” – “Known”, “noun”, “now”.
      • “The Unnow” – “The Unknown”, “un- now”.
      • “alto” – “Although”, “alto” (higher than a tenor, lower than a soprano).
      • “me here” – “My ear”, “me here”.
      • “senz” – “Sounds”, “sense”, “sans” (without).
      • “haili” – “Highly”, “hail I”.
      • “papadoxical” – “Paradoxical”, “papa doxie”. Possible reference to “Papa Doc” Duvalier.
        • The paradox is that their location is simultaneously “known (as)” and “unknown”.
  • Page 910
    • Woad the weild haunt of portergeists and gabblins that is everdauntly at your booz-heells beery spensible further delircious and razing malody that I fhear cluesign innerpinners as wee sqeak?”

      • “Woad” – “Would”, “woad” (type of plant; blue dye made from that plant, associated with the Picts).
      • “weild haunt” – “Wild hunt” (mythological motif involving supernatural hunters), “wield haunt”.
      • “portergeists” – “Poltergeists”, “porter” (in this context, probably the alcoholic beverage).
      • “gabblins” – “Goblins”, “gabbling” (babbling).
      • “everdauntly” – “Evidently”, “ever daunting”. Possibly “daintily”.
      • “booz-heells” – “Boot heels”, “booze hell”.
      • “beery spensible” – “Be responsible”, “beery” “Spenser” (Edmund Spenser (1553-1599), author of The Faerie Queene).
      • “further” – “For the”, “further”. Possibly “fuhrer” – in From Hell, Moore drew a direct parallel between Adolf Hitler and a painting of The Wild Hunt.

        The Wild Hunt by Franz Stuck
        The Wild Hunt by Franz Stuck
      • “delircious” – “Delirious”, “delicious”.
      • “razing” – “Rising”, “razing”.
      • “malody” – “Melody”, “malodorous”.
      • “fhear” – “Hear”, “fear”.
      • “cluesign” – “Closing”, “clue sign”.
      • “innerpinners” – “In upon us”, “inner pinners”.
      • “wee sqeak” – “We speak”, “wee squeak” (small sound of fear).
  • Paragraph 116
    Sir Malcom nods his thinning head impatiently, is peering nervously into the blackness that surrounds him and Lucia.

    • Sour Milkem knods his thornning heed i’mpatiently, eyespearing nearvoicely into the blanckness that surrends him and Lookhere.

      • “Sour Milkem” – “Sir Malcolm”, “sour milk”, “milk them”.
      • “knods” – “Nods”, “knob”.
      • “”thornning heed” – “Thinning head”, “thorn heed”.
      • “i’mpatiently” – “Impatiently”, “I’m patient (lie)”, possibly “inpatient”.
      • “eyespearing” – “Is peering”, “eye spearing”.
      • “nearvoicely” – “Nervously”, “near voice (lie)”.
      • “blanckness” – “Blackness”, “blankness”.
      • “surrends” – “Surrounds”, “surrenders”.
      • “Lookhere” – “Lucia”, “look here”.
  • Paragraph 117
    To bedevil me, they play a ghastly and discordant parody of my own greatest work, my Tam O’Shanter. I adapted musically the verse of Robby Burns, his nightmare poem of a drunken highlander chased by a horde of fiends and harmful spirits, only to belatedly discover it was my own story to which I’d composed a musical accompaniment. As you might be aware, I was considered once for a position as Director of the music of her Majesty the Queen, as were my contemporaries Richard Arnell, Tony as we nicknamed him, and Malcolm Williamson. I was disqualified for my incessant drinking and occasional insanity, while Tony didn’t get the job because of all his many marriages and subsequent divorces. I fear he was too heterosexual for the occupation, as was I myself, despite the fact that I am casually ambidextrous. The position went to the entirely homosexual Williamson, whom I suppose possessed the proper inclinations for an upright member of the Royal household.

    • “To badevil me, they ploy a ghoastly and discurdeant paradey of my own gravetest workth, my Sham O’Taunter.

      • “badevil” – “Bedevil”, “bad evil”, possibly “baa devil”.
      • “ploy” – “Play”, “ploy”.
      • “ghoastly” – “Ghastly”, “ghostly”.
      • “discurdeant” – “Discordant”, “discursive” (rambling), “dent”, suggest??.
      • “paradey” – “Parody”, “parade -y”, possibly “paradise”.
      • “gravetest” – “Greatest”, “gravest”, “grave test”.
      • “workth” – “Work”, “worth”.
      • “Sham O’Taunter” – “Tam O’ Shanter”, “sham taunter”.
        • Tam o’ Shanter Overture, Arnold’s Op. 51, was completed in March 1955. See notes at next sentence for more information. A recording of it may be found here.
    • I adoapted museekly deverse of Ribby Bones, his naughtmire pourem of a dramken highblunder chursed by a hurder freends and harmfool spurits, inally to beratedly dus’cover it was my unstarry to which I’d comepissed a muzzycall uncomfymeant.

