RtB section 5 – J. K. Stephen

Up to “Round the Bend”.

Back to Section 4 – Chaplin films and dark days.

In which Lucia meets a threatening figure who may be J. K. Stephen, or possibly Jack the Ripper!

Significant characters and themes in this section:

J. K. Stephen
J. K. Stephen
  • James Kenneth (“Jem”) Stephen (1859-1892) was an English poet and tutor to Prince Albert Victor. He appears to have suffered from bi-polar disorder, possibly exacerbated by a head injury in 1886 or 1887. He was eventually committed to St Andrews Hospital, where he died. In 1972, Michael Harrison first suggested him as a Ripper suspect, on fairly flimsy evidence. The portrait that Moore draws here appears to be largely drawn from Ripperologist sources, and is arguably unfair in many respects. Of course, this is rather mitigated by the reveal of this “Stephen”‘s status as not exactly real.
  • Moore's From Hell
    Moore’s From Hell

    Jack the Ripper“, the famous serial killer of 1888. Moore wrote extensively about this subject in his book From Hell, and Stephen’s status as a (minor) Ripper suspect gives Moore an excuse to play with a lot of the knowledge he picked up in the previous project. “Jem” Stephen appears briefly in chapters eight, nine, and both appendices of From Hell, though he is not identified as having any strong connection to the Ripper.

  • James Joyce (1882-1941) was an extremely famous writer and Lucia Joyce’s father.
  • The River Liffey is a river in Ireland which, in Finnegans Wake, is referred to many times, and is metaphorically linked to the female protagonist (who is, in some senses, Lucia).
  • World mythology, especially Irish, Greek, Roman, Norse, and Egyptian.
  • Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass by Lewis Carroll, classic children’s books whose themes include childhood, madness, wordplay, and doubled characters.
    • In a 2009 interview, Moore stated: “There are also references to Alice in Wonderland, almost like a reprise to Lost Girls. But that’s because James Joyce identified his daughter with Lewis Carroll’s Alice – Lucia is almost an anagram of Alice.”
    • Page 903 (continued)
    • Paragraph 73
      As the miserable occasion flashes inadvertently across her mind, Lucia feels her blood run cold. approaching her through the dark and moon-gilded spinney she can hear the yapping of her most unspeakable and horrid nightmare. Even more ominously, alongside the soft padding of its unnerving paws Lucia hears the measured tread of an accompanying adult gentleman, perhaps the little monster’s owner. Her heart hammering, she is attempting to sit up while dragging down her dress hem to un-reveal a recently plowed furrow when a sinister young man in a top hate and long Victoroan topcoat steps into the clearing. At his heels, although she knows it cannot possibly be real, there trots a small … no. No. There trots the small white dog.

      • As the missorrible occlasion flushes innardvertently a’course her mend, Lucia feers her sang run cold.

        • “missorrible” – “Miserable”, “miss horrible”.
        • “occlasion” – “Occasion”, “occlusion” (blocking of a view)
        • “flushes” – “Flashes”, “flushes”.
        • “innardvertently” – “Inadvertently”, “innards verdantly”.
        • “a’course” – “Across”, “of course”.
        • “mend” – “Mind”, “mend”.
        • “feers” – “Feels”, “fears”.
        • “sang” – “Blood” (in French), “sang”.
      • Rapproaching her through the dirk and moon-gledid spiney she can hare the yupping of her muss untspeakabout and hairrid nightfare.

        • “Rapproaching” – “Approaching”, “reproaching”, possibly “rapprochement”.
        • “dirk” – “Dark”, “dirk”.
        • “moon-gledid” – “Moon-gilded”, “glade”, “glad id”. Possibly “gelid” (cold), “glede” (ember; type of bird of prey).
        • “spiney” – “Spinney” (small wood), “spiny”.
        • “hare” – “Hear”, “hare” (in context, notable for being a prey animal, and easily scared).
        • “yupping” – “Yapping”, “yup” (yes). Possibly “yuppie”.
        • “muss” – “Most”, “muss”, “must”.
        • “untspeakabout” – “Unspeakable”, “can’t speak about”, “cunt”.
        • “hairrid” – “Horrid”, “hair rid”.
        • “nightfare” – “Nightmare”, “night fare”.
          • As noted in the previous section, Moore is being mysterious at least partially because the source of this idea is pretty mysterious itself. Shloss, chapter 8: “When [Lucia] was in emotional trouble in 1934, she hinted to her companion, Cary Baynes, that something sinister had happened to her, and she spoke of a little white dog”. Shloss, chapter 10 (quoting Baynes): “I noticed at the time that she laughed in a significant way when she was telling about the dog, as if a good deal was going on in her mind which she was not saying.” The word “epicide” in the previous section perhaps suggests the murder of a harmless animal, though only weakly. In this section Moore clearly suggests at least one incident of Lucia engaging in bestiality.
      • Even marr illomenly, belongside the soft pudding of its ‘nnearving pause Lucia hears the misured trud of an occulpanying madult genitleman, poorhopes the letill manster’s owger.

        • “marr” – “More”, “mar”, “marry”.
        • “illomenly” – “Ominously”, “ill-omened-ly”, “ill O manly”.
        • “belongside” – “Alongside”, “belong side”.
        • “pudding” – “Padding”, “pudding” (something incongruously unthreatening in context).
        • “‘nnearving” – “Unnerving”, “inner ear thing”, suggest??
        • “pause” – “Paws”, “pause”.
        • “misured” – “Measured”, “misused”, “miser”, possibly “insured”.
        • “trud” – “Tread”, “turd”.
        • “occulpanying” – “Accompanying”, “occult playing”, “occupying”, possibly “culpable”.
        • “madult” – “Adult”, “mad ult(imate)”, “ma dolt”.
        • “genitleman” – “Gentleman”, “genital man”.
        • “poorhopes” – “Perhaps”, “poor hopes”. Possibly “Pooh” (another undercutting of the threat).
        • “letill” – “Little”, “let ill”, possibly “le till”.
        • “manster’s” – “Monster’s”, “man stirs”.
        • “owger” – “Owner”, “auger” (drill). Possibly “dowager”.
          • According to Shloss, the dog was owned by Waldo Peirce. This is not, however, who is approaching…
      • Hear hert harmmering, she is intempding to skit up while ragging down her dress-ahem to unreveil a recantly plighed fur-row when a sinasttire yhung man in a top hate and long Fictorian stopquote staps into the quearing.

        • “Hear hert” – “Her heart”, “hear her”, “hurt”, “hart”.
        • “harmmering” – “Hammering”, “harm me ring” (possibly reflecting Lucia’s conflicting attitudes towards marriage?).
        • “intempding” – “Attempting”, “intending”, “in” “temp” (time) “ding” (harm).
        • “skit up” – “Sit up”, “scoot up”, “skirt”, “skit”.
        • “ragging” – “Dragging”, “ragged”, “raging”, possibly “ragging (on)” (making fun of).
        • “dress-ahem” – “Dress hem”, “ahem” (sound indicating an embarrassing situation — such as having one’s dress up).
        • “unreveil” – “Un-reveal” (cover), “unravel”, “re-unveil”.
        • “recantly” – “Recently”, “recant lie”.
        • “plighed” – “Ploughed” (metaphorically “fucked”), “plied”, “plight”.
        • “fur-row” – “Furrow” (metaphorically “vagina”), “fur row” (ditto).
        • “sinasttire” – “Sinister”, “sins attire” (The state of Lucia’s clothing reveals her “sins” with Clare). Possibly Fred “Astaire” (American dancer (1899-1987) who often wore a top hat).
        • “yhung” – “Young”, “y(ou are) hung” (sexually well-endowed).
        • “top hate” – “Top hat”, “to hate”.
        • “Fictorian” – “Victorian”, “fictional” (more foreshadowing about the lack of real threat here).
        • “stopquote” – “Topcoat”, “stop quote”.

          Victorian gentlemen in topcoats and top hats.
          Victorian gentlemen in topcoats and top hats.
        • “staps” – “Steps”, “taps” (another possible association with Fred Astaire), possibly “stops”, “stamps”.
        • “quearing” – “Clearing”, “queering”, possibly “quean” (archaic “whore”).
      • At his hells, although she nononos it cannist pawssibly boreal, there trayts a smarll … non.

        • “hells” – “Heels”, “hells”. Possibly “shells”.
        • “nononos” – “Knows”, “no no no” (frequently said in horror stories by those confronted by monsters).
        • “cannist” – “Cannot”, “can it?”, “canister” (of film?), “cannista” (Italian “angler”).
        • “pawssibly” – “Possibly”, “paws” (possessed by a dog; gropes a woman) “sibling”.
        • “boreal” – “Be real”, “boreal” (relating to the north), “bore all”.
        • “trayts” – “Trots”, “trays”, “betrays”, “traits”, “retreats”.
        • “smarll” – “Small”, “smart”, “snarl”.
        • “non” – “No” (in French).
      • Nine.

        • “Nine” – “No” (in German, “Nein”), “nine”.
      • There trods the smeall wight dagg.

        • “trods” – “Trots”, “treads”, “trod (upon?)”, possibly “rods”.
        • “smeall” – “Small”, “smell”, “smear”.
        • “wight” – “White”, “wight” (person; supernatural entity).
        • “dagg” – “Dog”, “dagger”. Possibly “dagg” (Swedish “dew”).
    • Paragraph 74
      The man is staring at her partly concealed nudity with a cruel and contemptuous smirk upon his merciless thin lips. He watches in amusement as the luminously pearl miniature poodle snuffles in between her lower limbs, attracted by the fondly-recollected scent, while Lucia, shrieking in alarm, attempts to kick the hound away from her and clamber to her feet at the same time. The stranger, whom she does not recognize, sneers callously at her dicomfort as he takes his time in calling his yappy pet to heel. When finally he speaks it is with a high voice that is well-educated albeit arrogant and somehow juvenile, with an affected lisp that strikes the flustered woman as effeminate.

      • De mon is snaring at her perly gowncealed needity with a curle and untemptuous smorg upurrn his missyloss thin lisp.

        • “De mon” – “The man”, “demon”.
        • “snaring” – “Staring”, “snarling”, “(en)snaring”.
        • “perly gowncealed” – “Partly concealed”, “pearly (and) congealed” (describing the spilled sperm), “gown sealed”.
        • “needity” – “Nudity”, “need it”, “needy”.
        • “curle” – “Cruel”, “curl” (curled, sneering lip — or possibly a curled mustache, like a stereotypical Victorian melodrama villain).
        • “untemptuous” – “Contemptuous”, “cunt tempt you us”.
        • “smorg” – “Smirk”, “smug”, “smorgasbord”.
        • “upurrn” – “Upon”, “you purr”.
        • “missyloss” – “Merciless”, “missy loss”.
        • “lisp” – “Lips”, “lisp”.
          • There is a more explicit reference to Stephen speaking with a lisp in the last sentence of this paragraph. I have been unable to find any documentation of Stephen’s voice.
      • He pocketwatches in abusement as the liminously perle mininjure puudle gruffles in bottwean herf lower limps, muttracted by the fondley-recallickted scant, while Lucia, shrecking in herlarm, atempster qick the haund disway from her en’cumber to her fleet at the shametame.

        • “pocketwatches” – “Watches”, “pocketwatch”.
          • Possible reference to the White Rabbit from Alice in Wonderland. (Another undercutting of the threat.)
        • “abusement” – “Amusement”, “abuse meant”. Possibly “basement”.
        • “liminously” – “Luminously”, “liminal”.
        • “perle” – “Pearl” (white), “peril”, suggest??
        • “mininjure” – “Miniature”, “men injure”.
        • “puudle” – “Poodle”, “puddle” (another reference to the spilled sperm).
        • “gruffles” – “Snuffles”, “growls”, “shuffles”.
        • “in bottwean” – “In between”, “botte” (French “boot”; “bunch”; “sex”), “wean”, “butt”.
        • “herf lower limps” – “Her lower limbs”, “her limp flowers”.
        • “muttracted” – “Attracted”, “mutt reacted”.
        • “fondley-recallickted” – “Fondly-recollected”, “fondle I recall lick Ted”.
        • “scant” – “Scent”, “scant”, “scanties” (lacy underwear).
        • “shrecking” – “Shrieking”, “shrecken” (German “to frighten”).
          •   Possible reference to Max Schreck (1879-1936), German actor best known for playing the vampire in Nosferatu (1922).
        • “herlarm” – “Alarm”, “her l(eft) arm”.
        • “atempster” – “Attempts to”, “a tempest”, “a tempter”, “a temp(orary) stir”.
        • “qick” – “Kick”, “quick”.
        • “haund” – “Hound”, “haunt”, “haunches”.
        • “disway” – “Away”, “this way”, “Dis way”, “Di(ana) sway”.
        • “en’cumber” – “And clamber”, “encumber”.
        • “fleet” – “Feet”, “fleet”.
        • “shametame” – “Same time”, “tame shame”.
      • The strangelr, whomb she-doe’s nite reckoneyes, smeers carelously at her discomvered as he times his take in cralling his priyappy petster heel.

