RtB section 3 – John Clare

Up to “Round the Bend”.

Back to Section 2 – Illusionary Giorgio Joyce.

In which Lucia meets John Clare, who mistakes her for his “first wife”, Mary Joyce. They have passionate sex, while Lucia considers the history of English as a visionary language.

Significant characters and themes in this section:

  • John Clare (1793-1864) was famed as the “Peasant Poet of Northamptonshire”.
    John Clare by William Hilton; 1820
    John Clare by William Hilton; 1820

    Like Moore, he rose from a lower-class family into fame and (moderate) fortune via his writings, only to lose a lot of money to unscrupulous publishers. Unlike Moore, he went quite mad, and ended his days in Saint Andrews. He married Patty Turner in 1820. Part of his madness was a fixed delusion that he had earlier married a childhood crush of his named Mary Joyce. Moore posits (both in Jerusalem and Voice of the Fire) that Clare sexually assaulted Mary when they were both quite young, and that their delusional “marriage” was the way in which Clare dealt with that traumatic event. Clare was the narrator of chapter ten of Voice of the Fire. He will also appear in a significant role in the upcoming chapter “The Steps of All Saints“.

  • James Joyce (1882-1941) was an extremely famous writer and Lucia Joyce’s father.
    • The River Liffey is a river in Ireland which, in Finnegans Wake, is referred to many times, and is metaphorically linked to the female protagonist (who is, in some senses, Lucia).
  • World mythology, especially Irish, Greek, Roman, Norse, and Egyptian.
  • Arthurian legend.
  • The Bible.
  • Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream.
  • The Pilgrim’s Progress, by John Bunyan.
  • Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass by Lewis Carroll, classic children’s books whose themes include childhood, madness, wordplay, and doubled characters.
  • Page892
  • Paragraph 33
    It is while Lucia is thus preoccupied that she detects a subtle shift in light and temperature. In her experience, this is an indication thatbshe inadvertently has passed into another timezone of the archetypal mental hospital; a different year or even century. Some of the trees around her seem to have entirely disappeared, while stout old oaks have been replaced by tender saplings. Pulling her cardigan more snugly round her shoulders,  she strides boldly on into an otherworld, a long-since vanished season.

    • It erswhile Lucia asdus philocupid doutshe deyetacts a settle shoft inlucht ont tempsrecher.

      • “erswhile” – “Is while”, “erstwhile” (former). Possibly “Eris” (Greek goddess of chaos).
      • “asdus” – “Is thus”, “as dust”, “has dues”, “astus” (Latin “cunning”).
      • “philocupid” – “Preoccupied”, “philo-” (fondness for) “Cupid” (Roman god of love) (hence, “in love with love”), “philosophical cupidity”.
      • “doutshe” – “That she”, “doubts he”, “do it she”, “douse”.
      • “deyetacts” – “Detects”, “the eye contacts”, “they are tactless”.
      • “settle” – “Subtle”, “settle”.
      • “shoft” – “Shift”, “soft”, “shot”.
      • “inlucht” – “In light”, “lucht” (Irish “load; people”), “ineluctable” (inescapable).
      • “ont” – “And”, “onto”, “taunt”.
      • “tempsrecher” – “Temperature”, “temps” (French “time”) “recherche” (exquisite, exotic), “tamp pressure”.
    • Ihner exterionce, desis un indaycaution dateshy annivertantly hors pastinto anolter tamezooen afder archeternpal mandal hourspetal; a difstrent jeerh orevern santury.

      • “Ihner” – “In her”, “inner”.
      • “exterionce” – “Experience”, “exterior once”.
      • “desis” – “This is”, “desist”, “the sister”. Possibly “Desis” (members of the South Asian diaspora).
      • “un” – “An”, “un-“, “un” (French “one”).
      • “indaycaution” – “Indication”, “in day caution” (even in daytime, exercise caution), “India vacation”.
      • “dateshy” – “That she”, “date-shy”, “dates I”.
      • “annivertantly” – “Inadvertently”, “anniversary” “hesitantly”, “importantly”.
      • “hors” – “Has”, “whores”, “horse”, “hors” (French “out”).
        • The phrase “hors de combat” means “out of action”, and is often used in a sexual sense.
      • “pastinto” – “Passed into”, “past in two”. Possibly “pasting”.
      • “anolter” – “Another”, “an otter”, “an altar”, “anol” (type of American lizard) “tree”.
      • “tamezooen” – “Timezone” (used in a more fantastical sense than usual), “tame zoo animal”, “protozoan”, “the Mesozoic” (geologic era dominated by reptiles).
      • “afder” – “Of the”, “after”.
      • “archeternpal” – “Archetypal”, “arch eternal”, “Archie tern pal”.
      • “mandal” – “Mental”, “mandala” (ritual geometric design), “Mendel” (Gregor Mendel (1822-1884), famous geneticist), “Mandela” (Nelson Mandela (1918-2013), South African politician).
      • “hourspetal” – “Hospital”, “hours” “petal”.
      • “difstrent” – “Different”, “strength”, “strent” (Friulian “tight, close”), suggest??
      • “jeerh” – “Year”, “jeer” (mock; Manx “indeed”), “jeeh” (Navajo “gum; into the ear”), suggest??
      • “orevern” – “Or even”, “oven”, “o reverend”, “ore vernal”.
      • “santury” – “Century”, “sanctuary”, “your sanity”.
    • Summerda treasurrounder shimto whave untreely dusapaert, wheil stortold oax evborn replast bye tiender saplungs.

      • “Summerda” – “Some of the”, “summer day”, “sum” “merda” (Italian “shit”).
      • “treasurrounder” – “Trees around her”, “treasure rounder”, “treat surround”, “tea surrender”, “sure treason”.
      • “shimto” – “Seem to”, “shimmer into”, “Shinto” (Japanese spiritual practice).
      • “whave” – “Have”, “wave”, “whale”.
      • “untreely” – “Entirely”, “un- tree lie”, “utterly”.
      • “dusapaert” – “Disappeared”, “dust apart”, “do sap aether”, “da sup earth”.
      • “wheil” – “While”, “whale”, “heil!” (German “hail!”), “Weill” (Kurt Weill (1900-1950), German composer whose work was homaged in Moore’s LoEG: Century 1910).
      • “stortold” – “Stout old”, “story told”, “startled”, “turtled”.
      • “oax” – “Oaks”, “ox”.
      • “evborn” – “Have been”, “ever born”.
      • “replast” – “Replaced”, “replaster”, “reptiles”, “repeat last”.
      • “bye” – “By”, “bye”.
      • “tiender” – “Tender”, “tinder”, “tie under”, “tien” (French “your”).
      • “saplungs” – “Saplings”, “sap lungs”, “sa” (French “his/her/its”; Italian “knows”) “plunges”.
    • Purling hair carmigan ma smuggly rounder shilvers, she straides birdly oneantwo unearthawhirl, a nong-sence fanished seesung.

      • “purling” – “Pulling”, “purling” (knitting action, that one might use to make a cardigan; rippling). Possibly “puling” (whimpering), “purloin” (steal).
      • “hair” – “Her”, “hair” (like wool, to make yarn, to knit with).
      • “carmigan” – “Cardigan” (sweater), “carmine” (red). Possibly “car migraine”.
      • “ma” – “More”, “ma” (“How do you know when your mother is cold? She tells you to put on a sweater.”).
      • “smuggly” – “Snugly”, “smugly”. Possibly “muggle” (marijuana cigarette; hot chocolate; person with no magic).
      • “rounder” – “Round her”, “more round”, “bounder” (cad; boundary).
      • “shilvers” – “Shoulders”, “shivers”. Possibly “silvers” (the color of her hair?).
      • “straides” – “Strides”, “straights”, “straits”.
      • “birdly” – “Boldly”, “like a bird”, “birth lie”.
      • “oneantwo” – “On into”, “one and two” (possibly counting off a beat for music or dancing).
      • “unearthawhirl” – “An otherworld”, “unearth a whirl” (possible reference to Moore’s Unearthing).
      • “nong-sence” – “Long-since”, “nonsense”. Possibly “song séance”.
      • “fanished” – “Vanished”, “famished”. Possibly “fanny shed”.
      • “seesung” – “Season”, “see sung”. Possibly “sea-song”, “singsong”.
  • Paragraph 34
    Before she’s gone but a step or two, she espies a sad-faced fellow dressed in the apparel of the nineteenth century, sitting as plain as day bemeath the spreading chestnut tree. He looks to be a man in his mid-fifties, with his longish and receding white hair swept back off the full moon of his prominent and noble brow. From his appearance, antiquated and anachronistic, he would seem to be a member of the working classes, and is wearing untidy trousers and has boots that have their soles worn through and hanging off. Beside him in the grass a battered stand-up hat is resting, of the sort referred to as a “Wide-awake”. Just for a moment, Lucia is certain that she has turned into Alice in Wonderland, and is arriving at the tea party arranged by the Mad Hatter.

    • Effor schi’z ganbult a stippytoe, sh’espeers a sod-fist faellow drastin dey apoorel o’ther naeteeth gentury, certin axplein astay beniht de spairdin chessnuttery.

      • “Effor” – “Before”, “effort”, “effor” (Latin “I say; I define”).
      • “schi’z” – “She’s”, “schizophrenic”, “say cheese” (expression used by photographers to make people smile).
      • “ganbult” – “Gone but”, “began ultimate”, “gambled”, “gan” (Irish “without”) “bull”, “built”, suggest??
      • “stippytoe” – “Step or two”, “tippytoe” (walking on the tips of one’s toes for stealth), “is tipi peyote”, “steep pity”.
      • “sh’espeers” – “She espies”, “she’s peers” (she is equals), “sh” (expression requesting silence) “espers” (psychics).
      • “sod-fist” – “Sad-faced”, “sod” (turf; slang “sodomite; person; damn!”) “fist” (slang “characteristic handwriting).
      • “faellow” – “Fellow”, “fallow” (uncultivated), “fall low”, “fáel” (Middle Irish “wolf”).
      • “drastin” – “Dressed in”, “drastic”.
      • “dey” – “The”, “day”, “dey” (British dialect “dairymaid”).
      • “apoorel” – “Apparel”, “a poor relative”.
      • “o’ther” – “Of the”, “other”, “author”.
      • “naeteeth” – “Nineteenth”, “nae” (Scots “no”) “teeth”. Possibly “nighties”.
      • “gentury” – “Century”, “gentry”.
      • “certin” – “Sitting”, “certain”, “caught in”.
      • “axplein astay” – “As plain as day”, “explain a” “stay” (stiffening piece of a garment), “ax” “plein” (French “plenty, full; pregnant”) “nasty”.
      • “beniht de” – “Beneath the”, “benighted” (unenlightened), “behind”.
      • “spairdin” – “Spreading”, “spared in”, “spare din” (extra noise?), “spairt” (Scottish Gaelic “turf”), “is a pair of djinn”.
      • “chessnuttery” – “Chestnut tree”, “chess nuttery”, “nut try”. Possibly “notary”.
        • Reference to poem by Longfellow, “The Village Blacksmith“, which begins “Under a spreading chestnut tree”.
    • Hay loofts toubee oman eners mad-fitties, wittis langish un receetin whytare swipd bacchuff the fellmoan o’ hes porminent innoble broew.

      • “Hay” – “He”, “hay” (dried grass; a net to catch a rabbit; a country dance).
      • “loofts” – “Looks”, “loots”, “lifts”, “lofts”, “loof” (dialect “hand”), “looft” (Dutch “you/he/she/it praises”).
      • “toubee” – “To be”, “tubby” (rather fat), “toubée” (Norman “tubful”), “toupee” (hairpiece), “tou”(Catalan “soft”), “bee”.
      • “oman” – “A man”, “Oman” (Middle Eastern country), “O man!”.
      • “eners” – “In his”, “manners”, “a nurse”, “energies”, “ener” (Danish “loner; one-of-a-kind”).
      • “mad-fitties” – “Mid-fifties”, “mad small fits”, “made fittest”, “fit ties”.
      • “wittis” – “With his”, “wits”, “witticism”.
      • “langish” – “Longish”, “languish” (to pine away), “language”.
      • “un” – “And”, “un-“, “un” (French “one”).
      • “receetin” – “Receding”, “receipt in”, “recent”, “recce” (reconnaissance) “tin”.
      • “whytare” – “White hair”, “why tarry”, “white hare” (possibly referring to the Alice character, the White Rabbit). Possibly “tare” (damaging weed; empty weight).
      • “swipd” – “Swept”, “swiped” (stolen).
      • “bacchuff” – “Back off”, “Bacchus” (Roman god of wine) “huff”.
      • “fellmoan” – “Full moon”, “fell moan”.
      • “hes” – “His”, “he is”.
      • “porminent” – “Prominent”, “permanent”, “porn intent”.
      • “innoble” – “And noble”, “un-noble”, “ennoble”.
      • “broew” – “Brow”, “brew”, “bro (brother) “ew” (expression of disgust).
    • Farmis apparence, untiquoted an’ anarchromanstic, hewood saem tobey ur’member iffty wolking clurses, innoce woern unshinely troseurs endis buots detturf bheir soulsworntruant hainging aff.

      • “Farmis” – “From his”, “farmer’s” (Clare, at times, did attempt to make a living by farming), “far mist”.
      • “apparence” – “Appearance”, “apparel”, “happy parents”.
      • “untiquoted” – “Antiquated”, “un- quoted”.
      • “anarchromanstic” – “Anachronistic”, “anarchic romantic”, “necromantic”, “chroma” (color).
      • “hewood” – “He would”, “hew wood” (something a peasant might do). Possibly Thomas “Heywood” (c.1570-1641), English playwright.
      • “saem” – “Seem”, “seam”, “same”.
      • “tobey” – “To be”, “Tobey” (male name, suggest??).
      • “ur’member” – “A member”, “remember”, “ur-” (original, archetypal).
      • “iffty” – “Of the”, “River Liffey“, “iffy” (dubious).
      • “wolking” – “Working”, “walking” (as will be seen below, Clare is also famous for walking), “wool(-gathering) king”.
      • “clurses” – “Classes”, “curses”, “clauses”.
      • “innoce” – “And is”, “innocence”.
      • “woern” – “Wearing”, “worn”, “woe earn”.
      • “unshinely” – “Untidy”, “and shiny”, “untimely” (anachronistic).
      • “troseurs” – “Trousers”, “treasures”, “trousseau”, “poseurs”.
      • “endis” – “And his”, “end is”.
      • “buots” – “Boots”, “but”, “butt” (ass; butt of a joke), “buoys”.
      • “detturf” – “That have”, “the turf”, “deters”.
      • “bheir” – “Their”, “bheir” (Scottish Gaelic future tense of “to give; to take”), “beir” (Irish “to bear”), “bier” (platform for a body).
      • “soulsworntruant” – “Soles worn through and”, “soul sworn truant”.
      • “hainging” – “Hanging”, “hinging”.
      • “aff” – “Off”, “aff” (Scots “off”), “gaff” (fishing tool, error, trick, garment to hide genitals, criticism, slang “residence”),”ass”.
  • Page 893
    • Besight hem indwe garsse a baettered sdent-up hattis ruesting, ofty sart refored tiwas ur ‘Why-de-wake’.

      • “Besight” – “Beside”, “be sight”.
      • “hem” – “Him”, “hem” (edge of garment, meaningless utterance).
      • “indwe” – “In the”, “in dew”, “inde”, (Latin “thence; since”), “Inde” (India) “we”.
      • “garsse” – “Grass”, “gas”, “arse”, “garse” (Middle French “woman”).
      • “baettered” – “Battered”, “bettered”, “baa” (sheep sound) “uttered”.
      • “sdent-up” – “Stand-up”, “dented”, “send” “tup” (slang “to have sex with”).
      • “hattis” – “Hat is”, “Attis” (figure of Greek/Phrygian myth).
      • “ruesting” – “Resting”, “rusting”, “rue sting”.
      • “ofty” – “Of the”, “often”, “softly”.
      • “sart” – “Sort”, “sartorial” (relating to clothes).
      • “refored” – “Referred”, “reef forest”, “reformed”, “reforged”.
      • “tiwas” – “To as”, “Tiwaz” (Norse t-rune, identified with Tyr), “it was”.
      • “ur” – “A”, “ur-” (original, primal).
      • “Why-de-wake” – “Wide-awake”, “why the wake”.
        wideawake hat
        wide-awake hat
        • Shortly before escaping from the asylum in Epping Forest in 1841, Clare acquired a “wide-awake” hat from a gypsy.
    • Jesfer a momerath, Lucia iscertin ditshee asterned anter Alicu de Wonderlass, undis erriving atter t’reeparti eranged bly ther mudhutter.

      • “Jesfer” – “Just for”, “jester”.
      • “momerath” – “Moment”, “mome rath” (imaginary creature from Through the Looking-Glass).
      • “iscertin” – “Is certain”, “ascertain”, “I, skirting”.
      • “ditshee” – “That she”, “ditty” (song), “do it sheep”.
      • “asterned” – “Has turned”, “astern-ed” (gone behind), “ascertained”.
      • “anter” – “Into”, “anterior” (before) “more like an ant”.
      • “Alicu de Wonderlass” – “Alice in Wonderland“, “Lucia the wonder lass”, “Looking-Glass“.
      • “undis erriving ” – “And is arriving”, “undine” (water spirit) “a river”, “undeserving”.
      • “atter” – “At the”, “atter (archaic “poison”), “adder” (snake), “attar” (perfume).
      • “t’reeparti” – “tea party”, “parti-colored tree”, “Tory (political) party”.
      • “eranged” – “Arranged”, “deranged”.
      • “bly ther” – “By the”, “blythe-r”, “blight her”.
      • “mudhutter” – “Mad Hatter”, “someone who lives in a mud hut”.
        • Perhaps the most famous scene from Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland is chapter seven’s “A Mad Tea-Party”, featuring a Hatter and a March Hare (both proverbial figures of madness).
  • Paragraph 35
    Then she notices his clear blue eyes. They are not sick and pouchy like the baggy eyes of Tenniel’s illustration, murderous and irate, crabby and filled with a sinister glance. Instead, the man’s eyes are most luminous and beautiful, brimming with poetry and vision. she can feel herself becoming sexually attracted to him, this despite the yawning social divide that is apparently between them, and so she steps forward, still light on her toes, to introduce herself unto this handsome shepherd boy.

    • Danche nowtosees es clare-vlue ayes.

      • “Danche” – “Then she”, “dance”, “anche” (Italian “also”; French “reed”), “ache”.
      • “nowtosees” – “Notices”, “now to sees”, “nowt” (nothing) “os” (bone; mouth) “is”, newt”, “tosses”.
      • “es” – “His”, “letter S”, suggest??
      • “clare-vlue” – “Clear blue”, “Clare view”, “clairvoyant”.
      • “ayes” – “Eyes”, “ayes” (agreements).
    • De’ar nicht socken’ pauchy lackday buaggy oeyls o’ Tennill’s ielustraction, murkurous ‘n’ itrate, crabobby an’ fellt wit a sinbiter’stance.

      • “De’ar” – “They are”, “dear”, “DR” (doctor?).
      • “nicht” – “Not”, “nicht” (German “not”; Scots “night”).
      • “socken’” – “Sick and”, “socket”, “stocking”.
      • “pauchy” – “Pouchy”, “paunchy” (pot-bellied), “patchy”.
      • “lackday” – “Like the”, “lack day” (be nighttime? Or out of time?), “alackaday” (expression of sorrow), “lackadaisical” (lazy).
      • “buaggy” – “Baggy”, “buggy”, “buaggine” (Italian “foolishness”).
      • “oeyls” – “Eyes”, “oeils” (French “eyes”), “Oyl” (Olive Oyl, comic strip paramour of Popeye).
      • “Tennill” – “Tenniel” (Sir John Tenniel (1820-1914), original illustrator of the Alice books), “ten ill”, suggest??

        Tenniel illustration of The Mad Hatter
        Tenniel illustration of The Mad Hatter
      • “ielustraction” – “Illustration”, “i.e.” (it is) “lust reaction”, “ill”, “luster” (shine), “traction”.
      • “murkurous” – “Murderous”, “murky”, “curious”, “mercurial”.
      • “‘n’ itrate” – “And irate”, “nitrate” (chemical term, often explosive), “nit rate”.
      • “crabobby” – “Crabby”, “craobh” (Irish “branch; victory”; Scottish Gaelic “tree”), “cabobbed” (archaic “kebabbed”), “bobby” (slang “policeman”).
      • “fellt” – “Filled”, “felt” (material for hats), “fell” (to chop down; grim; strong; animal hide; rocky ridge; field; and others…)
      • “wit” – “With”, “wit”.
      • “sinbiter’stance” – “Sinister glance”, “sin biter stance”, “substance”.
    • Instared, ther’ mance ighs armost liminouscen bitterfil, birming wed poesentry uynd viassion.

      • “Instared” – “Instead”, “in stared”, “infrared”, “instant red”.
      • “ther’” – “The”, “there”, “thermal”.
      • “mance” – “Man’s”, “romance”, “manse” (mansion).
      • “ighs” – “Eyes”, “sighs”.
      • “armost” – “Are most”, “almost”, “armor”.
      • “liminouscen” – “Luminous and”, “liminal” (pertaining to a threshold or beginning, often a mystical one) “scene”, “nous” (mind; common sense; French “we; us”).
      • “bitterfil” – “Beautiful”, “bitter feel”, “butterfly”.
      • “birming” – “Brimming”, “beaming”, “Birmingham” (city in England), “burning”.
      • “wed” – “With”, “wed”, “we’d”, “weed”.
      • “poesentry” – “Poetry”, “peasantry”, “poor century”, “Poe sentry”.
      • “uynd” – “And”, “yearned”?, suggest??
      • “viassion” – “Vision”, “passion”, “via Sion” (by way of Zion), “vissions” (French “we have been screwing”).
    • Shecarn filerself becommon socsially hertrickted towhim, des dispiet theyr yawrnin soeciual devied datus opoverntly betandem, und soci stoeps foraword, stallight anna toas, to instreduce heresylf ontu disharmsin sheappeardby.