      • “adoapted” – “Adapted”, “adopted”.
      • “museekly” – “Musically”, “muse seek lie”.
      • “deverse” – “The verse”, “diverse”.
      • “Ribby Bones” – “Robby Burns” (colloquial form of Robert Burns (1759-1796), Scottish poet), “rib bones”.
      • “naughtmire” – “Nightmare”, “naught (but) mire”.
      • “pourem” – “Poem”, “pour them”.
        • Burns’ poem “Tam o’ Shanter” was written in 1790, and its subject matter is as described here.
      • “dramken” – “Drunken”, “dram” (small quantity, often of alcohol) “ken” (knowledge (Scottish dialect)).
      • “highblunder” – “Highlander” (inhabitant of the Scottish Highlands), “high” (drunk) “blunder”.
      • “chursed” – “Chased”, “cursed”, possibly “choosed”.
      • “hurder” – “Horde of”, “herd or”, “hurt her”, possibly “murder”.
      • “freends” – “Fiends”, “friends”, possibly “freaks”.
      • “harmfool” – “Harmful”, “harm (a) fool”.
      • “spurits” – “Spirits” (both in the sense of “ghosts” and “alcohol”), “spur it”.
      • “inally” – “Only”, “in all”, possibly “ally”, “anally”.
      • “beratedly” – “Belatedly”, “berated lie”.
      • “dus’cover” – “Discover”, “dust cover”.
      • “unstarry” – “Own story”, “un- starry”.
      • “comepissed” – “Composed”, “come” “pissed” (slang “drunk”).
      • “muzzycall” – “Musical”, “muzzy” (indistinct (Northern England dialect)) “call”.
      • “uncomfymeant” – “Accompaniment”, “un- comfy meant”.
    • As you night be awhere, I was conceitered wonce for a prostigion as De wricter of themeusic off’er Maddesty the Queer’n, as war my competemporaries Reachhard Arnell, Toney as we knacknymed him, and Malecome Willyhandson.

      • “night” – “Might”, “night”.
      • “awhere” – “Aware”, “a where”.
      • “conceitered” – “Considered”, “conceited”.
      • “wonce” – “Once”, “wince”, “won”.
      • “prostigion” – “Position”, “prestigious”.
      • “De wricter” – “Director”, “the writer”.
        • The actual title of the position was “Master of the Queen’s Music“. The position opened up upon the death of Sir Arthur Bliss in 1975. The candidates and selection process are discussed further below.
      • “themeusic” – “The music”, “theme you sick”.
      • “off’er” – “Of her”, “offer”, “off her”.
      • “Maddesty the Queer’n” – “Majesty the Queen”, “maddest I, the queer one”.
      • “war” – “Were”, “war”.
      • “competemporaries” – “Contemporaries”, “competent”, “temporary”, “competition”.
      • “Reachhard Arnell” – “Richard Arnell”, “reach hard”.
        Richard Arnell
        Richard Arnell
      • “Toney” – “Tony”, “tone -y”.
        • Many sources attest that Arnell was known as “Tony”, but I have been unable to determine when he acquired that nickname.
      • “knacknymed” – “Nicknamed”, “knack (pseudo)nym”.
      • “Malecome Willyhandson” – “Malcolm Williamson”, “male come willy hands-on” (strongly alluding to Williamson’s homosexuality, see below.
        Malcolm Williamson
        Malcolm Williamson
        • Malcolm Williamson (1931-2003), Australian composer. He was Master of the Queen’s Music from 1975 until his death. A source quoted in Wikipedia claims that Williamson’s appointment was due to a need for “cementing the cracks in the Commonwealth”
    • I wash dishwashified for my inplessant drinching and accausional unsameity, while Toney diddl’t git the jab bycase of allismony mirrages and sobsequence rivorces.