        • “strangelr” – “Stranger”, “strangler”, “gel” (girl).
        • “whomb” – “Whom”, “womb”.
        • “she-doe’s” – “She does”, “doe” (female deer).
        • “nite” – “Not”, “night”.
        • “reckoneyes” – “Recognize”, “reckon eyes”.
        • “smeers” – “Sneers”, “smiles”, “smears”.
        • “carelously” – “Callously”, “carelessly”, “care lousy”.
        • “discomvered” – “Discomfort”, “dis-covered”.
        • “times his take” – “Takes his time”, “times his take” (suggestive of deliberate performance).
        • “cralling” – “Calling”, “crawling”.
        • “priyappy” – “Yappy”, “priapic” (phallic; excessively masculine). Possibly “Pripyat” (Ukrainian city abandoned after the Chernobyl disaster).
        • “petster” – “Pet to”, “pester”.
      • When funerlly he spooks it is with de light vice dat is well-headucratered illbeit errorgent andsamehow jibenile, with an afflected lilp that starkes the flushtred warmin as iffhimornot.

        • “funerlly” – “Finally”, “funereally”, “fun early”.
        • “spooks” – “Speaks”, “spooks” (ghosts; frightens).
        • “de light” – “A high”, “delight”.
        • “vice” – “Voice”, “vice”.
        • “dat” – “That”, suggest??
        • “well-headucratered” – “Well-educated”, “head you cratered”.
        • “illbeit” – “Albeit”, “ill bite”.
        • “errorgent” – “Arrogant”, “error gent”.
        • “andsamehow” – “And somehow”, “and same, how?”
        • “jibenile” – “Juvenile”, “jibe” (taunt), “Nile”.
        • “afflected” – “Affected”, “afflicted”.
        • “lilp” – “Lisp”, “lilt”.
        • “starkes” – “Strikes”, “stark”.
        • “flushtred” – “Flustered”, “flush red”.
        • “warmin” – “Women”, “warming”, “war”, “warning”.
        • “iffhimornot” – “Effeminate”, “if him or not” (Is Stephen the Ripper, is this even Stephen?).
    • Paragraph 75
      “Hail, hail Kaphoozelum, the harlot of Jerusalem!”

      • “Hail, hail Konphuzelum, the herlot of Rejoysalem!”

        • “Konphuzelum” – “Kaphoozelum” (see below), “confuse”.
        • “herlot” – “Harlot”, “her lot”.
        • “Rejoysalem” – “Jerusalem”, “rejoice”, “re-joy Salem”.
            • Although Moore suggests, both here and in “ABSOs of Desire”, that J. K. Stephen wrote this line, in fact he seems not to have. The story of Kaphoozelum actually begins with “The Great Comic Songs of Ka-Foozle-Um“, by S. Oxon (identified elsewhere as Samuel Wilberforce, Bishop of Oxford) and Frederick Blume, published in New York in 1866 (when J.K.S. was seven years old). The song is silly and mildly romantic, if racist. However, the folk process quickly produced many pornographic variants. These varied in their wording (and spelling), but the line given multiple times in Jerusalem is a typical version of the first half of the chorus. The only links with J. K. Stephen seem to have emerged from some shockingly bad research on the part of Ripperologist Michael Harrison which subsequently spread to many other sources, eventually reaching Alan Moore. Per Wikipedia, Harrison claims that various mental stresses “provoked Stephen to act out his own poem “Air: Kaphoozelum”, in which the protagonist kills 10 harlots.[18]” There are multiple errors in these claims. Firstly, Stephen did compose and publish a satirical song called “The Littlego“. Beneath the title of “The Littlego” is the notation “(Air: Kaphoozelum)”; this is not a title, but rather an indication that “The Littlego” is meant to be sung to the tune of the already-well-known Kaphoozelum. (This is easily verified by examining other songs from the same book, many of which have the same “(Air: name of well-known song)” notation beneath their titles.) What “The Littlego” is actually about is obscure, but the only “death” in it seems to be that of an abstruse academic concept, not a prostitute. The claim about “kills 10 harlots” can be traced to some variants of the Kaphoozelum song, but even that is a gross misrepresentation. The relevant stanza is:
            • For though he paid his women well,
              This syphilitic spawn of hell,
              Struck down each year and tolled the bell,
              For ten harlots of Jerusalem.

              The key word here is “syphilitic” – in the full context of the poem, it is abundantly clear that these deaths are from disease the fellow spreads, not Ripper-style murders. So even if Stephen had written (some version of) Kaphoozelum, it would hardly connect him to the Ripper.

        • Obiwanspicoli points out: “RejoysalemRe Joyce is a book by Anthony Burgess.  There is also a podcast that focuses on Ulysses by Irish author and broadcaster Frank Delaney called Rejoyce.
  • Paragraph 76
    Composing herself, Lucia discovers that her mounting sense of anger and indignity has overcome her fear. Like Samson with her back against the arch, she answers him defiantly by icily inquiring if she knows him.

    • Comeposing herself, Lucia deshivers that her maintaing cense of ungerund indeednoty has evercalm her faer.

      • “Comeposing” – “Composing”, “come posing”.
      • “deshivers” – “Discovers”, “de- shivers” (that is, ceases to be afraid).
      • “maintaing” – “Mounting”, “maintaining”.
      • “cense” – “Sense”, “censer”, “censor”.
      • “ungerund” – “Anger and”, “un gerund”.
      • “indeednoty” – “Indignity”, “indeed not I”.
      • “evercalm” – “Overcome”, “ever calm”.
      • “faer” – “Fear”, “faerie”.
    • Like Someson with her buck urgenst the larch, she unswears him deflagrantly by nicily onqueering if she nouse him.

      • “Someson” – “Samson”, “some son”.
        • Samson is a Biblical figure from the Book of Judges. While resting against a pillar in a pagan temple, he seized it and tore down the temple, killing all within.
      • “buck” – “Back”, “buck” (multiple meanings, unclear which ones are intended).
      • “urgenst” – “Against”, “urges”, “urgent”.
      • “larch” – “Arch”, “larch” (type of tree).
      • “unswears” – “Answers”, “un- swears”.
      • “deflagrantly” – “Defiantly”, “de- flagrantly”. Possibly “deflagrate” (burn with intense light and heat”, “deflorate”.
      • “nicily” – “Icily”, “nicely”. Possibly “Sicily”.
      • “onqueering” – “Inquiring”, “on queering”.
      • “nouse” – “Knows”, “noose”, “no use”, “nous” (mind; common sense).
  • Paragraph 77
    He attempts a mimicking and sardonic chuckle in reply, like something from a radio mystery-show, but with his lilting tenor voice, it merely sounds ridiculous.

    • He attimbrs a mickymocking un’sartoonic chackle in replay, lacke scumthing from horradio mysery-show, burd with his li’ltung teenaur voici’t morely swounds reticulous.

      • “attimbrs” – “Attempts”, “at timbre”.
      • “mickymocking” – “Mimicking”, “micky” (Irish slang “penis”; Cockney slang “take the mickey” = “take the piss”, “tease”), “mocking”.
      • “un’sartoonic” – “And sardonic”, “un sartorial”, “uncertain”, “cartoony”.
      • “chackle” – “Chuckle”, “hack”, “chackle” (rattle; cackle).
      • “replay” – “Reply”, “replay”.
      • “lacke” – “Like”, “lack”, possibly “lake”.
      • “scumthing” – “Something”, “scum thing”.
      • “horradio” – “A radio”, “horror”.
      • “mysery-show” – “Mystery-show”, “misery”.
        • A reference to the infamous laugh introducing “The Shadow” radio show in the 1930s.
      • “burd” – “But”, “bird”, “turd”.
      • “li’ltung” – “Lilting”, “little tongue”.
      • “teenaur” – “Tenor”, “teenage”, possibly “centaur”.
      • “voici’t” – “Voice, it”, “voici” (French “here”).
      • “morely” – “Merely”, “more lie”, possibly “morel” (type of mushroom).
      • “swounds” – “Sounds”, “wounds”, “swounds” (archaic exclamation, short for “God’s wounds”).
      • “reticulous” – “Ridiculous”, “reticule” (small women’s purse).
        • Again, I have been able to find no description of the historical Stephen’s voice.
  • Page 904
  • Paragraph 78
    “Ho ho! No woman knows me who has lived to tell the tale, but I know you! I know your kind, that haunts the brutal alleyways of every city, every town. You put me in mind of a woman that I met while strolling on the Backs of the River Cam. She was unthinking, dull, devoid of taste or shame or character. I shouldn’t mind if she were done away with, killed or ploughed. She did not seem to serve a useful end and certainly she was not beautiful. But then again, I am reminded when I look at you of other dismal females in another town, another year. In the Whitechapel streets of eighteen-eighty-eight to be precise, when in my leather butcher’s apron I chopped Mary Nichols just as well as any chop-man when he hits his stride. If I don’t cut the udders off, then it would be a miracle , a miracle! Look well upon me, thou pox-ridden hag, and tremble at my name, for I am Jack the Ripper!”

    • “Hor hor!

      • “Hor” – “Ho”, “whore”, “her”.
    • No wareman noose me who whas levd to tael the toll, but I no yew!

      • “wareman” – “Woman”, “ware (for a) man”, “(be)ware”.
      • “noose” – “Knows”, “noose”.
      • “whas” – “Has”, “was”, “whores”, possibly “whistled”.
      • “levd” – “Lived”, “lewd”, possibly “levied”.
      • “tael the toll” – “Tell the tale”, “tael” (Asian unit of currency) “toll” (fee for transit; to ring a bell).
      • “no” – “Know”, “no” (expressing negation of all womankind, repeated in next sentence).
      • “yew” – “You”, “yew (tree)”.
    • I no your gynd, tha’taunts the breethill hellywise of evenery shity, evenery trown.

      • “no” – See previous sentence.
      • “gynd” – “Kind”, “gyno-” (pertaining to women).
      • “tha’taunts” – “That haunts”, “you taunt”.
      • “breethill” – “Brutal”, “breed hill”.
      • “hellywise” – “Alleyways”, “Hell wise”.
      • “evenery” – “Every”, “venery” (pursuit of sexual pleasure). Possibly “even”, “ornery”.
      • “shity” – “City”, “shitty”.
      • “evenery” – See above.
      • “trown” – “Town”, “thrown”. Possibly “trown” (Welsh “we plow”?), “crown”, “trull” (prostitute).
    • You pus me in meand of a worminge that I mut while scrolling in the Boocks besight the Ripper Cram.

      • “pus” – “Put”, “pus”, “pussy” (slang “vagina”). Is it Stephen’s opinion that a woman’s vagina is as disgusting as a pus-filled wound?
      • “meand” – “Mind”, “mean”.
      • “worminge” – “Woman”, “worming” (insinuating?).
      • “mut” – “Met”, “mutt”, possibly “mute”.
      • “scrolling” – “Strolling”, “scroll” (connects with “books”).
      • “Boocks” – “Backs”, “books”.
        • Obiwanspicoli informs us that “The Backs is a beautiful garden-like area that buts against the River Cam.”
        • “In the Backs” is the first-half of a two-part poem “Men and Women” by J. K. Stephen. It is the primary evidence of Stephen’s alleged misogyny, and taken as suggestive by Ripperologists. Several of the following lines are partly or completely taken from it, as will be noted. In the notes to chapter 8 of From Hell, Moore quotes the exact same words from ITB that he adapts here!
      • “besight” – “Beside”, “be sight”.
      • “Ripper Cram” – “River Cam“, “Ripper crime”, “cram”.
    • She was insthinking, trull, de void of teste or shave or chapactor.

      • insthinking” – “Unthinking”, “instinct”.
      • “trull” – “Dull”, “trull” (prostitute).
        • Line 21 of ITB: “And so she strolled her dull, unthinking way;”.
      • de void” – “Devoid”, “the void”.
        • Probable reference to the infamous Cerebus #186, where author Dave Sim first became openly misogynistic, referring to females as black-hole-like “voids“.
      • “teste” – “Taste”, “testes”.
      • “shave” – “Shape”, “shave” (while women may shave parts of their bodies, they have no male beards).
      • “chapactor” – “Character”, “chap actor” (possible euphemism for “penis”).
        • Line 11 of ITB: “Devoid of taste or shape or character;”.
    • I schaden meund if she whor dinnerway with, kulled or plewd.

      • “schaden meund” – “Shouldn’t mind”, “schadenfreude” (joy at another’s sadness).
      • “whor” – “Were”, “whore”.
      • “dinnerway” – “Done away”, “dinner way” (suggesting cannibalism, which the “From hell” letter asserts the Ripper engaged in).
      • “kulled” – “Killed”, “culled”.
      • “plewd” – “Ploughed” (slang “had sex with”; in context, “raped”).
        • Lines 26-27 of ITB: “I did not like her: and I should not mind / If she were done away with, killed, or ploughed.”
    • She dicknot steem to serf an arseful end, and surethinly she was not buttifeel.

      • “dicknot” – “Did not”, “dick not” (that is, “wouldn’t have sex with me”).
      • “steem” – “Seem”, “esteem”. Possibly “steam”.
      • “serf” – “Serve”, “serf” (subservient worker).
      • “arseful” – “Useful”, “arse-ful”.
      • “surethinly” – “Certainly”, “sure thing lie”.
      • “buttifeel” – “Beautiful”, “I feel (her) butt”.
        • Lines 28-29 of ITB (the conclusion): “She did not seem to serve a useful end: / And certainly she was not beautiful.”
    • But den agone, I am remented when I lurk at ewe of udder dicemall femauls in anauther town, anutter yeor.