      • “Shecarn” – “She can”, “she, carnal”.
      • “filerself” – “Feel herself”, “filer self”.
      • “becommon” – “Becoming”, “be common”, “beckon”, “be cum on”.
      • “socsially” – “Sexually”, “socially”, “suck Sally”.
      • “hertrickted” – “Attracted”, “her tricked”, “heretic”.
      • “towhim” – “To him”, “tow whim”.
      • “des” – “This”, “despite”, “disdain”.
      • “dispiet” – “Despite”, “this piety”, “piet” (dialect “magpie”).
        • Despite… or because of?
      • “theyr” – “The”, “their”, “they are”, “the eyrie”.
      • “yawrnin” – “Yawning”, “yarning” (telling tall tales), “yaw” (rotation) “earning”, “awning”.
      • “soeciual” – “Social”, “soeur” (sister) “ciall” (Irish/Scottish Gaelic “sanity; meaning”).
      • “devied” – “Divide”, “devi” (Italian “you owe”) “ed” (Italian “and”), “Devi” (Indian name; Sanskrit “goddess“).
      • “datus” – “That is”, “the tush”, “datus” (Latin “given; yielded”).
      • “opoverntly” – “Apparently”, “o, poverty”, “operantly”, “opovržení” (Czech “contempt”).
      • “betandem” – “Between them”, “be tandem” (be together), “beta and them”.
      • “und” – “And”, “under”, “und” (German “and”), “mund” (German “world”), “mundane”.
      • “soci” – “So she”, “social”, “society”, “soci” (Italian “associates, pals”), “so ci” (Italian “I know about it”).
      • “stoeps” – “Steps”, “stoops”, “stops”.
        • Reference to “She Stoops to Conquer“, 1773 play by Anglo-Irish author Oliver Goldsmith that deals with class issues.
      • “foraword” – “Forward” (both in the sense of a direction, and in the sense of sexually aggressive), “for a word”, “foe raw order”, “fora” (multiple forums).
      • “stallight” – “Still light”, “starlight”, “stalling”, “is tall height”.
      • “anna” – “On her”, “Anna” (as in Finnegans Wake character Anna Livia Plurabelle), “and a”.
      • “toas” – “Toes”, “to as”, “toast”, “toa” (a type of Polynesian tree).
      • “instreduce” – “Introduce”, “instant reduce”, “sin” “traduce” (to malign; archaic “to pass on; to translate”).
      • “heresylf” – “Herself”, “here (is a) sylph” (Perhaps the reaction she is hoping for), “heresy”.
      • “ontu” – “Unto”, “onto” (the position she is hoping for).
      • “disharmsin” – “This handsome”, “dis-harm sin” (remove the harm from sin?), “disharmonious”.
      • “sheappeardby” – “Shepherd boy”, “she appeared by”.
  • Paragraph 36
    “Hello,” she sighs, her generously euphonic voice lilting and musical. “My name’s Lucia Joyce. Would it disturb you if I should sit down beside yourself?”

    • “Herlo,” she seghs, her jameously euphornic voyce lullting ain mugical.

      • “Herlo” – “Hello”, “her low (voice)”, “hero”, “harlot”.
      • “seghs” – “Says”, “sighs”, “segh” (Cornish “dry”), “seg” (archaic “man”; sedge (type of plant)).
      • “jameously” – “Generously”, “James Joyce-ly”, “jam” (fruit preserves; musical improvisation).
        • “Jam” may be a reference to an episode in Through the Looking-Glass.

          “I’m sure I’ll take you with pleasure!” the Queen said. “Two pence a week, and jam every other day.”
          Alice couldn’t help laughing, as she said, “I don’t want you to hire me – and I don’t care for jam.”
          “It’s very good jam,” said the Queen.
          “Well, I don’t want any to-day, at any rate.”
          “You couldn’t have it if you did want it,” the Queen said. “The rule is, jam to-morrow and jam yesterday – but never jam to-day.”
          “It must come sometimes to ‘jam to-day’,” Alice objected.
          “No, it can’t,” said the Queen. “It’s jam every other day: to-day isn’t any other day, you know.”

      • “euphornic” – “Euphonic” (pleasant-sounding), “you porn it”, “yup, horny”.
      • “voyce” – “Voice”, “Joyce”.
      • “lullting” – “Lilting” (lively), “lull thing”.
      • “ain” – “And”, “ain” (Scots “own”), “gain”.
      • “mugical” – “Musical”, “magical”, “mugic” (Italian “Russian peasant”).
    • “Menym’s Lewcheer Chayce.

      • “Menym” – “My name”, “me pseudonym”, “men” “ym” (Welsh “in”). Possibly Mnemosyne (Greek personification of thought)?
      • “Lewcheer” – “Lucia”, “lewd cheer”.
      • “Chayce” – “Joyce”, “chase”, “chaste” (not even remotely), “chased”.
    • Weddit distrobe yewe offeye shaed silt deign besad yernself?”

      • “Weddit” – “Would it”, “wedding”.
      • “distrobe” – “Disturb”, “disrobe”, “di- strobe”.
      • “yewe” – “You”, “yew” (type of tree), “ewe” (female sheep).
      • “offeye” – “If I”, “off eye” (along with all the other words having to do with clothes removal, there is a vague suggestion of voyeurism), “offend”.
      • “shaed” – “Should”, “shed”, “she would”, “shade”, “shae” (Scots “shoe”).
      • “silt” – “Sit”, “silt” (mud deposited from water).
      • “deign” – “Down”, “deign” (to condescend).
      • “besad” – “Beside”, “be sad”.
      • “yernself” – “Yourself”, “yearn self”, “you’re not me”.
  • Paragraph 37
    The man looks up at Lucia in surprise, as if she’d just appeared from nowhere. Suddenly, a smile of glad and joyous recognition spreads across his rough-hewn, melancholy features.

    • Demen larks uppet Lucia en stoppreyes, asof shay’d joyst appert form neowhere.

      • “Demen” – “The man”, “demon”, “dementia”. Possibly “demesne” (domain).
      • “larks” – “Looks”, “lark” (type of bird; jest).
      • “uppet” – “Up at”, “puppet”, “uppity”. Possibly “Muppet“.
      • “en” – “In”, suggest??
      • “stoppreyes” – “Surprise”, “stopper eyes”, “stupor”, “stop prey is”.
      • “asof” – “As if”, “a soft”, “sofa”.
      • “shay” – “She”, “shay” (small carriage).
      • “joyst” – “Just”, “Joyce”, “joyous”, “joust”.
      • “appert” – “Appeared”, “a pert”, “tap her”.
      • “form” – “From”, “form”.
      • “neowhere” – “Nowhere”, “neo-” (new) “where”.
    • Sadendly, asmile o’ gladean joyousce rekingnation spreachts acause hes raff-hyern, misencholy feutures.

      • “Sadendly” – “Suddenly”, “saddened lie”, “sad end lye”.
      • “asmile” – “A smile”, “asile” (French “asylum”), “às mil maravilhas” (Portuguese “perfectly” (literally “at thousand wonders”)).
      • “gladean” – “Glad and”, “glade an”, “gladen” (sword grass).
      • “joyousce” – “Joyous”, “Joyce”.
      • “rekingnation” – “Recognition”, “re-king nation”, “recking” (understanding), “wrecking”, “indignation”, “rekindle”.
      • “spreachts” – “Spreads”, “sprecht” (German “Speak!”), “speeches”, “spree acts”.
      • “acause” – “Across”, “a cause”, “of course”, “accuse”.
      • “he’s” – “His”, “he is”.
      • “raff-hyern” – “Rough-hewn”, “raff” (heap; riffraff; churl) “yearn”.
      • “misencholy” – “Melancholy”, “miserable”, “misenchant holy”.
      • “feutures” – “Features”, “futures”, “feu” (Scottish law “land held in feudal tenure”; French “fire; deceased”) “ture” (Italian “dams”), “feutre” (French “felt hat”).
  • Paragraph 38
    “Mary? Mary Joyce? Can it be thee, and not another cruel and sweet dream sent to torment me? Why my heart leaps like a fountain! Oh, my first and only wifeling, come and sit down here, here by my side, that I might properly embrace thee!”

    • “Marry? Marry Choyce?

      • “Marry” – “Mary”, “marry”.
      • “Choyce” – “Joyce”, “choice”.
        • Clare is mistaking Lucia Joyce for his childhood sweetheart Mary Joyce.
    • Cannit bithee, en nuit unearther cruelend swaet draum sunter tornd mae?

      • “Cannit” – “Can it”, “cannot”, “can nit”.
      • “bithee” – “Be thee”, “prithee” (please), “bitheism” (dualistic theology), “bitheach” (Irish “biotic, pertaining to life”).
      • “en nuit” – “And not”, “ennui”, “nuit” (French “night”), “nut”, “nit”.
      • “unearther” – “Another”, “unearther”, “underneath”.
        • Possible reference to Moore’s Unearthing.
      • “cruelend” – “Cruel and”, “crew lend”, “see rue end”.
      • “swaet” – “Sweet”, “sweat”, “swath”, “swaert” (Middle Dutch “sword”).
      • “draum” – “Dream”, “dram” (small amount, often of alcohol or poison), “draught” (drink), “drum”.
      • “sunter” – “Sent to”, “sunder” (break apart), “saunter” (walk casually), “sun to her”.
      • “tornd” – “Torment”, “torn id”, “tornado”, “turned”.
      • “mae” – “Me”, “Mae” (Welsh “he/she/it is”), “Mae” (diminutive of “Mary”).
    • Whomi heurt leipslik a foundyen!

      • “Whomi” – “Why my”, “who am I”, “who, me?”
      • “heurt” – “Heart”, “hurt”, “heurt” (French “collision, clash”).
      • “leipslik” – “Leaps like”, “leip” (Dutch “crazy”) “slik” (Dutch “I swallow”), “Leipzig” (German city), “slick pile”.
      • “foundyen” – “Fountain”, “fond yen”, “foundry and”.
    • O, my forst end unlie wifelife, commencit durniere, herbi mesighd, theart hi maet priapalie ingrace bhee!”

      • “forst” – “First”, “forced”, “forest”.
        • Historically, Clare in his later years suffered from the delusion that he had married Mary Joyce. Moore suggests that young Clare had actually raped her. See notes at the top of this section for more.
      • “end” – “And”, “end”, “tenderly”.
      • “unlie” – “Only”, “un-lie” (speak truly?), “lie on”.
      • “wifelife” – “Wifeling” (little wife), “why for life”, “lie”.
        • Clare here denies his “second” (actually only) wife, Patty.
      • “commencit” – “Come and sit”, “commence it”, “cum men clit”.
      • “durniere” – “Down here”, “derriere” (bottom), “dernier” (last), “durn” (darn, slang “doing”) “I” “ere” (before).
      • “herbi” – “Here by”, “herb-y”, “Herbie” (see section six).
      • “mesighd” – “My side”, “me sighed”, “messaged”, “resigned”.
      • “theart” – “That”, “to heart”, “the art”.
      • “hi” – “I”, “high”, “hello”.
      • “maet” – “Might”, “mate”, “meat”.
      • “priapalie” – “Properly”, “Priapus” (Greek personification of the phallus) “lie”, “priapic” (phallic; related to masculine sexuality), “prior pa lie”.
      • “ingrace” – “Embrace”, “in grace”, “racing”, “English race”.
      • “bhee” – “Thee”, “be”, “bee”, “he”, “hee” (laugh sound). Possibly “bheer” (fanspeak “beer”).
  • Paragraph 39
    It is clear to see that he has misidentified her, lost in his midsummer night’s dream, but the bottom line is that she hasn’t had a fuck in weeks now, figuratively speaking. In her unconventional confinement, she has had no Robin Goodfellow to put one over on her, or to nuzzle sweetly at her tit and ear. The color rushing in her cheeks, fishing for compliments, she’s all mustard beside the vinegary pauper. Oh, he was such stuff as dreams are made of!

    • Etes clare tlu ci dotthee-haws missintentified her, luost unhis mad somearenuts tream, bot der buttom loin is dirtshey aslent harda puck ens wakes, now, friggratively spoking.

      • “Etes” – “It is”, suggest??
      • “clare” – “Clear”, “Clare”.
      • “tlu ci” – “To see”, “Lucia”, “tu” (French familiar “you”) “ci” (French “this; here”), “tluc” (Polish “to break”).
      • “dotthee-haws” – “That he has”, “dotter” (Swedish “daughter”, James Joyce often used this word) “hee-haws” (makes a noise like a donkey), “dotty” (eccentric; crazy) “hawser” (rope leash).
      • “missintentified” – “Misidentified”, “miss intensified”, “my sin tent fight”.
      • “luost” – “Lost”, “lust”, “luostari” (Finnish “monastery/nunnery”).
      • “unhis” – “In his”, “un-his” (someone else’s?), suggest??
      • “mad somearenuts tream” – “Midsummer night’s dream”, “mad some are nuts tree am”, “somersaults team”, “stream”.
        • Reference to Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream. The play deals with surreal otherworldly occurences and sexual desire in a forest setting, so resonates with this chapter.
      • “bot der” – “But the”, “Bottom” (character in Dream), “butt duh”, “butter”.
      • “buttom” – “Bottom”, “Bottom” (the character again), “button” (clitoris?), “butt om”.
      • “loin” – “Line”, “loins” (crotch region, genitals), “lion”, “lie on”.
      • “dirtshey” – “That she”, “dirty”.
      • “aslent” – “Hasn’t”, “aslant” (tilted), “asleep”, “has lent”, “assent”. Possibly “aslan” (Turkish “lion”) or “Aslan” (lion/Christ figure from Narnia).
      • “harda” – “Had a”, “hard-up” (desirous of), “hard-on” (erection).
      • “puck” – “Fuck”, “Puck” (trickster fairy from Dream).
      • “ens” – “In”, “in his”, “insert”, “ens” (Latin “being”).
      • “wakes” – “Weeks”, “wakens”, “weakens”.
      • “friggratively” – “Figuratively”, “frig” (masturbate) “gratifyingly”, “Frigg” (wife of Odin) “ratify”.
        • “Figuratively” because Lucia’s time-traveling makes it hard to apply terms like “now” in a straightforward way.
      • “spoking” – “Speaking”, “is poking” (slang “having sex with”), “making spokes”.
    • Innur nunconventual cuntfhindement ’cias hedkno rubbin’ goodfeeler to purt juan oberhonour, autu mnuzzle sweatly utther tittanear.

      • “Innur” – “In her”, “inner”, “inure” (become used to).
      • “nunconventual” – “Unconventional”, “nun convent ritual”, “nonconsensual”.
      • “cuntfhindement” – “Confinement”, “cunt” “fundament” (bottom), “find”, “hind”, “cuff thin dementia”.
      • “‘cias” – “She has”, “ci” (Italian “us; on it”) “as”, “cias” (Latin “I might stimulate”(?)).
      • “hedkno” – “Had no”, “head” (oral sex) “know” (to have sex with).
      • “rubbin’ goodfeeler” – “Robin Goodfellow” (alternate name for Puck; can be used as a name for a generic man), “rubbing good feeler”. Possible allusions to “Robin Hood“, “goodfella” (gangster).
      • “purt juan oberhonour” – “Put one over on her” (have sex with her), “spurt” (ejaculate) “Juan” (Spanish name, to Lucia perhaps exotic and sexy) “ober-” (German “ober; upper”) “honor” (for women, often conflated with their lack of sexuality), Oberon” (fairy king from Midsummer).
      • “autu mnuzzle” – “Or to nuzzle”, “autumn guzzle”. Possibly “Uzziel” (minor Biblical character).
      • “sweatly” – “Sweetly”, “sweatily”, “is wetly”.
      • “utther” – “At her”, “utter”, “other”.
      • “tittanear” – “Tit and ear”, “Titania” (fairy queen from Midsummer), “tittande” (Swedish “watching”). Possibly “Titian” (1490-1576), Italian painter, “titan”.
    • Decolloar russin unner cheeps, fish’n’ furk condliments, shesalt mosthard boseyed the finnegary paupper.

      • “Decolloar” – “The color”, “decolletage” (low neckline, showing off cleavage), “de-collar” (remove restraint?).
      • “russin” – “Rising”, “Russian”, “rush in”, “russin” (Swedish “raisin”).
        • Russian dressing? This sentence is strangely filled with food and condiments.
      • “unner” – “In her”, “under”, “inner”, “unnerve”.
      • “cheeps” – “Cheeks”, “cheeps” (bird sounds), “chips” (British “french fries”), “cheats”, “chaps”.
      • “fish’n’ furk” – “Fishing for”, “fish and (chips) fork”, “fission”, “fuck”, “futhark” (Norse runes).
      • “condliments” – “Compliments”, “condiments”, “kind laments”.
      • “shesalt” – “She’s all”, “sea-salt”.
      • “mosthard” – “Mustard”, “most hard”, “almost”, “moist”.
        • Idiomatically, “to be as keen as mustard” means “to be very eager”.
      • “boseyed” – “Beside”, “bos” (Dutch “wood”; Irish “palm of the hand”; Latin “cow”) “eyed”, “boysenberry”.
        • Idiomatically, “to make cow eyes” at someone is to stare wide-eyed, indicating sexual attraction.
      • “finnegary” – “Vinegary”, “Finnegan”.
        • Normally, “vinegary” means sour or bitter, which doesn’t seem right. Possibly it is being used here as in the expression “full of piss and vinegar”, meaning “enthusiastic”?
        • Vinegar is often applied to fish-and-chips.
      • “paupper’ – “Pauper”, “paw her”, “papa”, suggest??
    • O, he wisp search stiffers dreums a maidoff!

      • “wisp” – “Was”, “wisp” (will-o-the-wisp, a mysteriously attractive but dangerous fairy light).
      • “search” – “Such”, “search”.
      • “stiffers” – “Stuff as”, “stiffers” (erections), “stuff her”.
      • “dreums” – “Dreams”, “drums”, “dreumes” (Dutch “toddler”).
      • “a maidoff” – “Are made of”, “(gets) a maid off” (brings a woman to orgasm), “in May, doff (your clothes).
        • This sentence paraphrases a line from Shakespeare’s The Tempest: “We are such stuff as dreams are made on” (often mis-quoted “of”).
  • Paragraph 40
    Breathlessly, she makes what she feels are inadequate inquiries after his identity, but since his face is at the moment buried in her dishabille and uncovered bosom, his rejoinder is unclear. When finally he disengages from her cleavage, there is saliva like a string of pearls suspended between lips and nipple. He looks up at her, his beaming face a rising sun above the landscape of her titties. She can’t entirely understand what he is saying, for all of his imprecations.

    • Breasthloossly, shimerks whot shyfeels aer inetiquaet unclearies afster hes iduntwithe, birdsense esface isaitdit mamment bareit intwer dishabilling ann uncumvert blousom, hes rejoyinher is junclear.

      • “Breasthloossly” – “Breathlessly”, “breasts loosely”.
      • “shimerks” – “She makes”, “shimmers”, “smirks”, “merkin” (woman’s pubic wig).
      • “whot” – “What”, “hot” (sexually aroused).
      • “shyfeels” – “She feels”, “shy feels”.
      • “aer” – “Are”, “aer” (Irish “air; tune”).
      • “inetiquaet” – “Inadequate”, “in etiquette”, “iniquitous”, “unquiet”.
      • “unclearies” – “Inquiries”, “unclear”, “fairies”, “uncle Aries”.
      • “afster” – “After”, “aster” (type of flower; obsolete “star”), “afsterven” (Dutch “to die away”).
      • “hes” – “His”, “he is”.
      • “iduntwithe” – “Identity”, “I don’t with he”, “dunt” (Scotland “to strike”) “withe” (to beat with a flexible twig or shoot).
      • “birdsense” – “But since”, “bird sense”.
      • “esface” – “His face”, “efface” (to rub out).
      • “isaitdit” – “Is at the”, “I said it”, “sait” (French “he/she/it knows”) “dit” (French “he/she/it says”).
      • “mamment” – “Moment”, “mammaries” (breasts), “Mammon” (personification of the desire for wealth).
      • “bareit” – “Buried”, “bare it”, “bare tit”.
      • “intwer” – “In her”, “into where”, “twerk” (portmanteau of twitch and jerk).
      • “dishabilling” – “Dishabille” (loose clothes), “disabling”, “this ha(ppy) billing”.
      • “ann” – “And”, “Ann” (woman’s name), suggest??
      • “uncumvert” – “Uncovered”, “un- covert” (not hidden), “in cum veritas” (in orgasm, truth), “vert” (green).
      • “blousom” – “Bosom”, “blossom”, “blouse on”.
      • “hes” – “His”, “he is”.
      • “rejoyinher” – “Rejoinder”, “re: joy in her”.
      • “junclear” – “Unclear”, “John Clare”, “junk” (slang “sexual parts”) “leer”, “Jung” (Carl Jung (1875-1961), Swiss psychoanalyst who once treated Lucia Joyce) “Lear” (King Lear, Shakespeare play with themes of madness).
    • Whin fingally hea desirngrazes firmher Kleefish, diris slibber licka strim o’peals susplendid beautween nips and lipple.

      • “Whin” – “When”, “whin” (gorse), “whinny” (gentle neigh).
      • “fingally” – “Finally”, “fin” “gally” (like gall, bitter; archaic “galley; to frighten”), “Finnegan”, “finger ally”.
      • “hea” – “he”, “head”, “hea” (Irish “it”; West Frisian “hay”).
      • “desirngrazes” – “Disengages”, “desiring grazes”, “the ring grazes”.
      • “firmher” – “From her”, “firmer”.
      • “Kleefish” – “Cleavage”, “Klee” (Paul Klee (1879-1940) Swiss-German artist – several of his famous paintings featured fish) “fish”.
      • “diris” – “There is”, “the iris”, “dirus” (Latin “dire”).
      • “slibber” – “Saliva”, “slobber”, “sliver”, “slib” (Czech “promise”).
      • “licka” – “Like a”, “licker”.
      • “strim” – “String”, “is” “trim” (slang “sexual intercourse”; decoration; neat).
      • “o’peals” – “Of pearls”, “appeals”, “peals” (bell sounds), “asleep”.
      • “susplendid” – “Suspended”, “su” (French “had known”) “splendid”, “suss” (dialect “to figure out”).
      • “beautween” – “Between”, “beau” (sweetheart), “beauty” “ween” (archaic “to think; doubt; to wish; to weep).
      • “nips and lipple” – “Lips and nipple”, “nip” (small quantity of liquor; pinch) “lie people”.
    • Hilloock supperter, his bemine fays orisen son ablove ther handscape efertitis.