      • “wash” – “Was”, “wash” (possibly in the sense of “washed out, failed”).
      • “dishwashified” – “Disqualified”, “dishwasher”.
      • “inplessant” – “Unpleasant”, “I’m pissant” (insignificant), suggest??. Possibly “inple” (Latin “you satisfy”).
      • “drinching” – “Drinking”, “inching”, possibly “drenching”.
      • “accausional” – “Occasional”, “accuse”, “cause”, “acausal”, possibly “delusional”.
      • “unsameity” – “Insanity”, “un- same -ity” (that is, difference from the norm).
        • Arnold appeared to suffer from significant (pre-1975) mental breakdowns in (at least) 1943, 1950, and 1959, so the claim that “occasional insanity” contributed to his not getting the position seems justified.
      • “Toney” – See previous sentence.
      • “diddl’t” – “Didn’t”, “diddle” (music “two consecutive percussive notes”; child slang “penis”; to have sex with) “it”.
      • “git” – “Get”, “git” (contemptible person).
      • “jab” – “Job”, “jab”.
      • “bycase” – “Because”, “by (the) case” (“in great quantities”, originally of alcohol).
      • “allismony mirrages” – “All his many marriages”, “alimony mirages”.
      • “sobsequence” – “Subsequent”, “sob sequence”.
      • “rivorces” – “Divorces”, “reverses” suggest??. Possibly “rivor” (Latin “I am drawn off”).
        • Arnell was married eight times in his life. I have been unable to determine how many of these had ended in divorce prior to 1975.
    • I fearl he was too heherosexual for the coccupation, as was bi mystelth, despiteful o’ the fuct that I am cashyoualley ambidickstrous.

      • “fearl” – “Fear”, “feel”, “earl”.
      • “heherosexual” – “Heterosexual”, “hehe” (laugh sound), “he(-man) hero”.
      • “coccupation” – “Occupation”, “cock”. Possibly “coccyx”.
      • “bi mystelth” – “I myself”, “by myself”, “bi(sexual) my stealth”.
      • “despiteful” – “Despite”, “spiteful”.
      • “fuct” – “Fact”, “fucked”.
      • “cashyoualley” – “Casually”, “cash you alley” (suggestive of meeting a male prostitute in an alley for sex).
      • “ambidickstrous” – “Ambidextrous”, “am bi dicks”.
    • The posituation went to the intearly hum-hosexual Willingson, whom I supphose perzest the priaper uncleanations for a rightup mamber of the Boyall househole.

      • “posituation” – “Position”, “situation” (British “job”).
      • “intearly” – “Entirely”, “in tear(s?) lie”.
      • “hum-hosexual” – “Homosexual”, “ho-hum” (boring).
      • “Willingson” – “Williamson”, “willing son”.
      • “supphose” – “Suppose”, “support hose”.
      • “perzest” – “Possessed”, “persist”, “per zest”.
      • “priaper” – “Proper”, “priapus” (erect penis).
      • “uncleanations” – “Inclinations”, “unclean nations”.
      • “rightup” – “Upright”, “right up (someone’s alley?)”.
      • “mamber” – “Member”, “mam” (suggesting “queen mum”).
      • “Boyall househole” – “Royal household”, “boy all house hole”.
  • Paragraph 118
    After this rejection I spent a considerable time here in Saint Andrew’s Hospital and upon my release made the mistake of drinking regularly at the Crown & Cushion on the Wellingborough Road. The landlord offered me accommodation in a room above the musically unnoted bar, with the incentive of free booze and board, if I might be prevailed upon at times to entertain the clientele with a performance at the pub’s piano. If you can imagine the indignity, I was frequently dragged out of my bed and mad3 to play a medley of appalling songs for the abusive louts as if I were no more than a deranged marathon concert pianist like Mad Marie, if you remember her. Sometimes they’d rough me up if I was uncooperative. That’s where I am at present, sleeping in myndismal room above the inn in nineteen eighty-two, dreaming that I’m pursued like Tam o’ Shanter through the veiled night of my former institution by a mob of ghoulish spirits that are also customers who haunt the Crown and Cushion. Speaking of which, from the nearness of their awful music they are practically upon us. If you will forgive me, I must be upon my way. I wish you better luck than I’ve had in escaping from this seemingly endless darkness. Do give my best wishes to your blind drunk father if you happen to run into him.”

    • “Asterdis drejection I spant a consolerable tame here in Soilt Undy’s Helsportal, and opine my rayless mad the misshape of dunking reckulearly at the Clown & Crushim on the Wellabhorror Rude.