      • “den” – “Then”, “den” (animal’s home). Possibly “button”.
        • This is the first of several “animal” words in this and the next sentences, referencing the character’s view of women as sub-human.
      • “agone” – “Again”, “I, gone”. Possibly “agon” (conflict), “agony”.
      • “remented” – “Reminded”, “mental” (slang “crazy”).
      • “lurk” – “Look”, “lurk”.
      • “ewe” – “You”, “ewe” (female sheep).
      • “udder” – “Other”, “udder” (“breasts”, usually used in reference to animals).
      • “dicemall” – “Dismal”, “dice small”.
      • “femauls” – “Females”, “maul”.
      • “anauther” – “Another”, “an author”.
      • “anutter” – “Another”, “a nutter” (slang “crazy person”).
      • “yeor” – “Year”, “yore” (archaic “archaic”). Possibly “ye or”, Eeyore” (connecting with “Pooh” in paragraph 75).
    • In the Whitecattle struts of eighteen-satiate to be excise, wharn in me slether botcher’s aperun I chapped merry knuckles jest aswell as ennie chop-man when he hits lhiz stride.

      • “Whitecattle” – “Whitechapel”, “white cattle”.
      • “struts” – “Streets”, “struts” (walks like a prostitute>
      • “eighteen-satiate” – “Eighteen eighty-eight”, “satiate”.
      • “excise” – “Precise”, “excise” (cut out).
      • “wharn in me” – “When in my”, “warning me”.
      • “slether botcher’s aperun” – “Leather butcher’s apron”, “slither” “botcher” (one who makes mistakes) “ape run”.
        • “Leather Apron” was an early name attached to the killer better known as Jack the Ripper, and the name was briefly identified with suspects John Pizer and Joseph Issenshmidt. Leather Apron plays a small role in chapters six through nine of Moore’s From Hell.
      • “chapped” – “Chopped”, “chapped” (acted in a male manner).
      • “merry knuckles” – “Mary Nichols”, “merry knuckles”.
        • Mary Nichols is generally considered to be the first Ripper victim
      • “jest” – “Just”, “jest”.
      • “aswell” – “As well”, “a swell” (dated slang “elegantly dresses person”).
      • “ennie chop-man” – “Any chop-man”, “Annie Chapman” (second Ripper victim).
      • “lhiz stride” – “His stride”, “Liz Stride” (third Ripper victim).
    • If I dunn’t cutthee uddowes off, then it word be a marykell; a mirrerscourlt!

      • “dunn’t” – “Don’t”, “dunnit” (as in “whodunnit”, the reductionist treatment of any mystery story — something which Moore deliberately avoided in From Hell.)
      • “cutthee uddowes” – “Cut the udders”, “Cathy Eddowes” (fourth Ripper victim).
      • “word” – “Would”, “word”.
      • “marykell” – “Miracle”, “Mary Kelly” (fifth Ripper victim).
      • “mirrerscourlt” – “Miracle”, “Miller’s Court” (scene of Mary Kelly’s murder).
        • In a 2009 interview, Moore said: ” I’ve just been in Joycean language writing the exchange between him and Lucia, in which I’ve managed to encode, into this casual conversation, the names of all five canonical Ripper victims, in order, and the addresses where they met their end.” The names, in order, were in the prior two sentences. The addresses are found in the last two sentences of paragraph 80, below.
    • Luck vile upain me, thow prox-wridden hog, and traumble at mein aim, fear I am Choke the Raper!”

      • “Luck” – “Look”, “luck”.
      • “vile” – “Well”, “vile”.
      • “upain” – “Upon”, “you pain”.
      • “thow” – “Thou”, “throw”.
      • “prox-wridden” – “Pox-ridden”, “prox” (slang “prostitute”) “written”.
      • “hog” – “Hag”, “hog”.
      • “traumble” – “Tremble”, “trauma”.
      • “mein aim” – “My name”, “mein” (German “my”) “aim”.
      • “fear” – “For”, “fear”.
      • “Choke the Raper” – “Jack the Ripper“, “choke the raper”.
  • Paragraph 79
    With this he pulls from underneath his sprawling coat an obvious stage-dagger some nine inches long but made out of such poor material that its long blade is sagging, blunt tip drooping like a wilted flower. Unable to contain herself, Lucia laughs, whereupon the phoney cardboard Liston knife flops even further. It is evident that his capacity for murder is a fallacy. Besides, Lucis thinks she has an inkling of his true identity and he is without question not the ghastly spiteful fiend he seems to be. She challenges his penny dreadful posturing, her tones merry with mockery.

    • Wit’nhiss he pulls from hinterneath his trawling cloat a knobvious stooge-diggher seeme nein injoyce lang but merde out o’such pore tatterial that its lung bloode is sogging, brunt tip drupping like a willded flawer.

      • “Wit’nhiss” – “With this”, “wit and hiss”, “witness”.
      • “hinterneath” – “Underneath”, “hinterlands”, “inter heath”.
      • “trawling” – “Sprawling”, “trawling”.
      • “cloat” – “Coat”, “clot”, possibly “clout”.
      • “knobvious” – “Obvious”, “knob” (slang “penis”) “vice”.
      • “stooge-diggher” – “Stage-dagger”, “stooge dig her”.
      • “seeme” – “Some”, “seem”.
      • “nein” – “Nine”, “nein” (German “no”).
      • “injoyce” – “Inches”, “in Joyce”, “enjoys”.
      • “lang” – “Long”, “language”.
      • “merde” – “Made”, “merde” (French “shit”).
      • “pore” – “Poore”, “pore”.
      • “tatterial” – “Material”, “tattered I all”.
      • “lung” – “Long”, “lung”.
      • “bloode” – “Blade”, “blood”.
      • “sogging” – “Sagging”, “soggy”.
      • “brunt” – “Blunt”, “brunt”.
      • “drupping” – “Drooping”, “dropping”.
      • “willded” – “Wilted”, “will dead”.
      • “flawer” – “Flower”, “flaw are”.
    • Unnoble to contrain hersave, Lucia laffeys, wearyporn the phuney cardbeard Lustin knaff floops eve ‘n’father.

      • “Unnoble” – “Unable”, “un- noble”.
      • “contrain” – “Contain”, “constrain”, “con train”.
      • “hersave” – “Herself”, “her save”.
      • “laffeys” – “Laughs”, “River Liffey”.
      • “wearyporn” – “Whereupon”, “weary (of) porn”.
      • “phuney” – “Phoney”, “funny”.
      • “cardbeard” – “Cardboard”, “card beard”.
      • “Lustin knaff” – “Liston knife”, “lusting knave”.
        • The Liston knife was associated with Jack the Ripper in Moore’s From Hell.
      • “eve ‘n’father” – “Even farther”, “Eve and father”.
    • It is evildent that his crapacity for merdre is a phallussy.

      • “evildent” – “Evident”, “evil dent”.
      • “crapacity” – “Capacity”, “crap actor”.
      • “merdre” – “Murder”, “merde” (French “shit”).
      • “phallussy” – “Fallacy”, “phallus pussy”.
    • Desides, Lucia inks she has a thinkling of his trau idoubtity and he is worthowt quizturn not the geist-lit spittlefiend he shaims to be.

      • “Desides” – “Besides”, “decides”.
      • “inks” – “Thinks”, “inks” (writes).
      • “a thinkling” – “An inkling”, “thinking”, “tinkling”.
      • “trau” – “True”, “trauma”.
      • “idoubtity” – “Identity”, “I doubt it”.
      • “worthowt” – “Without”, “worth owl”. Possibly “war thought”.
      • “quizturn” – “Question”, “quiz turn”.
      • “geist-lit” – “Ghastly”, “geist” (German “ghost”) “lit” (illuminated; literature).
      • “spittlefiend” – “Spiteful fiend”, Spitalfields” (the area which included Whitechapel, where the Ripper murders took place).
      • “shaims” – “Seems”, “shames”.
    • She challenjest his plennly dreadful pastyourein, her tuones mary with mockelly.

      • “challenjest” – “Challenges”, “call in jest”.
      • “plennly dreadful” – Penny dreadful” (Victorian era pulp fiction), “plainly dreadful”.
      • “pastyourein” – “Posturing”, “past you’re in” (Lucia does seem to be in the past now).
      • “tuones” – “Tones”, “tunes”.
      • “mary mockelly” – “Merry mockery”, “Mary Kelly” (final Ripper victim, see previous paragraph).
  • Paragraph 80
    “I do not think a weapon such as yours could penetrate a lady unless she were made of paper also. I sense it is the case that you would sooner bed a chap than chop a bawd? It strikes me from your shameless self-quotation that you might be an unpleasant specimen called Jerome K. Stephen, more an arse-end poetaster than an East End predator, for all that the misguided murder-dilettante and slab-happy Ripperologists might have to say about the matter au contraire. You may well be familiar with the Backs beside the glittering Cam, but not with dark back rows and buried streets where luckless girls are borne astride a mightier squire. You ought to take care you don’t get your malheurs caught!”

    • “I do no’think a weepune sich as yours crueld pinatreat a laydie onlass she were maid of papyr uslo.

      • “no’think” – “Not think”, “nothing”.
      • “weepune” – “Weapon”, “wee one”, “weep”, “pun”, “puny”.
      • “sich” – “Such”, “sick”. Possibly “Sickert” (another Ripper suspect).
      • “crueld” – “Could”, “cruel”.
      • “pinatreat” – “Penetrate”, “pin a treat”.
      • “laydie” – “Lady”, “lay die” (which is almost a parody of a lower-class Londoner’s accent when saying “lady”, as heard in not-very-good films about Jack the Ripper).
      • “onlass” – “Unless”, “on lass”.
      • “maid” – “Made”, “maiden”.
      • “papyr uslo” – “Paper also”, “papyrus lo”.
        • Arguably, both Lucia and her assailant are “made of paper”, as they are both characters in Jerusalem.
    • Issenschmidt des crase that you word saner bed a chap than chop a bawd?

      • Issenschmidt” – “I sense that it is” (somewhat strained, in order to fit the name), “Issenschmidt” (a contemporary Ripper suspect, see note about “Leather Apron” in paragraph 78, above).
      • “des crase” – “The case”, “disgrace”.
      • “word” – “Would”, “word”.
      • “saner” – “Sooner”, “saner”.
      • “bed a chap than chop a bawd” – That is, you are a homosexual (which Ripperologists claim to be true of J. K. Stephen), not a lady-killer in either the literal or metaphorical sense. Note that as Lucia herself uses more complex, punning language, Moore performs less and less “Joycean” mutations upon it.
    • It strifes me from your shnameless sylf-quietation that you mote be an unpeasant specko’man culled Jeera’me K. Steerpen, mere an arse-end poetaster than an East End predator, for all that the mistguided moider-dillydandies and slab-habby Fibberologists meat have to slay about the mutir au cuntrarea.

      • “strifes” – “Strikes”, “strife”, possibly “strafes”.
      • “shnameless” – “Shameless”, “nameless” (that is, unattributed).
      • “sylf-quietation” – “Self-quotation”, “sylph” (metaphorically “female”) “quiet -ation” (that is, murder).
      • “mote” – “Might”, “mote” (insignificant speck).
      • “unpeasant” – “Unpleasant”, “un peasant” (not working class).
      • “specko’man” – “Specimen”, “speck of a man”.
      • “culled” – “Called”, “culled” (killed due to being useless or weak, usually of herd animals).
      • “Jeera’me K. Steerpen” – “Jerome K. Stephen”, “jeer at me” “steer pen”.
        • Note that Stephen‘s first name is actually James, not Jerome. This may be an error on Moore or Lucia’s part. Then again, it may be a deliberate slight, perhaps conflating his name with the better-known (and extremely funny) Jerome K. Jerome.
      • “mere” – “More”, “mere”.
      • “arse-end poetaster” – “Arse end” is British slang for “worst part” of something. A “poetaster” is an unskilled poet. Again, as Lucia uses complex language, Moore doesn’t mutate it.
      • “mistguided” – “Misguided”, “mist guided”.
      • “moider-dillydandies” – “Murder-dilettantes”, “moider” (to toil; to muddle; to perplex) “dilly-dally” (to waste time), “dandies” (fops).
      • “slab-habby” – “Slab-happy” (a humorous combination of “slap-happy” (punch drunk) and “(mortuary) slab”.
      • “Fibberologists” – “Ripperologists”, “fibbers” (liars).
        • Moore writes at length about his opinions of various Ripperologists in the second appendix of From Hell, “Dance of the Gull-Catchers”. Most of them come off looking rather ridiculous, himself not excepted.
      • “meat” – “Might”, “meat” (what people are made of).
      • “slay” – “Say”, “slay”.
      • “mutir” – “Matter”, “mutilate”.
      • “au cuntrarea” – “Au contraire” (French “to the contrary”), “cunt area”.
    • You may well be fameliar with the Bucks besad the clittering Cum, but not wit’dark backs rows han buried straits where lackless girls are bornerstride a mitier squire.