      • “Hilloock supperter” – “He looks up at her”, “hillock” (small hill; metaphorically “breast”) “supporter” (bra?), “supper to”.
      • “bemine” – “Beaming”, “be mine”, “be-mind”, “beminnen” (Dutch “to love”).
      • “fays” – “Face”, “fairies”.
      • “orisen son” – “A risen sun”, “o risen son” (Jesus, or any number of dying/resurrecting figures), “horizon”, “örisen” (Finnish “I growl; I speak incoherently”).
      • “ablove” – “Above”, “ab-” (away from) “love”.
      • “ther” – “The”, “there”, “her”.
      • “handscape” – “Landscape”, “hand scope”.
      • “efertitis” – “Of her tits”, “Nefertiti” (an Egyptian queen), “effortless”.
    • Sha khenat entierly wonderstund wadi essaying, pher aohl ophirs impyracasings.

      • “Sha” – “She”, “shah” (King of Persia or Iran).
      • “khenat” – “Cannot”, “khanate” (region ruled by a khan), “shake hen at”.
      • “entierly” – “Entirely”, “ent” “tier” “lie”.
      • “wonderstund” – “Understand”, “Wonderland” (as in Alice), “wonder stunned”.
      • “wadi” – “What he”, “wadi” (a stream bed in northern Africa or southwest Asia that is dry except in the rainy season), “way die”.
      • “essaying” – “Is saying”, “essaying” (writing an essay; attempting).
      • “pher” – “For”, “pheromones”.
      • “aohl” – “All”, “kohl” (dark eye makeup).
      • “ophirs” – “Of his”, “Ophir” (a wealthy city mentioned in the Bible).
      • “impyracasings” – “Imprecations” (invoking prayers, usually curses, though that seems not to be the case here), “imp pyre casings”.
  • Paragraph 41
    “Ah, my Mary! Do you not recall how I wooed you when you lived in Glinton with your father, James? For many years I have been seeking thee. When I escaped from my imprisoners in Epping Forest and thereafter made my walking progress for eighty miles to where you used to live, I munched upon the grass beside the road, akin to …, mad as a hatter. Throughout my pilgrimage, I thought only of thee, Miss Joyce, who was now Mary Clare! Though I be low-born and unworthy and not matrimonial material, I hope you will consent to conjugal activity.”

    • “Ah, mimarry!

      • “mimarry” – “My Mary”, “marry me”, “mimar” (Spanish “to pamper”), “arrym” (Manx “veneration”).
    • Deweyer naturecall howhigh woowed yewenchew lifft in Gleamtown wittier fathen, Jimes?

      • “Deweyer” – “Do you”, “dewey-eyed” (on the verge of crying).
      • “naturecall” – “Not recall”, “nature’s call” (a need to urinate).
      • “howhigh” – “How I”, “how high”.
      • “woowed” – “Wooed”, “woo wed”, “wowed”.
      • “yewenchew” – “You when you”, “yew” (type of tree) “and chew”, “ye wench” “ew” (expression of disgust).
      • “lifft” – “Lived”, “River Liffey”, “lift”.
      • “Gleamtown” – “Glinton“, “gleam town”.
        • The village in Cambridgeshire where Mary Joyce lived.
      • “wittier” – “With your”, “more witty”.
      • “fathen” – “Father”, “fat hen”, “for then”, “faith in”.
      • “Jimes” – “James” (Mary’s father’s name), “Jim” (informal version of “James”) “is”, suggest??
    • Firmary jears highhalf bin sickinthee.

      • “Firmary” – “For many”, “fir” (type of tree) “Mary”, “infirmary”.
      • “jears” – “Years”, “jeers” (mocks), “jeans” (denim pants).
      • “highhalf” – “I have”, “high half”.
      • “bin” – “Been”, “bin” (container; trashcan).
      • “sickinthee” – “Seeking thee”, “sick in thee”, “sicking heat”.
    • Whelln aey excooped farm may inpersoners un Epinc Forege an’ theredafter maed muy walkin’ purgaress far oughty mieals t’whed yu yester lief, I manged apoorn degrase beseed dir rood, akinter Erbat Grab o’ Chesshome, maddled diz a heter.

      • “Whelln aey” – “When I”, “well-nigh” (nearly), “whelk ye”, “welkin yea”.
      • “excooped” – “Escaped”, “ex-coop-ed” (“flew the coop” = escaped), “sex coped”.
      • “farm” – “From”, “farm” (in both the agricultural sense, and as in “funny farm” = mental hospital).
      • “may” – “My”, “may”.
      • “inpersoners” – “Imprisoners”, “in person Eros”, “impersonators”.
      • “un” – “in”, “un-” (not), “under”.
      • “Epinc Forege” – “Epping Forest”, “epic forage”, “pincer for edge”.
        • Clare voluntarily admitted himself into a mental hospital located within Epping Forest in 1837. He gradually became dissatisfied, and escaped on July 20, 1841.
      • “an’ theredafter” – “And thereafter”, “ah there, dafter”, “answered after”.
      • “maed” – “Made”, “maid”, “maenad” (Greek mythology: “raving one”, a female follower of Dionysus).
      • “muy” – “My”, “muy” (very).
      • “walkin’ purgaress” – “Walking progress”, “Work in Progress”, “walk-in Purgatory“, “impure caress”.
        • Clare left Epping Forest on foot, and walked near-continuously for most of four days.
      • “far” – “For”, “far”.
      • “oughty mieals” – “Eighty miles”, “ought ye smile”, “without any meals” (Clare had no proper food during this walk, see later in this sentence), “far-out”, “doughty” (brave).
        • The usual figure given for the distance Clare walked is eighty miles, though some analyses put it closer to ninety!
      • “t’whed” – “Toward”, “to wed”, “tow-head” (blond), possibly “tweed”.
      • “yu” – “You”, suggest??
      • “yester” – “Used to”, “yesterday” (in a general sense, the past), “you stir (up emptions)”.
      • “lief” – “Live”, “lief” (archaic “willing; beloved”), “live”, “lie”.
        • Clare’s goal, in leaving the asylum was to ‘reunite’ with his ‘wife’, Mary. He thus was traveling towards Glinton.
      • “manged” – “Munched”, “managed”, “mangy”.
      • “apoorn” – “Upon”, “a poor ‘un”, “apron”, “porn”.
      • “degrase” – “The grass”, “degrade”, “graze”.
        • According to his account of his walk, on the third or fourth day of his walk, Clare “satisfied my hunger by eating the grass by the road side”.
      • “beseed” – “Beside”, “be-seed”, “be seed”, “bee seder”.
      • “dir” – “The”, “dire”, “suggest??
      • “rood” – “Road”, “rood” (cross, see also chapters five and thirty-two), “rod”.
      • “akinter” – “Akin to”, “akilter” (crooked), “asking the”
      • “Erbat Grab o’ Chesshome” – “Roger Crab of Chesham” (see below), “hermit crab”, “herb at grab”, “chess home” (probably an Alice reference).
        • Roger Crab (1621-1680), lived in Chesham and made his living as a haberdasher from 1649-1652, at which time he became a hermit. He is thought to be a possible source for the phrase “mad as a hatter”.
      • “maddled diz a heter” – “Mad as a hatter”, “muddled dizzy heterosexual”, “heter” (various Scandinavian languages “hot, hotter”).
  • Page 894
    • Thoughurt illmay pullgreenage, I’that onely idee, Mis Chase, herwhis noew Mira Clere!

      • “Thoughurt” – “Throughout”, “though hurt”, “tougher”.
      • “illmay” – “All my”, “ill may”, “male”.
      • “pullgreenage” – “Pilgrimage”, “pull greenage”.
      • “I’that” – “I thought”, “in that”.
      • “onely” – “Only”, “lonely”, “like one”.
      • “idee” – “Of thee”, “idée fixe” (obsession), “idea”.
      • “Mis Chace” – “Miss Joyce”, “mischance”, “my chase”.
      • “herwhis” – “Who is”, “her wish”, “wisher”, “whisker”.
      • “noew” – “Now”, “new”.
      • “Mira Clere” – “Mary Clare”, “miracle”, “mira” (Italian “sight”) “clear”.
    • Doweye be la-bourn ond unworkhy adnit madermony almaterial, I happ ier welcomscent t’ cumjiggle acshiverty.”

      • “Doweye” – “Though I”, “doe-eyed”, “do” “weye” (Middle English “to lead astray”).
      • “la-bourn” – “Low-born”, “labour”.
      • “ond” – “And”, “ond” (Scandinavian languages “evil”), suggest??
      • “unworkhy” – “Unworthy”, “un- work he” (Clare never had much patience for (or success at) manual labor).
      • “adnit” – “And not”, “admit”, “adnitor” (Latin “I kneel; I try”).
      • “madermony almaterial” – “Matrimonial material”, “made of money” “altmaterial” (German “old materials”).
      • “happ ier” – “Hope you”, “happier”.
      • “welcomscent” – “Will consent”, “welcome scent”.
      • “cumjiggle” – “Conjugal” (relating to marriage), “cum jiggle”.
      • “acshiverty” – “Activity”, “lack shiver tie”, “achievers”, “adversity”.
  • Paragraph 42
    One of his hands is on her knee and starting to move up beneath her skirt. Lucia’s pulse is racing. She can feel her river-of-life juices springing from her wellhead, is excited by his lyrical and poetic demeanor; by the fact that it’s a member of the lower classes that is ruffling her feather bower. Most of all, it is this talk of marital canoodlings that sends a thrill of clear, inspiring lewdness from her aereole to her hairy-hole. Those grim days of the early nineteen-thirties, in the prima donna splits and when she had her breakdowns, she’d been desperate for a husband, someone who would be her prince and rescue daddy’s little princess from the dark woods of her circumstances; from all the wicked witches and the jabberwocks and jubjubs that had molested her since she was a young girl. Now here is a lusty bridegroom. Who is under the delusion that they were already wedded! As his callused fingers breach the dewdrop territory just above her stocking-tops, she throws her caution to the wind and moves her dampening thighs apart.

    • Wanderfuzz hunds is onournee instirrting to mufup bynorth erscort.

      • “Wanderfuzz” – “One of his”, “wander (to the) fuzz”, “wonderful”.
      • “hunds” – “Hands”, “hounds”.
      • “onournee” – “On her knee”, “honour need”, “journey”.
      • “instirrting” – “And starting”, “in stir thing”, “inserting”.
      • “mufup” – “Move up”, “muff” (slang “vulva”), “puff”.
      • “bynorth” – “Beneath”, “by north” (In traditional Western maps, “north” is “up”).
      • “erscort” – “Her skirt”, “escort” (to accompany; high-class prostitute).
    • Lucia’s pillses raysing.

      • “pillses” – “Pulse is”, “pill” (slang “comical person; to peel; obsolete “to pillage”; a small tidal pool) “says”.
      • “raysing” – “Racing”, “ray (of light) sing”, “raising”, “raisin”.
    • Shakin filler riverlifely juyces sprilging foamr wellhaired, issexcited boyhis leerical int pawetrick demeanher; by defact datits a manber odor loweredglasses dittis ruffialing her faether-bower.

      • “Shakin” – “She can”, “shaking”, “shah kin”.
      • “filler” – “Feel her”, “filler”, “fill her”, “fils” (French “son”) “leer”.
      • “riverlifely” – “River-of-life”, “River Liffey”, “revel lively”, suggest??
        • The primary meaning given here is particularly uncertain.
      • “juyces” – “Juices” (vaginal lubrication), “Joyces” (Mary and Lucia).
      • “sprilging” – “Springing”, “spilling” (overflowing), “sprig” (small shoot or twig; youth), “sprightly”, “singing pig”.
      • “foamr” – “From her”, “foamy”, “former”, “farmer”.
      • “wellhaired” – “Wellhead” (source of water; here, metaphorically, vagina), “well-haired”.
      • “issexcited” – “Is excited”, “is sex cited?”.
      • “boyhis” – “By his”, “boyish”.
      • “leerical” – “Lyrical”, “leer I shall”.
      • “int” – “And”, “lint”, “interior”, suggest??
      • “pawetrick” – “Poetic”, “paw” (to touch in a sexual way) “trickle” (childish slang “vagina”), “patriarchal”, “power trick”.
      • “demeanher” – “Demeanor”, “demean her”.
      • “defact” – “The fact”, “defect”, “de facto” (in practice; Australia “common-law spouse”).
      • “datits” – “That it’s”, “the tits”.
      • “manber” – “Member”, “man-bear”.
      • “odor” – “Of the”, “odor” (scent).
      • “loweredglasses” – “Lower classes”, “lowered glasses” (a gesture that may indicate sexual interest).
      • “dittis” – “That is”, “ditties” (tunes).
      • “ruffialing” – “Ruffling” (disordering; causing to flutter; being rough with); “rifling” (stealing from), “rue falling”, “ruff ailing”.
      • “faether-bower” – “Feather-bower” (poetic “vulva”), “feather boa” (scarf made of feathers), “father bow-er”, “fate her bow, er…”, “faith”, “bowyer”.
    • Muskovall, ittish distalk o’ mairytale canubialings dirtsentse a t’rill o’ clare, insparin lewdning firma aereola t’erra airyole.

      • “Muskovall” – “Most of all”, “musk” (perfume; scent of arousal) “ova” (eggs), “Muscovite” (Russian), “muscovite” (type of mica).
      • “ittish” – “It is”, “skittish” (nervous), “ittiche” (Italian feminine “fishes”).
      • “distalk” – “This talk”, “the stalk” (penis), “distal” (remote from the origin).
      • “mairytale” – “Marital”, “Mary tale”, “fairytale”.
      • “canubialings” – “Canoodlings” (caresses), “connubial” (relating to the state of being married), “cannibal”.
      • “dirtsentse” – “That sends”, “dirt” (unclean; relating to sex) “sense”, “sent sex”, “seat”, “sensei” (teacher).
      • “t’rill” – “Thrill” “trill” (to make a trilling sound; obsolete “to trickle”), “at” “rill” (small brook).
      • “clare” – “Clear”, “Clare”, “clare” (Latin “O renowned; O upstanding”).
      • “insparin” – “Inspiring”, “unsparing”, “in, spar, in!”.
      • “lewdning” – “Lewdness”, “lightning”, “loud din”.
      • “firma” – “From her”, “firma” (Latin “stable, firm; rent; farm), “for ma”.
      • “aereola” – “areola” (area surrounding the nipple), “aer” (Irish “air; tune; pleasure; wonder”).
      • “t’erra” – “to her”, “terra firma” (solid ground), “to err”.
      • “airyole” – “Hairy-hole” (vulva), “airy old”, “air Yule”, “arsehole”.
    • Thers grimm dies afther eargly neintime-thordays, inther primadonner-splitzaen wan sheutter brakedwonce, shid burnd despairt forwear hisband, psalmwon herward bier primpce and reskew deaddies lithel pawnciss fomeday durk wurds uffer seekhimstances; framily wakehurt whichis undie jibberworks und jabjabs deterd monest’er oine shewars a jung cairl.

      • “Thers” – “Those”, “there’s”, “theirs”.
      • “grimm” – “Grim”, “Grimm” (as in Grimm‘s fairy tales).
        • This introduces a fairy tale motif which continues throughout the sentence.
      • “dies” – “Days”, “die” (cease to live; game of chance; tool for stamping a coin).
      • “afther” – “Of the”, “after”, “father”.
      • “eargly” – “Early”, “eagerly”, “eagle”.
      • “neintime-thordays” – “Nineteen-thirties”, “nein” (German “no”) “time” “Thor days” (Thursdays?), “sore days”.
      • “inther” – “In the”, “into”, “inter”.
      • “primadonner-splitzaen” – “Prima donna splits and”, “prime donner” (first wearer) “split zany”.
        • The meaning here is obscure and uncertain. Suggest??
      • “wan” – “When”, “wan” (pale, sickly).
      • “sheutter” – “She had her”, “shutter”, “utters”, “udders”.
      • “brakedwonce” – “Breakdowns”, “braked” (slowed down) “once”, “brake” (bracken; thicket) “dunce”.
      • “shid” – “She’d”, “is hid”, “shed”.
      • “burnd” – “Been”, “burned”, “be urned” (cremated?).
      • “despairt” – “Desperate”, “despaired”, “This pair”.
      • “forwear” – “For a”, “for wear”, “forbear” (to abstain).
      • “hisband” – “Husband”, “his band” (wedding ring).
      • “psalmwon” – “Someone”, “psalm won”, “salmon”.
      • “herward” – “Who would”, “her-ward” (towards her), “her ward” (protector; legal guardian).
      • “bier” – “Be her”, “bier” (platform for a body (perhaps Snow White?)).
      • “primpce” – “Prince” (many fairy tales feature a prince rescuing a princess), “primp” (spend time on one’s appearance, as the Queen in “Snow White“) “she”, “precipice”, “prim piece”, “pimp”.
      • “reskew” – “Rescue”, “re-skew”.
      • “deaddies” – “Daddy’s”, “dead he is” (James Joyce died in 1941), “dead dies” (in the eternalist view of Jerusalem, one might say that the concept of death dies; see also Lovecraft: “and with strange aeons, even death may die“).
      • “lithel” – “Little”, “lithe”, “literary Hell”.
      • “pawnciss” – “Princess”, “pawn sister”.
      • “fomeday” – “From the”, “foam day”, “some day” (“My Prince Will Come“).
      • “durk” – “Dark”, “murk” (darkness; lack of clarity).
      • “wurds” – “Woods”, “words”, “wurde” (Old English “you might become”(?)).
      • “uffer” – “Of her”, “utter” (to speak; absolute), “suffer”.
      • “seekhimstances” – “Circumstances”, “seek him stances”.
      • “framily” – “From all the”, “family”, “frame a lie”.
      • “wakehurt whichis” – “Wicked witches” (as appear in many fairy tales, and in The Wizard of Oz), “wake, which is hurt” (to be awake/alive, is to be in pain).
      • “undie” – “And the”, “un-die” (undead? immortal?), “undine” (water spirit).
      • “jibberworks” – “Jabberwocks” (monster from Alice), “jibber” (gibberish; to jabber; a balky horse) “works”.
      • “und” – “And”, “hound”, “sunder”.
      • “jabjabs” – “Jubjub” (monster from Alice), “jabbings”, “abdabs” (nervousness).
      • “deterd” – “That had”, “deterred”, “the turd”.
      • “monest’er” – “Molested her”, “monster”, “monastery”
      • “oine” – “When”, “one”, “groin”, “øine” (Danish “eyes”), “öinen” (Finnish “nocturnal”), “oin” (Finnish “thorns”).
      • “shewars” – “She was”, “show arse”, “she wars”, “skewers”, “showers”.
      • “jung” – “Young”, “Carl Jung“.
      • “cairl” – “Girl”, “cairn”, “cailleach” (Irish “witch”), “cair” (obsolete “to go; to carry”).
    • Nowheer uis a lustic breedgroam wheo ais undi daddelucian thot daywear allrudey werdded!

      • “Nowheer” – “Now here”, “nowhere”, “no wheel”.
      • “uis” – “Is”, “uis” (Irish literary “deer”), “ruins”.
      • “lustic” – “Lusty”, “rustic”, “lustig” (German “funny; enjoyable”).
      • “breedgroam” – “Bridegroom”, “breed groan”.
      • “wheo” – “Who”, “when”, “we”.
      • “ais” – “Is”, “as”, “ais” (Irish “back; axis).
      • “undi” – “Under”, “Sunday”, “undine”, “undies” (slang “underwear”).
      • “daddelucian” – “The delusion”, “daddy” “Lucian” (Ancient Greek writer), “Daedalus -ian”, “dad delicious”.
        • Lucian wrote the primary account by which we know of Glycon, the god Moore worships.
      • “thot” – “That”, “thought”, “Thoth” (Egyptian god of knowledge).
      • “daywear” – “They were”, “daywear” (clothes to be worn in the daytime), “day we are”.
      • “allrudey” – “Already”, “all ruddy” (blushing), “rude”, “allude”.
      • “werdded” – “Wedded”, “were dead”, “worded”.
    • Esses carelussed flindgers breatch the duedrip tendirtory jist aperver sticking-tups, sheflows herl cushion tuther whimd unmoves hir dampling shighs opert.

      • “Esses” – “As his”, “Ss”, “essays” (type of writing; attempts), “esses” (Latin “you would have been(?); you would have eaten(?)”).
      • “carelussed” – “Callused”, “careless”, “care lust”.
      • “flindgers” – “Fingers”, “flinders” (fragments; dialect “butterflies”), “fling her”.
      • “breatch” – “Breach” (enter), “beat”, “breath”, “bitch”, “breac” (Irish “spotted”).
      • “duedrip” – “Dewdrop” (i.e. moist), “due drip” (appropriately moist), “dude rip”, “dued” (Welsh “as black as”).
      • “tendirtory” – “Territory”, “tender” “oryx” (type of antelope), “tend her story”, “ten dirt orator”.
      • “jist” – “Just”, “jism” (slang “semen”), “gist” (most essential part).
      • “aperver” – “Above her”, “a pervert”, “ape river”.
      • “sticking-tups” – “Stocking-tops”, “stick-in” “tup” (slang “have sex with”), “sticking”.
      • “sheflows” – “She throws”, “she flows” (i.e. vaginal lubrication), “shelf owes”.
      • “herl” – “Her”, “hurl” (throw forcefully).
      • “cushion” – “Caution”, “cushion” (poetic “bottom”), “cochon” (French “smutty”).
      • “tuther” – “To the”, “tut” (expression of disapproval) “her”, “tether”, “author”, “tuter” (Latin “I would defend”).
      • “whimd” – “Wind”, “whim”, “with him”.
        • To “throw caution to the wind” is to do something without concern of risk or consequences.
      • “unmoves” – “And moves”, “unmoved”.
      • “hir” – “Her”, “hir” (Latin “hand”; Serbo-Croatian “whim”; Welsh “long”).
      • “dampling” – “Dampening”, “dumpling”.
      • “shighs” – “Thighs”, “she sighs”, “is high”.
      • “opert” – “Apart”, “O” “pert” (attractive; lively; impertinent).
  • Paragraph 43
    He kisses Lucia deep inside her open mouth, his lingual muscle tussling with hers, wrestling in beautiful silvery fluids. At the same time, an indeterminate amount of digits tickled up to her downy grove, gently taking liberties, inserting one joint at a time into her oily moisture, in and out, most deliciously. Blindly he fumbles back to shimmer near her clitoris, until she feels she’ll go off like a shot. Ah, she can smell the river even now. Her eyes are closed, but she can tell that all around them history is gushing past her, all the days and months and seasons, all accelerating in their cadence. Flowers are opening and closing, trees are blossoming and shedding, all across the sentimental hospital as she is kissed and fingerfucked by this romantic stranger.