      • “Asterdis” – “After this”, “asterisk”, “aster” (star) “Dis” (city in Hell).
      • “drejection” – “Rejection”, “dejection”.
      • “spant” – “Spent”, “pant”, possibly “pants” (British “underwear”).
      • “consolerable” – “Considerable”, “(un)consolable”, “miserable”.
      • “tame” – “Time”, “tame”.
      • “Soilt Undy’s Helsportal” – “Saint Andrew’s Hospital”, “soiled undies” “Hell’s portal”.
      • “opine” – “Upon”, “opine”, possibly “supine”.
      • “rayless” – “Release”, “ray-less” (suggesting a lack of metaphorical sunshine).
      • “mad” – “Made”, “mad”.
      • “misshape” – “Mistake”, “misshapen”.
      • “dunking” – “Drinking”, “dunking”.
      • “reckulearly” – “Regularly”, “wreck you early”, “reck” (archaic “to think”).
      • “Clown & Crushim” – “Crown & Cushion”, “clown and crush him”.
        The Crown & Cushion
        The Crown & Cushion
        • The Crown & Cushion pub previously appeared in the chapter “Atlantis”, and will appear again in “The Rood in the Wall”. It is a real Northampton pub, located at 276 Wellingborough Road.
      • “Wellabhorror Rude” – “Wellingborough Road”, “we’ll abhor her rude”, “well ab(out?) horror”.
    • The lendlured scoffered me accrummydation in a rheum above the musincholly unnotated bar, with the insanetive of fee blooze and bloarrd, if I night by previled apain at termes to entershame the cryantell with a perforceance at the plub’s payohno.

      • “lendlured” – “Landlord”, “lend lured”. Possible reference to “Lend-Lease” (WWII program of US aid to the Allies).
      • “scoffered” – “Offered”, “scoff”, possibly “coffers”.
      • “accrummydation” – “Accommodation”, “a crummy date”.
      • “rheum” – “Room”, “rheum(atism)”.
      • “musincholly” – “Musically”, “melancholy”.
      • “unnotated” – “Un-noted”, “annotated” (I feel very meta just now).
      • “insanetive” – “Incentive”, “insane”.
      • “fee blooze” – “Free booze”, “fee blues”.
      • “bloarrd” – “Board”, “blowhard”. Possibly “blurry”.
      • “night” – “Might”, “night”.
      • “previled” – “Prevailed”, “reviled”.
      • “apain” – “Upon”, “a pain”.
      • “termes” – “Times”, “terms”.
      • “entershame” – “Entertain”, “enter shame”.
      • “cryantell” – “Clientele”, “cry and tell”.
      • “perforceance” – “Performance”, “perforce dance”.
      • “plub’s” – “Pub’s”, “clubs”.
      • “payohno” – “Piano”, “pay oh no”.
    • Affe you can imanagerie the indognity, I was freakwantly drugged out of my bhead and mode to plea a maddley of upalle’en psongs for the abasive louds as if I wore no mere than a destranged moreathorn concerpt painist like Mem Marie, if you remadder her.

      • “Affe” – “If”, “affe” (German “monkey”). Possibly “ass”, “cafe”.
      • “imanagerie” – “Imagine”, “menagerie”.
      • “indognity” – “Indignity”, “dog night”.
      • “freakwantly” – “Frequently”, “freak want lie”.
      • “drugged” – “Dragged”, “drugged”.
      • “bhead” – “Bed”, “head”.
      • “mode” – “Made”, “mode”.
      • “plea” – “Play”, “plea”.
      • “maddley” – “Medley”, “maddeningly”.
      • “upalle’en” – “Appalling”, “up all evening”.
      • “psongs” – “Songs”, “psalms”.
      • “abasive” – “Abusive”, “abrasive”, possibly “abased”.
      • “louds” – “Louts”, “loud ones”.
      • “wore” – “Were”, “wore”.
      • “no mere” – “No more”, “no mere” (more than just a …).
      • “destranged” – “Deranged”, “estranged”.
      • “moreathorn” – “Marathon”, “more a thorn”.
      • “concerpt painist” – “Concert pianist”, “concept pain-ist” (suggesting a concept artist whose medium is pain itself).
      • “Mem Marie” – “Mad Marie”, “memory”.
        Mad Marie
        Mad Marie
        • “Mad Marie” Ashton previously appeared in the chapter “Hark! The Glad Sound!”
      • “remadder” – “Remember”, “re- madder”.
    • Shametimes they’d trough me up if I was inchaoperative.

      • “Shametimes” – “Sometimes”, “shame times”.
      • “trough” – “Rough”, “trough” (drinking container for animals, actual or metaphorical), possibly “truth”.
      • “inchaoperative” – “Uncooperative”, “in chaos perogative”.
    • Date’s where I am at prissont, seeping in my dus’smell woom aberth the inninninteen hatey-too, drayming that I’m purseowed like Time A’Slanter thrue the viled nicht of my famer instaytuition by a gob of moulish spittres that are aleso clustermers who haunt the Crowd in’ Caution.