      • “fameliar” – “Familiar”, “fame liar”.
      • “Bucks” – “Backs”, (see note about “In the Backs” at paragraph 78, above), “bucks” (young men).
      • “besad” – “Beside”, “be sad”.
      • “clittering” – “Glittering”, “clitoris”, possibly “clattering”.
      • “Cum” – “Cam” (a river next to The Backs), “cum” (ejaculate).
      • “backs rows” – “Back rows” (alleys), “Bucks Row” (street where Mary Nichols’ body was found).
      • “han buried straits” – “And buried streets”, “Hanbury Street” (where Annie Chapman’s body was found).
      • “lackless” – “Luckless”, “lackluster”, possibly “feckless”.
      • “bornerstride” – “Borne astride”, “Berner Street” (where Liz Stride’s body was found).
      • “mitier squire” – “Mightier squire”, “Mitre Square” (where Catherine Eddowes’ body was found).
        • The sense here, as I take it, is that the luckless girls (prostitutes) are “borne astride” (have sex with) a “mightier squire” (a higher-class — and thus more powerful — man who can afford to hire them for sex).
    • You auteur take care you daun’t get you malheurs caught!”

      • “auteur” – “Ought to”, “auteur” (French “author”).
      • “daun’t” – “Don’t”, “daunt”
      • “malheurs caught” – “Malheurs” (French “misfortunes”) “caught”, “Miller’s Court” (where Mary Kelly’s body was found).
        • The sense here seems to be something like “beware lest you fall into misfortune”, but is not entirely clear, possibly due to Moore’s desire to fit in a “Miller’s Court” reading.
        • These two sentences list all five Ripper victim locations, in order, as discussed in the notes for paragraph 78.
  • Paragraph 81
    Lucia’s assailant takes a step away from her, pressing his narrow lips into a puckered sphincter, glaring at her poisonously while the hateful little poodle scuttles back and forth around his ankles in confusion.

    • Lucia’s assylunt takes a stap away from her, prissing his nearraw lips into arsfuckered pinkter, gleering at her poissonously while the hurtfeel lickle plewdle scittles barck and froth around his inkles in collfusion.

      • “assylunt” – “Assailant”, “ass-y lunk”, “ass and cunt”.
      • “stap” – “Step”, “slap”. Possibly “stap” (Scots “to force”).
      • “prissing” – “Pressing”, “prissy” (excessively prim), “pissing”.
      • “nearraw” – “Narrow”, “near raw”.
      • “arsfuckered” – “A puckered”, “arse-fucker”.
      • “pinkter” – “Sphincter”, “pink to”, possibly “Pinkerton” (the Pinkerton Detective Agency having a very minor role in From Hell).
      • “gleering” – “Glaring”, “leering”, possibly “gleeking” (joking; giving an enticing glance).
      • “poissonously” – “Poisonously”, “poisson” (French “fish”) “O us lie”.
      • “hurtfeel” – “Hateful”, “hurt feel(ings)”.
      • “lickle” – “Little”, “lick” (how a dog usually initiates sex), “ick” (expression of disgust).
      • “plewdle” – “Poodle”, “lewd”.
      • “scittles” – “Scuttles”, “skitters”, possibly “skittles” (knocks down).
      • “barck and froth” – “Back and forth”, “bark” (dog noise) “froth” (around a dog’s mouth, indicative of excitement, or possibly rabies).
      • “inkles” – “Ankles”, “inks” (writes), “inkles” (hints).
      • “collfusion” – “Confusion”, “coll” (hug) “fusion, possibly “collie” (type of dog).
  • Paragraph 82
    “Why, how dare you question my veracity, you fishy-smelling harridan? You’re lucky I don’t slit your stringy throat from left to right and sling your guts over your shoulder, as I’ve done so many times before with others of your wretched gender. Your vile sex has spoiled the world since first your harlot mother Eve heeded to the one-eyed serpents and betrayed mankind. If all of the harm that women have done were put in a bundle and rolled into one, Earth would not hold it, the sky could not enfold it. Such masses of evil would puzzle the devil and keep him in fuel while Time’s wheels run!”

    • “Whey, how dour you quiztone my verocity, you flishy-smolling horridun?

      • “Whey” – “Why”, “whey” (probably as in “whey-faced”, coward).
      • “dour” – “Dare”, “dour”.
      • “quiztone” – “Question”, “quiz tone’.
      • “verocity” – “Veracity”, “ferocity”, “velocity”.
      • “flishy-smolling” – “Fishy-smelling” (women, and especially their genitals, are often referred to as fishy-smelling, though this is considered insulting), “flash is moll” (a prostitute is revealing her genitals in public).
      • “horridun” – “Harridan” (vicious old woman), “horrid one”.
    • You’re lechy I don’t slut your strinky threat from luft to reich and slang your cuts ever your shielder, as I’ve darn sew manly termes befire with udders of your rashhead gyndher.

      • “lechy” – “Lucky”, “lecherous”.
      • “slut” – “Slit”, “slut”.
      • “strinky” – “Stringy”, “stinky”.
      • “threat” – “Throat”, “threat”.
      • “luft” – “Left”, “Luft” (German “air”, hence “Luftwaffe” (German airforce, especially in World War 2)).
      • “reich” – “Right”, “Reich” (German “empire”, especially in relation to Hitler’s “Third Reich” in World War 2).
      • “slang” – “Sling”, “slang”, “languages”.
      • “cuts” – “Guts”, “cuts”, possibly “cunts”.
      • “ever” – “Over”, “ever”.
      • “shielder” – “Shoulder”, “shield her”.
        • To cut the throat from left to right and throw the guts over the shoulder is rumored to be a Masonic form of ceremonial execution. Various Ripperologists have connected this to the mutilations performed upon the Ripper’s victims.
      • “darn” – “Done”, “darn” (repair stitching).
      • “sew” – “So”, “sew”.
      • “manly termes” – “Many times”, “manly terms” (which “darn” and “sew” are traditionally not).
      • “befire” – “Before”, “be fire”.
      • “udders” – “Others”, “udders” (breasts, usually used only of animals).
      • “rashhead” – “Wretched”, “rash head”.
      • “gyndher” – “Gender”, “grind her”, “gyn-” (pertaining to women).
    • Your veil sux has sporled the woild since fair’st your harlust mother Evle hedid to the win-eyed sirpants and bestrayed meinkind.

      • “veil” – “Vile”, “veil”.
      • “sux” – “Sex”, “sucks”.
      • “sporled” – “Spoiled”, “spore led”, “sported”.
      • “woild” – “World”, “wild”.
      • “fair’st” – “First”, “fairest” (possibly alluding to the myth of Eris and the Golden Apple, well known to Moore via Illuminatus!).
      • “harlust” – “Harlot”, “her lust”.
      • “Evle” – “Eve”, “evil”.
      • “hedid” – “Heeded”, “he did”.
      • “win-eyed sirpants” – “One-eyed serpents”, “win” “sir pants”.
        • Alluding to the story of Eve and the Serpent in Genesis.
        • One colorful euphemism for penis is “one-eyed trouser snake”.
      • “bestrayed” – “Betrayed”, “be strayed”, possibly “destroyed”.
      • “meinkind” – “Mankind”, “mein” (German “my”) “Kind” (German “child” — Stephen had no children).
  • Page 905
    • If ill o’the harem that wermin have done whore-pet in a burndoll and rulled unter one, Bearth word note howld it, disguy could notunfouled it.

      • This sentence comprises lines one through four of Stephen’s poem “A Thought” (1833).
      • “ill” – “All”, “ill”.
      • “harem” – “Harm”, “harem”
      • “wermin” – “Women”, “we’re men”, “were min(imal)”.
      • “whore-pet” – “Were put”, “whore pet”.
      • “burndoll” – “Bundle”, “burn doll”.
      • “rulled” – “Rolled”, “ruled”, possibly “rutted”.
      • “unter” – “Into”, “under”, “hunter”, “unter” (German “under”, as in the Nazi concept of “untermensch”).
      • “Bearth” – “Earth”, “birth”, possibly “berth”.
      • “word” – “Would”, “word”.
      • “note” – “Not”, “note”.
      • “howld” – “Hold”, “howled”.
      • “disguy” – “The sky”, “this guy”, possibly “disguise”.
      • “notunfouled” – “Not enfold”, “nothing fouled”.
    • Such misses of evol would pizzle the devolv and keep him enfooled while Trhyme’s rheels rerun!”

      • This sentence comprises lines six through eight of “A Thought” (see previous senence).
      • “misses” – “Masses”, “misses”.
      • “evol” – “Evil”, “evolution”, “love” (reversed).
      • “pizzle” – “Puzzle”, “pizzle” (penis of an animal).
      • “devolv” – “Devil”, “devolve”.
      • “enfooled” – “In fuel”, “en- fooled”.
      • “Trhyme’s” – “Time’s”, “rhymes”.
      • “rheels” – “Wheels”, “reels”.
      • “rerun” – “Run”, “rerun”.
  • Paragraph 83
    This only makes her laugh the harder, until she is frightened that she’ll wet herself.

    • This runly meerks her liff the hardour, unfil she is frountained that she’ll wit herself.

      • “runly” – “Only”, “runnily”.
      • “meerks” – “Makes”, “meek”, possibly “meerkat”.
      • “liff” – “Laugh”, “River Liffey”, “live”.
      • “hardour” – “Harder”, “ardor” (passion).
      • “unfil” – “Until”, “un- fill”.
      • “frountained” – “Frightened”, “fountain”.
      • “wit” – “Wet”, “wit”.
  • Paragraph 84
    It’s hardly a surprise you find me fishy, now, when I’m the very spirit of the River Liffey. As for you, sir, you are merely an atrocious poet and infamous woman-hater, not the nemesis of neglect you pretend to be. You’re just the same as all those nasty-minded journalists and masturbators that set out to conjure the Whitechapel phantom in the first place, with their gloatingly sadistic letters to the paper, all their Dear Boss and their Catch-Me-If-You-Can. None of you had even the courage that it takes to murder an inebriate and incapacitated woman, but you sit there and a pen is in one hand and a penis in the other, and you wish you had. You’re more an eJaculator than a Jack. You weren’t the Ripper. You just wish you could have sucked his cock. Who knows? Perhaps you did, or at least if your boyfriend Albert Victor Christian Edward was the maniac that certain parties thought he was, to all intents and purposes, though personally I doubt it. He seemed much too fragile and docile(?) to be Leather Apron, with his later visits to the molly house in Cleveland Street and all the time he spent with you at Cambridge, you and your Apostles practicing your so-called higher sodomy! As for your poetry, it has a lack of loveliness and spirit that is equal to your local man John Dryden, though I’ll admit that you sucked up to monarchy more literally than even he did.

    • “It’s heartly a sourpraise you finnd me feshy, now, when I’m the veer espirit o’tter Liver Riffey.

      • “heartly” – “Hardly”, “heartily”, “heart lie”.
      • “sourpraise” – “Surprise”, “sour praise”.
      • “finnd” – “Find”, “finned”.
      • “feshy” – “Fishy”, “fleshy”, possibly “fetish”.
      • “veer espirit” – “Very spirit”, “veer esprit” (possibly referring to l’esprit d’escalier).
      • “o’tter” – “Of the”, “otter” (amphibious animal that often lives near rivers).
      • “Liver Riffey” – River Liffey” (see note at top of page), “liver Ripper”.
    • Ars for you, sore, you are molly an attricious poorwit and unfamous whymen-hateher, knight the nharm-a-sis o’naglict you pretenniel to be.

      • “Ars” – “As”, “arse”.
      • “sore” – “Sir”, “sore”.
      • “molly” – “Merely”, “molly” (slang “homosexual man”).
      • “attricious” – “Atrocious”, “attribute”. Possibly “attrice” (Italian “actress”).
      • “poorwit” – “Poet”, “poor wit”.
      • “unfamous” – “Infamous”, “un famous” (indeed, Stephen is little known today).
      • “whymen-hateher” – “Woman-hater”, “why men hate her”.
      • “knight” – “Not”, “knight” (probable reference to Stephen Knight, whose book Jack the Ripper: the Final Solution was a major source for Moore’s From Hell).
      • “nharm-a-sis o’naglict” – “nemesis of neglect”, “harm a sis nag licked”, possibly “assassin”.
        The Nemesis of Neglect
        The Nemesis of Neglect
        • “The Nemesis of Neglect” is the title of a political cartoon illustrated by John Tenniel that appeared in Punch on September 29, 1888. The cartoon was used as the frontispiece to chapter five of Moore’s From Hell, also titled “The Nemesis of Neglect”.
      • “pretenniel” – “Pretend”, “Tenniel” (see previous note).
    • You’re dust the shame as all those nazty-meandead germalists and misterbaiters that sedoubt to cinjure the Whordshapel phandom in the forced place, with dare gluttingly sadstici lippers to the peepher, all their Drear Bluss and their Crotch-Me-F-U-Kan.

