RtB section 4 – Chaplin films and dark days

Up to “Round the Bend”.

Back to Section 3 – John Clare.

In which Lucia considers how the nature of time is like a Charlie Chaplin film, and the vicissitudes of her own life during the 1920s and 1930s.

Significant characters and themes in this section:

  • James Joyce (1882-1941) was an extremely famous writer and Lucia Joyce’s father.
    • The Joyce family, 1924
      The Joyce family, 1924

      The River Liffey is a river in Ireland which, in Finnegans Wake, is referred to many times, and is metaphorically linked to the female protagonist (who is, in some senses, Lucia).

  • Nora Barnacle (1884-1951) was James Joyce’s wife and Lucia Joyce’s mother.
  • Giorgio Joyce (1905-1976) was the son of James and Nora, and Lucia’s older brother. Moore suggests that he may not have been James’ son, but the result of an affair between Nora and a lover. Moore also suggests that an incestuous affair took place between Giorgio and Lucia. This incestuous relationship is a theory of Moore’s, not attested to by the historical record, but not contradicted by it, either.
  • The films of Charlie Chaplin.
  • World mythology, especially Greek, Roman, Norse, and Egyptian.
  • Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass by Lewis Carroll, classic children’s books whose themes include childhood, madness, wordplay, and doubled characters.
  • Page 899
  • Paragraph 62
    As he collapses on her, grateful and relieved, Lucia shuts her eyes and slips into her own post-coital torpor, dreamily considering his statement. Was she dead? Was this her happy-ever-afterlife, here at Saint Andrew’s Hospital on this indeterminate day that seems to have the whole of history in it, from the poor ward cradle of creation to the Kingsthorpe graveside of her apocalypse? From the Big Bang, dawn chorus sunrise of spacetime, born out of an effervescent quantum vacuum in the morning, to the end of everything in the last cooling breath of an entropic sunset, just before the stars come and go out? Is this her heaven or her hell, she wonders, these asylum fields with a whole universe from start to finish somehow crystallized into each day, with every day eternal and with every day the same, reiterated endlessly down to the most infinitesimal detail, though somehow we don’t notice the unending repetition, possibly as a result of our premeditation? Perhaps this is what the afterlife is like for everyone, not just for her. Perhaps for everybody, their whole world and their whole life is one long and unusually eventful day that they will have forgotten by tomorrow morning when they wake as couldn’t-care-less babies, to begin the same old timeless and beloved story all over again.

    • Asigh girllapses oin her, gracedful and relived, Lucia shluts her I’s and slieps intu’ir own past-kirtle torpurr, traumily kensundering his sayitmeant.

      • “Asigh” – “As he”, “a sigh”, “as I” (somewhat continuing the confusion of pronouns/identity from the end of the last section).
      • “girllapses” – “Collapses”, “girl lapses”.
      • “oin” – “On”, “in”. His body collapses on top of her; his penis collapses within her. Possibly “oin” (Finnish “thorns, prickles”).
      • “gracedful” – “Grateful”, “graceful”, “graced fool”.
      • “relived” – “Relieved”, “re-lived” (as are all our lives, in the Eternalist view).
      • “shluts” – “Shuts”, “sluts”. Possibly “shouts”.
      • “I’s” – “Eyes”, “I’s” (multiple senses of identity).
      • “slieps” – “Slips”, “sleeps”. Possibly “sliep” (Serbo-Croatian “blind”).
      • “intu’ir” – “Into her”, “intuit”.
      • “past-kirtle” – “Post-coital”, “past” “kirtle” (gown).
      • “torpurr” – “Torpor”, “tor” (craggy outcrop; hill; tower) “purr” (contented cat noise).
      • “traumily” – “Dreamily”, “trauma family”.
      • “kensundering” – “Considering”, “ken” (know) “sundering”.
      • “sayitmeant” – “Statement”, “say it meant”.
    • Wiz she dod?

      • “Wiz” – “Was”, “is”, “wizard”.
        • See also the discussion of verbal tenses used in Mansoul in the chapter “Upstairs”.
      • “dod” – “Dead”, “dad”, “Dead as a dodo”. Possibly “dod” (Irish “sullenness”).
    • Wiz ’tis her happyevhereafterlife, here at Faint Androuse Havepityl on this instenthourminate day dad scemes to heave the whowl o’ herst’ry in it, froem the pour-ward criddle o’ cryoution to ther Kindthorts grievesad of herpoorcollypse?

      • “Wiz” – See above.
      • “’tis” – “This”, “it is”.
      • “happyevhereafterlife” – “Happy-ever-afterlife”, “hereafter”.
      • “Faint Androuse Havepityl” – “Saint Andrew’s Hospital”, “faint” “-androus” (having a specified number of husbands/stamens) “have pity”, “drowse”, “petal”.
      • “instenthourminate” – “Indeterminate”, “instant hour minute”, “in” “stent” (medical insert; archaic “cease”).
      • “dad” – “That”, “dad”, “doodad”.
      • “scemes” – “Seems”, “scenes”
      • “heave” – “Have”, “heave”.
      • “whowl” – “Whole”, “howl” (and possibly Ginsberg’s poem “Howl”), “hole”, “whore”.
      • “herst’ry” – “History”, “her story”.
      • “froem” – “From”, “foam”, “poem”.
      • “pour-ward” – “Poor ward”, “pour”, “forward”.
        • Lucia was born in the Ospedale Civico di Trieste. This was the equivalent of an English “poor ward”, a place where the poor received medical care.
        • Obiwanspicoli suggests “four word” as a reading, the words in question being God’s “Let there be light.”
      • “criddle” – “Cradle”, “riddle”. Possibly “griddle”.
      • “cryoution” – “Creation”, “cry evolution”.
      • “ther” – “The”, “there”
      • “Kindthorts” – “Kingsthorpe”, “kind thoughts”.
        • Lucia is buried in Kingsthorpe Cemetary.
      • “grievesad” – “Graveside”, “grieve sad”.
      • “herpoorcollypse” – “Her apocalypse”, “poor collapse”.
    • Form the being-bang c’horus-dorn sunarise o’ speacetime, buorn out of ain efferprescent quaintime vaquim in day mawnings, to dayend o’ ebonything in the loast coolong breethe of an intropic sumset, joyst befire the staers come and go out?

      • “Form” – “From”, “form” (as in Genesis 1:2 “And the earth was without form, and void”).
      • “being-bang” – “Big Bang”, “being” (for sexually-reproducing creatures) is preceded by a “bang” (sex act).
      • “c’horus-dorn” – “Chorus dawn”, “Horus” (Egyptian god), “Dorn” (character from Wilson and Shea’s Illuminatus!), “possibly “dorn” (Irish “fist”).
      • “sunarise” – “Sunrise”, “son arise”.
      • “speacetime” – “Spacetime”, “peacetime”.
      • “buorn” – “Born”, “burn”. Possibly “buon” (Italian “good”).
      • “ain” – “An”, “ain” (Scots “own”).
      • “efferprescent” – “Effervescent”, “ever-present”. Possibly “effort prescient”.
      • “quaintime” – “Quantum”, “quaint time”,
      • “vaquim” – “Vacuum”, “quim” (slang “vagina”). Possibly “aqua vitae” (water of life).
        • Note that vaginas are often taken as symbols of holes, or emptiness.
      • “in day” – “In the”, “in day”, “India”.
      • “mawnings” – “Mornings”, “yawning maw” (another bit of vagina/vacuum imagery).
      • “dayend” – “The end”, “day’s end”s.
      • “ebonything” – “Everything”, “ebony thing” (the blackness of empty space?).
      • “loast” – “Last”, “lost”. Possibly “loas” (voodoo spirits).
      • “coolong” – “Cooling”, “coo” (sound of affection) “long”. Possibly “oolong” (type of tea).
      • “breethe” – “Breath”, “breeze”, “breathe”, possibly “seethe”.
      • “intropic” – “Entropic”, “in (the) tropics”.
      • “sumset” – “Sunset”, “sum (of all) sets”. Possibly “Set” (Egyptian god of destruction).
      • “joyst” – “Just” (both in the sense of “immediately” and “fair”), “Joyce”, “joyous”.
      • “befire” – “Before”, “be fire”.
      • “staers” – “Stars”, “stares”, “stairs”.
      • “come and go out” – Portmanteau at the word level of the phrases “come and go”, “go out”, and “come out” (of the closet). “Come” also in the sense of “orgasm”.
    • Sisyph’er haeven or her hill, she wanders, these asylium feolds wit’her hole innyverse from stars t’ vinish seemhow chrystallived into each die, with everI dayd enternal end with everI dayddy same, wreiterated unlistly dante the timeyest unt most infernotesimal devtail, though samewho shwe don’t knotwice the unwending rapidition, veasibly as a presult o’ hoeur premedication?

      • “Sisyph’er” – “Is this her”, “Sisyphus” (Greek myth about a king who is punished in the afterlife by having to eternally repeat the action of rolling a boulder uphill).
      • “haeven” – “Heaven”, “haven”. Possibly “hævn” (Danish “revenge”).
      • “hill” – “Hell”, “hill”.
      • “wanders” – “Wonders”, “wanders”.
      • “asylium” – “Asylum”, “Elysium” (in Greek myth, the afterlife of the blessed).
      • “feolds” – “Fields” (as in “Elysian Fields”), “folds” (suggestive of folded spacetime, and angles).
      • “wit’her” – “With a”, “wither” (to shrivel), “whither” (archaic “to where”).
      • “hole” – “Whole”, “hole”.
      • “innyverse” – “Universe”, “inner verse”. Possibly “inny” (concave belly-button).
      • “stars” – “Start”, “stars”.
      • “vinish” – “Finish”, “vanish”.
      • “seemhow” – “Somehow”, “seem how”.
      • “chrystallived” – “Crystallized”, “Christ all lived”.
      • “die” – “Day”, “die” (to cease living; six-sided gaming cube)
      • “everI” – “Every”, “everlasting”, suggest??
      • “dayd” – “Day”, “dead”.
      • “enternal” – “Eternal”, “enter”, suggest??
      • “end” – “And”, “end”.
      • “everI” – See above.
      • “dayddy” – “Day the”, “daddy”.
      • “wreiterated” – “Reiterated”, “write rated”.
      • “unlistly” – “Endlessly”, “unlisted”. Possibly “unjustly”.
      • “dante” – “Down to the”, “Dante” (1265-1321, Italian writer best known for his depiction of the afterlife).
      • “timeyest” – “Tiniest”, “time yesterday”, “old-timey”, “eyes”. Possibly “timey-wimey” (Doctor Who catchphrase first used in “Blink”, 2007).
      • “unt most” – “And most”, “utmost”, “cunt”
      • “infernotesimal” – “Infinitesimal”, Inferno” (Dante’s book about Hell).
      • “devtail” – “Detail”, “devil”.
        • This word makes literal the phrase “the devil is in the details”.
      • “samewho” – “Somehow”, “same who” (that is, we are always the same person, repeated eternally).
      • “shwe” – “We”, “she”. Possibly “shweshwe” (a patterned South African fabric).
      • “knotwice” – “Notice”, “know twice”, “knot-wise”.
      • “unwending” – “Unending”, “unwinding”, “wending”.
      • “rapidition” – “Repetition”, “rapid iteration”, “radiation”.
      • “veasibly” – “Possibly”, “feasibly”, “visibly”.
      • “presult” – “Result”, “pre-“, suggest?? Possibly “presule” (Italian “bishop”).
      • “hoeur” – “Our”, “hour”, “soeur” (French “sister”), “whore”.
      • “premedication” – “Premeditation”, “medication”.
    • Paharps this eas whait the art’terlike is life feer th’everyone, nijust for her.

      • “Paharps” – “Perhaps”, “pa harps” (both in the sense of “harps on about” and “has a harp, being dead”).
      • “eas” – “Is”, “ease”, “eas” (“rivers”; Irish “waterfall”).
      • “whait” – “What”, “wait”.
      • “art’terlike” – “Afterlife”, “art to like”.
      • “life” – “Like”, “life”. The swapping of “life” and “like” may suggest an identity between living and pleasure.
      • “feer” – “For”, “fear”, “feer” (Manx “true”; dialect “companion”), “fearthainn” (Irish “rian”). Possibly “fee-er”, one who extracts fees.
      • “th’everyone” – “Everyone”, suggest??
      • “nijust” – “Not just”, “Nijinsky“, “unjust”.
    • Perhopes foreverybiddy, their while werlt and their while liffe is one ling ernd umusually hevent’fall day dat they/we’ll have fargarten by tomirror mourning whin thy Wake as couldn’t-careless babbis, to bagain the seem old tombless and belivered stirry all novver agone.

      • “Perhopes” – “Perhaps”, “through hopes”.
      • “foreverybiddy” – “For everybody”, “forever why” “biddy” (woman, archaic “Irish maidservant”).
      • “while” – “Whole”, “while”. This suggests the nature of time (“while”) as a physical dimension.
      • “werlt” – “World”, “welt”, “wert” (archaic “were”; German “worthy”).
      • “while” – See above.
      • “liffe” – “Life”, “River Liffey“.
      • “ling” – “Long”, “lingual” (relating to tongues or language), “ling” (Irish “leap”).
      • “ernd” – “And”, “end”, “earned”, “erned” (British dialect “to flow”, “to curdle”).
      • “umusually” – “Unusually”, “your muse is your ally”, “um usually” (to frequently express uncertainty?).
      • “hevent’fall” – “Eventful”, “heaven to fall” (suggestive of Milton’s Lucifer), “haven’t fallen”.
      • “dat” – “That”, “dat” (Latin “gave”), suggest??
      • “they/we’ll” – “They will”, “they and we will” (suggesting that “they” ARE “we”).
      • “fargarten” – “Forgotten”, “far garden”, “for garter”.
      • “tomirror” – “Tomorrow”, “to mirror”.
      • “mourning” – “Morning”, “mourning”.
      • “whin” – “When”, “win”, “whine”, “whinny”.
      • “thy” – “They”, “thy” (archaic “your”).
      • “Wake” – “Wake”, “Finnegans Wake“).
      • “couldn’t-careless” – “Couldn’t care less”, “careless”.
      • “babbis” – “Babies”, “babbis” (Italian “daddies”).
      • “bagain” – “Begin”, “be again”.
      • “seem” – “Same”, “seem”.
      • “tombless” – “Timeless”, “tomb-less” (undying, eternal).
      • “belivered” – “Beloved”, “believed”, “be live red”, “liver ed”, “liveried”.
      • “stirry” – “Story”, “stirring”, “starry”.
      • “novver” – “Over”, “never”, “nover” (French “to replace with something new”; Latin “I may have been changed”?).
      • “agone” – “Again”, “agone” (archaic “ago”; Italian “competition”), “agony”
  • Paragraph 63
    Perhaps, she thinks while sleeping in her blissful swoon, life is a seventy- or eighty-year long strip of celluloid. Lucia imagines this to be about the same length as, for instance, an old Charley Chaplin film, with every individual frame a single moment of our mortal span, from our birth-struggles underneath the opening titles to our tear-jerking demise with theend credits. We all start out as The Kid and wind up as a Little Tramp or possibly a Great Dictator. Either way, if our short features should last long enough, we find ourselves at last adrift in Modern Times, with which we’re largely unfamiliar. Even so, the first and last scene of the film and all the frozen frames that trace our flickering nonstop motion funny walking progress in between these points are all together on the reel at the same time, are all just millimeters from each other in the neatly-labeled cinematic canister. Nothing is really moving. We experience the tragicomical sequential story of our life, with all its pratfalls, and its punchlines, and its terrible X-rated scenes, only as the projector beam of our perceptions and awareness shines through each unmoving black-and-white transparency, each second where we twirled our cane or wiggled our mustache, with the rapidity of our perception through the static slideshow lending the illusion of continuous awareness, constant progress through our every waking moment and through every dreaming instant of our Arabian five-and-twenty thousand nights. By the same logic, when our main attraction epic is at last concluded, the reels that contain our tale are not erased or otherwise destroyed, but still remain to be sat through again, watched and experienced through all of eternity within the timeless Pearl & Dean cinema of our deathless awareness; of man’s soul. The angels, she envisions, would be critics, watching our slapstick performances and bowler-doffing escapades impartially before they hold their final inquest and agree upon their verdicts, from “lackluster” to “unmissable”.