      • “Date’s” – “That’s”, “date is”.
      • “prissont” – “Present”, “prisoned”.
      • “seeping” – “Sleeping”, “seeping”.
      • “dus’smell” – “Dismal”, “dust smell”.
      • “woom” – “Room”, “womb”.
      • “aberth” – “Above”, “a berth”, possibly “about”.
      • “inninninteen hatey-too” – “inn in nineteen eighty-two”, “hate you too”.
      • “drayming” – “Dreaming”, “dray” (horse-drawn cart) “ming” (obsolete “to bring together”; British slang “to be foul-smelling”; to speak).
      • “purseowed” – “Pursued”, “purse owed”.
      • “Time A’Slanter” – “Tam o’ Shanter”, “time (is) aslant”.
      • “thrue” – “Through”, “true”.
      • “viled” – “Veiled”, “reviled”.
      • “nicht” – “Night” (in German).
      • “famer” – “Former”, “fame -er”, possibly “farmer”.
      • “instaytuition” – “Institution”, “stay in tuition”.
      • “gob” – “Mob”, “goblin”.
      • “moulish” – “Ghoulish , “mulish” (stubborn).
      • “spittres” – “Spirits”, “spitters”.
      • “aleso” – “Also”, “ale (makes them) so”.
      • “clustermers” – “Customers”, “cluster”.
      • “haunt” – “Inhabit”, in multiple senses.
      • “Crowd in’ Caution” – “Crown & Cushion”, “crowd, incautious”.
    • Spooking of witch, from the hearness of their jawful mugic theo cracktically apawn us.

      • “Spooking” – “Speaking”, “spooking” (frightening; acting as a ghost).
      • “witch” – “Which”, “witch”.
      • “hearness” – “Nearness”, “hear(ing)ness”, possibly “harness”.
      • “jawful” – “Awful”, “jaw full” (probably meant to evoke “snootful” (“a lot of booze to drink”). Possibly “jahwol” (German “yes, sir”), “jawfall” (archaic “lockjaw”).
      • “mugic” – “Music”, “magic”, “mug”.
      • “theo” – “They are”, “theo(logical)”.
      • “cracktically” – “Practically”, “crack tic ally”.
      • “apawn” – “Upon”, “a pawn”.
    • If you will furglove me, I bust me onup why may.

      • “furglove” – “Forgive”, “fur glove” (possibly as a monster costume, or as a sex toy).
      • “bust me” – “Must be”, “bust me” (what the clients of the pub sometimes do to Arnold).
      • “onup” – “Upon”, “on up”.
      • “why may” – “My way”, “why may”, possibly “why me?”.
    • I wish you batter lock than I’vade in escarpering from this simianglee onandong drugness.

      • “batter” – “Better”, “batter” (to beat up).
      • “lock” – “Luck”, “lock”.
      • “I’vade” – “I’ve had”, “evade”, possibly “invade”.
      • “escarpering” – “Escaping”, “scarper” (British slang “to flee”).
      • “simianglee” – “Seemingly”, “simian glee”.
      • “onandong” – “Unending”, “on and on”.
      • “drugness” – “Darkness”, “drug(ged)-ness”.
    • Dew glub my inebriest wishkes to your blund-drink falther if you happyn to run enter him.”

      • “Dew” – “Do”, “dew” (here, a symbol of the morning).
      • “glub” – “Give”, “glub” (a watery sound, here signifying both drinking alcohol and drowning).
      • “inebriest” – “Very best”, “inebriated”.
      • “wishkes” – “Wishes”, “wiskies”.
      • “blund-drink” – “Blind drunk” (this may be the compound word, meaning “exceedingly drunk”, and/or referring to James Joyce’s vision problems), “drink(ing to excess is a) blunder”.
      • “falther” – “Father”, “falter”.
      • “happyn” – “Happen”, “happiness”
      • “enter” – “Into”, “enter”.
  • Paragraph 119
    With this the worse-for-wear musician staggers off amongst the whispering boughs and branches with their luminescent filigree of fungal fairies, at which Lucia takes a step back into the concealing undergrowth. No sooner has she taken this precaution than a terrifying carnival parade of nightmares and grotesques spills noisily into the moonlit glade, beating on drums and crashing cymbals, skirling terrifyingly upon their bagpipes. Watching Them between her parted fingers she can see every imaginable monster, either from mythology or the back-catalog of Universal Studios, as Mister Ogden Whitney had so recently asserted.

    • Wuth thus the worse-for-where unamusician straggers off amonster whysparing bows and blanches with their ruminescent fillygree of fungirl fearies, atwitch Lucia tykes a stub bekinto the coneceiling evergrowth.