    • He glisses Lucia deip insite her upin mawth, his lingwell mussletusclin’ wett’ers, wrutsling en meautifual silivery fluods.

      • “glisses” – “Kisses”, “glissando” (musical term), “glasses”.
      • “deip” – “Deep”, “dip”, “deipno-” (relating to dinner).
      • “insite” – “Inside”, “incite”, “insight”.
      • “upin” – “Open”, “you pin”, “up in”.
      • “mawth” – “Mouth”, “maw”, “ma with”.
      • “lingwell” – “Lingual” (relating to the tongue), “lying well”, “ling” (heather), “inkwell”.
      • “mussletusclin’” – “Muscle tussling”, “must let us in”, “musselinen” (German “linen”), “tusculis” (Latin “about incense”(?)).
      • “wett’ers” – “With hers”, “wetter”, “wet terse”.
      • “wrutsling” – “Wrestling”, “rustling”, “ruts ling”, “sling”.
      • “en” – “In”, “enemy”, suggest??
      • “meautifual” – “Beautiful”, “mutual”, “fual” (Irish “urine”).
      • “silivery” – “Silvery”, “salivary”, “very silly”, “livery”.
      • “fluods” – “Floods”, “fluids”, “fluo” (Latin “I flow; I am soaked in”).
    • Etre simul taem, in andetermerate amoint o’ didits tuckled upt’er deowny grooev, genitly tiklin labirties, inslirdin une juent enter taim intuir moily oiysteur, in und ate, in und ate, moissed deluciasly.

      • “Etre” – “At the”, “être” (French “to be”), “tree”.
      • “simul taem” – “Same time”, “simultaneous”, “simulate ’em”, “Sim” (possible reference to Dave Sim, Canadian cartoonist and former friend of Moore’s) “you’ll tame”, “ultimate”, “meat”.
      • “in andetermerate” – “An indeterminate”, “in an deter me rate” (too fast?).
      • “amoint o’ didits” – “Amount of digits”, “a moist O did it”, “Amontillado” (Poe reference?), “amoindrir” (French “to degrade; to weaken”), “móinteach” (Irish “bogland; mossy”), “didits” (Latin “we disseminate”).
      • “tuckled” – “Tickled”, “tucked”, “tuckered” (tired).
      • “upt’er” – “Up to her”, “tup” (have suck with) “her”, “Jupiter“.
      • “deowny” – “Downy”, “the only”, “deonym” (the name of a god).
      • “grooev” – “Grove”, “groove”.
      • “genitly” – “Gently”, “genitally”.
      • “tiklin” – “Taking”, “tickling”.
      • “labirties” – “Liberties”, “labia tease”, “labor ties”.
      • “inslirdin” – “Inserting”, “sliding in”, “uncertain”
      • “une” – “One”, “une” (French feminine “a”), “June”.
      • “juent” – “Joint”, “jeune” (Old French “young person”), “June”, “jew went”.
      • “enter” – “At a”, “enter”, “entire”.
      • “taim” – “Time”, “táim” (Irish “I am”) “Tam” (Lin).
      • “intuir” – “Into her”, “intuit”, “tuirseach” (Irish “tired”).
      • “moily oiysteur” – “Oily moisture”, “moily” (churning; defiled) “oyster”
      • “in und ate” – “In and out”, “inundate” (to flood), “a hound ate”.
      • “moissed” – “Most”, “moist”, “moss-ed” (covered in moss), “missed”, “moisset” (Occitan “falcon”).
      • “deluciasly” – “Deliciously”, “de Lucia’s lie” (for Lucia’s repose), “deluded lie”, “delicately”, “sly”.
    • Blundtly ee thumbles becktte himmher wear’er trigoris, untell sha feerls shilgo aflicker short.

      • “Blundtly” – “Blindly”, “bluntly”, “bumdt” (cake pan with a hole in the center).
      • “ee” – “He”, “ee” (expression of surprise and fear).
      • “thumbles” – “Fumbles”, “thumbs”, “stumbles”.
      • “becktte” – “Back to”, “Beckett” (Samuel Beckett (1906-1989), Irish playwright, associate of James Joyce, and object of obsession for Lucia – see section 4 for more details), “becked” (beckoned).
      • “himmher” – “Shimmer”, “him in her”, “himmerige” (Danish “heaven, paradise”).
        • “Shimmer” is oddly used here (and possibly an incorrect interpretation), seeming to mean “fiddle with”, but in an unusually poetic phrasing.
      • “wear’er” – “Near her”, “wearer”.
      • “trigoris” – “Clitoris”, “trig” (neat; to stuff; dialect “faithful; clever; a dandy”; trigonometry) “oris” (Latin “to the entrance).
      • “untell” – “Until”, “un-tell” (keep silent?).
      • “sha” – “She”, “shah” (king of various Middle Eastern nations).
      • “feerls” – “Feels”, “fears”, “feral” (untamed, animalistic).
      • “shilgo” – “She’ll go”, “shill” (paid endorser), suggest??
      • “aflicker short” – “Off like a shot”, “a flicker short”, “licker”, “afflict her”, “shirt”.
        • To “go off like a shot” means to go (or, in this case, come) very quickly. A variant of the phrase is “off like a dirty shirt”.
    • A, eycon smeil the riverina neow.

      • “A, eycon” – “”Ah, she can”, “aye con”, “an icon”.
        • Phonetically, this would make more sense as “I can”. Switching from third to first person in mid-narrative is unusual in normal prose, but does sometimes occur in erotica.
      • “smeil” – “Smell”, “smile”.
      • “riverina neow” – “River even now” (i.e. the flood of fragrant female lubrication), “riverine” (pertaining to rivers) “new”, “enow” (archaic “enough”). Possibly “Inanna” (Sumerian goddess of love).
    • Horizar closte, bardshe ken tael thetalle orund theem herstareye es gurshin pfast’er, allidayzen moonthsand shesongs, irl axhelaerating inth’air calendance.

      • “Horizar” – “Her eyes are”, “horizon”, “horizontal”.
      • “closte” – “Closed”, “closet”, “close to”
      • “bardshe” – “But she”, “bard” (professional poet) “is he”.
      • “ken” – “Can”, “ken” (knowledge).
      • “tael” – “Tell”, “tale”, “tael” (a Chinese measure of weight).
      • “thetalle” – “That all”, “the tall”, “tale”.
      • “orund” – “Around”, “oriundo” (Italian “native”), “orotund” (bombastic).
      • “theem” – “Them”, “teem” (to abound), “theme”, “Theems” (Dutch “Thames”).
      • “herstareye” – “History”, “her starry eye”, “her stare, yes”, “herstory” (history emphasizing the role of women).
      • “es” – “Is”, “yes”, suggest??
      • “gurshin” – “Gushing” (suggesting time seen as a river), “rushing”, “her shin”.
      • “pfast’er” – “Past her”, “faster”, “plaster”.
      • “allidayzen” – “All the days and”, “holidays”, “a lie day zen”, “ally”, “allida” (Ita;ian “I would beat”(?)), “dazen” (Dutch archaic “to talk nonsense”).
      • “moonthsand” – “Months and”, “moon sand”.
      • “shesongs” – “Seasons”, “she songs”.
      • “irl” – “All”, “IRL (Ireland; internet slang “in real life”), suggest??
      • “axhelaerating” – “Accelerating”, “exhilarating”, “ax” “Hel” (Norse death goddess) “aerating”, “healer thing”
      • “inth’air” – “In their”, “in the air”, “in thin air”.
      • “calendance” – “Cadence”, “calendar dance”.
    • Flowhers sa opreening en cluesing, treas ure blazoming enshaeding, ell o’course dei saintymental heartspetal asshe iss kiston tinkertucked brydehis roamhandtric sdrench’er.

      • “Flowhers sa” – “Flowers are”, “flow hers, ah!”, “flow where”.
      • “opreening” – “Opening”, “O preening”.
      • “en” – “And”, “enclosing”.
      • “cluesing” – “”Closing”, “clue sing”.
      • “treas ure” – “Trees are”, “treasure”.
      • “blazoming” – “Blossoming”, “blazing”, “blazoning” (proclaiming; shining; describing a coat of arms).
      • “enshaeding” – “And shedding”, “en-shading” (shadowing).
      • “ell” – “All”, “ell” (something L-shaped; archaic cloth measure).
      • “o’course” – “Across”, “of course”, “O course”.
      • “dei” – “The”, “die”, “dei” (Italian “gods; of the”).
      • “saintymental heartspetal” – “Sentimental hospital”, “Saint Andrews Mental Hospital”, “saintly mental heart’s petal”.
      • ‘asshe” – “As she”, “ass he”, “ashes”.
      • “iss” – “”Is”, “kiss”.
      • “kiston” – “Kissed and”, “kist” (Scotland “a chest; a coffin”) “on”, “kiss ton”.
      • “tinkertucked” – “Fingerfucked”, “tinker” (to fiddle with) “tucked”, “Tinkertoy” (type of construction toy).
      • “brydehis” – “By this”, “his bride”, “bryde” (Danish “to break;to like”).
      • “roamhandtric” – “Romantic”, “roaming hands” (hands which move to approach private parts) “trick”, “tric” (Scottish Gaelic “frequent”), “Rómhánach” (Irish “Roman”).
      • “sdrench’er” – “Stranger”, “drenches her” (makes her ‘wet’).
  • Paragraph 44
    Hesitantly, Lucia blindly searches for his bulging and distended button-fly, her grasp closing around what feels like it’s long and girthy rounders bat. How long has it been she wonders, since she held a mighty piece of prick as long as this one in her little hand? With guilty pleasure she remembers her long-since departed mornings spent in bed with teenage Giorgio when she was ten, that pearly fountain surging up out of her tight-clenched fist. She senses that her present suitor, country-born, knows all about such matters. Lucia has an intuition that this Mary, for whom he’s clearly mistaken her, might have been ten herself when first he had her in the leafy woods, with him fourteen, the same age as of her older brother. Timeless as a river, she can feel the madhouse centuries swirling around them, passing time a revolution. Any age she wants to be, she is a prepubescent jezebel once more, with dandelion perfume all around that makes her want to piddle, innocent. Eagerly, she unbuttons his old-fashioned trousers so that she can feel the large and naked flesh of it, tirgid and hot, wrapped in her soft and fine cool fingers.

    • Hesatentlike, Lucia blondly erches furries balljing en distentid butternfly, urgrisp clothesin erand whetfils licua lingan’ dirtygirthy randhers-biat.

      • “Hesatentlike” – “Hesitantly”, “he Satan-like”, “at the same time”.
      • “blondly” – “Blindly”, “like a blonde”.
      • “erches” – “Searches”, “reaches”, “arches”, “urges”.
      • “furries” – “For his”, “furriest”, “fur rise”.
      • “balljing” – “Bulging”, “ball jism”, “jing” (traditional Chinese medicine “the basis for the physical body”).
      • “en” – “And”, “end”, suggest??
      • “distentid” – “Distended”, “this tent” “id” (Freudian psychology “the uncontrolled, impulsive part of the personality”).
      • “butternfly” – “Button-fly”, “butterfly”, “butt” “enfler” (French “to swell up”).
      • “urgrisp” – “Her grasp”, “ur-” (original, primal) “grip”, “urging”, “gris” (French “grey; drunk”).
      • “clothesin” – “Closing”, “in (his) clothes”, “close to sin”, “clothespin”, “clothesline”.
      • “erand” – “Her hand”, “errand”, “Erand” (Albanian “perfume”).
      • “whetfils” – “What feels”, “whet” (increase appetite) “fils” (French “son”), “wet feels”, “het” (heated; heterosexual).
      • “licua” – “Like a”, “Lucia”, “lick you a”, “licua” (Spanish “blend thee!”).
      • “lingan’” – “Long and”, “lingam” (penis, especially in connection with Shiva).
      • “dirtygirthy” – “Girthy”, “Dirty Girty” (see notes at section 1, paragraph 14).
      • “randhers-biat” – “Rounders bat” (similar to a baseball bat), “randy” (horny) “her bait”, “roundabout” (in circumference, resonant with “girthy”).
    • Herlong hussyt banshi whenders, sinshy hilt a mitrey blishopric islangours deswan een lherlita lhand?

      • “Herlong” – “How long”, “her longing”, “hurling”.
      • “hussyt” – “Has it”, “hussy”(a women displaying inappropriate behavior) “‘tt” (sound expressing disapproval).
      • “banshi” – “Been she”, “banshee”, “ban show”.
        • In Irish folklore, a banshee is a female spirit whose wailing foretells death.
      • “whenders” – “Wonders”, “when-ders” (wanders through time), “when it is”.
      • “sinshy” – “Since she”, “sin shy”, “cinch” (easy).
      • “hilt” – “Held”, “hilt” (the handle of a weapon; the base of the penis).
      • “mitrey” – “Mighty”, “mitre-y” (like a bishop’s hat), “my tree”.

        Mitre
        Mitre
      • “blishopric” – “Piece of prick”, “bishopric”, “bliss”, “blush”.
      • “islangours” – “As long as”, “his langours”, “island tours”.
      • “deswan” – “This one”, “de- swan” (to move with purpose?), “these wan”.
      • “een” – “In”, “peen” (slang “penis”), “even”.
      • “lherlita” – “Little”, “Lolita” (underage yet sexually-active girl in Nabokov novel), “her litter”, “literal”.
      • “lhand” – “Hand”, “land”.
    • Wuth girlty pleasher cherie menbers her lingsence dispanted mournins spenkt inbredwit teurnage Jiggyo wantshe wisten, dit pirlly foamtain surchin oops owtovver totclinched frist.

      • “Wuth” – “With”, “worth”, “Wuthering Heights”.
      • “girlty” – “Guilty”, “girly”, “girl tie”.
      • “pleasher” – “Pleasure”, “her pleas”, “please her”.
      • “cherie menbers” – “She remembers”, “chérie” (French feminine “beloved”) “men” “ber” (French “ship’s cradle”), “cherry” (slang “virginal”) “members”, “hairy man-bears”.
      • “lingsence” – “Long-since”, “lingua” (Italian “language; tongue) “sense”, “lying séance”.
      • “dispanted” – “Departed” (in the past), “dis- panted” (without pants, naked), “disappointed”, “this (person) panted (with desire).
      • “mournins” – “Mornings”, “mourning”, “mourn in his”.
      • “spenkt” – “Spent” (in the sense of “time passed”, but also in the sense of “sexual ejaculation”), “spanked” (sometimes part of sexual play, especially in Britain), “spekt” (Dutch “you supply; you fill in”; Icelandic “tranquility”).
      • “inbredwit” – “In bed with”, “inbred wit”, “wittier”.
      • “teurnage” – “Teenage”, “tournage” (French “filming”), “tour” (French “tower; turn; stroll”) “nage” (French “swimming”)
      • “Jiggyo” – “Giorgio”, “jiggy” (slang “crazy; jittery; exciting) “O!”, “jig” (type of dance; to trick; offensive slang “black person”) “yo!”
      • “wantshe” – “When she”, “he wants”, “want she”.
      • “wisten” – “Was ten”, “wistful”, “wisten” (Dutch “might have known”(?)), “wist” (known) “any”.
      • “dit” – “That”, “dirty” (sexually forbidden), “dit” (ditty, song; dialect “to close up”).
      • “pirlly” – “Pearly”, “pilly” (Scotland “pillow”), “pillar”.
      • “foamtain” – “Fountain”, “foam” “tain” (French “aluminum foil”; Finnish “most posterior”), “mountain”, “Táin” (Bó Cúailinge, Irish legend).
      • “surchin” – “Surging”, “is urchin”, “searching”, “sur-” (above) “chin”.
      • “oops” – “Up”, “oops” (expression of dismay at a mistake).
      • “owtovver” – “Out of her”, “ow” (expression of pain) “tover” (Dutch “magic”), “O tower”, suggest??
      • “totclinched” – “Tight-clenched”, “tot” (small child; amount of alcohol; fool) “clinched” (embraced; made certain), “totally cliched”.
      • “frist” – “Fist”, “first”, “frisky”, “frist” (dialect “delay, respite”; Dutch “chillier”).
    • She sinses dirther prisend swoot’er, cuntreborn, knowsoil aboot serx muttres.

      • “sinses” – “Senses”, “sin says”, “sinsemilla” (type of marijuana).
      • “dirther” – “That her”, “dirtier”, “a dearth” (scarcity), “dither”.
      • “prisend” – “Present” (both in the sense of “current” and “gift”), “prisoned”, “pray send”, “prise” (to pry open; an enterprise) “end”.
      • “swoot’er” – “Suitor”, “swoon her”, “swoote” (Middle English “sweet”), “swotter” (British slang “studious person”), “Wooster” (Character in comedies by P. G. Wodehouse).
      • “cuntreborn” – “Country-born”, “cunt reborn”.
      • “knowsoil” – “Knows all”, “know soil”, “now”, “oil”.
      • “aboot” – “About”, “a boot” (referring to the hole in Clare’s shoe?).
      • “serx” – “Such”, “sex”, “search”.
      • “muttres” – “Matters”, “mutters”, “mattress”.
    • Lucia hasane intuatition det dismarry, far grhoom hes clarely mistpokin her, mait hov bien ten d’herself winforsty haidder unde liffey woords, wit’him spirteen, the seaym itch asouer heldher bratore.

      • “hasane” – “Has an”, “sane? Ha!”, “hasan” (Japanese “bankruptcy”; Okinawan “scissors; stag beetle”).
      • “intuatition” – “Intuition”, “insinuation” (arguably what Moore is doing with the imputations of incest in this chapter)
      • “det” – “That”, “det” (Irish “from your”; Latin “he/she/it might give”(?)).
      • “dismarry” – “This Mary”, “dis- marry” (divorce?), “dismay”.
      • “far grhoom” – “For whom”, “far groom”.
      • “hes” – “He’s”, “his”.
      • “clarely” – “Clearly”, “Clare lie”.
      • “mistpokin” – “Mistaken”, “miss poking”, “my spoken”, “misspoken”, “mist” “po” (dated “chamberpot”) “kin”.
      • “mait” – “Might”, “maid”, “maith” (Irish “good”).
      • “hov” – “Have”, “hov” (Scandinavian languages “hoof”).
      • “bien” – “Been”, “bien” (French “good”).
      • “ten d’herself” – “Ten herself”, “tender self”.
      • “winforsty” – “When first he”, “win forced he”, “win for sty”, “frosty wind”.
      • “haidder” – “Had her”, “the head” (maidenhead?), “hadder” (dialect “heather”).
      • “unde” – “In the”, “under”, “undies” (underwear), “undine” (water spirit).
      • “liffey” – “Leafy”, “River Liffey“.
      • “woords” – “Woods”, “words”.
      • “wit’him” – “With him”, “wit”, “within”.
      • “spirteen” – “Fourteen”, “spurting”, “spirte” (Norwegian “sprouted”).
        • “Thirteen” might be a more obvious reading, but in all other age references Moore makes to Lucia/Giorgio and Mary/John, the ages are 10 and 14.
      • “seaym” – “Same”, “seamy” (sordid; having a seam), “see him”, possibly “semen”.
      • “itch” – “Age”, “itch” (desire).
      • “asouer” – “As of her”, “a” “souer” (French “sister”) , “ass over” (variant of “head over heels”?).
      • “heldher” – “Older”, “held her” “helder” (Dutch “clear, lucid” – suggesting “Clare, Lucia”).
      • “bratore” – “Brother”, “bra tore”, “brat o’er” (knee, for spanking?), “ore”, “bratorum” (Latin “of the cypress trees(?)).
    • Tameless as erever, sie kinfeel di madhow saneturies swillring arandem, passin tiem a Mary/Lucian.

      • “Tameless” – “Timeless”, “tame-less” (untamed, umtamable).
      • “erever” – “A river”, “ever”, “erverve” (Norwegian “to acquire”), “eruv” (Jewish law term).
      • “sie kinfeel” – “She can feel”, “shaking field”, “sie” (dialect “to fall; to faint”; German “she; they”) “kin”.
      • “di” – “The”, “die”, “diamond”.
      • “madhow” – “Madhouse”, “made how”.
      • “saneturies” – “Centuries”, “sanitarium”, “sane” “Tories” (British conservative political party).
      • “swillring” – “Swirling”, “swelling”, “swill ring”.
      • “arandem” – “Around them”, “at random”, “randy man”.
      • “passin” – “Passing”, “passion”, “passin” (Catalan “they might move on(?)), “passim” (throughout).
      • “tiem” – “Time”, “tie them”, “tiem” (Latvian “with those”).
      • “Mary/Lucian” – “Revolution”, “Mary and/or Lucia”.
        • The meaning of the last phrase is not entirely clear.
    • Eeny arge she wankst tubee, shae easa prypubisscent jizzerbelle whensmear, wit daedelion pair’fum olorounde dot mictsur wee’nter paedle innisant.

      • “Eeny” – “Any”, “eeny” (small; part of a choosing rhyme).
      • “arge” – “Age”, “large”, “arge” (German “bad”), “argent” (silver; money).
      • “wankst” – “Wants”, “wanks” (slang “masturbates”), “wankst” (German “you stagger”).
      • “tubee” – “To be”, “tubby” (overweight), “tu” (French informal “you”) “bee”, “tubée” (French feminine “tubing”).
      • “shae” – “She”, “shae” (Scots “shoe”).
      • “easa” – “Is a”, “easy”, “easa” (Irish “of a waterfall; weasels”).
      • “prypubisscent” – “Prepubescent”, “pry pubis scent”.
      • “jizzerbelle” – “Jezebel” (Biblical character; a shameless woman), “jizzer” (ejaculator) “belle” (attractive woman).
      • “whensmear” – “Once more”, “when smear” (different times are blending into one another).
      • “wit” – “With”, “wit” (cleverness; to know).
      • “daedelion” – “Dandelion”, “daddy lion”, “Daedalus” (Greek mythological inventor).
      • “pair’fum” – “Perfume”, “pair of them”.
      • “olorounde” – “All around”, “Olorun” (Yoruba “God”), “olor” (Latin “swan”) “onde” (obsolete “malice”; dialect “breath”; French “wave”; Italian “whence; so that”), “O low” “roundel” (something round; musical round).
      • “dot” – “That”, “dot”.
      • “mictsur” – “Makes her”, “micturate” (urinate).
      • “wee’nter” – “Want to”, “wee” (childish “urinate”) “into”, “we enter”, “ween” (archaic “think”; dialect “weep”; Wolof “breast”) “to”.
      • “paedle” – “Piddle” (childish “urinate”), “paedophile”, “paddle”, “pedal”.
      • “innisant” – “Innocent”, “in a sink”, “inn saint”, suggest??
    • Eegirly, shy inbutwens his oult’fish-in trusshis so dirtshe cumfiel thi lurgent nokid fleush o’vite, urgid an’ dhot, rawpt inn’er sift an’ finne cool finglers.