    • Prehaps, she shinks while fleeting un her blusshful swoan, life physa seventary- or heighsty-year lang striep o’sellyuloud.

      • Prehaps” – “Perhaps”, “pre- haps” (before happemings). Possibly “prelapsarian” (relating to the period of innocemce before the Fall of man).
      • shinks” – “Thinks”, “shrinks” (as in “shrinks from”, or slang for psychiatrists), “sinks”, “shink” (to pour wine or beer).
      • fleeting” – “Sleeping”, “fleeting”, “flee tin”, “floating”. Very uncertain about this word; suggest??
      • un” – “In”, “on”, “un-“.
      • blusshful” – “Blissful”, “blush full”.
      • swoan” – “Swoon”, “swain” (lover), “swan”.
      • physa” – “Is a”, “physical”, “fizz”.
      • seventary” – “Seventy”, “sedentary”, “cemetery”.
      • heighsty” – “Eighty”, “heights tea”.
      • lang” – “Long”, “language”.
      • striep” – “Strip” (long thin piece, but also in the sense of “striptease”), “stripe”.
      • sellyuloud” – “Celluloid” (material of which film was made starting in 1909), “sell you loud”.
    • Lucia inmachines thus to be abate the sim lingth as, fher insdance, unold Cheerly Chappin feelm, with evary undievisual forme a stringle mement of our meretale spin, from our brith-striggles undernurthe the openyin tittles to our tire-joking demillse wittyend creadits.

      • inmachines” – “Imagines”, “in machines”, possibly “deus ex machina”.
      • thus” – “This”, “thus”.
      • abate” – “About”, “abate”.
      • sim” – “Same”, “simulation”, “sim” (Latin “I may be”?).
      • lingth” – “Length”, “language”, “tongue”, “lingam” (phallus), “lingthe” (Irish “leapt at”?).
      • fher insdance” – “For instance”, “of her own dance”.
      • unold” – “An old”, “un-old” (in Eternalism, “old” is meaningless), “unfold”.
      • Cheerly Chappin” – “Charlie Chaplin”, “cheery chap”.

        Chaplin as the Little Tramp
        Chaplin as the Little Tramp
      • feelm” – “Film”, “feel me” (film as a medium for conveying emotion).
      • evary” – “Every”, “e-vary” (unvarying, eternal).
      • undievisual” – “Individual”, “un-die” (again, undying, eternal) “visual”.
      • forme” – “Frame”, “form”, “for me”, “former”, “forme” (historical printing term).
      • stringle” – “Single”, “string”, possibly “strangle”.
      • mement” – “Moment”, “me meant”, “meme”, “memento”.
      • meretale spin” – “Mortal span” (lifetime), “(to) spin (a) mere tale”.
      • brith-striggles” – “Birth-struggles”, “brith” (Welsh “mottled”) “strigil” (grooming tool), “breath tickles”.
      • undernurthe” – “Underneath”, “under the earth”, “undernourished”.
      • openyin tittles” – “Opening titles” (credits at the beginning of a film), “open (reveal) your titties”.
      • tire-joking” – “Tear-jerking” (sad), “tired joking”.
      • demillse” – “Demise”, “them ills”.
      • wittyend creadits” – “With the end credits”, “witty end” “read it”, “credo”.
    • We all sturt out as Der Kind und wonedayp as a Littrle Traump or plossibly a Greyed Doctator.

      • sturt” – “Start”, “sturt” (obsolete dialect “to vex”).
      • Der Kind” – “The Kid” (1921 Chaplin film), “der kind” (German “the kid”), “do kind”.
      • und” – “And”, “und” (German “and”).
      • wonedayp” – “Wind up”, “one day”, “woned” (archaic “lived”).
      • Littrle Traump” – “Little Tramp” (not the name of any specific Chaplin film, but how his character in most of his work was referred to), “litter trump”, “literal trauma”.

        Chaplin as The Great Dictator
        Chaplin as The Great Dictator
      • plossibly” – “Possibly”, “plausibly”.
      • Greyed Doctator” – “Great Dictator” (1940 Chaplin film), “greyed” (aging) “doctor”.
    • Eother why, if our shord feutures should lost lang ineff, we fend oarsaves at laest adraft in Moredum Termes, wetwitch we’re larngely informiliar.

      • Eother why” – “Either way”, “other why”. Possibly “ether”.
      • shord feutures” – “Short features” (shorter films which used to be shown in between the “main” features), “shared futures”, “shored”, “shard”, “shord” (Romani “to flow”), “feutre” (spear holder).
      • lost lang” – “Last long”, “lost language”.
      • ineff” – “Enough”, “ineffable”, “ineffectual”.
      • fend” – “Find”, “fend”.
      • oarsaves” – “Ourselves”, “oar saves”
      • at laest” – “at last”, “at least”. Possibly “Laestrygonian” (mythical Greek tribe).
      • adraft” – “Adrift”, “a draft” (gust of wind; version of manuscript).
      • Moredum Termes” – “Modern Times” (1936 Chaplin film), “more dumb terms” (possibly an indictment of simplified language?).
      • wetwitch” – “With which”, “wet witch”.
      • larngely” – “Largely”, “laryngeal”, “learn gel”.
      • informiliar” – “Unfamiliar”, “information”, “info million”, “inform I liar”.
    • Eventsho, the fast and lirst scense o’the feelm and all the frooz’n fromes tha’trace our flickwrong nonstop-mation funny-walkin’progress in beturn those proints are ultigether on the rael at the see’em teeme, are all judd milliminnits frame each ofher in the nitely-liabelled scineormantic carnhistyr.

      • Eventsho” – “Even so”, “event show”, “event shore” (event horizon of a black hole), “events ho”.
      • fast and lirst” – “Last and first”, “fast and loose”, “lust”, “list”.
      • scense” – “Scenes”, “sense”.
      • feelm” – See first sentence of this paragraph.
      • frooz’n” – “Frozen”, “froo” (Plautdietsch “happy”) “zen”, suggest??
      • fromes” – “Frames”, “forms”. Possibly a reference to Ethan Frome.
      • tha’trace” – “That trace”, “the race”.
      • flickwrong” – “Flickering”, “fuck wrong”.
      • nonstop-mation” – “Nonstop motion”, “non” “stop-motion” (a type of film animation), “mations” (French “we got the better of”?) “ma shun”.
      • funny-walkin’progress” – “funny walking progress”, “Work in Progress“.
        • Chaplin’s Tramp character had a distinctive funny walk, which Lucia could mimic.
      • in beturn” – “In between”, “be turn”.
      • proints” – “Points”, “prints” (of film reels).
      • ultigether” – “All together”, “ultimate gather”.
      • rael” – “Reel” (of film), “real”.
      • see’em teeme” – “Same time”, “seems to me”, “see them teem”.
      • judd” – “Just”, “Jut”, “judder” (jerky television playback caused by mismatched frame rates).
      • milliminnits” – “Millimeters”, “moments”, “milli-minutes”.
      • frame” – “From”, “frame”.
      • ofher” – “Other”, “of her”.
      • nitely-liabelled” – “Neatly-labeled”, “nightly libelled”.
      • scineormantic” – “Cinematic”, “sin romantic”.
      • carnhistyr” – “Canister”, “carnal history”, “hysteria”.
    • Nothink is really moorphing.

      • Nothink” – “Nothing”, “no think”.
      • moorphing” – “Moving”, “morphing”, “moo” (as in moocow, see section 1, paragraph 2).
    • Wre-experience the tragichemical sequintial starry affairlife, wit’all its partfills, crendits pinchlines, e’dits torrible X-writed scins, onely as the prodictor-beam of our poorceptions and unwareness shimms through each onemorfing bleack-and-swhite trunsparingcy, each tickend whire we tworld arcane or twiggled our missterche, with the rapeyedarty of our pergreptsion t’rue the staidic sliceshow blending the illucian of continpurous aweirdness, cinstant procress through huor every waorkin’memeant and through ovary dremon unstant of ourabian fevern-twisty thoughtsand nights.

      • Wre-experience” – “We experience”, “re-experience”.
      • tragichemical” – “Tragicomical” (partaking of both tragedy and comedy), “alchemical”, “tragiche” (Italian “tragedies” (feminine)).
      • sequintial” – “Sequential”, “sequined”.
      • starry” – “Story”, “starry” (as in “starry-eyed” and “film stars”).
      • affairlife” – “Of our life”, “affair”.
      • wit’all” – “With all”, “wit (is) all”, “withal” (archaic “with that”, “all things considered”).
      • partfills” – “Pratfalls”, “part” (as in “a film role”) “fills” (suggesting extras who fill in the background).
      • crendits” – “Credits”, “end it”, “crendo” (Portuguese “believing”).
      • pinchlines” – “Punchlines”, “pinch” (steal, suggesting “scene stealer”) “lines” (of dialogue in a script).
      • e’dits” – “And its”, “edits”, “he (is a) ditz”.
      • torrible” – “Terrible”, “horrible”, “tolerable”.
      • X-writed” – “X-rated”, “ex- writed” (formerly written?).
      • scins” – “Scenes”, “sins”, “skins”.
      • onely” – “Onely”, “one lie”.
      • prodictor-beam” – “Projector-beam”, “predictor”.
      • poorceptions” – “Perceptions”, “poor”, suggest??.
      • unwareness” – “Awareness”, “unwariness”.
      • shimms” – “Shines”, “skims”, “shimmers”.
      • onemorfing” – “Unmoving”, “one more thing”, “one morphing”.
      • bleack-and-swhite” – “Black-and-white”, “bleak and shite”.
      • trunsparingcy” – “Transparency”, “unsparing”.
      • tickend” – “Second”, “ticket”, “tick” (as in clock) “end”.
      • whire” – “Where”, “wire”, “why are”, “hire”.
      • tworld arcane” – “Twirled our cane”, “world arcane”.
        • Possible reference to two characters from Moore’s Swamp Thing named Arcane.
      • twiggled” – “Wiggled”, “twigged” (slang “realized”).
      • missterche” – “Mustache”, “mister Che”, “Miss terse”.
      • rapeyedarty” – “Rapidity”, “rap eyed arty”, “rapid eye darty” (“Rapid Eye Movement” (dreaming sleep)).
      • pergreptsion” – “Perception”, “per” (through) “grep” (search text), suggest??
      • t’rue” – “Through”, “true”, “to rue”.
      • staidic” – “Static”, “staid”.
      • sliceshow” – “Slideshow”, “slices how” (suggesting the division of moments as panels, pages, or film frames).
      • blending” – “Lending”, “blending”, “blinding”.
      • illucian” – “Illusion”, “ill ocean”, “I Lucian”.
        • Probable reference to Lucian of Samosata, the primary source of historical information about Glycon, Moore’s deity.
      • continpurous” – “Continuous”, “contains porous”, “con tin pure us”.
      • aweirdness” – “Awareness”, “a weird” “ness” (promontory).
      • cinstant” – “Constant”, “C” (symbol for the speed of light) “instant”. Possibly “sea”, “sin”, “stand”, “consistent”.
      • procress” – “Progress”, “process”, “procreate”, “pro cress”.
      • huor” – “Our”, “hour”, “whore”.
      • waorkin’memeant” – “Waking moment”, “working me meant”, “meme ant”.
        • The last few words also contain a subtle “Work in Progress“.
      • ovary” – “Every”, “ovary”, “O vary”.
      • dremon” – “Dreaming”, “demon”.
        • Possible reference to Poe’s “The Raven“, which contains the line “And his eyes have all the seeming of a demon’s that is dreaming”.
      • unstant” – “Instant”, “un- stand”.
      • ourabian fevern-twisty thoughtsand nights” – “Our Arabian five-and-twenty thousand nights”, “our a-being fever twisty thoughts and nights”.
        • Combining a reference to The Arabian Nights (which numbered 1,001), and the 25,000 nights which comprise an average human lifespan (as discussed in the chapters “Rough Sleepers” and “Rabbits”).
  • Page 900
    • By the seem lowjoke, wence our man-attriction epoc is at list goncluded, the reals that contin our taell are not errased or etherwise dustdryed, but stell wemain to be seet thru agen, whiched and exterienced thrue h’all of sempiternity wittin the tomeless Dyin & Pearlygated sinnerma of our dearthless ‘ooweareness; of man’s soul.

      • seem” – “Same”, “seem”, “seam”.
      • lowjoke” – “Logic”, “low joke”.
      • wence” – “Once”, “whence” (archaic “from where”), “wince”, “wench”.
      • man-attriction” – “Main attraction” (featured film), “man a tricked one”. Possibly “friction”.
      • epoc” – “Epic”, “epoch”.
      • list” – “Last”, “list” (list of objects; tilt; archaic “likes”).
      • goncluded” – “Concluded”, “gone, you dead”.
      • reals” – “Reels” (of film), “realities”.
      • contin our taell” – “Contain our tale”, “continually” (unending).
      • errased” – “Erased”, “err I said”.
      • etherwise” – “Otherwise”, “ether -wise”.
      • dustdryed” – “Destroyed”, “dust dryed”.
      • stell” – “Still”, “stellar” (relating to stars, either celestial and filmic).
      • wemain” – “Remain”, “we mainly”.
      • seet thru” – “Sat through”, “seen true”.
      • agen” – “Again”, “aging”, “agent”. Possibly “agon” (struggle).
      • whiched” – “Watched”, “which head”, “(be-)witched”.
      • exterienced” – “Experienced”, “exterior” (technical term for “outdoors” used in film scripts).
      • thrue” – “Through”, “true”, “to rue”.
      • h’all” – “All”, “hall”, suggest??
      • sempiternity” – “Eternity”, “same paternity”, “sempiternity” (philosophy “existence within time but infinitely into the future; as opposed to “eternity”, understood as existing outside time”).
      • wittin” – “Within”, “witting” (conscious of), “tin wit”.
      • tomeless” – “Timeless”, “without books”.
      • Dyin & Pearlygated” – “Pearl & Dean”, “dying and pearly-gated” (referring to the description of Christian Heaven as having “pearly gates”).
        • Pearl & Dean are a British cinema advertising company, founded in 1953 (the same year Moore was born). Steve Noble reports that their “logo and theme precede each and every set of movie ads in all cinemas in the UK to this very day. Anyone here can sing you the song. https://youtu.be/3WQrLuaMBMw“.
        • Dean & Pearl are also referenced twice in the chapter “Upstairs”.
      • sinnerma” – “Cinema”, “sinner ma”.
      • dearthless” – “Deathless”, “dearth-less” (lacking nothing). Possibly “deartháir” (Irish “brother”).
      • “‘ooweareness” – “Awareness”, “who we are -ness”, “weariness”.
      • man’s soul” – “Man’s soul”, “Mansoul”.
    • The engels, she invisions, wourld be crueltics, watching oer sleepstuck perfromances and boawler-deffing escapeaids impersially befeer they hurld their fernall ownquest and agrue uponderr murdicts, from “lacklusia”to “annmissabelle”.