      • “Wuth thus” – “With this”, “worth thus”.
      • “worse-for-where” – “Worse-for-wear”, “where”.
      • “unamusician” – “Musician”, “unamused” (possible Queen Victoria reference?).
      • “straggers” – “Staggers”, “stragglers”, possibly “strangers”.
      • “amonster” – “Amongst the”, “a monster”.
      • “whysparing” – “Whispering”, “why sparing”.
        • Possible reference to “Whispering Grass”, the song which features prominently in the chapters “Hark! The Glad Sound!”, “The Trees Don’t Need to Know”, and “The Steps of All Saints”.
      • “bows” – “Boughs”, “bows” (as in “take a bow”; as in “bow and arrow”).
      • “blanches” – “Branches”, “blanches” (turns pale).
      • “ruminescent” – “Luminescent”, “reminiscent”, “ruminating”.
      • “fillygree” – “Filigree”, “filly agree”.
      • “fungirl” – “Fungal”, “fun girl”.
      • “fearies” – “Fairies”, “fear is”.
      • “atwitch” – “At which”, “a twitch”, “witch”.
      • “tykes a stub” – “Takes a step”, “takes a stab”, “tykes stub”.
      • “bekinto” – “Back into”, “beckon to”.
      • “coneceiling” – “Concealing”, “cone ceiling” (evocative of a tree?).
      • “evergrowth” – “Overgrowth”, “ever grows”.
    • No swooner haz she token this precushion than a terraflying carnivorl pirade of mightne’ers and growtusks spoills noxily into the meanlit glide, bleating on dreums and plashing symbals, scareling errorfyingly upain their bogpeeps.

      • “swooner” – “Sooner”, “swoon her”.
      • “haz” – “Has”, “haze”.
      • “token” – “Taken”, “token” (symbol; keepsake; money-substitute; password; seal of authority; many other meanings).
      • “precushion” – “Precaution”, “pre cushion”.
      • “terraflying” – “Terrifying”, “terra” (earth) “flying”.
      • “carnivorl” – “Carnival”, “carnivore”.
      • “pirade” – “Parade”, “tirade”, “pirate”.
      • “mightne’ers” – “Nightmares”, “might never is”, possibly “mutineers”.
      • “growtusks” – “Grotesques”, “grow tusks”.
      • “spoills” – “Spills”, “spoils” (ruins; booty).
      • “noxily” – “Noisily”, “noxiously”, “nox” (Latin “night’).
      • “meanlit” – “Moonlit”, “mean” “lit” (slang “drunk”).
      • “glide” – “Glade”, “glide”.
      • “bleating” – “Beating”, “bleating” (sheep sounds).
      • “dreums” – “Drums”, “rheums” (colds).
      • “plashing symbals” – “Crashing cymbals”, “clashing symbols” (again, descriptive of this entire chapter), “splashing”.
      • “scareling” – “Skirling” (making a shrill sound, usually in reference to bagpipes), “scaring”.
      • “errorfyingly” – “Terrifyingly”, “error”.
      • “upain” – “Upon”, “you (are in) pain”.
      • “bogpeeps” – “Bagpipes”, “bog peeps” (frog noises?).
  • Page 911
    • Wadging them betrem her peerded thingers see ban shee fevery imanigable moonsteer, ether form mythallergy or the black-catalike o’ U’llneversell Stoogios, as Messter Ogowonden Whynet has so resently asshurted.

      • “Wadging” – “Watching”, “wedging”. Possibly “wadge” (Ulster “thick slice of bread”).
      • “betrem” – “Between”, “be trem(bling)”.
      • “peerded” – “Parted”, “peer (at the) dead”.
      • “thingers” – “Fingers”, “things/monsters”.
      • “see ban shee” – “She can see”, “see banshee”.
      • “fevery” – “Every”, “feverish”.
      • “imanigable” – “Imaginable”, “mangle”, “I man I gable”.
      • “moonsteer” – “Monster”, “moon steer” (navigating by moonlight, or lunar cattle).
      • “ether” – “Either”, “ether”.
      • “form” – “From”, “form”.
      • “mythallergy” – “Mythology”, “myth allergy”.
      • “black-catalike” – “Back-catalog”, “black cat alike”.
        • The Black Cat (1934) was a Universal Studios horror film starring Béla Lugosi and Boris Karloff.
      • “U’llneversell Stoogios” – “Universal Studios”, “You’ll never sell, stooges” (a commentary on the mercenary financial practices of Hollywood movie studios).
        • Universal Studios had great success with horror films in the 1930s, including the most iconic movie versions of Dracula and Frankenstein.
      • “Messter Ogowonden Whynet” – “Mister Ogden Whitney”, “mess to” “Oh, go on then” “Why not?”.
      • “resently” – “Recently”, “resent(full)y”.
      • “asshurted” – “Assured”, “asshurt” (slang “offended”).
  • Paragraph 120
    There in the antic procession of the doomed are night-hags, succubi and werewolfs. There are gremlins, barrow-wights and creatures from the black lagoon, all clattering and bellowing on their instruments as they run shrieking through the spinney in the wake of the departed Malcolm Arnold. All of the assembled sports of nature and monstrosities, though they have double craniums lolling on their threadbare shoulders or are giant earthworms from the waist down, are apparently intoxicated and are dressed in modern casual-wear, in jeans and training-shoes, the uniform of the saloon bar. Some of them, she notices, are whistling that which is a familiar refrain associated with the fuhrer having but a single testicle. Trotting behind the hideous parade upon account of his much shorter legs there is an obviously plastered dwarf, who inexplicably exclaims ‘All hands on deck’ repeatedly as he ran scampering after his departing fellow bad dreams, until once more Lucoa is alone there in the shadowy and silent grove.