      • In this sentence, Moore returns to one of the motifs of From Hell: the writing of letters to the newspapers claiming to be from “Jack the Ripper”, but (at least mostly) coming from sources other than the actual killer.
      • “dust” – “Just”, “dust”.
      • “shame” – “Same”, “shame”.
      • nazty-meandead germalists” – “Nasty-minded journalists”, “Nazi mean dead Germans”.
        • In From Hell, Moore portrays a journalist named “Best” as authoring the “Dear Boss” letter (see note on “Dear Boss”, below).
      • misterbaiters” – “Masturbators”, “mister bait”.
        • An anonymous letter-writer is portrayed in the act of masturbating as he writes on page 36 of chapter 9 of From Hell. See also next sentence.
      • “sedoubt” – “Set out”, “sow doubt”.
      • “cinjure” – “Conjure”, “injure”, possibly “sin”.
      • “Whordshapel” – “Whitechapel”, “words shape”.
      • “phandom” – “Phantom”, “fandom”.
      • “forced” – “First”, “forced”.
      • “dare” – “Their”, “dare”.
      • “gluttingly” – “Gloatingly”, “gutting lie”, “gluttony”.
      • “sadstici” – “Sadistic”, “sad sack” (incompetent or unlucky person).
      • “lippers” – “Letters”, “lip person”, “Ripper”.
      • “peepher” – “Paper”, “peep her”.
      • “Drear Bluss” – “Dear Boss”, “dreary blues”. Possibly “bliss”, “buss” (kiss), “blunderbuss”.
        • An alleged Ripper letter addressed “Dear Boss” was received by the Central News Agency on September 27, 1888. This was the first documented use of the name “Jack the Ripper”. In Moore’s From Hell, the letter (and the name) were composed by a journalist named “Best” (chapter 7, pages 38-40).
        • Possible reference to Langston Hughes poem “The Weary Blues“?
      • “Crotch-Me-F-U-Kan” – “Catch-Me-If-You-Can”, “crotch fuck me”.
        • An alleged Ripper letter received by George Lusk (president of the Whitechapel Vigilance Committee) on October 16, 1888, was signed “Catch me when you can Mister Lusk“. The letter was accompanied by half a human kidney. In Moore’s From Hell, the letter is sent by the actual Ripper, as depicted in chapter 9.
    • Ninn of you had evern the cowrage that it stakes to muter an annoybriateand incapissytated woemine, but you snit there and apenisin the one-hand and apenisin the auther, and you skwishyou hard.

      • “Ninn” – “None”, “ninny”, possibly “nine”.
      • “evern” – “Even”, “ever”.
      • “cowrage” – “Courage”, “cow” (derogatory word for woman) “rage”.
      • “stakes” – “Takes”, “stakes”.
      • “muter” – “Murder”, “mutter”, “mute her”.
      • “annoybriateand” – “Inebriated and”, “annoy”.
      • “incapissytated” – “Incapacitated”, “pissy”.
      • “woemine” – “Woman”, “woe mine”.
      • “snit” – “Sit”, “snit” (bad mood).

        A pen is in one hand and a penis in the other
        A pen is in one hand and a penis in the other
      • “apenisin the one-hand and apenisin the auther” – “A pen is in one hand and a penis in the other” (that is, you write while masturbating, as portrayed in From Hell, page 36 of chapter 9), “one-hand” (pornography is often described as “one-handed reading material”), “author”.
      • “skwishyou hard” – “Wish you had”, “squish you hard”.
    • You’re mere a Jeckulater than a Jeck.

      • “mere” – “More”, “mere”.
      • “Jeckulater than a Jeck” – “eJaculator” (masturbator) “than a Jack”, “Jekyll” (and Hyde).
        • Moore attributes Stevenson’s creation of Doctor Jekyll to Jack the Ripper in From Hell, chapter 14, page 15.
    • You worm’t the Rippler.

      • “worm’t” – “Weren’t”, “worm”.
      • “Rippler” – “Ripper”, “rippler” (possibly referring to Moore’s theory, expressed in From Hell, that a significant event can cause ripples both forwards and backwards in time).
    • You jizzt-wash you coit have socked his cack.

      • “jizzt-wash” – “Just wish”, “jizz-washed” (covered in sperm).
      • “coit” – “Could”, “coitus”.
      • “socked” – “Sucked”, “socked” (possible reference to using a sock as a male masturbation aid).
      • “cack” – “Cock”, “cack” (shit; slang “penis”), possibly “cackle”.
    • Who nows?

      • “nows” – “Knows”, “now is”.
    • Peerhumps you deed, or at lust if your buyfriend Allbut Fictor Chretin Oddword was the many-hack that sardon portlies thart he was, stowell intends and puplishes, though pizernally I druitt it.

      • “Peerhumps” – “Perhaps”, “peer humps”.
      • “deed” – “Did”, “deed” (in this context, “sex”).
      • “lust” – “Least”, “lust”.
      • “buyfriend” – “Boyfriend”, “buy friend” (referring to male prostitutes, see next sentence).
        • Obiwanspicoli notes: “Also possibly bi-friend as in bisexual friend.”
      • “Allbut Fictor Chretin Oddword” – “Albert Victor Christian Edward”, “all but fiction cretin odd word”.
        Prince Eddy, 1891
        Prince Eddy, 1891
        • Prince Albert Victor Christian Edward was a grandson of Queen Victoria. J. K. Stephen was his tutor and, some claim, lover. He was first considered as a Ripper suspect in 1962. He appears in From Hell as “Prince Eddy”, where Moore does portray him and Stephen as lovers.
      • “many-hack” – “Maniac”, “many hack”.
      • “sardon” – “Certain”, “sardonic”.
      • “portlies” – “Parties”, “portly”.
      • “thart” – “Thought”, “the art”.
      • “stowell” – “To all”, Stowell” (Ripperologist who accused Eddy in 1970).
      • “intends and puplishes” – “intents and purposes”, “intends to publish”.
      • “pizernally” – “Personally”, “Pizer” (Ripper suspect, see note about Leather Apron in paragraph 78, above).
      • “druitt” – “Doubt”, Druitt” (Ripper suspect, whose framing forms the primary material for chapter 11 of From Hell).
    • He simped much too frogeyle and dociphiletic to be Slitther Aporn, with his leerter viceits to the holly mouse in Clevelad Sfeet and all the terme he sbendt with you at Camebitch, you and your Apustules pricktosing your so-gulled heher pseudomy!

      • “simped” – “Seemed”, “simpered”.
      • “frogeyle” – “Fragile”, “frog-eyed”.
      • “dociphiletic” – “Docile”, “syphilitic”, suggest??
      • “Slitther Aporn” – “Leather Apron” (see note at paragraph 78), “slit her a porn”, “slither upon”.
      • “leerter” – “Later”, “leer to”, “little”.
      • “viceits” – “Visits”, “it’s vice”.
      • “holly mouse” – “Molly house” (male brothel), “holly mouse”, “holy mouth”.
      • “Clevelad Sfeet” – “Cleveland Street”, “cleave lad’s feet”.
        • In 1889, London police raided a male brothel in Cleveland Street. It was rumored that several aristocrats were clients, including Prince Eddy. This raid was depicted in From Hell, chapter 13.
      • “terme” – “Time”, “term” (school period of time).
      • “sbendt” – “Spent”, “bent” (corrupt; British slang “homosexual”).
      • “Camebitch” – Cambridge” (University where Stephen tutored Eddy), “came bitch”.
      • “Apustules” – “Apostles”, “pustules”.
        • The Cambridge Apostles is an intellectual semi-secret society composed primarily of students, founded in 1820. Stephen was a member.
      • “pricktosing” – “Practicing”, “prick” (penis) “tossing” (“tossing off” is slang for masturbtion).
      • “so-gulled” – “So-called”, “gulled” (fooled), “Gull” (in From Hell, the Ripper).
      • “heher pseudomy” – “Higher sodomy”, “he her pseudo my”.
        • The phrase “Higher Sodomy” seems to have become associated with the Apostles in the early 20th century. See this article for more information.
    • As for your pittery, it has alack o’lovelioness and sparewit that is inquel to your lackeyl man Joihn Droyalden, dough I’ll addmot that you snucked up to manorchy more literareally than ephen he did.”

      • “pittery” – “Poetry”, “pottery”, “pity”.
      • “alack” – “A lack”, “alack” (expression of dismay).
      • “lovelioness” – “Loveliness”, “love lioness”.
      • “sparewit” – “Spirit”, “spare wit”.
      • “inquel” – “Equal”, “inquest”, “inkwell”.
      • “lackeyl” – “Local” (see note below), “lackey”.
      • “Joihn Droyalden” – “John Dryden”, “join royal den”.
        • John Dryden (1631-1700) was an influential poet. He was born in Northamptonshire, but spent most of his adult life in London, either of which might be behind the “local man” allusion above. When Charles II was restored to the throne, Dryden wrote several poems uncritically praising him, hence the “sucking-up” commentary below.
      • “dough” – “Though”, “dough” (slang “money”).
      • “addmot” – “Admit”, “add” “(bon) mot” (clever phrase).
      • “snucked up” – “Sucked up”, “snuck up”.
      • “manorchy” – “Monarchy”, “man orgy”.
      • “literareally” – “Literally”, “literarily”, “a liter really”, “light”, “area”.
      • “ephen” – “Even”, “Stephen”, “even-steven” (fair).
  • Paragraph 85
    Flinching at Lucia’s barb, the young rake takes another step back into the nocturnal vegetation while regarding her with mingled hatred and humiliation, his pale cheeks flushed twice as red as hers.

    • Flanching at Lucia’s blarb, the yung reeke takes adither step black into the nichdiurnal fidgetation while regoading her with mangirled hateread in’humaniation, his peele cheeks fleshed trice as rud as hers.

      • “Flanching” – “Flinching”, “blanching”, “flanking”.
      • “blarb” – “Barb”, “blurb”, “blab”.
      • “yung” – “Young”, Jung” (psychiatrist who treated Lucia).
      • “reeke” – “Rake”, “reek”.
      • “adither” – “Another”, “a-dither”.
      • “black” – “Back”, “black”.
      • “nichdiurnal” – “Nocturnal”, “nich” (German “not”) “diurnal”.
      • “fidgetation” – “Vegetation”, “fidget”.
      • “regoading” – “Regarding”, “re- goading”.
      • “mangirled” – “Mingled”, “man girl-ed” (made effeminate?), “mangled”.
      • “hateread” – “Hatred”, “hate read”.
      • “in’humaniation” – “And humiliation”, “inhumane nation”.
      • “peele” – “Pale”, Peel” (creator of “Peel’s Principles of Policing”).
      • “fleshed” – “Flushed”, “flesh”.
      • “trice” – “Twice”, “trice”, “thrice”.
      • “rud” – “Red”, “rude”, “ruddy”.
  • Paragraph 86
    “You have no right to say all that! Though you might think that I am not a danger, you don’t know what I am capable of doing. Why, I kept Vanessa Bell, the cousin of Virginia Woolf, at knifepoint for an afternoon. Besides, if you’re so insolent and unafraid, why did you cower so from my delightful little pet? If you’re so unassailable in all your pride and dignity, why have you summoned us out of this madhouse night to frighten and torment you? Is it not the case that like all women, you know all too well that what I say is true; that with your kind you are an excremental prostitute, a creature who would bare your arse for animals and yet deplores the noble fellow-feeling which may come about between two men?”

    • “You have know light tou ché all that!

      • “know” – “No”, “know”.
      • “light” – “Right”, “light”.
      • “tou ché” – “To say”, “touché” (acknowledging a hit in fencing; by extension, acknowledging a verbal barb that strikes home).
    • Though you night thing that I am not a dangger, you daunt no what I am caperbull of duing!

      • “night thing” – “Might think”, “night thing” (prostitute?).
      • “dangger” – “Danger”, “dagger”.
      • “daunt” – “Don’t”, “daunt”.
      • “caperbull” – “Capable”, “caper bull”.
      • “duing” – “Doing”, “dung” (suggesting he is full of “bullshit”).
    • Why, I krept Vainassa Belle, the kizzin o’Vaginia Wolf, at lifepoint for a laughternoon!

      • “krept” – “Kept”, “crept”.
      • “Vainassa Belle” – “Vanessa Bell”, “vain ass belle”.
        Vanessa and Virginia, 1894
        Vanessa and Virginia, 1894
        • Vanessa Bell (1879-1961) was a painter and a sister of Virginia Woolf, not cousin, as claimed below. She and Virginia were both first cousins of Stephen. For that matter, neither were married before J. K. Stephen died (being 13 and 10 years old, respectively), so would both still have had the maiden surname of “Stephen”, not “Woolf” and “Bell”. This supports the notion that this apparition is not actually Stephen, but a construct of Lucia’s imperfect memory.
      • “kizzin” – “Cousin”, “kissing” (as in the expression “kissing cousin”; Stephen does seem to have been courting at least one cousin, see below).
      • “Vaginia Wolf” – “Virginia Woolf”, “vagina wolf”.
        • Virginia Woolf (1882-1941) was an important modernist writer in the twentieth century. Not that Stephen was likely to think her at all notable, as she was only 10 years old when he died!
      • “lifepoint” – “Knifepoint”, “life point”.
      • “laughternoon” – “Afternoon”, “laughter noon”.
        • I have been unable to corroborate this specifoc incident. However, Virginia Woolf does relate, in her memoir “A Sketch of the Past”, that Stephen used to come to the house when she was a child, apparently in love with Virginia’s older half-sister Stella, and “with his madness on him [once] burst into the nursery and spear[ed] the bread on his swordstick”. This does make other violent actions towards family members seem plausible.
    • Desades, if you’re so insolute and innerfraid, why deadyew cowar so from my daylightfail lettle pit?