      • “engels” – “Angels”, “angles”, “Engels” (Friedrich (1820-1895), German social scientist who worked on The Communist Manifesto with Karl Marx). Possibly “gels” (devices for theatrical lighting).
      • “invisions” – “Envisions”, “in visions”.
      • “wourld be” – “Would be”, “would-be”, “world”.
      • “crueltics” – “Critics”, “cruel”.
      • “oer” – “Our”, “over”.
      • “sleepstuck” – “Slapstick”, “stuck (in) sleep”.
      • “perfromances” – “Performances”, “perforated romances”, “per” (through) “from ancestors”.
      • “boawler-deffing” – “Bowler-doffing” (a motion that Chaplin’s “Tramp” often performed), “bawler deafening”.
      • “escapeaids” – “Escapades”, “escape aids”.
      • “impersially” – “Impartially”, “imperially”. Possibly “silly imp”, “Persia”, “ally”.
      • “befeer” – “Before”, “be fear”. Possibly “feer” (Manx “correct”).
      • “hurld” – “Held”, “hurled”.
      • “fernall ownquest” – “Final inquest”, “Vernall’s inquest”, “fern all own quest”.
      • “agrue” – “Agree”, “argue” “a grue” (shiver; gore; a fictional monster that lives in darkness), “ag” (chemical symbol for silver) “rue”
      • “uponderr” – “Upon their”, “you ponder”, “up on the”.
      • “murdicts” – “Verdicts”, “murders”, “edicts”.
      • “lacklusia” – “Lackluster”, “lack Lucia”. Possibly “lose ya”, “loser”.
      • “annmissabell” – “Unmissable”, “Miss Ann Bell” (suggest??).
  • Paragraph 64
    Is her life, then, a single film, a single book, a single day that she repeats eternally, just like her Daddy’s solitary day in Dublin that can be reread a million times before you reach the meaning of it? If it is, Lucia decides, she doesn’t much mind after all. If she’s already dead and this is what it’s like, like being alive again upon a certain and specific sunny afternoon, sprawling with open legs between the nodding blossoms and with a good man on top of her, why, then she thinks it all sounds grand. If all of eternity is here and now, present in each one of her everlasting diamond instants, then is that not a remarkable and splendid situation? All the woodwork of the world, it seems to her, is to be found within the limits of Saint Andrew’s Hospital, with all of time exquisitely reflected in each indistinguishable day. To all intents and purposes she is the queen of all existence. She can make perambulations in the golden tale-time of myth and literature, or she can have it off with the departed shade of England’s most sublime pastoral poet, and it’s still only a little after breakfast. What a wonder it is, being Lucia Anna Joyce. She is the very goddess of creation. Will you look at her now?

    • Is herll liff, then, a cingle fulm, a songlee pook, a singirl di that she repeants herturnally, juyst like her Babbo’s solutary dayin’Doublein that can be re-rude a millin’termes befear you rich the maining of it?

      • “herll” – “Her”, “hurl”, “Erl”.
      • “liff” – “Life”, “River Liffey”.
      • “cingle” – “Single”, “cingle” (a kind of girdle; French “I sail”). Possibly “jingle”?
      • “fulm” – “Film”, “full”, “fulminate” (make a verbal attack; strike with lightning).
      • “songlee” – “Single”, “song (of) glee”, “son”. Possibly “anglais” (French “English “), “Song Lee” (Chinese name).
      • “pook” – “Book”, “poke”, “peek”, “peak’, “pooka” (shape-changing fairy). Possibly “pook” (Tagalog “place”).
      • “singirl” – “Single”, “sin girl”, “sing Erl”.
      • “di” – “Day”, “die”, “Di” (nickname for Princess Diana Spencer, see notes to chapter “ASBOs of Desire”).
      • “repeants” – “Repeats”, “repents”. Possibly “repaints”.
      • “herturnally” – “Eternally”, “her turn ally”.
      • “juyst” – “Just”, “Joyce”.
      • “solutary” – “Solitary”, “salutory”, “solution”.
      • “dayin’Doublein” – “Day in Dublin”, “dying double in”
        • Obiwanspicoli notes: “In Ulysses all of the events take place on 16 June 1904, now commonly referred to as Bloomsday (though technically the final three to four chapters bleed over into the 17th).”
      • “re-rude” – “Reread”, “re-rude” (rude again).
      • “millin’termes” – “Million times”, “milling terms” (words with multiple meanings?).
      • “befear” – “Before”, “be fear”.
      • “rich” – “Reach”, “rich”.
      • “maining” – “Meaning”, “main”, “maintaining”, “morning”.
    • Iffort is, Lucia decives, she doesn’t matchmind afert all.

      • “Iffort” – “If it”, “effort”, “River Liffey”. Possibly “ifrit” (genie).
      • “decives” – “Decides”, “believes”, “deceives”.
      • “matchmind” – “Much mind”, “match mind” (referring to her brilliance?), possibly “matchmaker”.
      • “afert” – “After”, “afeared”, possibly “ifrit” (genie). Possibly “fert” (Latin “he/she/it endures”).
    • If she’s aldeady read and this iswheet it’sleek, lake-being herlive o’gain upen a certime and spaceific sinny evternoon, strawling with oporn laygs boytorn the nuding blessems and with a gwood mien intip herfur, whee, danceshe thanks it all signds gland.

      • “aldeady” – “Already”, “all dead-y”.
      • “read” – “Dead”, “read”.
      • “iswheet” – “Is what”, “I sweet”.
      • “it’sleek” – “It’s like”, “it sleek”.
      • “lake-being” – “Like being”, “lake-being”.
      • “herlive” – “Alive”, “her life”.
      • “o’gain” – “Again”, “of gain”.
      • “upen” – “Upon”, “you pen”, “up in”.
      • “certime” – “Certain”, “sur-” (above) “time”.
      • “spaceific” – “Specific”, “space fic(tion)”.
      • “sinny” – “Sunny”, “sin -y”.
      • “evternoon” – “Afternoon”, “event”, suggest??
      • “strawling” – “Sprawling”, “strolling”, “straw”, “is trawling”.
      • “oporn” – “Upon”, “O porn”. Possibly “opornik” (Polish “resistor”).
      • “laygs” – “Legs”, “lay” (especially in the sense “have sex with”).
      • “boytorn” – “Between”, “boy torn”.
      • “nuding” – “Nodding”, “nude”.
      • “blessems” – “Blossoms”, “bless them”.
      • “gwood” – “Good”, “wood” (both in the literal sense, and in the slang sense of “erect penis”).
      • “mien” – “Man”, “mien” (attitude), “mine”.
      • “intip” – “On top”, “into”, “in tip” (as in the common sexual lie “I’ll just put the tip in”).
      • “herfur” – “Of her”, “her fur”.
      • “whee” – “Why”, “whee!” (expression of delight).
      • “danceshe” – “Then she”, “she dances”.
      • “thanks” – “Thinks”, “thanks”.
      • “signds” – “Sounds”, “signs”, possibly “songs”.
      • “gland” – “Grand”, “gland” (as in the sexual glands).
    • If allover meternity is her and new, prescent in each when of her everlusting diremonde insdance, than is thet not a remakeable and splaindad certuation?

      • “allover” – “All of her”, “a lover”, “all over”.
      • “meternity” – “Eternity”, “me turn it why”, “maternity”.
      • “her” – “Here”, “her”.
      • “new” – “Now”, “new”.
      • “prescent” – “Present” (both in the sense of “here” and “now”), “prescient”. Possibly “pre scent”.
      • “when” – “One”, “when”.
      • “everlusting” – “Everlasting”, “ever lusting”.
      • “diremonde” – “Diamond”, “dire” “monde” (French “world”). Possibly “Di” (Princess) “remind”.
      • “insdance” – “Instants”, “in dances”.
      • “than” – “Then”, “than”.
      • “thet” – “That”, “theta” (Greek letter), “Thetis” (mother of Achilles). Possibly “thetic” (pertaining to a thesis; dogmatic).
      • “remakeable” – “Remarkable”, “able to be remade”.
        • In Eternalism, the world is not “re-makeable” in terms of its events; those are all already fixed in time. Our reaction to those events, however, is subject to change. Ted Chiang treated this theme marvelously in the short story “The Merchant and the Alchemist’s Gate“.
      • “splaindad” – “Splendid”, “‘splain” (explain) “dad”.
      • “certuation” – “Situation”, certainty”.
    • All day wordwork o’the wold, it sames t’her, is to be fount wit’in the limins o’Sit Andrest Hapipil, with all of tame inquisitely reflettered in each industanguishable die.

      • “day” – “The”, “day”.
      • “wordwork” – “Woodwork”, “word work”, suggest??
      • “wold” – “World”, “wold” (archaic “grassland”, “forest”), “would”.
        • Possible reference to Philip Jose Farmer’s “Wold Newton family“, a mix of fictional continuities that may have influenced The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen.
      • “sames t’her” – “Seems to her”, “same as there”.
      • “fount” – “Found”, “fount” (fountain, spring).
      • “wit’in” – “Within”, “in wit”.
      • “limins” – “Limits”, “liminal spaces”.
      • “Sit Andrest Hapipil” – “Saint Andrews Hospital”, “sit and rest happy pill”, possibly “happy people”.
      • “tame” – “Time”, “tame”.
      • “inquisitely” – “Exquisitely”, “Inquisition”, “inquisitive”, “in quiet silly”, “ink we site lie”.
      • “reflettered” – “Reflected”, “re- lettered”.
        • Comic book writers (or editors) often rewrite parts of a work at the lettering stage, after the artwork has been completed. (Moore himself rarely did, but he would have been aware of the practice.) This has metaphorical application to changing one’s attitude towards an eternally recurring universe. Just as a changed caption may change the interpretation of a completed piece of artwork, so can a changed thought change how we see an unchanging series of events.
      • “industanguishable” – “Indistinguishable”, “understandable”, “Indus” (river which was the site of an early civilization), “in dust anguish able”. Possibly “industrial”.
      • “die” – “Day”, “die”.
    • To all instents and papasays she ishtar queer’n o’fall inxistence.

      • “instents” – “Intents”, “instants”.
      • “papasays” – “Purposes”, “papa says”.
      • “ishtar” – “Is the”, “Ishtar” (Babylonian goddess known as “Queen of Heaven”).
      • “queer’n” – “Queen”, “queer one”.
      • “o’fall” – “Of all”, “O fall” (evoking the Falls of both Lucifer and Man).
      • “inxistence” – “Existence”, “ink’s stance”.
    • She kin smake perundulations in the godlern tellit’me o’myrth and light’erassure, orghe can happytoff with the depanted sheaid of Hangland’s must sublim postoral pawit, andistill inlay a lietell ofter breakfarts.

      • “kin” – “Can”, “kin”.
      • “smake” – “Make”, “snake”, “smack” (as in “kiss”).
      • “perundulations” – “Perambulations”, “her undulations”.
      • “godlern” – “Golden”, “god learn”.
      • “tellit’me” – “tale-time”, “tell it to me”, possibly “twilight”.
      • “myrth” – “Myth”, “mirth”, “myrrh”.
      • “light’erassure” – “Literature”, “light erasure” (referring to the way Lucia has been “erased” from so much of the Joyce family history).
      • “orghe” – “Or she”, “orgy”.
      • “happytoff” – “Have it off” (slang “have sex”), “happy” “toff” (British slang “upper class person” — which John Clare very much is not).
      • “depanted” – “Departed”, “de- panted” (having removed his pants).
      • “sheaid” – “Shade” (ghost), “she aid”, “said”.
      • “Hangland’s” – “England’s”, “hang land”, “han” (various Nordic languages “he”) “gland”.
      • “must” – “Most”, “must”, “musty”.
      • “sublim” – “Sublime”, “subliminal”.
      • “postoral” – “Pastoral”, “post oral”.
      • “pawit” – “Poet”, “paw it”.
      • “andistill” – “And it’s still”, “an distill”.
      • “inlay” – “Only”, “inlay”.
      • “lietell” – “Little”, “lie tell”.
      • “ofter” – “After”, “ofter” (more often), possibly “softer”.
      • “breakfarts” – “Breakfast”, “break farts”.
    • Wetta windoor is it, be’in Lucia Anna Joyce.

      • “Wetta” – “What a”, “wetter”, “wetta” (German “sister”). Possibly “Weta” (New Zealand special effects company).
      • “windoor” – “Wonder”, “window door”, “win”, “wind”.
      • “be’in” – “Being”, “be in”. Possibly “be-in” (gathering of hippies).
    • She is thea viry goodesst o’croatoan.

      • “thea” – “The”, “Thea” (woman’s name), “Theia” (Greek “goddess”).
      • “viry” – “Very”, “virgin”, “viri” (Latin “men”).
      • “goodesst” – “Goddess”, “good destination”.
      • “croatoan” – “Creation”, “Croatoan” (the only clue as to the fate of the lost Roanoke Colony).
    • Will you luc at heer, now?

      • “luc” – “Look”, “Lucia”, “luc” (Dalmatian “place”).
      • “heer, now” – “Her, now”, “here and now”.
  • Paragraph 65
    With that awful sense of clarity that sometimes comes to us and jars us from the smug, contented slumber we were sinking into, Lucia knows suddenly that when she lets her eyes crack open, her rustic and lyric lover will have vanished; will’ve never truly been there. She is not the bride of galaxies and mother of all song at all, at all. She is a mad old woman who’s been wandering around the institution, lost in a sordid series of unlikely fantasies that are most often of a sexual nature, playing with herself in public, just like every other day.

    • With that rawful senks o’clawrity that seamtimes comes toworse and jarbs us from the smurk, cuntenterd slumper we weer synkhing into, Lucia knows shuddernly that when she lits her eyce crak eepin, her rutstick and layrick levor will have banished; willow’ve never treely barn there.