    • Dire in the antiq procression o’ the doomned are night-hugs, suckuboys and warewilfs.

      • “Dire” – “There”, “dire” (ill-boding; urgent; possible allusion to “dire wolf” and similarly-named dangerous animals).
      • “antiq” – “Antic” (grotesque, absurd), “antique”.
      • “procression” – “Procession”, “procreation”.
      • “doomned” – “Damned”, “doomed”.
      • “night-hugs” – “Night-hags” (name applied to various folkloric demons), “hugs”.
      • “suckuboys” – “Succubi”, “suck you boys”.
      • “warewilfs” – “Werewolves”, “beware people named Wilfred”.
    • There are crimlins, beerow-wights and screatures from the back legroom, all glattering and b’llowing on their unstruments as they ruin shrecking through the spinny inny wake upf the deephearted Maykhim Armhold.

      • “crimlins” – “Gremlins”, “criminals”
      • “beerow-wights” – “Barrow-wights” (wraith-like creatures from Tolkien), “beer ow” “wight” (archaic “person”; poetic “ghost”; “archaic “brave, strong”).

        Creature From the Black Lagoon
        Creature From the Black Lagoon
      • “screatures from the back legroom” – “Creatures from the Black Lagoon” (amphibious humanoids that first appeared in The Creature From the Black Lagoon (1954)), “screech”, “sea creature”, “leg room”.
        • Moore used the Creature From the Black Lagoon in the LoEG spinoff River of Ghosts.
      • “glattering” – “Clattering”, “glittering”.
      • “b’llowing” – “Bellowing”, “blowing”, “below-ing”, possibly “lowing” (making cow noises).
      • “unstruments” – “Instruments”, “unstrung”.
      • “ruin” – “Run”, “ruin”.
      • “shrecking” – “Shrieking”, “(Max) Schreck” (German actor best known for playing Count Orlock in Nosferatu (1922)).
      • “spinny” – “Spinney” (small wood), “spinning”.
      • “inny” – “In the”, “inwards”.
      • “wake upf” – “Wake of”, “wake up!”.
      • “deephearted” – “Departed”, “deep-hearted” (very emotional?).
      • “Maykhim Armhold” – “Malcolm Arnold”, “make him (with an) arm hold”, “may Kim”.
    • Mallady asshambled spurts o’ nichture and manstressities, though they have debble crowniums lulling on their headbare shudders or are gyrant birthworms from the ways down, are abbarently untaxicatered and are drossed immodern cashill-wear, in jeanius and shaining-troos, the gooniform o’ the salone bor.