      • “Desades” – “Besides”, de Sade” (French philosopher after whom “sadism” is named).
      • “insolute” – “Insolent”, “absolute”.
      • “innerfraid” – “Unafraid”, “inner ‘fraid”.
      • “deadyew” – “Did you”, “dead yew”.
      • “cowar” – “Cower”, “cow are”.
      • “daylightfail” – “Delightful”, “daylight fail”.
      • “lettle” – “Little”, “leet”, “kettle” (as in “the pot calling the kettle black”). Possibly “lettlest” (Norwegian “easy to read”).
      • “pit” – “Pet”, “pit” (Hell; Pit Bull).
    • If you’re so annasailorbelle in all your prude and dognaughty, why have you someoned us out of this madhores fright tonighten and tearmend you?

      • “annasailorbelle” – “Unassailable”, “Annabelle sailor” (possible reference to the Poe poem “Annabel Lee“?).
      • “prude” – “Pride”, “prude”.
      • “dognaughty” – “Dignity”, “dog naughty” (another indication of bestiality).
      • “someoned” – “Summoned”, “someone-d” (that is, made us someone).
      • “madhores” – “Madhouse”, “mad whores”.
      • “fright” – “Night”, “fright”.
      • “tonighten” – “To frighten”, “tonight end”.
      • “tearmend” – “Torment”, “tear mend”.
    • Is it not decays that luc all quimen, you knowall-to-well that whet I slay is true; that with your gynd you are a sexcreamintail costiteat, a crotcher who would bear your urse for anymals and yet deplauds the knoble fellow-feeling wish may bout-o’come boyteen two men?”

      • “decays” – “The case”, “decays”.
      • “luc” – “Like”, “Lucia”.
      • “quimen” – “Women”, “quim” (dated slang “vagina”).
      • “knowall-to-well” – “Know all too well”, “know-it-all”, suggest?? Possibly “wall-to-wall”?
      • “whet ” – “What”, “whet” (sharpen).
      • “slay” – “Say”, “slay”.
      • “gynd” – “Kind”, “gyno-” (relating to women).
      • “sexcreamintail” – “Excremental”, “sex cream in tail”.
      • “costiteat” – “Prostitute”, “cost it eat”, possibly “cause”, “cousin”, “tit”.
      • “crotcher” – “Creature”, “crotch watcher”.
      • “bear” – “Bare”, “bear” (first of a short sequence comparing Lucia to an animal).
      • “urse” – “Arse”, “ursine” (relating to bears).
      • “anymals” – “Any man”, “animals”.
      • “deplauds” – “Deplores”, “applauds”.
      • “knoble” – “Noble”, “knob” (slang “penis”).
      • “fellow-feeling” – A sense of sympathy with other human beings; taken more literally, “feeling up other fellows”.
      • “wish” – “Which”, “wish”.
      • “bout-o’come” – “Come about”, “bout of come” (encounter leading to ejaculation).
      • “boyteen” – “Between”, “boy teen”.
  • Paragraph 87
    The mocking smile falls from Lucia’s features like a veil, but still she does not give ground in the face of this assault.

    • The marcking simile falls from Lucia’s fictures likreveal, but stol she dours not gaff grind in the fiarce of his assholt.

      • “marcking” – “Mocking”, “marking”. Possibly “King Mark” (husband of Iseult).
      • “simile” – “Smile”, “simile”.
      • “fictures” – “Features”, “pictures”, “fiction sure”.
      • “likreveal” – “Like a veil”, “lick reveal” (possibly another reference to her activities with the dog?).
      • “stol” – “Still”, “stole”, “stool” (chair; excrement).
      • “dours” – “Does”, “dour”.
      • “gaff grind” – “Give ground”, “gaff” (error; fish spear; garment to hide genitals) “grind”.
      • “fiarce” – “Face”, “farce”, “fierce”, “fiance”. Possibly “fiacre” (carriage)
      • “assholt” – “Assault”, “asshole”
  • Paragraph 88
    “If you and your infernal poodle-hound are merely wraiths and figments called up by my own fractured imagination, it must be that I have chosen you to represent the casual misogyny that has pursued me all through my existence. Likewise, I have brought this sudden nightfall on myself to symbolize the darkness that descended on me in the last years of the nineteen-twenties and the first years of the nineteen-thirties. Your blatant and disdainful mention of Virginia Woolf serves only to remind me of the many vibrant and creative females from that period such as Zelda Fitzgerald, ladies who swam out too far or were misused, to my mind quite unnecessarily, and ended up in sanitariums or, worse, as suicides. If you want my opinion, Saucy Jack is just another bogeyman designed to keep all women cowering at him where they belong. Jack the Ripper is a fabrication made from gossip, rumors, and the masculine anger towards persons of my gender, formerly compliant, who had at that time begun to question their role as subservient. You are put together out of nothing more than language, mangled words and misspelled phrases, all the ‘Mister Lusk, Sor,’ and the Jubelo-bela-belum of the Masonic allegations. You, sir, are constructed from catchpenny headlines in the terrible press and shoddy line engravings out of the Police Gazette!”

    • “If ye ’njure infernicating piddle-hount are marley writhes and frigments cralled up bar my own cracktured mirrergination, it mist bay that I have chasen you to ripperscent the causual misssurgeony that haz pressued me ill thrue my exisdance.

      • “ye” – “You”, “ye” (archaic “you”).
      • “’njure” – “And your”, “injure”.
      • “infernicating” – “infernal”, “fornicating”.
      • “piddle-hount” – “Poodle-hound”, “piddle” (piss) “haunt”.
        A "puddle-hound" being brought to Fanny Hill
        A “puddle-hound” being brought to Fanny Hill
        • My translation here is a compromise between accuracy and readability. The word “poodle” comes from the German “pudelhund” (puddle-hound). This is remarked upon by Moore in The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen: The Black Dossier, in the “Fanny Hill” section, where, notably, bestiality with such a dog is strongly implied.
      • “marley” – “Merely”, “Marley” (ghost character from Dickens’ A Christmas Carol).
      • “writhes” – “Wraiths”, “writhes”.
      • “frigments” – “Figments”, “fragments”, “frig men”.
      • “cralled” – “Called”, “crawled”.
      • “bar” – “By”, “bar” (prevent).
      • “cracktured” – “Fractured”, “cracked”.
      • “mirrergination” – “Imagination”, “mirror”, possibly “germination”.
        • Obiwanspicoli notes: “Another reference to the cracked mirror or looking glass in cracktured mirrergination that appears in Ulysses when Stephen calls a cracked looking glass a “symbol of irish art”.  Mirrors have long been used as symbols for art as they reflect reality.  Stephen’s joke is that as subjugated people, Irish artists can’t really show reality so what we get instead is a distorted image, much like you’d get from a cracked mirror. ”
      • “mist bay” – “Must be”, “misty bay” (traditional location for ghost stories).
      • “chasen” – “Chosen”, “chased”.
      • “ripperscent” – “Represent”, “Ripper scent”.
      • “causual” – “Casual”, “causal”, “usual”.
      • “misssurgeony” – “Misogyny”, “miss surgeon I” (that is, I “operate on” young women).
      • “haz” – “Has”, “hazard”.
      • “pressued” – “Pursued”, “pressured”.
      • “ill thrue” – “All through”, “ill true”.
      • “exisdance” – “Existence”, “dance”.
  • Page 906
    • Lurkwise, I haf bright this sadden knightfail on byself to shambelies the dogness dirt daysundered on me inder lust yearns of the nonteen-wanties and the virst jears of the nonteen-hurties.

      • “Lurkwise” – “Likewise”, “wise (to) lurk”.
      • “haf” – “Have”, “half”.
      • “bright” – “Brought”, “bright”.
      • “sadden” – “Sudden”, “sadden”.
      • “knightfail” – “Nightfall”, “knight fail”.
      • “byself” – “Myself”, “by self”, possibly “bi-(sexual) self”.
      • “shambelies” – “Symbolize”, “shambles”, “sham belies”.
      • “dogness” – “Darkness”, “dog-ness”.
      • “dirt” – “That”, “dirty”.
      • “daysundered” – “Descended”, “sundered day”.
      • “inder” – “In the”, “inde” (Latin “since”), suggest??
      • “lust” – “Last”, “lust”.
      • “yearns” – “Years”, “yearns”.
      • “nonteen-wanties” – “Nineteen-twenties”, “non-teen wantons”.
      • “virst” – “First”, “worst”, “vir” (Latin “man”).
      • “jears” – “Years”, “jeers”.
      • “nonteen-hurties” – “Nineteen-thirties”, “non-teen hurt us”.
    • Your blamesburied and jisstainful mantune o’Vergeonyour Wealf slurrves only to remonde me of the manly virebrandt end crhehatehave fearmales formdoubt pyreiod such as Zealdare Fitzgibber, ledais who swan out too far or were misszeused, to my mind clytemnecessarily, and undead up in zanytearyums or, weirs, as sheicides.

      • “blamesburied” – “Blatant”(?, suggest??), “blame’s buried”, “Bloomsbury”.
        • Virginia Woolf was the best known of “The Bloomsbury Set“, a group of intellectuals, philosophers, and artists in the area of Bloomsbury, London during the first half of the twentieth century.
      • “jisstainful” – “Disdainful”, “jizz stain”.
      • “mantune” – “Mention”, “man tune”.
      • “Vergeonyour Wealf” – “Virginia Woolf” (see note to paragraph 86), “verge on your welfare”, “weal” (prosperity).
      • “slurrves” – “Serves”, “slurs”, possibly “loves”, “slaves”.
      • “remonde” – “Remind”, “monde” (French “world”).
      • “manly” – “Many”, “manly” (that is, un-feminine).
      • “virebrandt” – “Vibrant”, “Rembrandt” (Dutch painter), “vile brand”.
      • “end” – “And”, “end”
      • “crhehatehave” – “Creative”, “he hate have”.
      • “fearmales” – “Females”, “fear males”.
      • “formdoubt” – “From that”, “form doubt”.
      • “pyreiod” – “Period”, “pyre I o.d.”.
      • “Zealdare Fitzgibber” – “Zelda Fitzgerald”, “zeal dare gibber”.
        • Zelda Fitzgerald (1900-1948) was a novelist who suffered from mental problems in her later life, and died in a mental hospital. Shloss mentions her, and several similar women in chapter 16, and does a detailed comapison of parts of Zelda’s and Lucia’s lives in chapter 7.
      • “ledais” – “Ladies”, “is Leda”.
        • The first of a string of references to the Greek myth of Leda and the Swan, wherein Zeus rapes the princess Leda while he is transformed into the shape of a swan. The myth proved a popular subject for classical art in spite of (or due to) its nudity and bestiality.
      • “swan” – “Swam”, “swan”.
        • The image of “swimming out too far” may be probably referring to an alleged quote by Jung regarding James and Lucia Joyce to the general effect of “You two are in the same river, but you swim and she drowns”.
      • “misszeused” – “Misused”, “miss Zeus”.
      • “clytemnecessarily” – “Quite unnecessarily”, “Clytemnestra”.
        • Clytemnestra was a daughter of Leda (though not by Zeus). She is most famous for murdering her husband Agamemnon.
      • “undead” – “Ended”, “undead”.
      • “zanytearyums” – “Sanitariums”, “zany teary”.
      • “weirs” – “Worse”, “weirs” (fish traps).
      • “sheicides” – “Suicides”, “she decides”.
    • Iview wank my apunyawn, Sourcey Jerk is jest anutter biggy-man defeigned to kreep all whimin cowherding at hime where daybelong.

      • “Iview” – “If you”, “I view”.
      • “wank” – “Want”, “wank” (slang “masturbate”).
      • “apunyawn” – “Opinion”, “a pun, yawn” (well, there have been rather a lot of them by now…).
      • “Sourcey Jerk” – “Saucy Jack” (another nickname for the Ripper), “source (of) y(on) jerk”.
      • “jest” – “Just”, “jest”.
      • “anutter” – “Another”, “a nutter” (slang “crazy person”).
      • “biggy-man” – “Bogeyman”, “big man”.
      • “defeigned” – “Designed”, “feigned”, possibly “defend”.
      • “kreep” – “Keep”, “creep”.
      • “whimin” – “Women”, “whim in”.
      • “cowherding” – “Cowering”, “cow herding”.
      • “hime” – “Home”, “hymen”, “him”. Possibly “hime” (Scots “hymn”).
      • “daybelong” – “They belong”, “day be long”.
    • Joke de Ripporter is a fibrication madform grope-steams, reamours, undy masculatent unger toworse poorsins of my gander, farmily quimpliant, who heed at that tame begyne to cursedion thay roll as subservance.