      • “rawful” – “Awful”, “raw full”, “fool”, “rueful”.
      • “senks” – “Sense”, “sinks” (as in “sinking feeling”).
      • “clawrity” – “Clarity”, “claw writing”.
      • “seamtimes” – “Sometimes”, “seam times” (times which mark a boundary (seam) between one state and another).
      • “toworse” – “To us”, “(from bad) to worse”.
      • “jarbs” – “Jars”, “jabs”, possibly “jobs”.
      • “smurk” – “Smug”, “smirk”, “is murky”, “smur” (dialect “light rain”).
      • “cuntenterd” – “Contented”, “cunt entered”.
      • “slumper” – “Slumber”, “slumped”, “lump her”.
      • “weer” – “Were”, “wee -er” (smaller), “weer” (Dutch “weather”).
      • “synkhing” – “Sinking”, “synonym king” (a title which could be applied to James Joyce or Alan Moore).
      • “shuddernly” – “Suddenly”, “shudder”.
      • “lits” – “Lets”, “lights”.
      • “eyce” – “Eyes”, “Joyce”.
      • “crak” – “Crack”, “rack”, “creak”.
      • “eepin” – “Open”, “he pin”, “eep” (expression of surprise) “-ing”.
      • “rutstick” – “Rustic”, “rut stick” (that is, “penis”).
      • “layrick” – “Lyric”, “lay” (have sex with) “rick” (close to “dick”, and therefore “penis”).
      • “levor” – “Lover”, “lever” (possibly yet another penis euphemism), “leave her”, “levor” (Latin “I am elevated”(?)).
      • “banished” – “Vanished”, “banished”.
      • “willow’ve” – “Will have”, “willow”.
      • “treely” – “Truly”, “tree lie”.
      • “barn” – “Been”, “barn”. Possibly “bairn” (dialect “child”).
    • She is nut the breede of girlextsies and myther ovall sangue at all, at all.

      • “nut” – “Not”, Nut” (Egyptian sky goddess), “nut” (crazy person).
      • “breede” – “Bride”, “breed”.
      • “girlextsies” – “Galaxies”, “girl ecstasies”.
      • “myther” – “Mother”, “myth her”.
      • “ovall” – “Of all”, “ova” (eggs).
      • “sangue” – “Song”, “sangue” (Italian “blood”).
    • She is a mudd eld woomin who’s been whendering aroundy institentiary, lust in a serdid sories of inlickly funtosees that are moist opten of a soxial nudger, plying with hersalve in pubelook, joycelike every uddle day.

      • “mudd eld” – “Mad old”, “muddled”, “eld” (archaic “antiquity”).
      • “woomin” – “Woman”, “wooing”, “human”.
      • “whendering” – “Wandering”, “when- dering” (wandering through time).
      • “aroundy” – “Around the”, “a round I”, suggest??
      • “institentiary” – “Institution”, “penitentiary”.
      • “lust” – “Lost”, “lust”.
      • “serdid sories” – “Sordid series”, “sir did stories”. Possibly “sorites” (rhetorical series of propositions).
      • “inlickly” – “Unlikely”, “in lick lie”, “unlucky”.
      • “funtosees” – “Fantasies”, “fun to sees”, “sieze”.
      • “moist opten” – “Most often”, “moist open”.
      • “soxial nudger” – “Sexual nature”, “social nudger”.
      • “plying with hersalve” – “Playing with herself” (masturbating), “plying with her salve”.
      • “pubelook” – “Public”, “pube look”.
      • “joycelike” – “Just like”, “Joyce-like”.
      • “uddle” – “Other”, “muddle”, “udder”.
  • Paragraph 66
    Her lashes stir and flutter like ebony moths as she awakens, sitting up to squint about her. It is much worse than she had anticipated, for not only has her poet paramour completely disappeared as she’d predicted, but the very light of day has summarily absented itself. While only thirty minutes ago it had still been a clear and sunny morning, now it is the dead of night, and here upon the green and needle-covered grass between the trees it is a moonlit world of black and silver.

    • Her lushes flir and stutter like epony myths as she awakeins, sotting up to squaint aborter.

      • “lushes” – “Lashes”, “lushes” (drunkards).
      • “flir and stutter” – “Stir and flutter”, “flirt”, “stutter”, possibly “fleer” (archaic “mockery”).
      • “epony” – “Ebony”, “pony”, “eponym” (word formed from someone’s name). Possibly “Epona” (Roman fertility goddess).
      • “myths” – “Moths”, “myths”.
      • “awakeins” – “Awakens”, “a wake in his”. Possibly “kein” (German “no, not”).
      • “sotting” – “Sitting”, “sotting” (drinking to drunkenness; becoming infatuated). Possibly “swotting” (British slang “studying hard”).
      • “squaint” – “Squint”, “quaint” (old-fashioned; slang “cunt”).
      • “aborter” – “About her”, “aborter”.
        • Carol Loeb Shloss suggests that Lucia may have had an abortion in the early 1930s. As with so much about Lucia’s life, all we really have are scanty hints.
        • James Joyce described the mythological Lilith as “patron of abortions” in chapter 14 of Ulysses.
    • It is mulch verse than she had antecepatered, for not unlay has her pawit pooramour compliterally disappealed as she’d prejicted, but the veri lieto’day has summilarly ibsented itself.

      • “mulch” – “Much”, “mulch” (material used to cover and protect the top layer of soil).
      • “verse” – “Worse”, “verse”.
      • “antecepatered” – “Anticipated”, “antecedent pater”.
      • “unlay” – “Only”, “un- lay” (to get up; to undo having had sex)
      • “pawit” – “Poet”, “paw it”.
      • “pooramour” – “Paramour”, “poor amour”
      • “compliterally” – “Completely”, “compose literally”.
      • “disappealed” – “Disappeared”, “dis- appealed” (become unappealing).
      • “prejicted” – “Predicted”, “projected”, “jilted” (rejected in love).
      • “veri” – “Very”, “veri” (Italian “truths”). Possibly “veri” (Finnish “blood”).
      • “lieto’day” – “Light of day”, “lie today”.
      • “summilarly” – “Summarily”, “similarly”.
      • “ibsented” – “Absented”, “Ibsen”.
        • Henrik Ibsen (1828-1906) was a major Nowegian playwright, and an influence upon James Joyce. His works were known for their realism (and darkness), so invoking him here, as Lucia’s bright fantasia of sex with John Clare gives way to literal darkness, seems apropos.
  • Page 901
    • Whylonely twirlty minuets ago it hed still bon a clare and sinny more’gen, neow it is the dread of naught, and here upine the crone and needelle-covert grase beterni’trees it is a meanlit wald o’blackund salver.

      • “Whylonely” – “While only”, “why lonely”
      • “twirlty” – “Thirty”, “twirl tie”. Possibly “flirty”.
      • “minuets” – “Minutes”, “minuets”.
      • “hed” – “Had”, “he’d”, “head”.
      • “bon” – “Been”, “bon” (French “good”).
      • “clare” – “Clear”, “Clare”.
      • “sinny” – “Sunny”, “sinning”.
      • “more’gen” – “Morning”, “more gen(ital?)”. Possibly “Morrigan” (Celtic war goddess).
      • “neow” – “Now”, “new”, “meow”.
      • “dread of naught” – “Dead of night”, “dread of nought” (fear of nothing), “dreadnought” (large military vessel).
      • “upine” – “Upon”, “supine”.
      • “crone” – “Green”, “crone” (old woman).
      • “needelle-covert” – “Needle-covered” (covered in needles from pine trees), “delle” (Italian “of the, from the”) “covert” (hidden; thick overgrowth).
      • “grase” – “Grass”, “graze”.
      • “beterni’trees” – “Between the trees”, “be eternity”.
      • “meanlit” – “Moonlit”, “meanly”.
      • “wald” – “World”, “wald” (forest).
      • “blackund salver” – “Black and silver”, “blackened” “salver” (one who cures; serving tray).
  • Paragraph 67
    She becomes afraid. At first she wonders if she’s actually fallen asleep, out here in the asylum woods, while night has fallen all around and where the doctors send out search parties to look for her. After she’s listened for a period and not heard any anxious voices calling out her name, Lucia concludes that she has simply come unfastened in her sense of time again. She’s leaped out of her madhouse day into a madhouse night, and can’t say that she much enjoys the atmosphere. Ambiguous and threatening, with dark shapes looming all around her, it reminds her all too fervidly of those infernal days in the late twenties and the early thirties, the bleak years that all her lucid dreams had upped and flown to Hell.

    • She becons afreet.

      • “becons” – “Becomes”, “beckons”, “beacons”.
      • “afreet” – “Afraid”, “ifrit” (genie).
    • At fearst she wunders if she’s actooearlly fellin farst aslip, out here in the asighloom weirds, while ’nert has pallen all aground and whereid duct’ers sanedoubt search-poeties to luc for her.

      • “fearst” – “First”, “fears to”
      • “wunders” – “Wonders”, “under”, possibly “understand”.
      • “actooearlly” – “Actually”, “act too early”.
      • “fellin” – “Fallen”, “felling”. Possibly “Fellini” (Italian filmmaker).
      • “farst aslip” – “Fast asleep”, “farce a slip”, “far stars lip”.
      • “asighloom” – “Asylum”, “a sigh loom”.
      • “weirds” – “Woods”, “weirds”.
      • “’nert” – “Night”, “inert”.
      • “pallen” – “Fallen”, “palling” (becoming dull), “pollen”. Possibly “pallen” (Scandinavian “stool”, “apple”).
      • “aground” – “Around”, “aground”.
      • “whereid” – “Where the”, “were id”.
      • “duct’ers” – “Doctors”, “abduct her”, “duct hearse”.
      • “sanedoubt” – “Send out”, “sane doubt”.
      • “search-poeties” – “Search parties”, “poetries”, “poetics”.
      • “luc” – “Look”, “Lucia”.
    • Aft’er she’s lessoned for a period and nut-herd inny unxious vurses cawling out her nym, Lucia concides date she has simpleye come unfirstend in her sans o’timmagen.

      • “Aft’er” – “After”, “aft of her”.
      • “lessoned” – “Listened”, “lessoned” (been instructed).
      • “nut-herd” – “Not heard”, “nut-herd” (group of crazy people).
      • “inny” – “Any”, “inner”, “inny” (concave belly button).
      • “unxious” – “Anxious”, “unctuous” (insincerely earnest).
      • “vurses ” – “Voices”, “verses”.
      • “cawling” – “Calling”, “caw -ling” (baby crow?), “crawling”.
      • “nym” – “Name”, “pseudonym”.
      • “concides” – “Concludes”, “decides”, “coincides”.
      • “date” – “That”, “date”.
      • “simpleye” – “Simply”, “simple yes”, “eye”
      • “unfirstend” – “Unfastened”, “un- first end”.
      • “sans o’timmagen” – “Sense of time again”, “sans” (without) “Finnegan“.
        • This recalls the famous line of Vonnegut’s Slaughterhouse-Five: “Billy Pilgrim has come unstuck in time”.
    • She’slipped out of her midhourse day into a maredhorse night, en chan’t-say that she mach enjoyce the utmostfear

      • “She’slipped” – “She’s leaped”, “she slipped”.
      • “midhourse” – “Madhouse”, “amid hours”, “mid-hours” (midday).
      • “maredhorse” – “Madhouse”, “mare horse”, “married”.
      • “en chan’t-say” – “And can’t say”, “enchant say” (perform a spell?).
      • “mach enjoyce” – “Much enjoys”, “Machen” (Arthur Machen (1863-1947), Welsh fantasy/horror author) “Joyce”.
      • “utmostfear” – “Atmosphere”, “utmost fear”.
    • Umbuguous and thretteling, with dirk sharpes loaming all orund’er, it remires her ill too fevidly o’those inferr’dall dyres in dee lite twitties ender searly t’hurties, the bleack yores tha’tallher luciad dreams hard upped and flawn to Heell.

      • “Umbuguous” – “Ambiguous”, “humbug” (foreshadowing that the upcoming section with J. K. Stephen will feature only a sham threat).
      • “thretteling” – “Threatening”, “throttling”, possibly “retelling”.
      • “dirk” – “Dark”, “dirk” (knife).
      • “sharpes” – “Shapes”, “sharps” (“knives”, but possibly also in the sense of “sharp medical instruments”).
      • “loaming” – “Looming”, “gloaming” (twilight), “loaming” (spreading with loam (a type of fertile soil)).
      • “orund’er” – “Around her”, “or under”, possibly “orotund” (pompous, bombastic).
      • “remires” – “Reminds”, “re- mires” (weighs down again).
      • “ill” – “All”, “ill”.
      • “fevidly” – “Fervidly” (intensely emotional), “fevered lie”, “vividly”. Possibly “fetid” (stinking).
      • “inferr’dall” – “Infernal”, “inferred all”, suggest??
      • “dyres” – “Days”, “dire”, “years”.
      • “dee lite” – “The late”, “delight”.
        • Possible allusion to Neil Gaiman’s Sandman, and the character of Delight, who later becomes Delirium.
      • “twitties” – “Twenties”, “twits”, “twitters”.
      • “ender” – “And the”, “ender” (one who ends), “end her”.
      • “searly t’hurties” – “Early thirties”, “sear(ing) lie to hurt us”.
      • “bleack” – “Bleak”, “black”. Possibly “blech” (expression of disgust).
      • “yores” – “Years”, “yore” (archaic “archaic”).
      • “tha’tallher” – “That all her”, “the tall her” (that is, Lucian, standing tall, with self-esteem).
      • “luciad” – “Lucid” (clear; sane; a “lucid dream” is a dream where one is conscious of the fact that they are dreaming), “Lucia”.
      • “hard upped” – “Had upped”, “hard up” (lacking resources, desperate).
      • “flawn” – “Flown”, “flaw”, possibly “lawn”.
      • “Heell” – “Hell”, “heel”, “he’ll”, suggest??
  • Paragraph 68
    Her teenage years had been a long and idyllic afternoon she’d thought would never end. Her and her dearest friend Kay Boyle had frolicked ar George Herbert’s Summer Camp in Deauville on the coast of Brittany, and then had joined the toga-wearing commune of artists and dancers formed by Raymond Duncan, brother of the blesséd Isadora. Raymond had been utterly obsessed with ancient Greece; had taught her to glide like a flattened shape as if she were a pointed figure on a shard of ancient pottery, demonically possessed of only two dimensions. He also appeared to half-believe that he was Ulysses, which mave been why ue was married to a woman named Penelope. It really was too perfect, being sixteen in that mythological environment, dancing to greet the rising sun with blosssoms in her maiden hair as if she were a hippy, trippy, go-to-San-Francisc-y girl of twenty-five years later.

    • Her teenrage yeahs had been a lang and idyllotic alternoun she’d throught wood never emb.

      • “teenrage” – “Teenage”, “rage”.
      • “yeahs” – “Years”, “yeah!” (expression of enthusiasm).
      • “lang” – “Long”, “languid”, “language”.
      • “idyllotic” – “Idyllic”, “idiotic”, “id ill tic”.
      • “alternoun” – “Afternoon”, “alter noun” (something this chapter does continually!).
      • “throught” – “Thought”, “through”, “throughout”.
      • “wood” – “Would”, “wood”.
      • “emb” – “End”, “ember”, “remember”.
    • Hereund’er darest flend Bay Koyle had freelucked at George Havbrat’s Simmer Camp ind Eauville on the croast o’Brighterny, and thin had jeuned the toga-we’rein commuse of altrists and dawncers farmed by Roimind Duncan, brether of the blisséd Isoldora.