      • “Eegirly” – “Eagerly”, “ee” (expression of enthusiasm) “girly”.
      • “shy” – “She”, “shy”.
      • “inbutwens” – “Unbuttons”, “in between”, “in butt went”, “but when?”
      • “oult’fish-in” – “Old-fashioned”, “out fishing”, “oultre” (Middle French “over the top”) “fission”.
      • “trusshis” – “Trousers”, “truss” (to secure; hernia bandage; architectural term; tuft of flowers) “his”, “treasures”, “trousseaus”.
      • “dirtshe” – “That she”, “dirty”.
      • “cumfiel thi” – “Can feel the”, “cum filthy”, “come” “fiel” (Spanish “loyal”) “thee”.
      • “lurgent” – “Large and”, “urgent”, “lure gent”.
      • “nokid” – “Naked”, “no kid”, “knock id”.
      • “fleush” – “Flesh”, “flush”, “fleur” (French “flower; (figuratively) female virginity).
      • “o’vite” – “Of it”, “O” “vite” (French “quickly”; Italian “lives; screw; vine”), “invite”, “ova” (eggs).
      • “urgid” – “Turgid” (swollen), “urged”.
      • “an’ dhot” – “And hot”, “a dot”, “dhoti” (Hindu loincloth).
      • “rawpt” – “Wrapped”, “rapt” (fascinated), “raw pet”.
      • “inn’er” – “In her”, “inner”.
      • “sift” – “Soft”, “sift”.
      • “an’ finne cool” – “And fine cool”, “finne” (Irish “of a blonde”(?)), suggest??
        • Possible allusion to Fionn MacCool, mythological Irish warrior.
      • “finglers” – “Fingers”, “tingler” (slang “orgasm”), “fingle-fangle” (archaic “trifle”).
  • Page 895
  • Paragraph 45
    Well aware that she is teetering upon the brink of absolute surrender, she decides that it would be unladylike if she didn’t attempt to find out what his name might be before she lets him stick his great shillelagh up her. Disengaging from his lips, her voice is trembling with desire, gasping and panting as she tries to articulate an intelligible sentence.

    • Willoware tutshe es teaterring upendy blink o’ adssolute sirenter, shadeysides detert wordpie inlaitylike avshe diredent attopt tefinedoubt wattirs neme motbe beforshe luts hom stickies grirt she-lully oppor.

      • “Willoware” – “Well aware”, “willow ware” (popular 18th century china pattern), “willow are”.
      • “tutshe” – “That she”, “tuts” (expresses disapproval) “he”.
      • “es” – “Is”, suggest??
      • “teaterring” – “Teetering”, “tea the ring”, “theater”, “terrine” (type of casserole pan; Italian “tureens”), “terning” (Scandinavian languages “dice”).
      • “upendy blink” – “Upon the brink”, “upend-y blink”.
      • “adssolute” – “Absolute”, “ads” “solute” (liberal; relaxed; soluble).
      • “sirenter” – “Surrender”, “sir enter”, “siren to”.
      • “shadeysides” – “She decides”, “shady sides”.
      • “detert” – “That it”, “deterred”, “determined”, “desert”.
      • “wordpie” – “Would be”, “word pie”.
      • “inlaitylike” – “Unladylike”, “in” “laity” (common man or woman) “like”, “inlay tyke”.
      • “avshe” – “If she”, “avse” (Swedish “to intend”), “sheaves”.
      • “diredent” – “Didn’t”, “dire dent”, “the red ent”, “di” (Italian “of”) “redent” (French “recess; shelf”).
      • “attopt” – “Attempt”, “atop”, “at topped”, “atto-” (10^-18) “point”.
      • “tefinedoubt” – “To find out”, “the fine doubt”, “te-fine” (Mele-Fila “woman”), “fined ought”.
      • “wattirs” – “What his”, “waters”, “Watt” (James Watt (1736-1819), Scottish inventor) “Irish”.
      • “neme” – “Name”, “Nemo”, “neme” (Dutch “I may take”).
        • In Homer’s Odyssey, Odysseus once uses the alias of “Nemo”, which literally means “nobody”.
      • “motbe” – “Might be”, “so mote it be” (ritual phrase used by Freemasons), “motbevise” (Norwegian “to disprove”).
      • “beforshe” – “Before she”, “be forced”.
      • “luts” – “Lets”, “slut”, “lutes”.
      • “hom” – “Him”, “homo” (man).
      • “stickies” – “Stick his”, “sticky things”, “stickiest”.
      • “grirt” – “Great”, “girt” (girded), “girth”, “grit”.
      • “she-lully” – “Shillelagh” (Irish wooden stick or cudgel), “lulling her”, “lollipop”.
      • “oppor” – “Up her”, “opportunity”, “oppo” (British slang “friend; colleague”).
    • Dislinguaging famishlips, hervice hystermbling weddysire, glasping unpanton usshe troyce to artichoate en untellagabble signdance.

      • “Dislinguaging” – “Disengaging”, “this language sing”, “dis-lingua-ing” (removing tongue), “disingenuous” (deceptive).
      • “famishlips” – “From his lips”, “famished”, “family ships”.
      • “hervice” – “Her voice”, “her vice”, “service”, “hervir” (Spanish “to boil”).
      • “hystermbling” – “Is trembling”, “hysteria” (a type of madness often attributed to females; the word derives from the Greek for “uterus”) “mumbling”, “his term” “bling” (luxury; jewelry).
      • “weddysire” – “With desire”, “wed the sire”, “wedding”.
      • “glasping” – “Gasping”, “gaping”, “lapsing”.
      • “unpanton” – “And panting”, “un-pant-on” (having removed pants?), “unpantied”, “a pantomime”, “panton” (Latin “everything”).
      • “usshe” – “As she”, “usher”, “Ussher” (James Ussher (1581-1656), Irish Archbishop, best known for using the Bible to establish the date of creation).
      • “troyce” – “Tries”, “Joyce”, “Troy, C.E.”.
      • “artichoate” – “Articulate”, “inchoate” (incoherent), “artichoke”, “art I” “choad” (slang “penis”).
      • “en untellagabble” – “An intelligible”, “unintelligible”, “un-tell a gabble”, “nun”, “until la gable”
      • “signdance” – “Sentence”, “sign dance”, “significance”.
        • “Sign dance” is an excellent description of what this chapter is doing; with all sorts of semiotic signs interacting with each other in a complex dance.
  • Paragraph 46
    “Sir, you have me at a disadvantage! Much as I might fancy having you on top of me, I must insist, before I spread my legs, on knowing who you are.”

    • “Siur, ye heif meowt a desiredvintage!

      • “Siur” – “Sir”, “surly”, siur” (Old Irish “sister”), “sur” (French “on”; Old English “sour”).
      • “ye” – “You”, “ye” (archaic “you”).
      • “heif” – “Have”, “heifer” (young female cow; obsolete “wife”), “half”, “hei” (Scots “he”).
      • “meowt” – “Me at”, “meow” (cat noise), “nowt” (dialect “nothing”).
      • “desiredvintage” – “A disadvantage”, “desired vintage”, “this is red wine age”.
        • To “have one at a disadvantage” means to not know the other person’s name when they know yours; to request an introduction.
    • Mochasigh maidfanntsy havendew ittupi’me, highmast inserst, prefore espered muy lux, innerwing heu yewaere.”

      • “Mochasigh” – “Much as I”, “mocha” (coffee with chocolate; Irish “early (ones)”) “sigh”, “mock his eye”. Possibly “Mucha” (Alphonse Mucha (1860-1939), Czech Art Nouveau painter).
      • “maidfanntsy” – “Might fancy”, “maid fantasy”, “fanny” (slang “vagina”).
      • “havendew” – “Having you”, “haven dew”, “avenue”, “ha vend you”.
      • “ittupi’me” – “On top of me”, “I” “tup” (slang “have sex with”) “time”. Possibly “tipi”.
      • “highmast” – “I must”, “high mast” (phallic imagery).
      • “inserst” – “Insist”, “insert”, “incest”.
      • “prefore” – “Before”, “prefer”, “proffer”, “pre-” “fore!” (exclamation before hitting a golf ball), “perform”.
      • “espered” – “I spread”, “espere” (Spanish “I might hope”(?); Old French “sphere”), “ESP” “red”, suggest??
      • “muy lux” – “My legs”, “muy” (very) “lux” (Latin “light” (related to “Lucia”)).
      • “innerwing” – “In knowing”, “inner wing”, “innerving” (stimulating).
      • “heu” – “Who”, “heu” (Catalan “Get!”; Latin “alas!”).
      • “yewaere” – “You are”, “yew”(type of tree) “aere” (Italian “air”), “aware”, “wary”.
  • Paragraph 47
    He lifts her frilly skirt-hem to her belly, so as to show off her glistening pussy. As he climbs between her perspiration-beaded knees, he looks up to her with joy and sorrow mingled in his incandescent eyes.

    • Hi lufts caerphrilly scurthem towar belley, seewish tissuewife hairglossnin’ per se.

      • “Hi” – “He”, “hello”, “high”.
      • “lufts” – “Lifts”, “lüft” (Middle English “air”), “luft” (chess term).
      • “caerphrilly” – “Her frilly”, “carefully”, “Caerphilly” (town in Wales; type of cheese).
      • “scurthem” – “Skirt-hem”, “scour them”, “is curt him”.
      • “towar” – “To her”, “towards”, “to war””towar” (Polish “merchandise; psychoactive drugs).
      • “belley” – “Belly”, “bellend” (glans of the penis), “belay” (to stop), “belle lay”, “bell, eh?”, “ley (line)
      • “seewish” – “So as”, “see wish”, “sewist” (one who sews), “sewage”.
      • “tissuewife” – “To show off”, “tissue wife” (suggesting a tissue used to catch sperm after masturbating).
      • “hairglossnin’” – “Her glistening”, “hair gloss nine”, “glossolalia” (speaking in tongues).
      • “per se” – “Pussy” (vagina), “per se” (as such).
    • Eashe clambs patwina prisperation-beauded nays, elucs apter wedjoy unserrow manguilt ennis inklindecent whyes.

      • “Eashe” – “As he”, “easy”, “eash” (Manx “age; century”).
      • “clambs” – “Climbs”, “clambers”.
      • “patwina” – “Between her”, “patina” (superficial layer), “pa twiner”, “pat winner”, “Pat, whiner”.
      • “prisperation-beauded” – “Perspiration-beaded”, “desperation beau dead”, “pris” (obsolete “price; prize”) “PE ratio” (price-earnings ratio) “boded”.
      • “nays” – “Knees”, “nays” (refusals).
      • “elucs” – “He looks”, “Lucia”, “elucidate” (to make clear).
      • “apter” – “Up to her”, “at her”, “apter” (more appropriate), “chapter”.
      • “wedjoy” – “With joy”, “wed joy” (wedded bliss?).
      • “unserrow” – “And sorrow”, “un-” “serro” (Italian “I close”), “unserrated”.
      • “manguilt” – “Mingled”, “man guilt”.
      • “ennis” – “In his”, “enni” (Icelandic “forehead”), “tennis”, “Ennis” (Town in the county of Clare, Ireland).
        • Possible allusion to Garth Ennis, Irish-born comics writer and friend of Moore.
      • “inklindecent” – “Incandescent”, “ink indecent”, “inkling descent”.
        • Possible allusion to the Inklings, an Oxford literary group whose most notable members were J. R. R. Tolkien and C. S. Lewis.
      • “whyes” – “Eyes”, “whys”, “wise”, “why yes”.
  • Paragraph 48
    “I am, but who I am I cannot tell. It may be that I am the father of our gracious majesty and empress, Queen Victoria, or it may be I am Lord Byron, author of my Don Juan, for I was as lame as him when I was in my pilgrimage from Essex. To be truthful, I have lost myself, and in this manner have discovered I am everyone. Come now, my lovely wife, and let me first of all immerse my length within your Holy Grail, that I might finally fulfill my quest.”

    • “Iharm, betwo ayarm acarenot tael.

      • “Iharm” – “I am”, “I harm”, “ihar” (Estonian “lewd”).
        • One of Clare’s most famous poems is titled “I am“. It’s first line is echoed in tis sentence: “I am—yet what I am none cares or knows;”.
      • “betwo” – “But who”, “be two”, “bet woe”, “netween”.
      • “ayarm” – “I am”, “a yarn”, “I yam” (see below), “a Mary”.
      • “acarenot” – “I cannot”, “I care not”, “not a care”
      • “tael” – “Tell”, “tale”, “tael” (Asian unit of measure).
        • This is reminiscent of both God identifying Himself as “I am that I am” (Exodus 3:14) and Popeye the Sailor‘s catchphrase “I yam what I yam”. Clare, sadly, is less certain of his identity than those worthies.
    • Idt mebe dittyam defert’her avower groesus mamchesty endimpress, Quoin Fictoria, errat mebe eyeaim Leerd Boyromp, eathor arffmi Dinny-Winny, far ighways a’slame a’slhim wornigh wasane me parkrummage fam Hessicks.

      • “Idt” – “It”, “id”.
      • “mebe” – “May be”, “maybe”, “me be”, “meme”.
      • “dittyam” – “That I am”, “ditty” (song) “yam”.
      • “defert’her” – “The father”, “defer to her”.
      • “avower” – “Of our”, “avower” (one who promises)
      • “groesus” – “Gracious”, “Croesus” (Greek mythological king, famed for his wealth), “gross-out”, “grows us”.
      • “mamchesty” – “Majesty”, “mammary chesty” (having large breasts), “ma’am chesty” (a woman with treasures).
      • “endimpress” – “And empress”, “end” “impress” (to affect favorably; to seize by force).
      • “Quoin Fictoria” – “Queen Victoria“, “quim” (slang “vagina”) “fictitious”, “quoin” (keystone arch).
        • One of the historical Clare’s delusions was indeed that he was Queen Victoria’s father.
      • “errat” – “Or it”, “err at”, “errata”.
      • “mebe” – See above.
      • “eyeaim” – “I am”, “eye aim”.
      • “Leerd Boyromp” – “Lord Byron”, “leered boy romp”, “learned”.
        • George Byron (1788-1824), English poet and aristocrat. The historical Clare sometimes believed himself to be Lord Byron, and some of Clare’s poems are named after works by Byron.
      • “eathor” – “Author”, “either”, “ether”, “eathar” (Scottish Gaelic “rowboat”), “eat her”, “Thor“.
      • “arffmi” – “Of my”, “affirm”, “arf” (dog noise) “mi” (musical note).
      • “Dinny-Winny” – “Don Juan”, “dinky weinie” (small penis), “dinny winny” (loud horse noise), “Dinny” (pet dinosaur of comic strip character Alley Oop (strip begun in 1932)) “Winnie Winkle” (American comic strip which began in 1920).
      • “far” – “For”, “far” (such as the 80+ miles that Clare traveled on his famous walk).
      • “ighways” – “I was”, “highways”, “high ways”.
      • “a’slame” – “As lame”, “a shame”, “aflame”.
        • Byron was known for being lame.
      • “a’slhim” – “As him”, “a slim”, “ash-limb”
      • “wornigh” – “When I”, “worn high”, “woe nigh”.
      • “wasane” – “Was on”, “we sane”, “ane” (Latin “O ring!; O asshole!”).
      • “me” – “My”, “me”.
      • “parkrummage” – “Pilgrimage”, “park rummage”.
      • “fam” – “From”, “fam” (family).
      • “Hessicks” – “Essex”, “he sicks”. Possibly “Hessian“.
        • Essex was the location of the asylum Clare walked away from in 1841.
    • Tabby toothful, I hearf loost mesafe, undun dismayner heav dustcovert Ihymn everywhen.

      • “Tabby” – “To be”, “tabby” (a brindled cat; archaic “old maid; gossip”).
      • “toothful” – “Truthful”, “toothful” (full of teeth, archaic “a small amount; delicious; sexually attractive”).
      • “hearf” – “Have”, “heart”, “half”.
      • “loost” – “Lost”, “loose” (sexually available), “loosed”, “loost” (Dutch “emptiest”).
      • “mesafe” – “Myself”, “me, safe”, “mesafe” (Turkish “distance”).
      • “undun” – “And in”, “undone”, “un-dun” (not brown-colored).
      • “dismayner” – “This manner”, “dismay her”.
      • “heav” – “Have”, “heave”, “heaven”.
      • “dustcovert” – “Discovered”, “dust cover” (protective jacket for a book), “covert”.
      • “Ihymn” – “I am”, “I hymn”, “ihme” (Finnish “miracle”; German “to him”).
      • “everywhen” – “Everyone”, “every when” (suggesting the eternalist viewpoint of this novel).
    • Calmnow, my liffley wiff, endlit me perstival inmerce my langthe wettin uer hole o’ gairl, th’arteye kmight fannily filfull myh quemst.”

      • “Calmnow” – “Come now”, “calm”.
      • “liffley” – “Lovely”, “River Liffey“, “lifft” (Welsh “lift, ride”) “ley (line)“.
      • “wiff” – “Wife”, “whiff” (scent).
      • “endlit” – “And let”, “end” “lit” (literature; on fire).
      • “perstival” – “First of all”, “Percival” (Arthurian knight associated with the Grail Quest), “perst” (Dutch “you squeeze”), “festival”.
      • “inmerce” – “Immerse”, “in Mercia” (Anglo-Saxon kingdom), “merce” (to subject to fine).
      • “langthe” – “Length”, “the language”, “Langhe” (territory in Italy).
      • “wettin” – “Within”, “wetting”, “wedding”
      • “uer” – “Your”, “puer” (Latin “boy”), “uer” (Norwegian “rose fish”).
      • “hole o’ gairl” – “Holy Grail”, “hole of girl”, “gair” (Irish “to invoke”; Scots “a strip of fertile grass on a hillside”; Welsh “word”).
        • In many symbol systems, the Grail (or holy cup) is metaphorically identified with the vagina. This connection is made especially clear in Moore’s Promethea.
      • “th’arteye” – “That I”, “thou art (the) eye”.
      • “kmight” – “Might”, “knight” (another Arthurian reference).
      • “fannily” – “Finally”, “fanny” (slang “vagina”).
      • “filfull” – “Fulfill” (complete), “fill full””.
      • “myh” – “My”, “myth”, “mhy” (Middle Persian “peg, nail”), “myrrh” (a resin with many symbolic links).
      • “quemst” – “Quest”, “quim” (slang “vagina”), “quem” (Portuguese “who; whom”).
  • Paragraph 49
    She never could resist a silver tongue, especially when employed by a rough-hewn fellow, come from peasant stock. Although she hails from literary aristocracy and he is but a vagrant, a grounds-keeper, she is keen to chat or lie with him, mellifluously, here upon the wooded edge of the asylum lawns, far from all of the sons and mothers.

    • She nibberl cun dresist a solvér tingue, expressially whin umplyed be’er ruffyewn feelher, cumfrot pealsant stolk.

      • “nibberl” – “Never”, “nibbler”.
      • “cun” – “Could”, “cunt”, “cun” (obsolete “to know”).
      • “dresist” – “Resist”, “dressed”.
      • “solvér” – “Silver”, “solvé” (the alchemical principle of analysis, an important part of Moore’s conception of magic), “solver”, “sol” (the sun) “ver” (truth).
      • “tingue” – “Tongue”, “tinge”, “tingue” (Latin “dip!; moisten!; impregnate!”).
      • “expressially” – “Especially”, “express ally”.
      • “whin” – “When”, “win”, “whinny” (horse noise).
      • “umplyed” – “Employed”, “implied”, “ump(-ire) lied”, “um” (expression of uncertainty) “plied”, “umplere” (Romanian “filling”).
      • “be’er” – “By a”, “be her”, “beer”.
      • “ruffyewn” – “Rough-hewn”, “ruffian”, “ruff yew”
      • “feelher” – “Fellow”, “feel her”, “feeler”.
      • “cumfrot” – “Come from”, “comfort”, “cum” (ejaculate) “frot” (to rub one’s genitals against another person).
      • “pealsant” – “Peasant”, “pleasant”, “peal” (bell sound) “saint”.
      • “stolk” – “Stock”, “stalk”, “stork”.
    • Iylldo sheheelsfirm laterarley eristalkracy undhe isbed a vergerant, a ground-kipper, she ischeem to chatterlie weddim, mellorfluously, hearapun der woorded hodge irty assailem lawrnce, faer farm illaday sins n’ mutters.