      • “Joke de Ripporter” – “Jack the Ripper”, “joke of reporter”.
      • “fibrication” – “Fabrication”, “fib”.
      • “madform” – “Made from”, “mad form”.
      • “grope-steams” – “Gossip”?, suggest?? “grope steam”.
      • “reamours” – “Rumors”, “ream” (British dialect “foam”; to enlarge a hole; to sexually penetrate in a rough and painful way).
      • “undy” – “And the”, “underwear”.
      • “masculatent” – “Masculine”, “latent”, “emasculate”.
      • “unger” – “Anger”, “hunger”.
      • “toworse” – “Towards”, “to worse”.
      • “poorsins” – “Persons”, “poor sins”.
      • “gander” – “Gender”, “gander” (look at; male goose).
      • “farmily quimpliant” – “Formerly compliant”, “family” “quim” (slang “vagina”) “pliant”.
        • Possible allusion to an incident of tension between Moore and DC Comics centering around the phrase “quietly compliant“.
      • “heed” – “Had”, “heed”.
      • “tame” – “Time”, “tame”.
      • “begyne” – “Begun”, “be gyno-“
      • “cursedion” – “Question”, “cursed I on”.
      • “thay roll” – “Their role”, “roll in the hay” (have sex).
      • “subservance” – “Subservient”, “sub servants”, “observance”.
    • You are blut tugother out of nothink mere than longwish, mongreled wyrds and messpilled fraysays, all the ‘Mashdher Lust, Sore,’and the Juwe-below-belabel-’em o’the Mizenic sparegullations.

      • “blut” – “Put”, “blood”.
      • “tugother” – “Together”, “tu” (French “you”) “goth-er” (more Goth).
      • “nothink” – “Nothing”, “no think”.
      • “mere” – “More”, “mere”.
      • “longwish” – “Language”, “long wish”.
      • “mongreled” – “Mangled”, “mongrel” (something of mixed kind, often a dog).
      • “wyrds” – “Words”, “wyrd” (fate).
      • “messpilled” – “Misspelled”, “mess spilled”.
      • “fraysays” – “Phrases”, “fray says”.
      • “‘Mashdher Lust, Sore’” – “‘Mister Lusk, Sor'”, “mashed her lust sore”.
      • “Juwe-below-belabel-’em” – “Jubelo-bela-belum”, “Juwe” (see note below) “below be label them”, possibly “belabor”.
        • This refers to graffiti found near one of the Ripper victims: “The Juwes are/The men that/Will not/be Blamed/for nothing”. It is unknown whether this was actually left by the Ripper, or what, precisely, it even means. “Juwes” was taken originally to be a simple misspelling of “Jews”, but this has been much debated. Stephen Knight suggested that The “Juwes” were “Jubelo, Jubela, and Jubelum”, figures he alleged to be part of Masonic mythology. Moore follows this suggestion in From Hell.
      • “Mizenic” – “Masonic”, “Mizen”.
        • Police Constable Jonas Mizen was one of the early people who arrived at the scene of Mary Nichols’ murder. He appears in From Hell, where he is depicted as a Mason, and in on the coverup.
      • “sparegullations” – “Allegations”, “spare gull nations”, possibly “regulations”.
    • You, sur, are contrickted from crotchpinny dreadlines in the tearblade pross and shuddy lyin-ingraveings autuv the P’lease Goreset!”

      • “sur” – “Sir”, “surly”.
      • “contrickted” – “Constructed”, “contracted” (like a disease), “con trick”
      • “crotchpinny dreadlines” – “Catchpenny headlines” (that is, headlines designed to sell newspapers, which then mostly cost a penny), “crotch pin”, “penny dreadful” (cheap violent pulp fiction), “lines”.
      • “tearblade” – “Terrible”?, suggest?? “tear blade”.
      • “pross” – “Press”, “pross” (slang “prostitute”), “prose”.
      • “shuddy” – “Shoddy”, “shuddery”.
      • “lyin-ingraveings” – “Line engravings”, “lying in grave”.
        • At this time, newspapers did not have technology to print photographs, so employed artists to create line engravings when pictures were desired.
      • “autuv” – “Out of”, “autumn”.
      • “P’lease Goreset” – “Police Gazette”, “please (the) gore set”.
        Actual Police News
        Actual Police News
        Police News in From Hell
        Police News in From Hell
        • The Police Gazette was a newspaper put out by the College of Policing in London, focusing on criminal matters. Moore seems here to be confusing it with the unofficial and much more sensational and exploitative tabloid The Illustrated Police News. At this time, “Police News” featured heavy use of line engravings. At least two authentic issues are depicted in From Hell, at chapter 7, page 32 and chapter 8, page 3.
  • Paragraph 89
    No sooner has Lucia spoken than her would-be persecutor gives vent to a shrill and piercing scream. He starts to fragment into merchandise and pamphlets, flapping pages torn from comic strips and television scripts. His shape collapses into tattered and remaindered true-crime paperbacks, their jackets lurid and sensational with shiny blades and cobalt alleyways. His frightened and uncomprehending face becomes the grainy photo-reproduction of a broadsheet centerfold and blows away between the midnight trees, the loathsome little white poodle-dog chasing after it and barking frenetically.

    • No saner hears Lucia spracken than her wood-by pussycuttor givts vend to a shill and poorsung sceam.

      • “saner” – “Sooner”, “saner”.
      • “hears” – “Has”, “hears”.
      • “spracken” – “Spoken”, “bracken”, “sprack” (British dialect “lively”).
      • “wood-by” – “Would-be”, “by the wood”.
      • “pussycuttor” – “Persecutor”, “pussy cutter”.
      • “givts” – “Gives”, “gifts”.
      • “vend” – “Vent”, “vend” (first of a sequence of money-related words, indicating that “Jack the Ripper” is largely a commercial phenomenon).
      • “shill” – “Shrill”, “shill” (to promote), “shilling”.
      • “poorsung” – “Piercing”, “poor(ly) sung”, “poor person”.
      • “sceam” – “Scream”, “scam”.
    • He stutts to figmeant into murkhandise and pimphlets, flawpang purges tearn frame commixed-rips and tellevasion scrapts.

      • “stutts” – “Starts”, “stutters”, possibly “tuts”.
      • “figmeant” – “Fragment”, “figment”, “fig” (valued at practically nothing) “meant”.
      • “murkhandise” – “Merchandise”, “murky hands”.
      • “pimphlets” – “Pamphlets”, “pimps”.
      • “flawpang” – “Flapping”, “flopping”, “flaw pang”.
      • “purges” – “Pages”, “purges”.
      • “tearn” – “Torn”, “tear” (teardrop; to rip).
      • “frame” – “From”, “frame” (a technical term in the creation of both comics and television).
      • “commixed-rips” – “Comic strips”, “co-mixed rips” (that is, something which has been ripped up and then mixed together, probably referring to William Burroughs’ “cut-up technique“, which Moore has referred to in the context of Jack the Ripper).

        • There have of course been many comic books which have taken Jack the Ripper as subject matter, not least Moore’s own From Hell.
      • “tellevasion scrapts” – “Television scripts”, “tell a vision scrapped”, “craps”.
        • Equally, Jack the Ripper has often been seen on television. Odd that Lucia/Moore don’t also mention film.
    • Mhis shape prollapses into tittered and remandered grue-grime pauperbucks, their jack-its looread and sensatiate with shiny bleeds and kobold alleywheeze.

      • “Mhis shape” – “His shape”, “misshapen”.
      • “prollapses” – “Collapses”, “prolapse”.
      • “tittered” – “Tattered”, “titter”, “tits”.
      • remandered” – “Remaindered”, re-man-dered” (that is, made a man again).
        • Remaindered books are books which, due to lower-than-expected sales, are sold at greatly reduced prices.
      • “grue-grime” – “True-Crime”, “grue grime”.
      • “pauperbucks” – “Paperbacks”, “pauper bucks” (paperbacks are a medium for poor people to spend small amounts of their money on for cheap entertainment).
      • “jack-its” – “Jackets” (book cover), “jack it” (masturbate).
        • The use of “jackets” with “paperbacks” is not strictly correct. Jackets properly refer to removable paper covers, as are usually found on hardcover books.
      • “looread” – “Lurid”, “loo read” (that is, appropriate for reading while on the toilet).
      • “sensatiate” – “Sensational”, “sans” (without) “satiate” (satisfied, full).
      • “bleeds” – “Blades”, “bleed” (to lose blood; of artwork, to extend to the borders of the page).
      • “kobold” – “Cobalt” (dark blue), “kobold” (goblin).
      • “alleywheeze” – “Alleyways”, “wheeze” (something funny).
    • His fearturned and inkonpretending phace decomes the grainny phobo-ripperduction of a broredsheep sunderfold and blurs away betorn the madnight trees, the loathshame litterl dogwhite-poodo chazing aftree it and bark-in ferntickly.

      • “fearturned” – “Frightened”, “fear turned”.
      • “inkonpretending” – “Uncomprehending”, “incomprehensible”, “ink on pretending”.
      • “phace” – “Face”, “phase”.
      • “decomes” – “Becomes”, “decompose”.
      • “grainny” – “Grainy”, “granny”, suggest??
      • “phobo-ripperduction” – “Phoro-reproduction”, “Phobos” (Greek god of fear) “Ripper deduction”. Possibly “hobo”.
      • “broredsheep” – “Broadsheet” (non-tabloid newspaper), “bored sheep” (the type of people who consume Ripper media).
      • sunderfold” – “Centerfold”, “sunder fold”.
        • Originally, “centerfold” simply referred to the center two pages of any publication. Later, largely via Playboy magazine, it took on sexual and objectifying connotations.
      • “blurs” – “Blows”, “blurs”.
      • “betorn” – “Between”, “be torn”.
      • “madnight” – “Midnight”, “mad night”.
      • “loathshame” – “Loathsome”, “loath shame”.
      • “litterl” – “Little”, “litter”.
      • “dogwhite-poodo” – “White poodle-dog”, “dogshit poo”.
      • “chazing” – “Chasing”, “hazing”, suggest??

        You're nothing but a pack of cards!
        You’re nothing but a pack of cards!
      • “aftree” – “After”, “a tree”.
      • “bark-in” – “Barking”, “in bark” (dog noise; tree covering).
      • “ferntickly” – “Frenetically”, “frantically”, “fern tickle”.
        • This paragraph is evocative of the end of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland:
        • `Who cares for you?’ said Alice, (she had grown to her full size by this time.)  `You’re nothing but a pack of cards!’At this the whole pack rose up into the air, and came flying down upon her:  she gave a little scream, half of fright and half of anger, and tried to beat them off, and found herself [awake].

  • Paragraph 90
    Lucia dusts her hands as if to say “that’s quite enough of that”, and carries on her interrupted stroll through the enchanted lunatic asylum night, its darkness every bit as inescapable as that which had befallen her when she was only twenty-four years old, in nineteen-thirty-one. That was the year she’d had her ‘accident of health’, as it had been politely phrased. The truth, the agony of it, is they had scraped a baby out of her and she’d not even been entirely certain whose it was. For all she knew it might have been the poodle-hound’s; that or some other dog, it makes no difference. Afterwards they’d told her that she’d not be having any other children, although this was not the only dreadful news that she’d received during that period, for there is also the occasion of her parents’ marriage to consider.

    • Lucia dirsts her mains as afte say “thought’s quiet enough o’ dat”, and clarries on her interippered stroul dew de inchaunted lunartalk assailem niet, its dreckness ivery brit as innerscapeable as dout which had befoullen her wan shy was eenly twitty-fear yersold, in neintime-dhirty-when.

      • “dirsts” – “Dusts”, “dirties”, possibly “durst” (archaic “dared”).
      • “mains” – “Hands” (in French), suggest??
      • “afte” – “If to”, “after”.
      • “thought’s” – “That’s”, “thoughts”.
      • “quiet” – “Quite”, “quiet”.
      • “dat” – “That”, “dad”, suggest?? Possibly “dat” (Latin “he/she/it gives”).
      • “clarries” – “Carries”, “clear”, “clarion”.
      • “interippered” – “Interrupted”, “in the Ripper red”.
      • “stroul” – “Stroll”, “soul”.
      • “dew de” – “Through the”, “of the dew”.
      • “inchaunted” – “Enchanted”, “in haunted”.
      • “lunartalk” – “Lunatic”, “lunar talk”.
      • “assailem” – “Asylum”, “assail them”.
      • “niet” – “Night”, “niet” (Dutch “no”), possibly “Nietzsche”.
      • “dreckness” – “Darkness”, “dreck” (trash).
      • “ivery” – “Every”, “I very”, possibly “ivy”, “ivory”.
      • “brit” – “Bit”, “Brit”, “brittle”.
      • “innerscapeable” – “Inescapable”, “inner is capable”.
      • “dout” – “That”, “doubt”, dout (archaic “douse”).
      • “befoullen” – “Befallen”, “befoul”.
      • “wan” – “When”, “wan”.
      • “shy” – “She”, “shy”.
      • “eenly” – “Only”, “eensy” (very small).
      • “twitty-fear” – “Twenty-four), “twit fear”.
      • “yersold” – “Years old”, “you’re sold”.
      • “neintime-dhirty-when” – “Nineteen-thirty-one”, “nein” (German “no”) “time dirty when”.
    • That wasteher yore she’d hed hor ‘ancident of hellth’, as it hid bin pollutely pherased.