      • “Hereund’er” – “Her and her”, “here under”.
      • “darest” – “Dearest”, “dares to”
      • “flend” – “Friend”, “lend”, “flendus” (Latin “worth lamenting”). Possibly “fiend”, “flense” (flay).
      • “Bay Koyle” – “Kay Boyle”, “bay coil”, “kohl” (dark eye makeup).
        Kay Boyle
        Kay Boyle
        • Kay Boyle (1902-1992), American novelist who was living in France at the time. When asked much later if she had seen any signs of madness in Lucia when she knew her, Boyle “said no” (Shloss, Introduction).
      • “freelucked” – “Frolicked”, “free lucked”.
      • “George Havbrat’s Simmer Camp” – “George Hebert‘s Summer Camp”, “have brats simmer”.
        Georges Hébert
        Georges Hébert
        • In summer 1922, “Lucia, with Helen Kieffer as her companion, was allowed to go to Deauville on the coast of Brittany, where a gentleman named George Hebert ran a summer program for adolescents” (Shloss, chapter 3). In summer 1923, Lucia “would once again spend the summer at Deauville. Helen Kieffer would return” (Shloss, chapter 4). Shloss makes no mention of Kay Boyle accompanying Lucia, so Moore (or Lucia) may have confused Boyle with Kieffer, another young friend of Lucia’s in France.
      • “ind Eauville” – “In Deauville”, “India”, “eau” (French “water”; Lincolnshire dialect “brook, stream”).
      • “croast” – “Coast”, “roast”, possibly “croak”.
      • “Brighterny” – “Brittany”, “bright and early”, possibly “bright eternity”.
      • “thin” – “Then”, “thin”.
      • “jeuned” – “Joined”, “jeune” (French “young”).
      • “toga-we’rein” – “Toga-wearing”, “we’re in”.
        • As mentioned below, Raymond Duncan was obsessed with ancient Greek culture, including the clothing.
      • “commuse” – “Commune”, “common muse”.
      • “altrists” – “Artists”, “altruists”. Possibly “all” “triste” (French “sad”).
      • “dawncers” – “Dancers”, “dawn” (referring to dancing at dawn, see last sentence of this paragraph).
      • “farmed” – “Formed”, “farmed”.
      • “Roimind Duncan” – “Raymond Duncan”, “roi” (French “king”) “mind”, possibly “remind”.
        Raymond Duncan, 1908
        Raymond Duncan, 1908
        • Raymond Duncan (1874-1966) was an American dancer and philosopher. Lucia Joyce and Kay Boyle joined his commune in Neuilly in the 1920s.
      • “brether” – “Brother”, “breather”, suggest??
      • “blisséd” – “Blesséd, “blissed”.
        • The accented é indicates that the stress goes on that syllable, as it Often does in Shakespeare, as opposed to modern English pronunciation.
      • “Isoldora” – “Isadora”, “Isolde” (of Tristan and Isolde).
        • Isadora Duncan (1877?-1927) was a famous and influential American dancer.
    • Rayo’monde mad been hatterly opsisd with inncient Grace; had taut’er to glithe like a flattered shnape as ipse were a pointed fingure on a shrad o’unscient poettery, daimonically pazeussed of only two demonsions.

      • “Rayo’monde” – “Raymond”, “Ray” (Middle English nickname “king”) “of the” “monde” (French “world”). Possibly “mondegreen” (misheard word).
      • “mad been hatterly” – “Had been utterly”, “Mad Hatter” (from Alice).
      • “opsisd” – “Obsessed”, “synopsis”, “op(eration?) sis(ter)”.
      • “inncient Grace” – “Ancient Greece”, “innocent grace”.
      • “taut’er” – “Taught her”, “more taut”.
      • “glithe” – “Glide”, “lithe”.

        Lucia Joyce in profile as from a Greek vase painting, Paris, circa 1925 (from Shloss).
        Lucia Joyce in profile as from a Greek vase painting, Paris, circa 1925 (from Shloss).
      • “flattered shnape” – “flattened shape”, “flattered nape”. Possibly “Schnapps”.
      • “ipse” – “If she”, “ipse” (Latin “herself”).
      • “pointed fingure” – “Painted figure”, “pointed finger”.
      • “shrad” – “Shard”, “shred”. Possibly “shraddha” (Hindu ceremony commemorating one’s dead relatives).
      • “unscient poettery” – “Ancient pottery”, “unscientific poetry”. Possibly “un sentient”.
      • “daimonically pazeussed” – “Demonically possessed”, “daimon” (“demon”, but also in the sense of “tutelary spirit”) “Pazuzu” (king of demons in Babylonian mythology).
      • “demonsions” – “Dimensions”, “demon sins”.
        • As discussed elsewhere in Jerusalem (“Choking on a Tune”, “Malignant, Refractory Spirits”, “Clouds Unfold”), Moore conceives of demons as being 2-dimensional reductions of 3-dimensional humanity. “They fold up into you.”
    • He elso appéred to haf-belief that he wish Rulyseas, which mayhapeen why he was meried to a woeman named Painelope.

      • “elso” – “Also”, “else”, suggest??
      • “appéred” – “Appeared”, “aped” (imitated) “pére” (Norman “father”), possibly a mistake for “père” (French “father”).
      • “haf-belief” – “Half-believe”, “have belief”, possibly “haf” (Icelandic “ocean”; Welsh “summer”).
      • “wish” – “Was”, “wish”.
      • “Rulyseas” – “Ulysses”, “rule the seas”, “(un)ruly”.
      • “mayhapeen” – “May have been”, “mayhap” (perhaps) “peen” (slang “penis”), “may happen”.
      • “meried” – “Married”, “merry”, “meridian”.
      • “woeman” – “Woman”, “woe (to) man”.
      • “Painelope” – “Penelope”, “pain elope”.
        • Raymond Duncan met his wife, Penelope, in Greece. Penelope was also the name of the wife of the mythological Ulysses.
    • Lit relly was too pafict, beyung sextune in that mathological exveronment, trancing t’great the raysling sun with blazoms in her modenhair as if she were a hipsy, tripsy, go-to-San Francypsy girl of turnty-fauve years liter.

      • “Lit relly” – “It really”, “literally”, “lit(erature)” “relly” (slang “relative”), “lit” (set alight).
      • “pafict” – “Perfect”, “pacifist”, “pa fict(ion)”.
      • “beyung” – “Being”, “be young”, “beyond”.
      • “sextune” – “Sixteen”, “sex tune”.
      • “mathological” – “Mythological”, “math logical”.
      • “exveronment” – “Environment”, “ex vero” (Latin “from truth”?), “experiment”.
      • “trancing” – “Dancing”, “trance”, possibly “tracing”, “racing”.
      • “t’great” – “To greet”, “the great”.
      • “raysling” – “Rising”, “ray-sling” (emitting rays of light). Possibly “Riesling” (type of white wine).
      • “blazoms” – “Blossoms”, “blazons” (ostentatious displays), possibly “bazooms” (slang “breasts”).
      • “modenhair” – “Maiden hair”, “maidenhair” (female pubic hair), “modern heir”.
      • “hipsy, tripsy, go-to-San Francypsy” – “Hippy, trippy, go to San Francisc-y”, “France gypsy”.
      • “turnty-fauve” – “Twenty-five”, “turn to” “fauvism” (late nineteenth century art movement emphasizing spontaneity and bright colors).
      • “liter” – “Later”, “liter”, “literature”.
  • Paragraph 69
    Of course, back then there’d been lots of bright young things like her, intelligent young women wading into the exhilarating shallows of the twentieth century, all liberated in their individuality and confidence that they might quite transmogrify the whole world for the betterment of their illustrious gender, back before they’d even got the vote, never considering that the hairy-chested world might have its own ideas upon that subject. With the sheer invincibility of youth she’d formed a dance troupe with her friends, Les Six de Rhythme et Couleur. Oh, hadn’t all of Paris, just for laughs, flocked to their Cinq Pièces Faciles when slender, neurasthenic girls were all the fashion, more than likely hoping that they’d be sex easy-peasies? Andre Beton had said that hysteria was a supreme mode of expression, had he not, now? Then there was her celebrated mermaid act in a costume with one leg bared and one clad in blue scales, the dance that had the critics saying that in future, James Joyce would be best known as Lucia’s father. Why, she’d been called the manifested spirit of that Zeitgeist and should have had the whole world at her feet, the naked one and shimmering blue one both. But, well, then everything had started to go badly. The darkness had descended on her life and the bewildering of the nicht had fallen.

    • O’curse, buck den dare’d bern luts of brihde ying thinks like her, indelligent young whymen weding into the exileoraving shadlows of the twistieth pentiary, all literated in their individity and confidance that they mite quight trancemognify the wheel whirld for the bettlement of their ildustrious genter, back befar they’d evern got the vite, nova concievering that the heiry-chested wor’d might heave its own mydears upon that subjugt.

      • “O’curse” – “Of course”, “O curse”.
      • “buck” – “Back”, “buck” (in the sense of “young man”). Possibly “Buck Rogers” (manly American space hero of the early twentieth century).
      • “den dare’d” – “Then there’d”, “den dare”. Possibly “Dan Dare” (manly British space hero of the early twentieth century).
      • “bern” – “Been”, “bern” (Scots “barn”; West Frisian “child”).
      • “luts” – “Lots”, “lust”.
      • “brihde ying thinks” – “Bright young things”, “bride yin-yang thinks”, “denying”.
        • Regarding the “lots of bright young things” like Lucia, this quote from Carol Loeb Shloss (chapter 16) may be helpful: 
        • The scene was a rough one, in ways that we can begin to measure simply by taking stock of the number of young women who ended the sexual adventures of their Parisian youth by recuperating in asylums of one sort or another. By the end of Lucia’s youth, Helen Fleischman was institutionalized, as was her good friend Yva Fernandez. Kay Boyle, Emily Coleman, Zelda Fitzgerald, and Nancy Cunard—just to name those in her immediate circle—spent time in asylums as well. Even Marthe Fleischmann, the young woman with whom Joyce had flirted in Zurich in 1918, ended up in a sanatorium after Joyce had his way with her.

      • “indelligent” – “Intelligent”, “indigent” (poor).
      • “whymen” – “Women”, “why men” (a fundamental question of feminism).
      • “weding” – “Wading”, “wedding” (something many young feminists deliberately avoided).
      • “exileoraving” – “Exhilarating”, “exile O raving”.
      • “shadlows” – “Shallows” (metaphorically “early years”), “shadows”.
      • “twistieth” – “Twentieth”, “twistiest”.
      • “pentiary” – “Century”, “penitentiary” (in direct contrast to being “liberated”).
      • “literated” – “Liberated”, “literary”, “alliterated”.
      • “individity” – “Individuality”, “own divinity”, “indivinity” (obsolete “absence of divine power).
      • “confidance” – “Confidence”, “dance”.
      • “mite” – “Might”, “mite” (very small thing).
      • “quight” – “Quite”, “quiet”, “quit”.
      • “trancemognify” – “Transmogrify”, “trance magnify”
      • “wheel” – “Whole”, “wheel”.
      • “whirld” – “World”, “whirled”.
      • “bettlement” – “Betterment”, “battlement”.
      • “ildustrious” – “Illustrious”, “industrious”.
      • “genter” – “Gender”, “gentler” (women are sometimes referred to as “the gentler sex”).
      • “befar” – “Before”, “be far (away from)”.
      • “evern” – “Even”, “ever”. Possibly “Severn” (an English river).
      • “vite” – “vote”, “vite” (French “quickly”; Italian “vine”, “lives”).
        • Obiwanspicoli notes: “In France, women would not gain the right to vote until 1944 with the first election taking place in 1945.”
      • “nova” – “Never”, “nova” (exploding star; Italian “new thing (f); Veps “swamp”).
      • “concievering” – “Considering”, “conceiving” (both in the sense of “thinking” and “bearing a child”).
      • “heiry-chested” – “Hairy-chested”, “heir” (typically male in western cultures).
      • “wor’d” – “Would”, “word”, “world”.
      • “heave” – “Have”, “heave”, possibly “heaven”.
      • “mydears” – “Ideas”, “my dears” (condescending form of address to women).
      • “subjugt” – “Subject”, “subjugate”.
    • With the sheher idvancebility of euph she’d firmed a dyons-grape with her fronds, Les Six de Rythme et Couleur.

      • “sheher” – “sheer”, “she her”.
      • “idvancebility” – “Invincibility”, “id”, “advance”, “dance bill”.
      • “euph” – “Youth”, “euphoria”. Possibly “euphemism”.
      • “firmed” – “Formed”, “firmed”.
      • “dyons-grape” – “Dance group”, “Dionysus” (god of wine and revelry) “grape”. Possibly “dyons” (hypothetical physics particle).
      • “fronds” – “Friends”, “fronds”.
        • “Les Six de Rythme et Couleur” – In English, “The Six of rhythm and color”. Note that, though Moore capitalizes “Rhythme et Couleur”, Shloss does not. It is also interesting that Moore does not perform any linguistic transmogrification of this non-English phrase-name, nor (similarly) does he below with “Cinq Pièces Faciles”.
        • Les Six de rhythme et couleur was an outgrowth/renaming of a group of young women that came together initially under the tutelage of Margaret Morris in 1924. Their first known performance under the name Les Six de rhythme et couleur was on November 20, 1926. (For more information, see Shloss, chapter 5.)
    • Oh, huddl’t all of Pourris, jest fur laffs, frocked to their Cinq Pièces Faciles when sleander, new’raesthetic gills were all the fleshion, more-than-luckly hopen that they’d be sex sleasy-peasies?

      • “huddl’t” – “Hadn’t”, “huddled”.
      • “Pourris” – “Paris”, “pourrisant” (French “decaying”), “pour”.
      • “jest” – “Just”, “jest”.
      • “fur” – “For”, “fur”, “furl”.
      • “laffs” – “Laughs”, “laff” (variant spelling of “laugh”; German “weak”).
      • “frocked” – “Flocked”, “frock” (dress), “frocked” (made a cleric).
        • “Cinq Pièces Faciles” – In English, “Five Easy Pieces”; a collection of music by Igor Stravinsky composed in 1917. Les Six de rhythme et couleur danced to it at their first concert.
      • “sleander” – “Slender”, “slander”. Possibly “Leander” (figure from Greek mythology who swam the Hellespont).
      • “new’raesthetic” – “Neurasthenic” (having suffered or likely to suffer a nervous breakdown), “new aesthetic”.
      • “gills” – “Girls”, “gills” (bringing in a “fish” theme that will continue over the next few sentences).
      • “fleshion” – “Fashion”, “flesh in”.
      • “more-than-luckly” – “More than likely”, “luckily”, “luck lie”.
      • “hopen” – “Hoping”, “happen”, “ho, pen!”, “hopen” (Scandinavian languages “a heap”).
      • “sex sleasy-peasies” – “Six easy-peasies”, “sleazy”.
        • This, of course, plays on both the name of the group in French, and “Five Easy Pieces” in English.
    • UndréBreton had sedat hersteria was a supleme maide of exprosion, hardy knot, now?