      • “Mallady” – “All of the”, “malady” (illness).
      • “asshambled” – “Assembled”, “ass handled”, “as shambled”.
      • “spurts o’ nichture” – “Sport of nature” (individuals who are abnormal), “spurts” (of semen?) “nicht” (German “night”) “your”.
      • “manstressities” – “Monstrosities”, “man stress I ties”, possible allusion to “dress” or “titties”, suggesting (in association with “man”) a degree of transphobia.
      • “debble” – “Double”, “devil”, possibly “dabble”.
      • “crowniums” – “Craniums”, “crown”.
      • “lulling” – “Lolling”, “lulling”.
      • “headbare shudders” – “Threadbare shoulders”, “head bare shudders”.
        • There’s a joke here contrasting the extra head of “double craniums” with the no-head-at-all of “head bare”.
      • “gyrant birthworms” – “Giant earthworms”, “gyrating” “birth”.
      • “ways down” – “Waist down”, “ways down” (a considerable vertical distance; manners of descent (physical or moral)).
      • “abbarently” – “Apparently”, “aberrant”, possibly “a barren lie”.
      • “untaxicatered” – “Intoxicated”, “in taxi catered”, “un- taxonomized” (nameless, uncategorized).
      • “drossed” – “Dressed”, “dross”.
      • “immodern” – “In modern”, “immodest”.
      • “cashill-wear” – “Casual-wear”, “cash ill wear” (inexpensive clothing).
      • “in jeanius” – “In jeans”, “ingenious”.
      • “shaining-troos” – “Training shoes” (sneakers), “shining” “trews” (trousers), possibly “true”, “through”.
        • How creatures who (some of them) have wormlike lower bodies manage to wear jeans and sneakers is left as an exercise for the reader.
      • “gooniform” – “Uniform”, “goon” (thug; possible references to Alice the Goon from Popeye and to The Goon Show).
      • “salone bor” – “Saloon bar”, “alone bore(d)”, “salon”, “boar”.
    • Slummer dum, she nightysees, are whasailing that whitches afamiliar refraime massociated with the furor halving but a singill jesticle.

      • “Slummer” – “Some of”, “slumming”, possibly “summer”.
      • “dum” – “Them”, “dumb”.
      • “nightysees” – “Notices”, “nighty” (nightgown) “sees”.
      • “whasailing” – “Whistling”, “wassailing” (reveling; singing carols), “what sailing”.
      • “whitches” – “Which is”, “witches”.
      • “afamiliar” – “A familiar”, “a-familiar” (unfamiliar), “familiar” also in the sense of a witch’s magical companion animal.
      • “refraime” – “Refrain”, “re-frame”.
      • “massociated” – “Associated”, “mass” (matter; large amount; the sacrament of the Eucharist).
      • “furor” – “Fuhrer” (title of Adolf Hitler), “furor”.
      • “halving” – “Having”, “halving”.
      • “singill jesticle” – “Single testicle”, “sing ill small jest”, possibly “sin gill”, “icicle”, “tickle”.
    • Trottling behide the pideous pariahde upin accrunt o’ his mach sorter lags there is a bibviously plustired dwart, who imixplacably excreams ‘All haunds und heck’ repisstedly as Iran scamp-ring evter his disparting follew bed sdreams, hauntil whencemare Lucia is alune dare in the shuddowy and sighlent groave.

      • “Trottling” – “Trotting”, “throttling”.
      • “behide” – “Behind”, “be hide” (to conceal; skin of an animal), “beside”.
      • “pideous” – “Hideous”, “piteous”.
      • “pariahde” – “Parade”, “pariah”.
      • “upin” – “Upon”, “you pin”, “up in”.
      • “accrunt” – “Account”, “ack” (expression of disgust) “runt”.
      • “mach” – “Much”, “mach” (measure of the speed of sound), “march).
      • “sorter” – “Shorter”, “sort of”, “sorter”.
      • “lags” – “Legs”, “lags”.
      • “bibviously” – “Obviously”, “bibulous” (given to drinking).
      • “plustired” – “Plastered” (very drunk), “plus tired”.
      • “dwart” – “Dwarf”, “dart”, “wart”.
      • “imixplacably” – “Inexplicably”, “I mix peaceably”, “implacably”.
      • “excreams” – “Exclaims”, “ex creams”, “screams”.
      • “All haunds und heck” – “All hands on deck” (naval order indicating an emergency requiring everyone to help), “hounds” “und” (German “and”) “heck”, “haunches under”.
      • “repisstedly” – “Repeatedly”, “pissed” (very drunk).
      • “Iran” – “He ran”, “Iran” (Middle East country, significance suggest??).
      • “scamp-ring” – “Scampering”, “scamp” (mischievous person) “ring”.
      • “evter” – “After”, “ever”.
      • “disparting” – “Departing”, “Dis” (city in Hell) “parting”.
      • “follew” – “Fellow”, “follow”.
      • “bed sdreams” – “Bad dreams”, “bed screams”.
      • “hauntil” – “Until”, “haunt ill”.
      • “whencemare” – “Once more”, “whence” (from where) “(night)mare”.
      • “alune” – “Alone”, “a lune” (obsolete “fit of lunacy”; French “moon”).
      • “dare” – “There”, “dare”.
      • “shuddowy” – “Shadowy”, “shudder”.
      • “sighlent” – “Silent”, “sigh lent”.
      • “groave” – “Grove”, “grave”, “silent as the grave”.

Forward to Section 8 – Institutionalized.