      • “Iylldo” – “Although”, “I’ll do”, “dildo”, “idyll”.
      • “sheheelsfirm” – “She hails from”, “she, heels firm”, “she feels him”.
      • “laterarley” – “Literary”, “lateral eye”, “literally”, “later are ley”.
      • eristalkracy” – “Aristocracy”, “Eris” (Greek goddess of discord) “talk racy”, “er, I stalk crazy”.
      • “undhe” – “And he”, “undies” (underwear), “unde” (Latin “whence”).
      • “isbed” – “Is but”, “is bed”.
      • “vergerant” – “Vagrant”, “sergeant”, “verger” (one who cares for the grassy area near the street) “rant”.
      • “ground-kipper” – “Grounds-keeper” (gardener), “ground kipper” (one who sleeps on the ground, a rough sleeper).
      • “ischeem” – “Is keen”, “ischemia” (disturbance in blood circulation), “is” “cheem” (Singapore informal “profound”).
      • “chatterlie” – “Chat or lie” (lie in the sense of “have sex with”, also “deceive”), “chatter”, “chattel”.
        • Also a reference to Lady Chatterly’s Lover, a 1928 novel by D. H. Lawrence, an erotic (and explicit) story of the relationship between an upper class woman and a working class man.
      • “weddim” – “With him”, “wedding”, “wed (a) dim (person)”, “weddi” (Welsh “prayer”).
      • “mellorfluously” – “Mellifluously” (pleasantly; flowing like honey), “mellor” (Latin “I am made honey”(?); Galician “better”) “fluently”, “mellow furiously”, suggest??
      • “hearapun” – “Here upon”, “hear a pun” (which we do often in this chapter).
      • “der” – “The”, “there”.
      • “woorded” – “Wooded”, “worded”, “we’re dead”
      • “hodge” – “Edge”, “hedge”, “hodge-podge”.
      • “irty” – “Of the”, “dirty”, “Girty” (see notes to section one).
      • “assailem” – “Asylum”, “assail them”.
      • “lawrnce” – “Lawns”, “Lawrence” (another Chatterly reference, see above), “law earns”.
      • “faer” – “Far”, “faerie” (archaic “fairy”), “faer” (Norman “iron”).
      • “farm” – “From”, “farm”, “far, far away”.
      • “illaday” – “All of the”, “holiday”, “ill lady”.
      • “sins n’ mutters ” – “Sons and mothers” (the sense seems to be that this asylum is a refuge for Lucia from the abusive members of her family), “sins in mutters”.
  • Paragraph 50
    More importantly, Lucia feels she knows who he must be. It is clear that he is the very soul of verse himself, the puissant poet, an eternal spirit wandering about the fields of language, enriching itself upon detritus plucked from in the litter-bins. This is the lyric, ragged phantom that lolled in a corner looking on while clever men translated the whole Bible from the papal Latin in to English, to the language of the disenfranchised common population. This same literary spectre crackled in the works of Bunyan, with his nation of saints and his political convictions, writing his parables in terms that ordinary working creatures and the mechanic philosophers could understand, insisting that the Anglo-Saxon tongue is capable of uttering the proclamations of man’s soul. This vagabond that she’s about to fuck is the embodiment of script, and speech, and song. He is the very essence of the minstrel or the balladeer, the selfsame vulgar and itinerant poetic impulse guiding Bunyan’s pilgrim upon his walking progress, the same fallen-angel sensibility that surged through his contemporary, blind and flatulent John Milton who was paid but five pounds for his Paradise Lost. This same rebel energy was then transmitted through the sole of the left foot of William Blake from Lambeth, architect and the performer of our new Jerusalem raised in the mean streets of the poor and destitute, assembled out of nothing save for words and visions. Pouring out from Blake, there in the shade of Bedlam, the rough beast now slouches toward William Butler-Yeats to birth itself. Likewise, the energy was manifested in its purest form within the clarion call of John Clare, the finest cock of the poetic walk in progress. It was this incarnate spirit, this tatterdemalion apparition, the embodiment of the Romantic and the pastoral tradition, that was just about to put his penis (mightier than his word) into her pussy, while for her part Lucia is the quintessence of the mad or mystic impulse, is the maiden dance in all its spring rite and extravagant glory! Why, their union would be the consummation of almost a thousand years of burning and frustrated literary passions!

    • Mer importnently, Lucia fillshe gnows wooey mistbe.

      • “Mer” – “More”, “mere” (only; body of water), “mermaid”.
      • “importnently” – “Importantly”, “impertinently”, “Portnoy’s Complaint” (1969 novel, considered by some to be pornographic).
      • “fillshe” – “Feels she”, “filthy”, “fill she”.
      • “gnows” – “Knows”, “gnosis” (direct experience of the mystical), “gnaws” (metaphorically expressive of her sexual hunger), “gnome”.
      • “wooey” – “Who he”, “woo he”, “wooer”, “woozy”.
      • “mistbe” – “Must be”, “be mist”, “missed he”.
    • Ertes clare dirthe isty veery sole a’verse humself, the puieassant poorwet, an enternal spareit woundering abard de feilds o’ linguish, newriching itsaev upoem dustwritus plaqued faminde lettir-beens.

      • “Ertes” – “It is”, “certes” (archaic “certainly”), “art is”.
      • “clare” – “Clear”, “Clare”.
      • “dirthe” – “That he”, “dirty”, “dirt, he”.
      • “isty” – “Is the”, “misty”, “istý” (Slovak “certain”).
      • “veery” – “Very”, “in a veering manner”, “eerie”.
      • “sole” – “Soul”, “sole”, “so lay”.
      • “a’verse” – “Of verse”, “averse”.
      • “humself” – “Himself”, “elf hums”.
      • “puieassant” – “Puissant” (mighty), “peasant”.
        • Clare was known as the Peasant Poet.
      • “poorwet” – “Poet”, “poor wet”.
      • “enternal” – “Eternal”, “enter Nell” (Nell can be taken as a generic name for a woman), “in turn, all”.
      • “spareit” – “Spirit”, “spare it”.
      • “woundering” – “Wandering”, “wound her ring” (somewhat flowery way of discussing taking a woman’s virginity?), “wondering”.
      • “abard” – “About”, “a bard”.
      • “de feilds” – “The fields”, “is defiled”, “failed”.
      • “linguish” – “Language”, “languish” (to pine away), “linguist”, “long wish”.
      • “newriching” – “Nourishing”, “enriching”, “new reaching”, “wrenching”, “wenching”, “nouveau riche”.
      • “itsaev” – “Itself”, “save it”.
      • “upoem” – “Upon”, “you poem”.
      • “dustwritus” – “Detritus”, “dust write us”.
      • “plaqued” – “Plucked”, “mounted on a plaque”, “plagued”.
      • “faminde” – “From in the”, “famined” (extremely hungry), “fam” (family) “inde” (Latin “thence”).
      • “lettir-beens” – “Litter-bins” (trashcans), “letters been”, “let her be in his”.
    • Dysses deliric, ruagged finetome thort lolld inacoarnert lurkin on Wyl cliffer maen turnsletterd dei whoyl Bable formde pepul-letin endto Anguage, tardy lenglish odee disenfarmchased curmong pauper lesson.

      • “Dysses” – “This is”, “Odysseus“, “disses” (slang “disrespects”), “dysses” (Danish “of a dolmen” (megalithic tomb)).
      • “deliric” – “The lyric”, “deliric” (suffering from deleria).
      • “ruagged” – “Ragged”, “rugged”.
      • “finetome” – “Phantom”, “fine tome”, “Finn(egan) at home”, “fin et, Oh me!” (help, I’ve been eaten by a shark!).
      • “thort” – “That”, “thought”, “troth”.
      • “lolld” – “Lolled” (relaxed), Lollards” (religious reform movement founded by Wycliffe (see below)), “LOLd” (internet slang “laughed out loud”).
        • The term “Lollard” may be derived from a Dutch term meaning “mutterer”.
      • “inacoarnert” – “In a corner”, “incontinent” (unrestrained), “incoar” (Spanish “to start”), “inert corpse”, suggest??
      • “lurkin” – “Looking”, “lurking”.
      • “Wyl cliffer” – “While clever”, “Wycliffe” (John Wycliffe (132x-1384), English theologian who translated the Bible into English), “wyll” (Welsh literary “twilight”), “cliff”.
      • “maen” – “Men”, “mane”, “maen” (Welsh “stone”). Possibly “maenad” (mythical worshipper of Bacchus).
      • “turnsletterd” – “Translated”, “turned letters”, “(by) turns lettered”.
      • “dei” – “The”, “deity”, “dei” (Latin “of god; O gods!”).
      • “whoyl” – “Whole”, “holy”. Possibly Edmond “Hoyle” (1672-1769) compiler of rules for card games.
      • “Bable” – “Bible”, “Babel”, “babble”.
        • In the Book of Genesis (Gen 11:3-19), the story is told how originally all people spoke the same language. The people began to build a tower intended to reach as high as heaven. God struck down the Tower of Babel while simultaneously “confounding” the language of the people, thus explaining the origins of different languages. The applicability of this story to translators, as well as to the nigh-impenetrable language of this chapter, should be clear.
      • “formde” – “From the”, “formed”, “deform”.
      • “pepul-letin” – “Papal Latin”, “let people in”, “population”, “pepuli” (Latin “I have set in motion”(?)) “leting” (Norwegian “a search”).
      • “endto” – “Into”, “to (an) end” (to completion; for a purpose), “and two”.
      • “Anguage” – “English”, “language”, “anguish”, “assuage” (to soothe), “engage”.
      • “tardy” – “To the”, “tardy” (late), “tarred I”.
      • “lenglish” – “Language”, “English”.
      • “odee” – “Of the”, “odious” (smelly), “ode” (poem, song), “idea”, “O, Dee! (John Dee (1527-160x), English magician, partially the subject of chapter 8 of Moore’s Voice of the Fire).
      • “disenfarmchased” – “Disenfranchised”, “chased out of this farm”.
      • “curmong” – “Common”, “cur mongrel” (dogs of little value), “among”, “curmudgeon”.
      • “pauper lesson” – “Population”, “pauper” (poor person) “lesson” (i.e., to teach the poor).
    • Dissem lightorairy sparktre carckledin de walksore Bornyen, worthis notion o’ sense undies poeletical convictshuns, wriotin his poorables interrms deterdunerry workin preacrhes orndy muckyneck fellowsuphrers cud interstant, incisting theart de angelsexin tang escapable iff ultering dee perculmations o’ mansoul.

      • “Dissem” – “This same”, “disseminate” (spread), “diss ’em” (disrespect them).
      • “lightorairy” – “Literary”, “light or airy”, “O fairy!”.
      • “sparktre” – “Spectre” (ghost), “spark tree” (a family tree of sparking (and sparkling) ideas expressed in the English language).
      • “carckledin” – “Crackled in”, “cark” (obsolete “worry”) “led in”, “craquelure” (hairline cracks in the surface of an old painting).
      • “de walksore” – “The works of”, “he walks, sore”. Possibly “Die Walküre” (part of Wagner’s Ring Cycle).
      • “Bornyen” – “Bunyan” (John Bunyan, see notes at top of page), “born yen” (i.e. innate desire), “bornyr” (Swedish “foam, head (on drinks)).
      • “worthis” – “With his”, “worthies”, “war this”.
      • “notion o’ sense” – “Nation of saints”, “notion of sense”, “sins”.
        • In a 2007 interview, Moore stated:

          … people such as John Bunyan … stating that there was no need for priests, that there was no need for leaders; they were hoping to announce a nation of saints. That everybody would become a saint, and that they would become mechanic philosophers.

          Moore also published a CD of Northampton-based music in 2009 titled Nation of Saints.

      • “undies” – “And his”, “undying”, “undies” (underwear).
      • “poeletical” – “Political”, “poet lyrical”, “polemical” (contentious), “Poe” (Edgar Allan) “lexical” (concerning language).
      • “convictshuns” – “Convictions”, “convict shuns”. “Convictions” is meant in both the sense of “firmly held beliefs” and “being found guilty by trial”. Moore earlier made use of this double meaning in chapter 12 of Voice of the Fire.
      • “wriotin” – “Writing”, “rioting”, “writhing”.
      • “poorables” – “Parables”, “poor-ables” (things accessible to poor people).
      • “interrms” – “In terms”, “into rooms”, “inter” (bury) “MS” (manuscript), “interrogative”.
      • “deterdunerry” – “That ordinary”, “deter” “dunnery” (pursuing debtors about their debts), “dunce” (foolish person” “erry” (being in error), “the turd”, “the third”.
      • “workin” – “Working”, “walking”, suggest??
      • “preacrhes” – “Creatures” (people, in a physical, earthy sense), “preaches”.
      • “orndy” – “And the”, “ordinary”, “horny”, “Sunday”.
      • “muckyneck fellowsuphrers” – “Mechanic philosophers” (people who were both laborers and preachers; see quoted Moore interview excerpt above), “mucky” (covered in dirt; obscene) “neck” “fellow sufferers”, “my kinetic”, “fellowship”, “fallow sulphurs”.
      • “cud” – “Could”, “cud” (food that is being re-chewed by a cow; metaphorically, something that is thought about repeatedly, especially by simple-minded people).
      • “interstant” – “Understand”, “interest and”, “in testament”, “inter” (confine; bury), “interstant” (Latin “they stand in the midst of”), “intestate”.
      • “incisting” – “Insisting”, “inciting”, “incising”, “incisto” (Italian “I encyst”).
      • “theart de” – “That the”, “the art of”, “theatre”, “heart”.
      • “angelsexin” – “Anglo-Saxon”, “angel sex in”, “sexing”.
        • The term “Anglo-Saxon” is used here poetically. The Anglo-Saxon language (more commonly called Old English now) had been replaced with Middle English by the time of Wycliffe.
      • “tang” – “Tongue”, “tang” (obsolete “tongue”; strong smell or taste; slang “vagina”).
      • “escapable” – “Is capable”, “escapable” (able to be escaped from; unnecessary).
      • “iff ultering” – “Of uttering”, “I, faltering”, “if altering”, “River Liffey”, “ulterior”
      • “dee” – “The”, “Dee” (John Dee (1527-160x), English magician, partial subject of chapter eight of Voice of the Fire).
      • “perculmations” – “Proclamations”, “percolations”, “deeper culminations”, “perculsus” (Latin “beaten down”).
      • “mansoul” – “Man’s soul”, “Mansoul”.
    • Thus vigourbannd dareshe’s abaord ter fick asday enbawdimonde o’ scrapt, unspitch, unsung.

      • “Thus” – “This”, “thus”.
      • “vigourbannd” – “Vagabond”, “vigour” “banned” (prohibited; having posted banns (marriage announcement)), “vi” (Italian “you”) “gourmand” (appreciater of good food; glutton)
      • “dareshe’s” – “That she’s”, “she dares”.
      • “abaord” – “About”, “aboard” (on; agreeable to), “a bard”.
      • “ter fick” – “To fuck”, “terrific”, “turf ick” (expressing disgust at dirt).
      • “asday” – “Is the”, “Asmoday” (see notes to chapter fourteen), “as day”.
      • “enbawdimonde” – “Embodiment”, “en-bawd” (to make or become a prostitute) “demimonde” (female prostitutes; disrespected group), “bawdy” “monde” (French “world; people”).
      • “scrapt” – “Script”, “scrapped”, “it’s crap”, “scrapta” (Latin “epithet of a prostitute”).
      • “unspitch” – “And speech”, “unspeak”, “uns” (ones, people) “pitch” (many English meanings; Fremch “sales patter), “un” “spitchcock” (a manner of preparing eel)
      • “unsung” – “And song”, “unsung”.
    • Heas devoury gressence o’ de mentstroll ardy bawlerdire, the selfsave volkar iant ithinnerrant powertick enpulse guading Banyarn’s perilgrin apain his wearkened pullgrass, desirme fallinangerl sinsybiletry tat searged truehist cromtemprary, bloind and effletuent Journ Milston wheo worspayed bitte fief punes firehis Pooroldeyeslast.

      • “Heas” – “He is”, “he was”, “heast” (obsolete “command”).
      • “devoury” – “The very”, “devour-y”, “devoir” (archaic “duty”).
      • “gressence” – “Essence”, “grace us”, “presence”, “gressene” (Norwegian “grasses”)
      • “o’ de” – “Of the”, “ode” (poem, song).
      • “mentstroll” – “Minstrel”, “menstrual”, “men stroll”, “men’s troll”, “mental”.
      • “ardy” – “Or the”, “ardent” (passionate), “hardy”, “lardy” (fat), “ard y” (Manx “pole”), “our die”.
      • “bawlerdire” – “Balladeer”, “bawdlerie” (lewdness), “bawler dire”.
      • “selfsave” – “Selfsame”, “save (your)self”.
      • “volkar iant” – “Vulgar and”, “volk” (dialect “folk”) “errant” (straying from the proper course; error-prone), “variant”, “folk are giant”.
      • “ithinnerrant” – “Itinerant”, “I, thin and errant”, “ithinn” (Irish “I used to eat”(?)), “inerrant”.
      • “powertick” – “Poetic”, “power tick”.
      • “enpulse” – “Impulse”, “en-pulse” (imbue with life).
      • “guading” – “Guiding”, “goading”, “guarding”, “guadino” (Italian “they should wade”(?)).
      • “Banyarn’s” – “Bunyan’s”, “ban yarns” (prohibit stories), “banyan” (type of tree).
      • “perilgrin” – “Pilgrim”, “peril grin”, “peregrine” (wandering; type of falcon).
      • “apain” – “Upon”, “a pain”, “apainelado” (Portuguese “panelled; covered in paintings”).
      • “wearkened” – “Walking”, “Work in“, “weakened”, “knew weariness”.
      • “pullgrass” – “Progress”, “Progress” (both Pilgrim’s and Work in), “pull grass” (allusion to how Clare, starving during his long walk, ate grass).
      • “desirme” – “The same”, “desire me”, “de” (Italian “of the”) “sirme” (Italian “final two tercets of an Italian sonnet)
      • “fallinangerl” – “Fallen angel” (allusion to Lucifer, especially Milton’s, see below), “falling (in love with) a girl”, “fall in anger”.
      • “sinsybiletry” – “Sensibility”, “sin” “Sybil” (prophetess) “try”, “bile”.
      • “tat” – “That”, “tat” (tastelessness)
      • “searged” – “Surged”, “seared”, “sea raged”, “serged” (stitched over the edge).
      • “truehist” – “Through his”, “true history”
      • “cromtemprary” – “Contemporary”, “crom” (Scots Gaelic “bent”) “tempus” (Latin “time”) “rarity”, “temporary”, “pray”.
      • “bloind” – “Blind”, “blond”.
      • “effletuent” – “And flatulent”, “effluent” (flowing out; Latin “they will vanish”), “eff” (f-word, fuck) “let you in to”.
        • Milton (see below) was both blind and flatulent. According to medical theories of the time, the two conditions may have been connected.
      • “Journ Milston” – “John Milton”, “journey”, “journeyman”, “millstone”, “milestone”
        • John Milton (1608-1674) was an English poet, best known for Paradise Lost, and its characterization of the rebel (and then fallen) angel Lucifer as an almost heroic figure. Milton himself entered the English language through the adjective “Miltonian”.
      • “wheo” – “Who”, “we”, “when”, “theo-” (relating to god(s)).
      • “worspayed” – “Was paid”, “worse”, “worshipped”, “we spayed” (neutered).
      • “bitte” – “But”, “bitte” (German “please”).
      • “fief” – “Five”, “fief” (that which someone has rights over).
      • “punes” – “Pounds”, “puny”, “puns”, “punes” (Spanish “you punish”).
        • Wikipedia says:

          Milton sold the publication rights for Paradise Lost to publisher Samuel Simmons for £5, equivalent to approximately £770 in 2015 purchasing power, with a further £5 to be paid if and when each print run sold out of between 1,300 and 1,500 copies. The first run … sold out in eighteen months.

      • “firehis” – “For his”, “his fire” (in Voice of the Fire, fire is often usee as an image of the creative force).
      • “Pooroldeyeslast” – “Paradise Lost“, “poor old eyes (didn’t) last”.
    • Disflame rubbel enerchy wisdem trancemittered tru’the soulody liftfeat o’ Williron Blaze faem Lambirth, archintegt onder perfounder afarnow Jerusalhymn rayshed in demeanstraits oer deploor un’ destnytute, assymbold utternuttin searve firewords en’virsions.

      • “Disflame” – “This same”, “Dis” (city in Hell) “flame” (see note on “fire” from previous sentence), “disfame” (disrepute).
      • “rubbel” – “Rebel”, “rubble”.
      • “enerchy” – “Energy”, “anarchy”.
      • “wisdem” – “Wisdom”, “with them”, “we are them”.
      • “trancemittered” – “Transmitted”, “trance muttered”, “mittere” (Latin “you will have discharged”(?))
      • “tru’the” – “To the”, “truth”, “truthy”.
      • “soulody” – “sole of the”, “soul” “prosody” (the study of poetic meter), “melody”, “O soul, die!”.
      • “liftfeat” – “Left foot”, “lift feat”.
        • William Blake (see below), in his poem Milton (about John Milton) writes (and draws) about the spirit of Milton descending from heaven into his (Blake’s) left foot.
          Blake illustration for "Milton"
          Blake illustration for “Milton”

          With thunders loud and terrible: so Milton’s shadow fell
          Precipitant loud thund’ring into the Sea of Time & Space.
          Then first I saw him in the Zenith as a falling star,
          Descending perpendicular, swift as the swallow or swift :
          And on my left foot falling on the tarsus, enter’d there

      • “Williron Blaze” – “William Blake”, “will (of) iron” “blaze” (again, see note on fire from previous sentence).
        • William Blake (1757-1827) was an English poet and visual artist. He has been a large influence on Moore in general, and on this novel in particular.
      • “faem” – “From”, “fame”, “faemos” (Asturian “we make”).
      • “Lambirth” – “Lambeth” (district of London), “birth of the Lamb” (a Christ symbol), “lambire” (Italian “to lap; to lick).
        • Blake lived in Lambeth from 1790-1800. To say he is “from” there is rather an exaggeration.
      • “archintegt” – “Architect”, “arch” (of Heaven?) “intact”, “arch” (mischievous) “integrity”.
      • “onder” – “And the”, “under”, “yonder”, “onde” (obsolete “breath”; Italian “whence”).
      • “perfounder” – “Performer”, “pre- founder”, “first founder”, “perfundo” (Latin “I imbue”), suggest??
      • “afarnow” – “Of our new”, “afar now”.
      • “Jerusalhymn” – “Jerusalem”, “hymn for us all”.
        • The anthem “Jerusalem”, most probably the source for the title of this book, takes its words from a short poem by Blake that appeared in the preface to his Milton (see above). “New” refers both to Blake’s creation of the poem, as well as the poem’s exhortation that there be no rest “Till we have built Jerusalem,/ in Englands green & pleasant Land.”
      • “rayshed” – “Raised”, “rayed” (emitting rays of light), “ravished”, “ray shed”.
      • “demeanstraits” – “The mean streets”, “demean” “straits” (difficulties), “demonstrates”.
        • Probable allusion to Raymond Chandler’s 1944 essay on detective fiction, “The Simple Art of Murder“, which includes the famous words “…down these mean streets a man must go who is not himself mean…”
      • “oer” – “Of”, “over”, “oer” (Welsh “cold”).
      • “deploor” – “The poor”, “deplore”, “deploro” (Latin “I abandon”).
      • “un’ destnytute” – “And destitute”, “undestined”, “one destiny to them”, “tute” (Latin “safely; you yourself”), “deštný” (Czech “rain”).
      • “assymbold” – “Assembled”, “as symbolized”, “ass, I am bold”
      • “utternuttin” – “Out of nothing”, “utter nutting” (completely crazy).
      • “searve” – “Save”, “serve”, “swerve”, “searver” (Romansch “to open”).
      • “firewords” – “For words”, “fire” (see note in previous sentence), “forwards”, “fireworks”, “firewood”.
      • “en’virsions” – “And visions”, “environs”, “N versions”, “inversions”.
    • Pureing outfhim B’like, darin deShade o’ Badlame, daer roughbest neow slurges tewords Wellaim Bettler-Yetts t’ beirth etslif.