      • “UndréBreton” – “André Breton”, “sunder”, “sundry”, “undre” (Danish “to be a surprise”), “Breton” (language spoken in Brittany).
        Andre Breton
        Andre Breton
        • André Breton (1896-1966) was a French writer, best known as the founder of surrealism.
      • “sedat” – “Said that”, “sedate”.
      • “hersteria” – “Hysteria”, “her”, possibly “herstory”.
      • “supleme” – “Supreme”, “supplement”.
      • “maide” – “Mode”, “maid”.
      • “exprosion” – “Expression”, “explosion”.
        • I have been unable to find an exact quote which matches this, but Breton did call hysteria “one of the most beautiful poetic discoveries of our epoch” and expressed similar sentiments on multiple occasions.
      • “hardy” – “Had he”, “hardy”, “hard why”.
      • “knot” – “Not”, “knot”.
    • Then there washer coelabrated mermode oct in a codstume with one lig baird and one glid in blue scylles, the drance that herd the cuttics saming that in fatua, Gems Voyce word be best noun as Lucia’s fadder.

      • “washer” – “Was her”, “washer”.
      • “coelabrated” – “Celebrated”, “coelacanth” (a type of deep-water fish, thought until 1938 to have been extinct), “coelum” (medieval Latin “sky, heaven”).
      • “mermode” – “Mermaid”, “mere mode”. Possibly “her mode”, or even “Hermod” (Messenger of the Norse gods).
        Lucia Joyce in her mermaid costume.
        Lucia Joyce in her mermaid costume.
        • The accompanying photograph of Lucia in her mermaid costume was used as the cover image of Carol Loeb Shloss’s biography of Lucia Joyce. It was also clearly used by Moore in composing the cover of Jerusalem; one of the upper floors of the “angel’s body” depicts Lucia dancing, in the same pose and costume.
        • This costume/act debuted during a contest on May 24, 1929, her first solo competition. While Lucia did not win, a letter from James Joyce alleges that the audience loudly cried “l’Irlandaise! Un peu de justice, Messieurs!” (“The Irish girl! Gentlemen, be fair!”; quoted in Shloss, chapter 7).
      • “oct” – “Act”, “octopus”.
      • “codstume” – “Costume”, “codfish”, possibly “codpiece”.
      • “lig” – “Leg”, “light”, “lig” (British dialect “to lay”; Irish “to allow”; Old English “fire”).
      • “baird” – “Bared”, “bairn” (Scots “child”), “bàird” (Scottish Gaelic “poets”).
      • “glid” – “Clad”, “glide”, “gilded”, “glib”.
      • “scylles” – “Scales”, “Scylla” (a sea monster in Greek mythology).
      • “drance” – “Dance”, “trance”.
      • “herd” – “Had”, “heard”.
      • “cuttics” – “Critics”, “cuttlefish”, “cut tics”.
      • “saming” – “Saying”, “same -ing”, “seeming”.
      • “fatua” – “Future”, “fatuous”. Possibly “fata” (as in fata morgana).
      • “Gems Voyce” – “James Joyce”, “gems voice”.
      • “word” – “Would”, “word”.
      • “noun” – “Known”, “noun”
      • “fadder” – “Father”, “fad”, “fader”.
        • One critic, at least, writing for the Paris Times in March 1928: “When she reaches her full capacity for rhythmic dancing, James Joyce may yet be known as his daughter’s father.” (quoted in Shloss, chapter 6).
    • Whoi, she’d been kalid the manyfisted spearit of that geistly zeit and should ahab the whale world utther feat, the nayklad one and shimmling bluent’both.
      • “Whoi” – “Why”, “who (am) I?”.
      • “kalid” – “Called”, “Kali” (Hindu goddess). Possibly “alkalide”.
      • “manyfisted” – “Manifested”, “many-fisted”.
      • “spearit” – “Spirit”
      • “geistly zeit” – “Zeitgeist”, “ghostly site”, “ghastly sight”, “geistlich” (German “spiritual”) “zeit” (German “time”).
        • I have been unable to discover any such description of Lucia Joyce. Suggest??
        • In The Wicked + The Divine: 1923 Special, Kieron Gillen (a longtime admirer of Moore’s) depicts a conspiracy of gods in 1923 attempting to incarnate (and thus capture and control) the zeitgeist.
      • “ahab the whale” – “Have had the whole”, “Ahab (and) the whale” (referring to Moby Dick).
      • “utther feat” – “At her feet”, “utter defeat”.
      • “nayklad” – “Naked”, “not clad”, “skyclad” (naked), “lad”. Possibly “naklada” (Serbo-Croatian “edition; publisher”), “na klar” (German “sure thing”).
      • “shimmling” – “Shimmering”, “shimmying”, suggest??
      • “bluent’both” – “Blue one both”, “fluent”. Possibly “blunt”, “bluestocking” (a cultured woman).
        • That is to say, the world should be at her feet, as they appeared in the mermaid costume.
  • Page 902
    • Bitt, well, then everythink had stutterd to go badily.

      • “Bitt” – “But”, “bitter”, “bitte” (German “please”; French slang “penis”).
      • “everythink” – “Everything”, “every think”.
      • “stutterd” – “Started”, “stuttered”.
      • “badily” – “Badly”, “bawdily”, “dilly(-dally)”.
    • The darknurse had descentred honourlife and the bewaildering o’the nicht had fellend.

      • “darknurse” – “Darkness”, “dark nurse”.
      • “descentred” – “Descended”, de- centered”, “descent red”.
      • “honourlife” – “On her life”, “honor”.
      • “bewaildering o’the nicht” – “bewildering of the nicht” (see note), “bewailing”, “bewilder”, “night”, “nicht” (German “not”; Scots “night”).
        • The phrase “bewildering of the nicht” is quoted several times (and once misquoted!) in Shloss. It apparently was originally said by James Joyce to his friend Jacques Mercanton, concerning his agony and guilt over Lucia’s condition. As related by Mercanton years later:
        • In that night wherein his spirit struggled, that “bewildering of the nicht,” lay hidden the poignant reality of a face dearly loved. He gave me details about the mental disorder from which his daughter suffered, recounted a painful episode without pathos, in that sober and reserved manner he maintained even in moments of the most intimate sorrow. After a long silence, in a deep, low voice, beyond hope, his hand on a page of his manuscript: “Sometimes I tell myself that when I leave this dark night, she too will be cured.”

      • “fellend” – “Fallen”, “fell end” (grim conclusion).
  • Paragraph 70
    Firstly, during nineteen twenty-nine, her brother had announced that he was going to marry Helen Kastor, nearly old enough to be his mother. All his life he would be trying to climb back up the enormous hole that he squirmed out of, which in that same year was diagnosed as having uterine cancer. Lucia, only twenty-two years old, had still been trying to establish a more nourishing connection with her mother, and had been completely devastated. All the people that she’d tried to love were leaving her, and Giorgio’s desertion was the worst of all. He’d suddenly stopped being intimate with her and, even more upsetting, had attempted to pretend that their affair had never happenedWhen Lucia had insisted that it had been going on since she was only ten, that was the first time that he used the powerful and frightening magic word insane and the first time anyone had claimed she was delusional. Though everyone could see that Giorgio’s young/old bride was flirting shamelessly with his immortal father, her big brother didn’t want his happy marriage sullied by the inconvenient fact that he’d been fornicating with his little sister for the best part of a dozen years. For her part, Lucia had been shaken by the idea that he could prefer the body of a woman who was almost forty to her own Ophelian contours. It was at this point, Lucia realizes looking back, that she had started to develop her obsession with her wonky eye, certain that this must be the feature which disfigured her and drove away her lovers. She had felt less like a Nausicaa than like a Polyphemus, a horrific cyclops who kept stranded mariners and boyfriends captive in her useless, hateful darkness, just so she might have a bit of company.

    • Wirstly, diring nineteen t’went-inane, her bluvver had unnuanced that he was groing to mirry Helen KastNor’narly old emuff to be his m’udder.

      • “Wirstly” – “Firstly”, “worst lie”.
      • “diring” – “During”, “dire”.
      • “t’went-inane” – “Twenty-nine”, “it went insane”, “inane”.
      • “bluvver” – “Brother”, “lover”, possibly “blubber” (cry).
      • “unnuanced” – “Announced”, “un-nuanced”.
      • “groing” – “Going”, “groin”.
      • “mirry” – “Marry”, “mirror” (of his mother?), “miry” (relating to a swamp). Possibly “mirri” (Finnish slang “vagina”), “mirra” (Italian “myrrh”).

        Giorgio and Helen (photo by Man Ray)
        Giorgio and Helen (photo by Man Ray)
      • “KastNor’narly” – “Kastor, nearly”, “cast normally”, “ordinarily”. Possibly “kast” (Icelandic “seizure”).
      • “emuff” – “Enuff”, “muff” (slang “vagina”).
      • “m’udder” – “Mother”, “my udder”.
        • As obiwanspicoli points out, Helen was only eleven years older than Giorgio.
    • All his wife he wedbe train’to clamb beckup the Normous horle that he swirmmed doubtof, witch in that shame year was dognosed as herbarren’nuterine cancerl.

      • “wife” – “Life”, “wife”.
      • “wedbe” – “Would be”, “wedded”. Possibly “wedbrek” (obsolete “adulterer”).
      • “train’to” – “Trying to”, “train to”.
      • “clamb” – “Climb”, “clamber”, “clam” (slang “vagina”).
      • “beckup” – “Back up”, “(Samuel) Beckett” (see paragraph 72, below), “beckon”.
      • “Normous” – “Enormous”, “Nora’s”, “nor mouse”.
      • “horle” – “Hole”, “whore”. Possibly “horloge” (French “clock”).
      • “swirmmed” – “Squirmed”, “swimmed”, “swarmed”.
      • “doubtof” – “Out of”, “doubt of” (possibly alluding to the dubious identity of Giorgio’s father).
        • This is an old joke about men in general, not just Giorgio.
      • “witch” – “Which”, “witch”.
      • “shame” – “Same”, “shame”.
      • “dognosed” – “diagnosed”, “dog nosed”.
      • “herbarren’nuterine” – “Having uterine”, “her barren” “nut Erin” (Irish madwoman). Possibly “nuteris” (Latin “you might have been signalled”?), “nutrients”.
      • “cancerl” – “Cancer”, “cancel”.
        • Two doctors suspected Nora of having uterine cancer in November 1928 (without apparently making a formal diagnosis). In February 1929, Nora had a hysterectomy (Shloss, chapter 7).
    • Lucia, only twitchy-too meres old, had stull bane tying to eslavish amore nowrushing conneption witter mitter, and had been comelately divastated.

      • “twitchy-too” – “Twenty-two”, “too twitchy”.
      • “meres” – “Years”, “mere” (only; obsolete “famous”), “meres” (lakes; boundary-markers; Latin “you deserve”).
      • “stull” – “Still”, “sullen”. Possibly “stull” (a timber framework to protect miners from falling stones)
      • “bane” – “Been”, “bane”.
      • “tying” – “Trying”, “tie-ing”.
      • “eslavish” – “Establish”, “slavish”, “is lavish”.
      • “amore” – “A more”, “amore” (Italian “love”).
      • “nowrushing” – “Nourishing”, “now rushing”.
      • “conneption” – “Connection”, “conniption” (a fit of anger).
      • “witter mitter” – “With her mother”, “wit to mitt her”, “witter” (to speak at length of trivia; obsolete “knowing”; Scots “water”) “mitter” (Scots “matter”).
      • “comelately” – “Completely”, “come lately”, “Johnny-come-lately” (newcomer).
      • “divastated” – “Devastated”, “diva” (female celebrity; extremely self-important, fussy person; Latin “goddess”) “stated”.
        • While this portrait of Lucia’s reaction to her mother’s illness is plausible, it is notably not attested to in Shloss.
    • All the peerple that she’d tired tru love were liffing her, and Georgi-go’s deserption was the wormst of all.

      • “peerple” – “People”, “peer” (to look; an equal in status) “please”.
      • “tired tru love” – “Tried to love”, “tired through love” (descriptive of any close family members of the mentally-challenged), “true love”.
      • “liffing” – “Leaving”, “River Liffey”.
      • “Georgi-go’s” – “Giorgio’s”, “gigolo” (Lucia called Giorgio a gigolo at about this time (Shloss, chapter 7)), “Georgie goes”
      • “deserption” – “Desertion”, “the serpent in”.
      • “wormst” – “Worst”, “worms”.
    • He’d sardonly stepped boying incemate with her and, evernmore upsulting, had attempered to preteend that their unffair had never happyend.

      • “sardonly” – “Suddenly”, “sardonically”.
      • “stepped” – “Stopped”, “stepped (on?)”.
      • “boying” – “Being”, “boy -ing”.
      • “incemate” – “Intimate”, “incest mate”.
      • “evernmore” – “Even more”, “nevermore” (possibly another reference to Poe’s “The Raven”).
      • “upsulting” – “Upsetting”, “insulting”.
      • “attempered” – “Attempted”, “hot-tempered” (Which Lucia and Nora both were).
      • “preteend” – “Pretend”, “pre-teen” (Lucia’s state when their affair began, according to Moore’s version of events).
      • “unffair” – “Affair”, “unfair”.
      • “happyend” – “Happened”, “happy ending” (how fairy tales traditionally end; slang for “orgasm”, especially one administered by a masseuse).
    • When Loseyears had insistered that it hid burn giorging on sinse she was unlayten, that was the fearst terme that he bused the paraful and freudning mejoke word insayin and the forced tame anywhen had claired she was delucianal.

      • “Loseyears” – “Lucia”, “lose years”.
      • “insistered” – “Insisted”, “in sister (inserted)”.
      • “hid burn” – “Had been”, “hid burn”.
      • “giorging” – “Going”, “Giorgio”, “gorging”.
      • “sinse” – “Since”, “sins”.
      • “unlayten” – “Only ten”, “unlay” (what Giorgio’s denials are attempting to do), “latent”.
      • “fearst” – “First”, “fears to”.
      • “terme” – “Time”, “term” (word; period of time).
      • “bused” – “Used”, “abused” (both linguistically and sexually).
      • “paraful” – “Powerful”, “paragraph”, “para” (British slang “very drunk”).
      • “freudning” – “Frightening”, “Freudian”.
      • “mejoke word” – “Magic word”, “me joke”.
        • Moore’s views about the literal magical power of language are, of course, well known.
      • “insayin” – “Insane”, “in saying”. Possibly “I’m just sayin'”.
      • “forced” – “First”, “forced”.
      • “tame” – “Time”, “tame” (what Giorgio is attempting to do to Lucia).
      • “anywhen” – “Anyone”, “any when”.
      • “claired” – “Claimed”, “declared”.
      • “delucianal” – “Delusional”, “de” (Latin “of”) “Lucia ill”.
        • As with the entire matter of the Giorgio/Lucia incest, this is largely invented by Moore. Giorgio did first bring Lucia to a maison de santé (Shloss, chapter 9), but this happened in early 1932, over a year after Giorgio’s marriage in December 1930.
    • Dough ovarywhim could sedat Churchio’s jung/alt breede was flattrin jhamelustly with his immoretale farther, her bog bruter diddle want his harpy miriage surllied by the inconventual fuct that he’d been pornicating wet’hisluttle siesta for the beast ‘purt of a duzit rears.