      • “wasteher” – “Was the”, “waste her”.
      • “yore” – “Year”, “yore” (archaic “archaic”).
      • “hed” – “Had”, “he’d”, “head”.
      • “hor” – “Her”, “whore”.
      • “ancident of hellth” – “Accident of health”, “incident of Hell”, “ancient”.
        • Shloss frequently quotes Dominique Maroger’s statement that Lucia stopped dancing in 1931 “on account of an accident of health.”
      • “hid” – “Had”, “hidden”.
      • “bin” – “Been”, “bin” (as in trash bin).
      • “pollutely” – “Politely”, polluted lie”.
      • “pherased” – “Phrased”, “erased”. Possibly “Pharisees”.
    • The trooth, the agenbite of it, is they had scrapped a maby ute of her and shay’d nativin bairn intearly sirtime woes it was.

      • “trooth” – “Truth”, “tooth”. Possible allusion to King Lear “How sharper than a serpent’s tooth it is to habe a thankless child.”
      • agenbite” – “Agony”, “agenbite” (“biting again”, see below).
        • Obiwanspicoli notes:
        • The untranslated agenbite of it recalls Ayenbite of Inwyt (or Agenbite of Inwit), literally the “biting again of inner wit”.  It originally appeared in a translation of a French treatise on Christian morality into a Kentish dialect of Middle English.  The translator was a Benedictine monk known as Michael of Northgate. The phrase Mike was trying to translate was “remorse of consciousness” but the translator was either very bad at his job or there was simply no phrase or means to translate “remorse of consciousness” into Kentish Middle English.  Understanding the original French, the best Mikey could do was invent his own version for English readers by rendering it as though one’s inner wit or knowledge was biting again. Why is this important here? It’s not, except that Joyce appeared to have loved the phrase and used it several times throughout Ulysses.

        • Shloss quotes a section of Ulysses which she interprets as also being James Joyce speaking about Lucia:
        • She is drowning. Agenbite. Save her. Agenbite. All against us. She will drown me with her, eyes and hair. Lank coils of seaweed hair around me, my heart, my soul. Salt green death.

      • “scrapped” – “Scraped”, “scrapped”.
      • “maby” – “Baby”, “maybe”.
      • “ute” – “Out”, “uterus”.
        • Shloss presents significant circumstantial evidence that Lucia had an abortion, though without definitive proof.
      • “shay’d” – “She’d”, “hay” (as in “roll in the hay”), “shade”, “shay” (small carriage).
      • “nativin” – “Not even”, “nativity” (possible allusion to the Christian Nativity, another occasion of dubious parentage), “native in”.
      • “bairn” – “Been”, “bairn” (child).
      • “intearly” – “Entirely”, “in tears lie”.
      • “sirtime” – “Certain”, “sir time”.
      • “woes” – “Whose”, “woes”.
    • Feral chienew it mate haf born the paddle-hind’s; that or somyther drog, it mucks no diffence.

      • “Feral” – “For all”, “feral”.
      • “chienew” – “She knew”, “chien” (French “dog”) “ew” (expression of disgust).
      • “mate” – “Might”, “mate”.
      • “haf” – “Have”, “half”. Possibly “haf” (Icelandic “sea”; Czech “woof”).
      • “born” – “Been”, “born”.
      • “paddle-hind’s” – “Poodle-hound’s”, “paddle behinds” (spank).
        • This is presumably exaggeration for effect, unless Lucia is woefully ignorant of basic biology.
      • “somyther” – “Some other”, “so myth”.
      • “drog” – “Dog”, “drug”.
        • It seems to me more likely that Lucia is here referring to her other human lovers in derogatory terms, not claiming that she had multiple canine lovers. The point is ambiguous.
      • “mucks” – “Makes”, “mucks”.
      • “diffence” – “Difference”, “defence”, “defiance”.
    • Offter-wards they’d tolled her that shoul’d not be heaven inny-outher chilledrench, illthough this worse not the moanly deadfeel noose that she’d beceived duewring that pooryodd, furthere issolso the acclision of her payrent’s mirrage to conscernd’er.

      • “Offter-wards” – “Afterwards”, “off to (hospital) wards”.
      • “tolled” – “Told”, “tolled”. Possible reference to “Ask not for whom the bell tolls”.
      • “shoul’d” – “She’d”, “should”.
      • “heaven” – “Having”, “heaven”.
      • “inny-outher” – “Any other”, “in-out (sex?) “her”.
      • “chilledrench” – “Children”, “chilled wrench”, “drench”.
      • “illthough” – “Although”, “Ill thought”.
      • “worse” – “Was”
      • “moanly” – “Only”, “moan”, possibly “manly”..
      • “deadfeel” – “Dreadful”, “dead feel”.
      • “noose” – “News”, “noose”.
      • “beceived” – “Received”, “believed”, “deceived”.
      • “duewring” – “During”, “due wring”.
      • “pooryodd” – “Period”, “poor you odd”.
      • “furthere” – “For there”, “further”, “fur”, possibly “father”.
      • “issolso” – “Is also”, “is sol so”, suggest??. Possibly “isso” (Neapolitan “he”; Italian “I hoist”).
      • “acclision” – “Occasion”, “acclimate”. Possibly “occlusion”.
      • “payrent’s” – “Parents'”, “pay rent”.
        • Lucia, especially after the end of her dancing career, was financially dependent upon her parents to, literally, pay the rent.
        • The apostrophe should properly go behind the “s”, since “parents” is plural. Unless, perhaps, Lucia considers herself to only have one “real” parent…
      • “mirrage” – “Marriage”, “mirage”.
      • “conscernd’er” – “Consider”, “concerned her”, “condescend”.
  • Paragraph 91
    While in Giorgio’s case she thought he’d always been a bastard and he always would be, she had never questioned her legitimacy, at least not until her Mother (to whom she had lost her strabismic eye in the pursuit of knowledge) and her Father had announced they were to marry properly, after a quarter-of-a-century of raising their unwitting offspring! Lucia, already pushed so far, had finally snapped altogether. There had been the incident when Daddy had decided that they were to live in England, and she had refused to board the train. More seriously, when her parents had invited Samuel Beckett to a party after he had dropped her, she had thrown a chair at Nora. That was when her brother had insisted that she be committed to a mental institution and the other members of the family had simply gone along with him. The rest, in her consideration, was history.

    • Waile in Gorgeio’s carse she thurt he’d allwise bane a bossturd and he hurlways wed be, she had nefar kwastimed her legiteracy, at laest not untell her Mimir (to whomb she had list her strabismystic oeill in the pa’swit o’ Norledge) and her Daedir had dannounced day were to mary poperly, after a keepitquieter-of-a-sintury o’ razing their inwaitting iffspring!

      • “Waile” – “While”, “wail”.
      • “Gorgeio’s” – “Giorgio’s”, “gorge”.
      • “carse” – “Case”, “arse”, possibly “cares”, “cars”, “corpse”.
      • “thurt” – “Thought”, “to hurt”.
      • “allwise” – “Always”, “all wise”.
      • “bane” – “Been”, “bane”.
      • “bossturd” – “Bastard”, “boss turd”.
      • “hurlways” – “Always”, “hurl away”.
      • “wed” – “Would”, “wed” (much of Lucia’s anger towards him is due to his marriage).
      • “nefar” – “Never”, “nefarious” (sinful, wicked).
      • “kwastimed” – “Questioned”, “K(?) was timed”.
      • “legiteracy” – “Legitimacy”, “literacy”.
      • “laest” – “Least”, “last”, “latest”.
      • “untell” – “Until”, “un-tell” (that is, keep secret).
      • “Mimir” – “Mommy”, Mimir” (figure of Norse mythology).
        • This introduces a lengthy parenthetical which allegorizes Lucia with Odin, who sacrificed an eye to Mimir’s Well to gain wisdom.
      • “whomb” – “Whom”, “womb”.
      • “list” – “Lost”, “list”.
      • “strabismystic” – “Strabismic”, “mystic”.
        • Lucia did not physically lose an eye, but her strabismus is being taken as a metaphorical loss here.
      • “oeill” – “Eye”, “oeil” (French “eye; glyph”), “O ill”.
      • “pa’swit” – “Pursuit”, “pa’s wit”.
      • “Norledge” – “Knowledge”, “Nora ledge”, “Norn“.
      • “Daedir” – “Daddy”, Daedalus” (Shloss often compares Lucia to Icarus).
      • “dannounced” – “Announced”, “denounced”.
      • “day” – “They”, “(wedding) day”.
      • “mary poperly” – “Marry properly”, “Mary Popery” (referencing the Catholicism that James Joyce spent much of his life repudiating). Possibly “Mary Poppins”?
        • James Joyce and Nora Barnacle, though they celebrated their “anniversary” on October 4, had not, in fact, ever been formally married until July 4, 1931. This was perhaps spurred by legal concerns over Giorgio’s inheritance, now that he was married. (See Shloss, chapter 8.) The revelation was a shock to their friends and children, and a deep trauma for Lucia.
      • “keepitquieter-of-a-sintury” – “Quarter-of-a-century”, “keep it quiet sin”.
      • “razing” – “Raising”, “razing” (destroying).
      • “inwaitting” – “Unwitting”, “in waiting”. Possibly “unwanted”?
      • “iffspring” – “Offspring”, “iffy” (dubious) “spring” (origin).
  • Page 907
    • Lucia, allreedy prusht far-so, had fianlly snipped altargather.

      • “allreedy” – “Already”, “all reedy” (pliable).
      • “prusht” – “Pushed”, “rushed”. Possibly “prudish”, “shit”, “prush” (Albanian “embers”), “prusten” (German “to snort”).
      • “far-so” – “So far”, “farce”, suggest??
      • “fianlly” – “Finally”, “fiance lie”.
      • “snipped” – “Snapped”, “snipped” (cut with scissors; verbally lashed out).
      • “altargather” – “Altogether”, “altar gather”.
    • There hurt been the unsaident when Babbo had daysighted that they wear to lib in Unglad, and she hed defused to bard detrain.

      • “hurt” – “Had”, “hurt”
      • “unsaident” – “Incident”, “unsaid”.
      • “daysighted” – “Decided”, “day sighted”.
      • “wear” – “Were”, “wear”.
      • “lib” – “Live”, “lib(erty)”.
      • “Unglad” – “England”, “un-glad”.
      • “hed” – “Had”, “he’d”, “head”.
      • “defused” – “Refused”, “defused”.
      • “bard” – “Board”, “bard”.
      • “detrain” – “The train”, “de-train”.
        • This took place April 17, 1932, see Shloss, chapter 9. The family ended up staying in Paris.
    • Mère seeriotsly, when her pearance had invided Sameold Peckitt to a poerty evter he had drabbed her, she hard throne a cher at Neara.

      • “Mère” – “More”, “mère” (French “mother”).
      • “seeriotsly” – “Seriously”, “see riot sly”, “seer I thusly”.
      • “pearance” – “Parents”, “appearance”.
      • “invided” – “Invited”, “invidious”, “invaded”.
      • “Sameold Peckitt” – “Samuel Beckett“, “same old peck it”, “pecker (penis).
      • “poerty” – “Party”, “poetry”.
      • “evter” – “After”, “ever”.
      • “drabbed” – “Dropped”, “drab” (prostitute), possibly “drubbed” (beaten).
      • “hard” – “Had”, “hard”.
      • “throne” – “Thrown”, “throne”.
      • “cher” – “Chair”, “cher” (French “dear”).
      • “Neara” – “Nora”, “nearer”.
        • The party was on February 2, 1932, in celebration of James Joyce’s fiftieth birthday. Beckett was still a friend of the other Joyces, so his presence at the party was perhaps unsurprising, but Lucia seems to have taken it as a personal attack. (See Shloss, chapter 9.)
    • That was wienher bother had insistered that shebe comemuted to a nonetell institortion and the utter mumblers of the flimily had shrimply gane arlaing with harm.

      • “wienher” – “When her”, “wiener” (hot dog; penis). Possibly “wean her”.
      • “bother” – “Brother”, “bother”.
      • “insistered” – “Insisted”, “in sister”.
      • “shebe” – “She be”, “Sheba” (Biblical queen), suggest??. Possibly “shebang”, “is Hebe” (derogatory “Jew”).
      • “comemuted” – “Committed”, “(be)come muted”. Possibly “commuted”.
      • “nonetell” – “Mental”, “none tell”.
      • “institortion” – “Institution”, “distortion”.
      • “utter” – “Other”, “utter”.
      • “mumblers” – “Members”, “mumblers”.
      • “flimily” – “Family”, “flimsily”.
      • “shrimply” – “Simply”, “shrimpy” (weak).
      • “gane” – “Gone”, “gane” (Scots “gone”), suggest??
      • “arlaing” – “Along”, suggest??. Possibly “alarming”.
      • “harm” – “Him”, “harm”.
    • Tha rrest, in her insideoration, was histeria.

      • “Tha rrest” – “The rest”, “the arrest”.
      • “insideoration” – “Consideration”, “inside oration”.
      • “histeria” – “History”, “hysteria” (a poorly-defined diagnosis, often used to imcarcerate troublesome women).

Forward to Section 6 – Ogden Whitney