      • “Pureing” – “Pouring”, “pure ring”, “pureeing”.
      • “outfhim” – “Out of him”, “outfit”, suggest??
      • “B’like” – “Belike” (dialect “probably”), “Blake”, “bee-like”.
      • “darin” – “There in”, “daring”, “Da rind”.
      • “deShade o'” – “The shade of”, “shadow”, suggest??
      • “Badlame” – “Bedlam”, “bad lame” (suggesting Clare’s/Byron’s lameness), possibly “Lambeth”.
        • Bedlam was the common name for Bethlehem Royal Hospital, a psychiatric hospital in London for over 600 years. In Blake’s youth, it was located in Moorfields, and was in very poor condition. A new building was built along Lambeth Road in St. George’s Fields, construction completing in 1815. Blake’s last years were spent living in Fountain Court off the Strand, arguably close enough to Bedlam’s new location to count as “under the shade of”, at least poetically.
      • “daer” – “The”, “dare”, “dear”, “read”.
      • “roughbest” – “Rough beast”, “roughest”, “rough (is) best”.
        • Any fan of English poetry will instantly recognize this and the following words as an allusion to “The Second Coming“, written by W. B. Yeats (see below) in 1919. Its final lines are:

          And what rough beast, its hour come round at last,
          Slouches towards Bethlehem to be born?

          Moore seems to be comparing this poetic energy that has traveled from Wycliffe to Bunyan, through Blake, and now to Yeats with the Antichrist.

      • “neow” – “Now”, “new”, “meow”.
      • “slurges” – “Slouches”, “surges”, “lurches”, “splurges”
      • “tewords” – “Towards”, “the words”.
      • “Wellaim Bettler-Yetts” – “William Butler Yeats”, “aim well better-yet”, “Bettler” (German “beggar”),”yetts” (Scots “gates”)
        • William Butler Yeats (1865-1939) was an important Irish poet who was significantly influenced by William Blake.
      • “t’ beirth” – “To birth”, “to be earth”, “beirthe” (Irish “born”(?)), “berth”.
      • “etslif” – “Itself”, “it’s life”.
  • Page 896
    • Wyclise, dei ennerjoy wis manyfacedit enits puorest foarm worthin declareyon-crowll o’ Jonty Cleer, definest cockerdee powittric wolkin’ procress.

      • “Wyclise” – “Likewise”, “Wycliffe” (see notes earlier in this paragraph), “wych” (a brine spring or well; Welsh “excellent”).
      • “dei” – “The”, “dei” (Latin “gods”; Italian “of the”; Scots “to die”; Welsh “you will come”).
      • “ennerjoy” – “Energy”, “inner joy”, “enervate” (to weaken).
      • “wis” – “Was”, “wise”, “wis” (obsolete “certainly; to know”; Ditch “twig”).
      • “manyfacedit” – “Manifested”, “many faced it”, “many-faceted”.
      • “enits” – “In its”, “tenets”, “enitor” (Latin “I give birth; I struggle; I ascend”).
      • “puorest” – “Purest”, “poorest”, “phew, O rest”, “puor” (Dalmatian “appears”) “est” (Latin “he/she/it is”).
      • “foarm” – “Form”, “foam”, “forearm”, “foe arm”.
      • “worthin” – “Within”, “worth in”, “working”, “worthing” (obsolete “becoming”).
      • “declareyon-crowll” – “The clarion call” (urgent call to action), “declare yon crow (mentally) ill” (“crow” here being short for “scarecrow”, someone clad in rags or awkward), “cowl”, “Crowley” (Aleister Crowley (1875-1947), English magician, highly influential on Moore).
      • “Jonty Cleer” – “John Clare”, “Chaunticleer” (rooster character in many medieval tales, especially in The Canterbury Tales), “jaunty cheer”, “clear”.
      • “definest” – “The finest”, “definest” (archaic “defines”).
      • “cockerdee” – “Cock of the” (as in the phrase “cock of the walk” – used to describe someone who is proud or arrogant), “cocker” (a rustic high shoe) “Dee” (John Dee), “cockered” (indulged), “cockerel” (young male chicken), “cockerney” (alternate spelling of “cockney” (lower class inhabitants of London’s East End)).
      • “powittric” – “Poetic”, “poor wit trick”, “wittre” (German “I smell”).
      • “wolkin’” – “Walk in”, “Work in” (Progress), “working (class)”.
        • These last two words may be interpreted in several ways which are all appropriate, so it is more difficult than usual to call any of them the “primary” meaning.”procress” – “Progress”, “process”. Possibly “pro cress” (in favor of salad?), “procrastinate”, “procreate”, “Procris” (figure in Greek mythology).
    • Eatwish dis incornered spillet, thus totteredamileon appearvition, thee enbeddimeant o’de Roamontrac endy past-oral treadiction, datewasht jistaburst t’ proddis painis (meaghtier din dhisword) inter hior poesy, wheelfire harpart Lucia asday quimtessence oddy madormystic impelse, isty maidern dansin awelits springwrite n’ exstravigansk Iglori!

      • “Eatwish” – “It was”, “eat wish” (desire to consume).
      • “dis” – “This”, “Dis” (city in Hell), “diss” (disrespect).
      • “incornered” – “Incarnate”, “in cornered” (trapped?), “incornerei” (Italian “you might gore”(?)).
      • “spillet” – “Spirit”, “spill it”, “spillet” (long fishing line with multiple hooks), “spy let”, “skillet”.
      • “thus” – “This”, “thus”.
      • “totteredamileon” – “Tatterdemalion” (tattered), “tottered a mile on”.
      • “appearvition” – “apparition”, “appear (to) vision”, “vitio” (Latin “I rape”).
      • “thee” – “The”, “thee” (archaic/literary familiar “you”).
      • “enbeddimeant” – “Embodiment”, “in bed he meant”, “embed dimension”.
      • “o’de” – “Of the”, “ode” (poem, song).
      • “Roamontrac” – “Romantic”, “roam on track”, “Roman track”.
      • “endy” – “And the”, “end-y”, “die in”, possibly “candy”.
      • “past-oral” – “Pastoral” (pertaining to country life), “past oral” (oral tradition).
      • “treadiction” – “Tradition”, “tree diction” (speech about trees), “tread” “ick” (expression of disgust) “shun”.
      • “datewasht” – “That was”, “date washed”, “tewach” (Welsh “fatter”).
      • “jistaburst” – “Just about”, “jism, a burst”, “gist”, “stabber”.
      • “proddis” – “Put his”, “prodder” (one who prods; slang “penis”), “prod diss” (urge disrespect?).
      • “painis” – “Penis”, “pen is”, “pain is” (there’s a concise bit of existential angst!), “painiskella” (Finnish “to wrestle”).
      • “meaghtier” – “Mightier” (“The pen is mightier than the sword”), “meatier”, “meager”, “meahte” (Old English “was able”).
      • “din” – “Than”, “din” (noise).
      • “dhisword” – “His word”, “the sword”, “dhise” (Scottish Gaelic “to her”).
      • “inter” – “Into”, “inter” (bury; confine).
      • “hior” – “Her”, “higher”, “whore”.
      • “poesy” – “Pussy” (slang “vagina”), “poesy” (poetic quality).
      • “wheelfire” – “While for”, “wheel (of) fire”.
        • Wheel of fire” has many literary uses/allusions. It is most often used as a symbol of chains of tragic consequences, a trope which Jerusalem as a whole attempts to subvert.
      • “harpart” – “Her part”, “apart”, “harp art” (referring to popular angel imagery?), “harpata” (Finnish “to leap”), “harper”.
      • “asday” – “Is the”, “Asmoday” (see notes to chapter fourteen), “(clear) as day”, “assay”.
      • “quimtessence” – “Quintessence” (perfect embodiment), “quim” (archaic slang “vagina”) “essence”, “tessente” (Italian “weaving; plotting”).
      • “oddy” – “Of the”, “oddly”, “eddy” (whirlpool; Welsh obsolete “she promises”), “oddychać” (Polish “to breathe”).
      • “madormystic” – “Mad or mystic”, “maternalistic”, suggest??
      • “impelse” – “Impulse”, “impels”, “imp” (possible reference to Poe’s “The Imp of the Perverse”) “else”.
      • “isty” – “Is the”, “misty”, “iste” (Latin “that”, often used disparagingly), “istý” (Slovak “certain”).
      • “maidern” – “Maiden”, “may” “dern” (dialect “secret”), “May” (the month).
      • “dansin” – “Dance in”, “dancing”, “dans” (French “in”; Latin “yielding”) “in”, “dansin” (Catalan “they must dance”(?)).
      • “awelits” – “All its”, “awe is lit”, “awel” (Welsh “breeze, wind”) “it is”.
      • “springwrite” – “Spring rite” (ritual of Springtime), “spring” (coiled mechanism) “write”. Possibly “Ringwraith” (from Tolkien mythology).
      • “n’ exstravigansk” – “And extravagant”, “Nijinski” (see below), “extraviar” (Spanish “to mislay; to get lost”).
        • Vaslav Nijinsky (1889-1950) was a Russian dancer and choreographer. The premiere of his “Rite of Spring” in Paris (1913) occasioned a riot, an event depicted by Moore in Lost Girls.
      • “Iglori” – “Glory”, suggest??. Possibly “igloo”, “ignori” (Italian “you ignore”).
    • Whee, dare you’n’yourn wedbeddy cuntsoremation everlmossed a thoughtsand yearnso’ bourningland firestrated licherary perssions!

      • “Whee” – “Why”, “whee” (expression of enjoyment), “we”, “wee” (small).
      • “dare” – “Their”, “dare”
      • “you’n’yourn” – “Union”, “you and yours” (“yourn” is dialect for “yours”).
      • “wedbeddy” – “Would be the”, “wedding bed”, “wet” “biddy” (woman; Irish maidservant).
      • “cuntsoremation” – “Consummation”, “cunt sore (from) mating”, “cunts over (the) nation”, “mations” (French “we have been ogling”(?)), “formation”.
      • “everlmossed” – “Of almost”, “ever mossed”, “ev” (Cornish “he”) “Erl“(-king) (“king of the fairies” in German Romanticism).
      • “thoughtsand” – “Thousand”, “thoughts and”, “thought sand”.
      • “yearnso’” – “Years of”, “yearn so”.
      • “bourningland” – “Burning and”, “bourn” (destination; limit; brook) “England”, “burgeoning land”.
      • “firestrated” – “Frustrated”, “fire castrated”, “firestarter”.
      • “licherary” – “Literary”, “lecher” “airy”, “lich” (archaic “corpse”) “rare”.
      • “perssions” – “Passions”, “permissions”, “persimmons”, “persons”, “Persians”.
  • Paragraph 51
    Longingly, Lucia reaches down between her legs to take hold of her pilgrim’s burning staff, and steer it into her mansoul, putting an end to her giant despair.

    • Longunlay, Looseyher reurges dinebetwine herlix t’ treicold effor pullgroom’s Burnyin’ stiaff in’stierit entowhire man’shole, pettin’ un intiher Vagiant Dis’pear.

      • “Longunlay” – “Longingly”, “long un-laid”.
      • “Looseyher” – “Lucia”, “loose-y, her” (i.e. she is a “loose woman”, sexually active).
      • “reurges” – “Reaches”, “re- urges”.
      • “dinebetwine” – “Down between”, “dine” (suggestive of oral sex, or indulging pleasure) “betwine” (entwine).
      • “herlix” – “Her legs”, “helix” (suggestive of DNA, hence reproduction, and sex), “her licks” (again suggestive of both oral sex and indulging pleasure), “herlig” (Norwegian “lovely”).
      • “t’ treicold” – “To take hold”, “trei” (Scots “tree”)”cold”, “letter old”, “tricot” (soft knit fabric).
      • “effor” – “Of her”, “effort”, “efflorescence” (flowering).
      • “pullgroom’s” – “Pilgrim’s”, “pull (the) groom’s (penis)”.
      • “Burnyin’” – “Burning”, “Bunyan” (John Bunyan), “burn” “yin” (female principle in Chinese philosophy), “yen” (desire).
      • “stiaff” – “Staff”, “stiff”.
        • “Pilgrim’s staff” is, of course, a metaphor for “penis”, as well as being a reference to The Pilgrim’s Progress, one of several in this sentence.
      • “in’stierit” – “And steer it”, “insert it”, “stir it in”, “inspired”, “institution”, “initier” (Latin “you might be started”(?)), “stierig” (German “ready to be mated”)
      • “entowhire” – “Into her”, “entire whore”, “wire”, “white”, “tent”.
      • “man’shole” – “Mansoul“, “man’s hole”.
        • Lucia is conflating her vagina with Bunyan’s conception of Heaven.
      • “pettin’” – “Putting”, “petting” (kissing or stroking in a sexual manner).
      • “un” – “An”, “un-” (negation), “nun”.
      • “intiher” – “End to her”, “into her”.
      • “Vagiant Dis’pear” – “Giant despair” (Lucia’s lengthy time without sex), “Giant Despair” (allegorical figure in Pilgrim’s Progress), “vagina, this pear” (vaginas are often poetically compared to fruit), “his spear” (penis).
        • This last phrase can also be read as “putting the end of his spear into her vagina.”
  • Paragraph 52
    And now, the jigsaw-puzzle satisfaction of it, as his hammer-headed meat-torpedo noses its way up in to her lubricated literary passage. He utters a slow moan of gratitude as his wide knob slides in between the open vellum patches of her milk-white thighs, and plunges into her overflowing inkwell. Dipping in and out of Lucia as if her fanny were a dictionary or encyclopedia, he sucks upon her ample titties while he simultaneously establishes a slippery but steady rhythm to their copulation. Hark the glad sound, Jerusalem and all things bright and beautiful, to be a pilgrim and amazing grace are singing in her ears as all his poetry is pounded into her hot, juicy cunt of many callers. Her snatch is on fire as he jams his peen into her tail, he’s in. His bare dick is assisting her towards her happy climax as she wriggles on it, villainously wrapping her legs around him in her perverse ecstasy, for once happy to be misunderstood.

      • Endowh, di jiggsher-piezzel sertinsfuction avit, ahsis lhammar-heddy maet-turpego gnosis itsweigh oupein t’war lubrarycated litterlhairy passage.

        • “Endowh, di” – “And now, the”, “endowed”, “in, dowdy”.
        • “jiggsher-piezzel” – “Jigsaw-puzzle”, “jigs” (moves briskly) “her” “pizzle” (penis), “jigger” (archaic “one who dances jigs; an odd-looking person). Possibly “Jiggs” (comic strip character), “pizza”.
        • “sertinsfuction” – “Satisfaction”, “set in its function”, “certain” “fuck-ton” (slang “a large quantity; a place for sex”), “sertis” (French “I set in its socket”).
        • “avit” – “Of it”, “avitus” (Latin “ancestral”), suggest??.
        • “ahsis” – “As his”, “ah, sis” (something Giorgio might say), “assis” (French “seated”; Latin “axis”).
        • “lhammar-heddy” – “Hammer-headed”, “heady”, “l’amoureux” (French “the lovers”), “Lammas” (pagan harvest festival), “hedde” (Danish “to be named”)
        • “maet-turpego” – “Meat-torpedo” (slang “penis”), “meatier” “pego” (archaic slang “penis”), “mate” “turpid” (depraved) “ego”, “matter”, “meteoric”, “maette” (Norman “to put”), mæt (Danish “full”), “mäet” (Finnish “hills”).
        • “gnosis” – “Noses” (pushes forward nose-first – nose here being metaphorical for the head of the penis), “gnosis” (mystical insight).
        • “itsweigh” – “Its way”, “sway” (dominion; to persuade), “weighty”.
        • “oupein” – “Up in”, “open”, “oh pain”, “opein” (Finnish “knowledges”(?)).
        • “t’war” – “To her”, “twat” (slang “vagina”), “to war”, “twardy” (Polish “stiff”).
        • “lubrarycated” – “Lubricated”, “library”.
        • “litterlhairy passage” – “Literary passage”, “little hairy passage”, “literal”, “litter”.
      • Hae eddas a slermoan o’ creatitude esshays wiet knib slieds inbeturn d’her ipen virllum parches off’er wilq-uite thys, an’ plingues ent’er iverfloowing unquell.

        • “Hae” – “He”, “hae” (Irish “metrical composition”; Scots “to have”; Latin “these women”), “hwæt” (Old English “hark!”, the first word of Beowulf).
        • “eddas” – “Utters”, “eddas” (works of Norse mythology).
        • “slermoan” – “Slow moan”, “sermon”, “slur man”, “sperm own”.
        • “creatitude” – “Gratitude”, “creative attitude”, “great” “etude” (type of music).
        • “esshays” – “As his”, “essays” (short non-fiction writings; undertakes to do), “is hayseed”.
        • “wiet” – “Wide”, “wit”, “wet”, “white”, “wiet” (Dutch “weed”).
        • “knib” – “Knob” (tip of penis), “nib” (tip of pen), “nibs” (British slang “important person”),”knibe” (Danish “pinch; tight spot”), “knibbel” (West Frisian “knee”).
        • “slieds” – “Slides”, “lieds” (type of song), “lied in essence”.
        • “inbeturn” – “In between”, “in the turn”, “sin be turned”.
        • “d’her” – “The”, “do her”.
        • “ipen” – “Open”, “I pen”, “ipen” (Cuyunon “tooth”).
        • “virllum” – “Vellum” (high-quality paper; metaphorically here as “white”), “villum” (Latin “tuft of hair”), “vir” (Latin “man; husband”), “virile”, suggest??
        • “parches” – “Patches”, “parchment” (again, a type of paper suggestive of “white”), “peaches”, “porches”, “arches”.
        • “off’er” – “Of her”, “offer”, “off (of) her”.
        • “wilq-uite” – “Milk-white”, “well, quite”, “will quit”, “requite”.
        • “thys” – “Thighs”, “this”, “thus”, “thy”.
        • “plingues” – “Plunges”, “lingue” (Italian “tongue; language”), “springes (obsolete “snares”).
        • “ent’er” – “Into her”, “enter”, “sent her”.
        • “iverfloowing” – “Overflowing”, “river”, “ever-flowing”, “flooding”, “iver” (Scandinavian languages “eagerness; ardour”).
        • “unquell” – “Inkwell” (metaphorically, vagina), “un- quell” (to remove suppression).
      • Dippen erundite o’ Lucia, asef’er finney wor a dicksinhurry er encirclo’pubia, he seecks apunner imple ditties whell hym simpultuneously ensteplicious a slurppery buot steurdy rhymthem t’ theor copgruglation.

        • “Dippen” – “Dipping”, “the pen”.
        • “erundite” – “In and out”, “erudite” (scholarly), “gerund” (part of speech), “erunt” (Latin “you (plural) will be”).
        • “asef’er” – “As if her”, “a safer”, suggest??
        • “finney” – “Fanny” (slang “vagina”), “Finnegan”, “finny” (having fins; abounding in fishes).
        • “wor” – “Were”, “word”, “whore”, “war”.
        • “dicksinhurry” – “Dictionary”, “dicks in (a) hurry”, “dick sin”.
        • “er” – “Or”, “er” (expression of uncertainty), “your”.
        • “encirclo’pubia” – “Encyclopedia”, “in (the) circle of pubis”.
        • “seecks” – “Sucks”, “seeks”.
        • “apunner” – “Upon her”, “a punner” (Moore frequently is this), “apuntar” (Catalan “to write down”).
        • “imple” – “Ample”, “dimpled”, “implex” (complex).
        • “ditties” – “Titties”, “ditties”.
        • “whell” – “While”, “well” (satisfactorily; deep hole; to issue forth), “we’ll”, “whelm” (to submerge; to overcome with emotion; a surge).
        • “hym” – “He”, “hymn”.
        • “simpultuneously” – “Simultaneously”, “simple tune joyously”.
        • “ensteplicious” – “Establishes”, “in step delicious”.
        • “slurppery” – “Slippery”, “slurpy” (sloppy; sounding or feeling like slurping liquid), “peri” (sprite in Persian folklore).
        • “buot” – “But”, “bot” (British slang “to bugger”; robot; Catalan “boat; wineskin”; Dutch “blunt; bone”; Middle Irish “penis”), “buot” (Cebuano “will; sanity”; Northern Sami “everything”).
        • “steurdy” – “Steady”, “sturdy”, “study”, “steur” (Dutch “Sturgeon”).
        • “rhymthem” – “Rhythm”, “rhyme them”, “hymn theme”.
        • “theor” – “Their”, “theory”, “theo-” (god).
        • copgruglation” – “Copulation”, “congregation”, “congratulation”, “cop grudge elation”, “grug” (Welsh “heather”), “grulla” (Italian feminine “fool”).
      • Whake-deglade sounds ierushalem ain alltrhings briton betterfeel, to be a pilldream orn amaez ingrasse err sringing innherears asaill hes pubetry ix Puondred innerher hort, joycy cunto manny calleurs.