      • “Dough” – “Though”, “dought”, “dough”.
      • “ovarywhim” – “Everyone”, “ovary whim”.
      • “sedat” – “See that”, “sedate”.
      • “Churchio’s” – “Giorgio’s”, “church”.
      • “jung/alt” – “Young/old”, “Jung alternate”.
      • “breede” – “Bride”, “breed”. Possibly “bread” (going with “dough”, above).
      • “flattrin” – “Flirting”, “flattering”.
      • “jhamelustly” – “Shamelessly”, “James lustily”.
      • “immoretale” – “Immortal”, “I’m more tale”, possibly “immoral”.
      • “farther” – “Father”, “farther”.
        • Helen’s own memoir (as related in Shloss chapter 7) attests that Helen and James Joyce shared a mutual attraction upon first meeting.
      • “bog bruter” – “Big brother”, “bog brute”.
      • “diddle” – “Didn’t”, “diddle” (to have sex with, often in a childish context).
      • “harpy” – “Happy”, “harpy” (mythological monster with a woman’s face; shrewish woman).
      • “miriage” – “Marriage”, “mirage”.
      • “surllied” – “Sullied”, “surly”.
      • “inconventual” – “Inconvenient”, “unconventional”, “in convent you’ll”, possibly “nonconsensual”.
      • “fuct” – “Fact”, “fucked”.
      • “pornicating” – “Fornicating”, “porn”.
      • “wet’hisluttle” – “With his little”, “wet high slut tale”.
      • “siesta” – “Sister”, “siesta”.
      • “beast” – “Best”, “beast”.
      • “‘purt” – “Part”, “spurt”.
      • “duzit rears” – “Dozen years”, “does it (from the) rear”, “doozy” (large problem) “rears (up)”.
    • Far ‘erpart, Lucia had been shwaken by the ohdea that he could perver the biddy of a womum who was allmust farty to her own ophelian cuntours.

      • “Far ‘erpart” – “For her part”, “far apart”.
      • “shwaken” – “Shaken”, “she awakens”.
      • “ohdea” – “Idea”, “oh dear”.
      • “perver” – “Prefer”, “perverse”.
      • “biddy” – “Body”, “biddy” (old woman).
      • “womum” – “Woman”, “woe mum”
      • “allmust” – “Almost”, “all must” (possible reference to a Shakespeare song about mortality containing the lines “Golden lads and girls all must,/ As chimney-sweepers, come to dust.”).
      • “farty” – “Forty”, “fart-y”.
      • “ophelian” – “Ophelian”, possibly “ophidian” (snake-like), suggest??
        • Comparing herself to Hamlet‘s girlfriend Ophelia, young, beautiful, and betrayed in away that drove her insane.
      • “cuntours” – “Contours”, “cunt ours”, “tours”.
    • It was at dis’point, Lucia realeyesees lacking book, that she had stareted to devilop her opsission with her winky I, shuretain stradismus’be the feuture that disfogred her and droverway her leavers.

      • “dis’point” – “This point”, “disappoint”.
      • “realeyesees” – “Realizes”, “real eye sees”.
      • “lacking book” – “Looking back”, “lacking book”.
      • “stareted” – “Started”, “stare”.
      • “devilop” – “Develop”, “devil op(eration)”.
      • “opsission” – “Obsession”, “opposition”, “op(tical) session”.
      • “winky I” – “Wonky eye”, “winky I”.
      • “shuretain” – “Certain”, “sure taint”.
      • “stradismus’be” – “That thismust be”, “strabismus” (a defect of vision that causes squinting or cross-eyed-ness).
        • Lucia did suffer from strabismus. According to family friend Stuart Gilbert (Shloss, chapter 8), Lucia had an (apparently unsuccessful) eye operation in January 1930 and was increasingly worried about this condition in late 1930 (just when Giorgio was getting married).
      • “feuture” – “Feature”, “future”.
      • “disfogred” – “Disfigured”, “ogred” (made ogre-like), possibly “disgorged”, “this fog red”.
      • “droverway” – “Drove away”, “drover way” (referring to the sheep trail from Wales to Northampton, see chapters “X Marks the Spot”, “Blind, but Now I See”).
      • “leavers” – “Lovers”, “leavers” (calling back to the third sentence of this paragraph, with its explicit worry that those Lucia loves are leaving her), “leaves”.
    • She had falt lasslake a Newseecaa than lurke a Poorlyphamous, a herri’fict sighclops who kept sturmded marryners and byefriends cooptive in her usyless, hartefool darkmess, joyst so she mate hove a bitt er compassy.

      • “falt” – “Felt”, “fault”. Possible “falt” (Scottish Gaelic “hair”).
      • “lasslake” – “Less like”, “lass lake” (possible reference to the Lady of the Lake, a figure from Arthurian myth).
      • “Newseecaa” – “Nausicaa”, “new seeker”, “news”.
        • Nausicaa is a woman from The Odyssey, previously mentioned in paragraph 14 (section 1).
      • “lurke” – “Like”, “lurk”.
      • “Poorlyphamous” – “Polyphemus”, “poorly famous”.
        • Polyphemus was a monstrous cyclops in The Odyssey.
      • “herri’fict” – “Horrific”, “her, in fact”, “herr” (German “mister”), “I (am) fiction”.
      • “sighclops” – “Cyclops”, “sigh”.
      • “sturmded” – “Stranded”, “storm dead”.
      • “marryners” – “Mariners”, “marry her”.
      • “byefriends” – “Boyfriends”, “bye, friends”.
      • “cooptive” – “Captive”, “cooperative”, “co-opt”.
      • “usyless” – “Useless”, “Ulysses”.
      • “hartefool” – “Hateful”, “heart fool”.
      • “darkmess” – “Darkness”, “dark mess”.
      • “joyst” – “Just”, “Joyce”. Possibly “joust”.
      • “mate hove” – “Might have”, “mate” “hove” (heaved; obsolete “to wait, to remain”).
      • “bitt er” – “Bit of”, “bitter”.
      • “compassy” – “Company”, “compass”, “encompass”.
        • Obiwanspicoli points out that this sounds a bit like the Nene hag.
  • Paragraph 71
    It had been that same year that she had been invited by Max Merz to live out a long-cherished dream by teaching dance at the prestigious Elizabeth Duncan School in Darmstadt, named for yet another sibling of poor bye-bye blackbird Isadora. But Max Merz was a disgusting man who dreamed of the Teutonic master-race and practiced the most awful prejudice against some of the pupils at his own establishment. His ideas had been instantly repugnant to Lucia, utter balderdash, although it would be several years before she and the rest of Europe really understood the full monstrosity of what they represented. She remembers seeing her first images of the precise, goose-stepping ranks and understanding why the Busby Berkeley chorus lines had always filled her with an obscure horror at the loss of human individuality that was apparent in all those insectile, kicking legs. She’d turned Merz down, knowing that it would be the end of her career, a mountain pinnacle that she’d turned back from; knowing that it would be all downhill from there.

    • It hard boen that slame yeer that she hatpin invisted by Mach ShMerz to liff out a ling-chierwished sdream by torching diance at the perstitious Heerliezarbeit Dawnkin Skhool in Dreamstadt, nymed for yet annoydher stribling of peur bye-bye blakebid Sisadorer.

      • “hard boen” – “Had been”, “hard bone” (erect penis).
      • “slame” – “Same”, “slam”, “slime”.
      • “yeer” – “Year”, “ye”. Possibly “yesteryear”, “eye”, suggest??
      • “hatpin” – “Had bin”, “hatpin”.
      • “invisted” – “Invited”, “invested”, “in visited”.
      • “Mach ShMerz” – “Max Merz”, “mach” (speed of sound; German “do!”; Welsh “small”) “merz” (Ladin “March”), suggest??
        • Max Merz was the husband of Elizabeth Duncan (see below), and seems to have been the shaping force behind the policies of her school (Shloss, chapter 6). More details throughout the notes for this paragraph.
      • “liff” – “Live”, “River Liffey”.
      • “ling-chierwished” – “Long-cherished”, “ling(uistic)”, “ling” (Irish “leap”), “cher” (French “dear”) “wished”, “chier” (French slang “to shit”).
        • The combination of “long-cherished” with a word meaning “shit” brings to mind a conversation between Dave Sim and Alan Moore where Moore said (in reference to the comics industry in the middle 1980s):
        • We got everything we ever asked for, just as one often finds in real life or the better fairy stories, and just like in real life or the better fairy stories it turned out to be shit.

      • “sdream” – “Dream”, “stream”.
      • “torching” – “Teaching”, “torching”. Possibly “torch singer”.
      • “diance” – “Dance”, “Diana” (goddess of virginity, referenced in a book by Samuel Beckett in reference to wondering whether or not Lucia was a virgin (Shloss, chapter 8)).
        • The offer of a teaching position is an educated guess by Shloss (chapter 6), based on a line in a James Joyce letter on October 19, 1929: “Lucia turned down the Damstadt offer […]”.
      • “perstitious” – “Prestigious”, “superstitious”, “pernicious”.
      • “Heerliezarbeit Dawnkin Skhool” – “Elizabeth Duncan School”, “here lies” “arbeit” (see below) “dawn kin”, “heer” (German “army”), suggest??. Possibly “skool” (Finnish “cheers (a toast)”).
        Elisabeth Duncan and students, 1928
        Elisabeth Duncan and students, 1928
        • As mentioned in the notes to section 1, Elizabeth Duncan (1871-1948, sibling of the famous dancer Isadora Duncan, see below) ran a school of dance in various locations starting in 1904.
        • “arbeit” – The gate of the Auschwitz concentration camp had the slogan “arbeit macht frei“, meaning “Work sets you free”. This was, of course, utterly untrue in that context.
      • “Dreamstadt” – “Darmstadt” (city in Germany), “dream state”.
      • “nymed” – “Named”, “pseudonym”.
      • “annoydher” – “Another”, “annoyed her”
      • “stribling” – “Sibling”, “stripling” (adolescent youth).
      • “peur bye-bye blakebid” – “Poor bye-bye blackbird”, “peur” (French “fear”), “Blake bid”, possibly “puer” (Latin “boy”).
      • “Sisadorer” – “Isadora”, “sis adorer” (what Lucia wishes Giorgio still was).
        • “Poor” Isadora Duncan died tragically in 1927. The song “Bye Bye Blackbird” was published in 1926; it seems to have no direct connection to Isadora Duncan, but did appear on the soundtrack to the 1968 biographical film, The Loves of Isadora. The song itself might be applicable to Lucia’s life in the asylum, with lyrics including “No one here can love and understand me […] I’m like a flower that’s fading here / Where ev’ry hour is one long tear”.
    • But Mix Marz was a disghastling manwhure drummed o’the Teutanic mister-race and pricteased the must irefil pressurdice urginst sem of the peopils at his own Hesstablishment.

      • “Mix Marz” – “Max Merz”, “mix” Mars” (Roman god of war, introducing a sequence of war-gods). Possible reference to cowboy actor Tom Mix.
      • “disghastling” – “Disgusting”, “this ghastly”.
      • “manwhure” – “Man who”, “manwhore”.
      • “drummed” – “Dreamed”, “drummed” (martial connotation).
      • “o’the” – “Of the”, Othin” (Norse god of war).
      • “Teutanic” – “Teutonic” (relating to ancient Germanic peoples), Teu” (another form of Tyr, who is another Norse deity associated with war) “tannic” (possibly relating to the tannin used in the Northampton shoe industry, see chapter “Malignant, Refractory Spirits”).
      • “mister-race” – “Master-race”, “mister” (Germanic fascism, in addition to its other qualities, was very sexist).
      • “pricteased” – “Practiced”, “prick-teased”.
      • “must irefil” – “Most awful”, “must ire fill”.
      • “pressurdice” – “Prejudice”, “pressure dice”.
      • “urginst” – “Against”, “urges”, “urgent”.
      • “sem” – “Som”, “semitic” (that is, Jewish).
      • “peopils” – “Pupils”, “peoples” (that is, different tribes of people that one might be prejudiced against).
      • “Hesstablishment” – “Establishment”, “Hesse” (see below).
        • Merz’s principal patron was Ernest Louis, grand duke of Hesse.
        • While Shloss goes to some length to connect Max Merz to fascism, it remains dubious whether the historical Lucia had the attitudes towards him that Moore ascribes to her in this paragraph. Shloss, chapter 6 says: “Looking back on [this period] in 1961, Lucia remembered nothing about ideology but considered that she had had excellent dance instruction.”
    • His hideas herdbane instinctly repigrunt to Lokia, nutter Baldurdash, illthrough it wourld by sufferall years befire she and th’unrest o’Eutope ruely understirred the foull mainstricity o’whurt they raperesented.

      • “hideas” – “Ideas”, “hideous”, “hides”.
      • “herdbane” – “Had been”, “herd bane” (possible reference to the dire consequences of “herd mentality” (i.e. fascism)).
      • “instinctly” – “Instantly”, “instinctively”, “distinctly”.
      • “repigrunt” – “Repugnant”, “re-” (again) “pig grunt”.
      • “Lokia” – “Lucia”, Loki” (Norse god associated with evil, chaos, and fire).
      • “nutter” – “Utter”, “nutter” (slang “crazy person”).
      • “Baldurdash” – “Balderdash”, “Baldur dash”.
        • Baldur was the Norse god associated with the sun, beauty, and joy. Shloss quotes Irma Duncan mockingly describing Merz as having invoked Baldur (Shloss, chapter 6).
      • “illthrough” – “Although”, “ill through”.
      • “wourld by” – “Would be”, “world by”.
      • “sufferall” – “Several”, “suffer all”.
      • “befire” – “Before”, “be fire”.
      • “th’unrest” – “The rest”, “the unrest”.
      • “o’Eutope” – “Of Europe”, “Euterpe” (Greek muse of lyric poetry). Possibly “eutopia” (medicine “the condition of being properly placed”, “isotope” (referring to the atom bombs debeloped in response to Hitler).
      • “ruely” – “Really”, “rue lie”.
      • “understirred” – “Understand”, “under stirred”.
      • “foull” – “Full”, “foul”.
      • “mainstricity” – “Monstrosity”, “main strict city”, “mainstream”, “strictly”.
      • “o’whurt” – “Of what”, “ow hurt”.
      • “raperesented” – “Represented”, “rape resented”.
    • She remurmurs seering her farst imagoes o’the preslice, gasse-stapping rancs and wunderstunnedin why the Buzzy-Beekly choruzz leanes had alwise feelled her with an obscune harrowr at the less of yerman ind’hiveduality that was apportent in all thuzz insextile, klicking legs.

      • “remurmurs” – “Remembers”, “re- murmurs”.
      • “seering” – “Seeing”, “seer -ing” (that is, being a seer, foretelling), possibly “searing”.
      • “farst” – “First”, “far”, “farsight”.
      • “imagoes” – “Images”, “imago” (an idealized concept of a loved one; Latin “ghost, echo, thought”), “Irma (Duncan?) goes”.
      • “preslice” – “Precise”, “pre- slice”.
      • “gasse-stapping” – “Goose-stepping” (marching with stiff legs, as in the Nazi army), “gasses tapping” (referring to the Nazi gas chambers). Possibly “gasse” (Italian nautical “stopper knots”)
      • “rancs” – “Ranks”, “rancor”. Possibly “rancs” (Catalan “crippled ones”).
      • “wunderstunnedin” – “Understanding”, “wonder stunned in”, possibly “stand-in”.
      • “Buzzy-Beekly” – “Busby Berkeley”, “buzzy beak”, possibly “meekly”.
        Poster for 42nd Street, a Busby Berkeley musical also featured in Moore's Cinema Purgatorio
        Poster for 42nd Street, a Busby Berkeley musical also featured in Moore’s Cinema Purgatorio
        • Busby Berkeley (1895-1976) was an American film director and musical choreographer who rose to prominence in the 1930s. Busby Berkeley makes a brief appearance in Moore’s Cinema Purgatorio #6.
        • “Buzz” is a sound associated with bees, and the “zz” sound will be repeated several more times in this sentence. Bees are thematically relevant as they are hive insects, and thus natural ‘fascists’.
      • “choruzz leanes” – “Chorus lines”, “leans”, suggest??. Possibly “chorizo” (spicy Spanish sausage), “ruzzolare” (Italian “to tumble down”).
      • “alwise” – “Always”, “all-wise”. Possible reference to “All-wise” as a name for Odin, or as the name of a dwarf in the Poetic Edda.
      • “feelled” – “Filled”, “feel led” (that is, led by emotions).
      • “obscune” – “Obscure”, “obscene”.
      • “harrowr” – “Horror”, “harrower” (one who breaks open; possible reference to Christ’s Harrowing of Hell).
      • “less” – “Loss”, “less”, “possibly “legs”.
      • “yerman” – “Human”, “your man”. Possibly “yerman” (Spanish “they lay waste”).
      • “ind’hiveduality” – “Individuality”, “in the hive duality”.
      • “apportent” – “Apparent”, “a portent”, abhorrent”, “important”.
      • “thuzz” – “Those”, “thus”, suggest??
      • “insextile” – “Insectile”, “in sextile” (astronomy “separated by 60°”), “sex”.
      • “klicking” – “Kicking”, “clicking” (making an insect noise).
    • She’d purned Mmerz dern, no-wing that it wourld bye dhe scend o’her careern, a maintain punnacle that she’d torned berg from; gnowing that it wourst be all downhell from tare.

      • “purned” – “Turned”, “spurned”.
      • “Mmerz” – “Merz”, “Mme” (French “mademoiselle”), suggest??
      • “dern” – “Down”, “dern” (obsolete “secret, obscure”; Old Irish “I may”?)
      • “no-wing” – “Knowing”, “no wing” (giving up the chance to metaphorically fly).
      • “wourld bye” – “Would be”, “world bye” (saying goodbye to the world of dance).
      • “dhe scend” – “The end”, “descend”, “scent”, “send”, “scend” (surge).
      • “careern” – “Career”, “careen”, “careering”.
      • “maintain” – “Mountain”, “maintain”.
      • “punnacle” – “Pinnacle”, “pun”. Possibly “nacre” (mother-of-pearl), “NaCl” (sodium chloride, salt).
      • “torned” – “Turned”, “tor” (high rock, hill).
      • “berg” – “Back”, “berg” (mountain).
      • “gnowing” – “Knowing”, “gnawing” (pain).
      • “wourst” – “Would”, “worst”.
      • “downhell” – “Downhill”, “down (to) Hell”.
      • “tare” – “Their”, “tare” (“empty weight”; to set a zero value on an instrument; obsolete “tore”; French “flaw”).
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  • Paragraph 72
    However, as she is here in the suddenly benighted forest, spraddling on the moss with her bare thighs still open and her sex exposed, ambiguous growls and rustlings in the thick grass around her, she relives all the dread and panic that had settled on her then. With her new-wedded brother unavailable she had commenced a desperate and disastrous carnal sprint amongst the other fellows in their circle, eligible or more often otherwise. Young Samuel Beckett, he’d broken her foolish heart, while lesser men, with malice, threw her looking-glass; had squashed her sense of who she was, her sense of what she would or wouldn’t do. She’d not been too opinionated to refuse a taste of laudanum, nor had she sniffed at an injection of cocaine. Drunken or drugged she’d taken part in threesomes, foursomes, to the point where she and all her family were quite expecting daily that she would be diagnosed as having syphilis. She’d been experimenting with cannabis when there was that sick incident she can’t bear to think about, the unimaginable episode with the white …

    • Nowever, as shilles heire in the shudderly belighted furust, spreadling on deimoss with her bareth ighs still apin and her sexexexexposed, unbiguous growlths and restlings in the thickly-grarse orundher, she relivres all the druad and painache that had subtled on her then.

      • “Nowever” – “However”, “now ever” (an eternalist sentiment).
      • “shilles” – “She’s”, “shills” (con artists). Possibly “hills”, “shillelagh” (Irish club).
      • “heire” – “Here”, “heir”. Possibly “sheirbhíseach” (Irish “servant, vassal”).
      • “shudderly” – “Suddenly”, “shudderingly”.
      • “belighted” – “benighted” (darkened; unenlightened), “be lighted”.
      • “furust” – “Forest”, “fur rust”, suggest??
      • “spreadling” – “Spraddling” (spreading legs apart), “spread long”, possibly “prattling”.
      • “deimoss” – “The moss”, “Deimos” (Greel god of terror, and son of Ares, god of war)
      • “bareth ighs” – “Bare thighs”, “eyes”, “sighs”, suggest?? Possibly “reth” (dialect “fierce, savage”).
      • “apin” – “Open”, “a pin”. Possibly “aping”.
      • “sexexexexposed” – “Sex exposed”, “XXX” (film ‘rating’ for pornography), suggest??
      • “unbiguous” – “Ambiguous”, “un-big you (seem to) us” (foreshadowing Lucia’s lack of fear of J.K. Stephen?)
      • “growlths” – “Growls”, “growths”.
      • “restlings” – “Rustlings”, “restless”, possibly “wrestle”.
      • “thickly-grarse” – “Thick grass”, “sickly gorse”, “possibly “hick”, “arse”.
      • “orundher” – “Around her”, “orotund” (pompous; more foreshadowing of next section?).
      • “relivres” – “Relives”, “livre” (French coin; French “book”). Possibly “delivers”.
      • “druad” – “Dread”, “druid”.
      • “painache” – “Panic”, “pain ache”.
      • “subtled” – “Settled”, “subtle led”.
    • Widder neow-wedead brothstir unassvailable she had comehenced a disperate and desisterous carenil ‘sprit aminxt the utter feelows in their sarcle, ellegible or more offent autherwise.

      • “Widder” – “With her”, “widow”.
      • “neow-wedead” – “New-wedded”, “now we (are) dead”. Possibly “meow”.
      • “brothstir” – “Brother”, “broth stir”.
      • “unassvailable” – “Unavailable”, “unassailable”, “ass”.
      • “comehenced” – “Commenced”, “come hence” (similar to phrase for seductive “come hither”).
      • “disperate” – “Desperate”, “disparate”.
      • “desisterous” – “Disastrous”, “desist eros”, “the sister of us”.
      • “carenil” – “Carnal”, “care nil”.
      • “‘sprit” – “Sprint”, “spurt”, “spirit”.
      • “aminxt” – “Amongst”, “a minx” (flirtatious woman).
      • “utter” – “Other”, “utter” (to speak; furthest out; complete).
      • “feelows” – “Fellows”, ” feel low”, “feel ow”.
      • “sarcle” – “Circle”, “sarcoma” (type of tumor), “sarcasm”. Possibly “sarcle” (obsolete “hoe”)
      • “ellegible” – “Eligible”, “elle” (French “she”) “gibe” (taunt; to agree with). Possibly “garble”, “gullible”.
      • “offent” – “Often”, “offend”. Possibly “offentlig” (Scandinavian languages “public”).
      • “autherwise” – “Otherwise”, “author wise”.
        • Shloss, chapter 7: “The immediate effect on Lucia of Giorgio’s liaison with Helen Fleischman was to catapult her into a sexualized world in a position of loss, a world where most of the players were considerably older and certainly more experienced.”
        • According to Shloss (chapter 8), Lucia’s lovers early in this period included Samuel Beckett (entangled with another lover at the time), Alexander Calder (engaged, though Lucia may not have been aware of this initially), Albert Hubbell (married), and possibly Waldo Peirce (married).
    • Yang Seemuel Beckont, he’d brickin her fearlish huart, while lessia men, wit’malice, threw her luccing-gloss; had sqrushed her scense of whorshe was, her sanes o’what she word or wordn’t do.

      • “Yang Seemuel Beckont” – “Young Samuel Beckett”, “yang” (Chinese masculine principle), “seem you’ll”, “see mule”, “beckon to”.
        Samuel Beckett, early 1930s
        Samuel Beckett, early 1930s
        • Samuel Beckett (1906-1989) was an Irish author who was a protégé of James Joyce during this period.
      • “brickin” – “Broken”, “brick in”.
        • Possible reference to the classic newspaper strip Krazy Kat, in which Ignatz Mouse often throws a brick at Krazy Kat, who misinterprets this a sign of Ignatz’s love.
      • “fearlish” – “Foolish”, “fear delicious”, “girlish”.
      • “huart” – “Heart”, “hurt”.
      • “lessia” – “Lesser”, “Lucia’s”. Possibly “lessiamo” (Italian “we boil”).
      • “wit’malice” – “With malice”, “wit” “Alice”.
      • “threw her luccing-gloss” – “Threw her looking-glass”, “Lucia” “gloss” (shine; interpretation of a text).
        • This seems to me to be a somewhat strained metaphor (of these men damaging Lucia’s self-image as “throwing her mirror”), in order to get in another reference to Through the Looking-Glass.
        • In a fictionalized memoir, Beckett describes the Lucia analogue at one point as “She lived between a comb and a glass.” (Shloss, chapter 8).
      • “sqrushed” – “Squashed”, “crushed”, “rushed”. Possibly “square usher”, “hushed”.
      • “scense” – “Sense”, “scent”, “scene”. Possibly “sciens” (Latin “knowing; conscious; having sexual relations with a man”), “science”.
      • “whorshe” – “Who she”, “whorish”.
      • “sanes” – “Sense”, “sane”. Possibly “sans” (without).
      • “word or wordn’t do” – “Would or wouldn’t do”, “word”.
    • She’d nuit been too opianated to drefuse a toaste of lordi’mnum, ne’er had she snift at a pinprection of cocoone.

      • “nuit” – “Not”, “nuit” (French “night; she harms”). Possibly “Nut” (Egyptian sky goddess).
      • “opianated” – “Opinionated”, “ate opium”.
      • “to drefuse” – “To refuse”, “tod” (German “death”), “defuse”. Possibly “dref” (Welsh “town, home”).
      • “toaste” – “Taste”, “toast”.
      • “lordi’mnum” – “Laudanum” (opium tincture), “lord, I’m numb”, possibly “lordy, mum”.
      • “ne’er” – “Nor”, “never”.
      • “snift at” – “Sniffed at” (disdained, but also literally how cocaine is often ingested), “snifter” (small alcoholic drink).
      • “pinprection” – “Injection”, “pinprick”, “imprecation” (curse).
      • “cocoone” – “Cocaine”, “cocoon”.
        • Moore here expands on speculation by Shloss in her chapter 8. Lucia does seem to have become addicted to barbituates by 1935, though this seems to have been at least partly to be due to medical treatments. Whether she took recreational drugs in the early 1930s is unknown.
    • Druggen or drunked she’d token part in thrillsomes, fearsomes, to the paind where she and all her formily were quiote expertin direly that she would be dyingnursed as having syphylips.

      • “Druggen or drunked” – “Drunken or drugged”, spoonerized in a way that suggests how drunk or drugged people mangle language.
      • “token” – “Taken”, “token”, “toking” (smoking marijuana).
      • “thrillsomes” – “Threesomes” (sexual groups of three people), “thrill some”.
      • “fearsomes” – “Foursomes” (sexual groups of four people), “fearsome”.
        • Shloss makes no mention of these activities, suggesting they are an elaboration of Moore’s.
      • “paind” – “Point”, “pained”.
      • “formily” – “Family”, “formerly”, “formally”, “formality”.
      • “quiote expertin” – “Quite expecting”, “quit”, “quote”, “expert in”. Possibly “(Don) Quixote“.
      • “direly” – “Daily”, “direly”.
      • “dyingnursed” – “Diagnosed”, “dying nursed”.
      • “syphylips” – “Syphilis”, “sip high lips”.
        • We have some documentary evidence of family concern over syphilis as of September 1934, while she was being treated by Carl Jung. (Shloss, chapter 10). Shloss concludes that Lucia probably was not diagnosed with syphilis, but the relvant records are not extant.
    • She’d been experimelting with canalbis when there woes that sicky indicent she camembert to think abort, the animaligable epicide mit der veiss …

      • “experimelting” – “Experimenting”, “expert in melting”.
      • “canalbis” – “Cannabis”, “cannibal”, “canal” “bis” (twice; bisexuals; Quebec French “kiss”).
        • There is no evidence of Lucia “experimenting with cannabis”.
      • “woes” – “Was”, “woes”.
      • “sicky” – “Sick”, “icky”, “sickly”. Possibly “sexy”, in a repressed, deniable fashion.
      • “indicent” – “Incident”, “indecent”, “indictment”.
      • “camembert” – “Cannot bear”, “camembert” (type of cheese). Possibly “came”, “ember”.
      • “abort” – “About”, “abort”.
        • See note about abortion hints at paragraph 66, above.
      • “animaligable” – “Unimaginable”, “animal leg able”.
      • “epicide” – “Episode”, “-cide” (murder).
      • “mit der veiss …” – “With the white” (in German), “vice”.
        • Moore is being mysterious at least partially because the source of this idea is pretty mysterious itself. Shloss, chapter 8: “When [Lucia] was in emotional trouble in 1934, she hinted to her companion, Cary Baynes, that something sinister had happened to her, and she spoke of a little white dog”. Shloss, chapter 10 (quoting Baynes): “I noticed at the time that she laughed in a significant way when she was telling about the dog, as if a good deal was going on in her mind which she was not saying.” The word “epicide” above perhaps suggests the murder of a harmless animal, though only weakly. In a work as sexually charged as this, we cannot ignore the possibility of bestiality.

Forward to Section 5, J. K. Stephen.