        • This sentence is full of the names of hymns. I think (but am not sure) that the primary meaning of the sentence is that Lucia is hearing these hymns.
        • “Whake-deglade sounds” – Hark the glad sound” (hymn composed by Philip Doddridge, 1735), “wake the glade sounds”, “whale”, “degrade”.
        • “ierushalem” – Jerusalem” (hymn composed by Hubert Parry, 1916, based on William Blake’s 1808 poem), “shalom” (traditional Jewish greeting or farewell; “peace”),”salem” (Latin “salt; wit”), “ieru” (Japanese “to be healed”), “sieru” (Latvian “with cheese”).
        • “ain” – “And”, “main”, “an”, “in”, “ain” (Scots “own”; Old Irish “you would save”(?); Norman “fishhook”), “Ain” (river in France) “Ainu” (Japanese ethnic group in Hokkaido).
        • “alltrhings briton betterfeel” – All things bright and beautiful” (Hymn composed by Cecil Alexander, 1848), “alterings”, “Briton” (inhabitant of Britain), “feel better”, “Althing” (Icelandic parliament).
        • “to be a pilldream” – To Be a Pilgrim” (aka “He Who Would Valiant Be”, hymn composed by John Bunyan, 1684), “pill dream” (suggesting psychedelic drugs, or psychiatric sedation).
        • “orn” – “And”, “or”, “on”, “orne” (Latin “O ash tree!”), “ornament”.
        • “amaez ingrasse” – Amazing grace” (hym composed by John Newton, 1779; see chapter seven), “a maze in grass”, “Amazon” (female warriors of Greek mythology), “ingrassare” (Italian “to fatten; to fertilize”).
        • “err” – “Are”, “err” (to mistake), “er” (expression of uncertainty).
        • “sringing” – “Singing”, “ringing”.
        • “innherears” – “In her ears”, “innner ears”, “in her rear”, “in arrears” (overdue).
        • “asaill” – “As all”, “assail” (attack), “wassail” (revel).
        • “hes” – “His”, “he is”.
        • “pubetry” – “Poetry”, “puberty”, “Pooh Bear try”.
        • “ix” – “Is”, “9” (in Roman numerals), “ix” (Latin name of the letter “X”).
        • “Puondred” – “Pounded”, “upon dread”, “plundered”, “pond red”, “poindre” (French “to puncture; to prick”).
          • Also Ezra Pound (1885-1972), American poet and critic, and friend of the Joyce family.
        • “innerher” – “Into her”, “inner her”
        • “hort,” – “Hot”, “heart”, “hurt”, “Hort” (German “shelter, refuge; treasure”), “hort” (Catalan “orchard”).
        • “joycy” – “Juicy”, “Joyce-y”, “joy see”, “Joycean”, “Joseph’s”.
        • “cunto ” – “Cunt of”, “canto” (section of poetry), “cunto” (Italian “I narrate”), “coat of”.
          • Ezra Pound wrote a poem called “The Cantos“.
        • “manny” – “Many”, “mannish”, “Manny” (name, no obvious significance).
        • “calleurs” – “Callers”, “colors”, “calleuse” (French feminine “callused”), “call lures”.
    • Hur snatcho’songfire assy iambcis poentamter’er tailhesin.

      • Whereas the previous sentence was full of hymn names, this one and the next are full of specific poetry jargon.
      • “Hur” – “Her”, “hurt”, “hur” (Swedish “how”, Basque “near; hazel”).
      • “snatcho’songfire” – “Snatch is on fire” (“snatch” is slang for “vagina”), “snatch of song” “fire”.
      • “assy” – “As he”, “assay” (attempt), “assy” (like an ass; abbreviation for “assembly”), “sassy”.
      • “iambcis” – “Jams his”, “iambics” (metrical foot of verse with an unstressed syllable, then a stressed one), “jamb” (side of a door frame) “cis” (not queer; Irish “wicker basket; to place one’s weight on”; Polish “yew”).
      • “poentamter’er” – “Peen (penis) into her” (this is rather a strain, in order to get the secondary meaning in), “pentameter” (poetic meter with five metrical feet). Possibly “poen” (Dutch “money”), “poena” (Latin “punishment”), “Tam Lin”, “tempter”.
      • “tailhesin” – “Tail (vagina), he’s in”, “Taliesin” (legendary Welsh bard), “he sin”. Possibly “taille” (obsolete “tenor part”).
    • His baredic is asestina towords haer epiclimax ishy wrigglesonnet, villanellesley warpping a’lexarndhime inher preeverse ecstrasay, fairwence hepitobe missunderstud.

      • “baredic” – “Bare dick”, “bardic” (pertaining to bards, such as Taliesin, above). Possibly “bardiche” (a type of poleaxe).
      • “asestina” – “Assisting her”, “a sestina” (a highly structured form of poem). Possibly “asesinato” (Spanish “murder”).
      • “towords” – “Towards”, “to words”.
      • “haer” – “Her”, “share”, “hair”. Possibly “Hera” (wife of Zeus).
      • “epiclimax” – “Happy climax”, “epic” (extended narrative poetry) “limax” (Latin “slug, snail”), “epi-” (above; over; on; in addition to).
      • “ishy” – “As she”, “fishy”. Possibly “ishyaa” (Chickasaw “to mourn”).
      • “wrigglesonnet” – “Wriggles on it”, “sonnet” (form of poetry).
      • “villanellesley” – “Villainously” (in this context, perhaps “degradingly”), “villanelle” (form of poetry), “willingly”. Possibly “Lesley” (Scottish surname meaning “garden of hollies”).
      • “warpping” – “Wrapping”, “warping” (twisting; perverting; obsolete “plotting”). Possibly “Wapping“, a London district that featured in The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen.
      • “a’lexarndhime” – “Her legs around him”, “alexandrine” (a type of poetic meter).
      • “inher” – “In her”, “inner”. Possibly “inherit”.
      • “preeverse” – “Perverse”, “pre-” (before) “verse”. Possibly “preverse” (Spanish “to foresee oneself”).
      • “ecstrasay” – “Ecstasy” (in both the physical and mystical senses), “extra say” (arguably, the main point of poetry; it says more than it appears to say).
      • “fairwence” – “For once”, “fair wench”.
      • “hepitobe” – “Happy to be”, “hep” (obsolete “rose hip”; dated “up-to-date”) “it” “ode”, suggest??
      • “missunderstud” – “Misunderstood”, “miss under stud”.
  • Paragraph 53
    In their abandoned thrusting is the alchemical union; is the silver-gold of the copulating sexual flowers, for they both true lovers are. His full face, like a harvest moon, is hanging over Lucia as he enters her with strength and lust. A towering stalk, boy-lightning, drives into her wheel of fortune like a chariot. This rough son of the soil impresses her with his ability to jangle her whole predestined universe with just his devil of a prick fucking her half to death. He soothes a major ache in her. To Lucia he represents the letters of the Hebrew lexicon, from aleph to beth, the two-and-twenty-something symbols from which all of her awareness and reality has been composed. As his great exclamation mark continuously interjects upon her discourse, it occurs to her that there are three-and-twenty pairs of chromosones in every human being, like the letters of our DNAlphabet in which our mortal song is wrought, at least according to young Master Crick who once upon a time attended the Northampton Grammar School for little boys, next door to the Saint Andrew’s Hospital along Billing Road.

    • En dare abinndoned t’rusting istre allcummickle yinyan; estre solvérguilt e’ther coapula-t’ing stextual flowwords, firlthey baothe tarue loversart.

      • “En dare” – “In their”, “endear”, “daring”.
      • “abinndoned” – “Abandoned” (unrestrained), “a bin” (trash container). Possibly “abonnement” (season ticket).
      • “t’rusting” – “Thrusting”, “trusting”, “to rusting” (suggestive of something abandoned).
      • “istre” – “Is the”, “is tree”, “gist”, suggest?? Possibly “estre” (archaic “the layout of a castle”; French archaic “to be”).
      • “allcummickle” – “Alchemical”, “all” “cum” (ejaculate) “mickle” (large, great).
      • “yinyan” – “Union”, “yin-yang” (Chinese philosophical expression of the unibersal balance between opposites; slang “vagina”.
      • “estre” – “Is the”, “nest”, “estre” (archaic “the layout of a castle”; French archaic “to be”).
      • “solvérguilt” – “Silver-gold” (metaphor for pollen?), “solvé” (an alchemical principle important to Moore), “gilt”, “solver”, “guilt”.
      • “e’ther” – “Of the”, “ether” (the sky; in some versions of alchemy, the fifth element; in outmoded physics, a substance thought to permeate space as the mediummfor electromagnetic waves).
      • “coapula-t’ing” – “Copulating”, “couple of things” (a very euphemistic way of describing joined genitals?), “coagulating”. Possibly “copal” (tree resin used to make printing ink).
      • “stextual” – “Sexual”, “textual”, “stet” (proofreader’s indication that a suggested change to copy should be allowed to remain as is).
      • “flowwords” – “Flowers”, “flow words”.
      • “firlthey” – “For they”, “filthy”, “feel the”.
      • “baothe” – “Both”, “bathe”, “baoth” (Irish “foolish; giddy”).
      • “tarue” – “True”, “to rue” (to regret), “tarot” (pictorial cards, used since the 18th century for fortune-telling), “tare” (name for certain weedy plants).
        • The theme of the tarot will continue through the next four sentences. The numbers given for the trumps are their traditional ones, though some decks use different numbering.
      • “loversart” – “Lovers are”, “The Lovers” (tarot trump 6), “art” (archaic “are”; artwork; magical act). Possibly “sart” (obsolete “clearing”).
        • In Crowley’s Thoth deck, the normal trump 14 (“Temperance”) is replaced by “Art”.
    • His fuul phace, lucca haird’vest loon, is hangdmin’ hierpha Lucia issay empers hormit stirrngth ornd luste.

      • “fuul” – “Full”, “The Fool” (tarot trump 0). Possibly “fuul” (Somali “to climb”).
      • “phace” – “Face”, “phase” (suggestive of the moon).
      • “lucca” – “Like a”, “Lucia”, “Lucca” (province of Tuscany).
      • “haird’vest” – “Harvest”, “haired chest”, “hair-vest (shirt)” (a shirt made of haircloth, worn as religious penance), “hard”, “hired”.
      • “loon” – “Moon”, “The Moon” (tarot trump 17), “loon” (a type of waterbird; lunatic).
      • “hangdmin’” – “Hanging”, “The Hanged Man” (tarot trump 12). Possibly “demon”.
      • “hierpha” – “Over”, “The Hierophant” (tarot trump 5), “hier” (French “yesterday”; German “here”) “phase”.
      • “issay” – “As he”, “is say”, “essay” (nonfiction writing; to try).
      • “empers” – “Enters”, “The Emperor” (tarot trump 4).
        • One might think this was The Empress, but that seems to fit better in the following sentence.
      • “hormit” – “Her with”, “The Hermit” (tarot trump 9). Possibly “hör mit” (German “I overhear”).
      • “stirrngth” – “Strength” (quality of being strong; tarot trump 8), “stirring the”, “strings”, “tiring”
      • “ornd” – “And”, “or”, “on”, “order”, “orno” (Italian “manna ash tree; I embellish”).
      • “luste” – “Lust”, “lusty” , “luster” (shine). Possibly “luste” (Finnish “ryegrass”).
        • “Lust” is an alternate name for the tarot trump “Strength”. Decks which use this name largely derive from Crowley’s Thoth deck, which numbers it trump 11 instead of 8.
    • A towerin’ stalk, boy-lightnin’, droives aeonto’er whoel o’ furtones slakeher cherryhot.

      • “towerin’ stalk, boy-lightnin’” – “Towering stalk, boy-lightning” (poetic metaphors for “penis”), “The Tower Struck by Lightning” (tarot trump 16).
      • “droives” – “Drives”, “droves” (large groups). Possibly “droits” (French “right angles”).
      • “aeonto’er” – “Into her”, “aeon” (age, eternity). Possibly “toer” (Danish “die roll or playing card with value two”; Dutch “turn; tour”).
        • The Crowley Thoth deck replaces tarot trump 20 “Judgement” with “The Æon”.
      • “whoel o’ furtones” – “Wheel of fortune” (here, poetically, “vagina”; tarot trump 10), “hole of fur tones”, “whore”, “whole”, “furto” (Italian “theft; plagiarism”).
      • “slakeher” – “Like a”, “slake her (thirst; lust)”.
      • “cherryhot” – “Chariot” (wheeled cart; tarot trump 7), “cherry” (slang “hymen”; possibly used here metaphorically for “vagina” or “clitoris”?) “hot” (sexually excited), “chary” (obsolete “sad”), “heart”, “cheery”.
    • Disruph sun o’ de’ toile empresses herwitties lability t’ jongleur hole priestressed innyverse wit’ just’is divel avva prich-furkin’ hier hafter dearth.

      • “Disruph” – “This rough”, “disrupt”.
      • “sun” – “Son”, “The Sun” (tarot trump 19).
      • “o’ de’ toile” – “Of the soil”, “étoile” (French “star”), “ode” (poem, song) “toile” (type of plain fabric), “toil” (labor).
        • “Étoile”, above, suggests “The Star“, tarot trump 17.
      • “empresses” – “Impresses”, “The Empress” (tarot trump 3).
      • “herwitties” – “Her with his”, “wittiest”, “her titties”. Possibly “The Hermit” again.
      • “lability t’” – “Ability to”, “labia tit”, “lability” (instability).
      • “jongleur” – “Jangle her”, “jongleur” (juggler; troubadour).
        • According to Robert Price’s book The Tarot, both The Fool (trump 0) and The Magician (trump 1) were “jongleurs” in the influential Tarot of Marseilles. Since The Fool appears elsewhere, it would seem that The Magician is intended here.
      • “hole” – “Whole”, “hole”.
      • “priestressed” – “Predestined”, “The High Priestess” (tarot trump 2), “pre-stressed”, “priest dressed”.
        • Trump 2 is traditionally “The High Priestess”, and “hole” above may be meant to be read “high”. Crowley’s Thoth deck, however, merely calls her “The Priestess”.
      • “innyverse” – “Universe”, “any verse”, “inny” (inward-pointing belly button), “worse”.
        • Crowley’s Thoth deck calls trump 21 “The Universe”, instead of the more traditional “The World“.
      • “wit’” – “With”, “wit” (cleverness).
      • “just’is” – “Just his”, “Justice” (tarot trump 11), “just is” (an existential sentiment?).
      • “divel” – “Devil” (in this context,something wicked), “The Devil” (tarot trump 15), “diver”, “divel” (obsolete “to rend apart”).
      • “avva” – “Of a”, “avvalare” (Italian “to collapse”), suggest??
      • “prich-furkin’” – “Prick fucking”, “pitchfork” (farm implement; The Devil is often depicted holding one), “rich fur kin”. Possibly “príchod” (Czech “coming”).
        • Possible reference to James Cowles Prichard (1786-1848), British physician who introduced the term “senile dementia”.
      • “hier hafter” – “Her half to”, “hereafter”, “hier” (French “yesterday”), “The Hierophant” (tarot trump 5, again), “higher faster”, “hafter” (metaphorically, “fucker”).
      • “dearth” – “Death” (little death, i.e. orgasm; tarot trump 13), “dearth” (lack)
    • He soothsay major achin’er.

      • “soothsay” – “Soothes a”, “soothsay” (to tell the future, often done with tarot cards).
      • “major achin’er” – “Major ache in her”, “major arcana” (collective term for the 22 tarot trumps, literally “greater secrets”), “machiner”, “machina” (as in “deus ex machina”).
        • Here we come to an end of the tarot subsection. In the last five sentences, Moore has included references to ALL the major arcana in one form or another. Primarily their traditional names are used, with the following exceptions:
          1: “jongleur” instead of “The Magician”
          8/11: Both the traditional “Strength” and the Crowley variant “Lust” appear.
          11/8: “Justice” appears, but the Crowley variant “Adjustment” doesn’t.
          14: Crowley variant “Art” instead of “Temperance”.
          17: French “étoile” instead of “The Star”.
          20: Crowley variant “The Æon” instead of “Judgment”.
          21: Crowley variant “The Universe” instead of “The World”.
    • Tru Lucia hay repreasants dee lettches oft’yn Herbrow legsin’cun, form alepht’beth, the twa-ent-twintie-saything sqymbols phamwitch allove huor awearedness un’ reallytoy ashbin cimprosed.

      • “Tru” – “To”, “true”.
      • “hay” – “He”, “hay” (suggestive of “hayseed” – yokel).
      • “repreasants” – “Represents”, “rare peasants”, “represa” (Spanish “repression”).
      • “dee lettches” – “The letters”, “delicious”, “Dee” (John Dee) “letches” (lustful desires).
      • “oft’yn” – “Of the”, “often”, “oft in”.
      • “Herbrow” – “Hebrew”, “her brow”. Possibly “herbronnen” (Dutch “to reorient, to introspect”), “herb Robert” (type of flower).
      • “legsin’cun” – “Lexicon”, “legs in, cunt”, “cun” (obsolete “to know”). Possibly “legislation”, “legsins” (Icelandic “of a uterus”).
      • “form alepht’beth” – “From aleph to beth”, “form alphabet”.
        • This is in the form of the popular saying “from A to Z”, but significantly more restricted. Traditionally “beth”, like B, is the second letter of the alphabet, not the last. It recalls Dorothy Parker’s insult of an actress that she could “run the gamut of emotions from A to B!
      • “twa-ent-twintie-saything” – “Two-and-twenty-something” (the Hebrew alphabet is generally considered to have 22 letters, although there are some subtleties that could produce different counts), “twa” (Scots “two”), “twat” (slang “vagina”), “ent” (Tolkien tree creature), “twin tie” (suggestive of the bonds of being siblings), “say thing”.
      • “sqymbols” – “Symbols”, “quim” (slang “vagina”), “squabbles”, suggest??
      • “phamwitch” – “From which”, “pharmacy witch”, “family”, “sandwich”. Possibly “phåm” (Vietnamese “to violate”).
      • “allove huor” – “All of her”, “allover”, “I love her”, “a-love whore”.
      • “awearedness” – “Awareness”, “a wearied nest”, “weird” (strange; fate).
      • “un’ reallytoy” – “And reality”, “un-reality”, “really a toy”.
      • “ashbin” – “Has been”, “ashbin” (container for ashes).
      • “cimprosed” – “Composed”, “cime” (French “mountaintop; treetop”; Irish “prisoner”) “prosed”, “compromised”.
    • Eas ‘es girht prixclamotion merk cuntinusesly intherjerkts upin hiar piscourse, ut oqueers twoher dout derror drei-und-wetty persof ghromoresons ineffary youmean’ behim, liauc delittres if or DNAllpharbest en rhich uor meretale sung es wrot, atleas acode-in t’ yourng Maister Criack whew one cyphernotime o’ttenderd day Notrampsin Grimmar Skhull fher pricky bois, knix doorn tether Saine Undre’ss Nhursepity alinger Billding Reord.

      • “Eas ‘es” – “As his”, “eases”, “eas” (dialect “rivers”; Irish “waterfall; weasel”).
      • “girht” – “Great”, “girth”, “girt” (girded).
      • “prixclamotion merk” – “Exclamation mark” (!, here a metaphor for “penis”), “prick’s” “clam” (slang “vagina”) “motion” “merkin” (female pubic wig), “proclamation”, “prix” (French “prize”), “ocean”, “commotion”.
      • “cuntinusesly” – “Continuously”, “cunt in use, sly”, “uselessly”.
      • “intherjerkts” – “Interjects”, “jerks into her”.
        • As viewers of Schoolhouse Rock will remember, interjections are set apart from a sentence by an exclamation point.
      • “upin” – “Upon”, “up in”, “you pin”. Possibly “upine” (Lithuanian feminine “pertaining to a river”).
      • “hiar” – “Her”, “hair” (pubic?).
      • “piscourse” – “Discourse”, “piss-course” (vulva). Possibly “piscor” (Latin “I fish”).
      • “ut” – “It”, “ut” (musical note; Latin “how?; as; that”; Swedish “out”).
      • “oqueers” – “Occurs”, “O queers!” (both in the sense of “queer persons” and “makes strange”).
      • “twoher” – “To her”, “two (of) her” (expressing a dualistic notion?)
      • “dout” – “That”, “doubt”, “dout” (dialect “douse”).
      • “derror” – “There are”, “derrière” (bottom), “error”, “terror”.
      • “drei-und-wetty” – “Three-and-twenty”, “dry and wet”, “drei” (German “three”), “undine” (water spirit).
      • “persof” – “Pairs of”, “person”.
      • “ghromoresons” – “Chromosomes”, “grow more sons”. Possibly “ghost”, “groom”, “Romeo“, “whoresons”, “reasons”.
      • “ineffary” – “In every”, “ineffable” (incomprehensible), “in a fairy”.
      • “youmean’ behim” – “Human being”, “you mean be him”, “behind”.
      • “liauc” – “Like”, “Lucia”, “lilac”. Possibly “liacht” (Ieish “medicine”), “liauka” (Lithuanian “gland”).
      • “delittres” – “The letters”, “the litters” (offspring), “delicious”. Possibly “delittore” (Italian “delinquent”).
      • “if or” – “Of our”, “if or”, “O four”, “I for”.
      • “DNAllpharbest” – “DNA alphabet”, “all for the best”, “Allfather”, “beast”.
      • “en rhich” – “in which”, “enrich”.
      • “uor” – “Our”, “your”, “ur-” (original; first).
      • “meretale” – “Mortal”, “mere tale”, “marital”. Possibly “fairytale”, “mertal” (Javanese “to translate”).
      • “sung” – “Song”, “sung”, “Taliesin” (legendary Welsh bard).
      • “es” – “Is”, suggest??
      • “wrot” – “Writ” (written), “wrought” (created), “wroth” (anger), “rot”, “wot” (archaic “to know”).
      • “atleas” – “At least”, “atlas” (book of maps), Atlas (figure of Greek mythology), “alas”.
      • “acode-in t’” – “According to”, “a code in it” (such as DNA encoded in each cell). Possibly “codeine” (pain medication).
      • “yourng” – “Young”, “yourn” (archaic “yours”), “yearn”.
      • “Maister Criack” – “Master Crick”, “mister”, “crack”, “craic” (Irish “conversation; crazy person”). Possibly “criação” (Portuguese “creation”).
        • “Master” is a traditional form of address for a young boy.
        • Francis Crick (1916-2004) was a British scientist who is best known as being the co-discoverer of the structure of DNA. As attested below, he attended Northampton Grammar School, some decades before Lucia came to Northampton.
      • “whew” – “Who, “whew” (expression of relief), “hew” (to chop; to shape; to conform).
      • “one cyphernotime” – “Once upon a time”, “one cypher no time” (possible reference to one time pads?), “phenotype”, “inferno”.
      • “o’ttenderd” – “Attended”, “O tendered”, “otter den”.
      • “day” – “The”, “day” (NGS was a “day” school; the students were not housed there, but went home each night).
      • “Notrampsin Grimmar Skhull” – “Northampton Grammar School“, “No tramps in grim mar skull”, “traipsing”, “Grimm”, “hull”. Possibly “grimmur” (Icelandic “cruel”).
      • “fher” – “For”, “fuck her”.
      • “pricky” – “Little”, “pricky” (having pricks), “prickly” (easily annoyed).
      • “bois” – “Boys”, “bois” (French “wood”; Scottish Gaelic “palm”; submissive men; lesbians who adopt male appearance).
      • “knix” – “Next”, “knickers” (a type of baggy knee breeches popular in the early 20th century; women’s underpants).
      • “doorn” – “Door”, “down”. Possibly “doorn” (Dutch “thorn”).
      • “tether” – “To the”, “tether”.
      • “Saine Undre’ss Nhursepity” – “Saint Andrew’s Hospital“, “sane undress nurse pity”. Possibly “saine” (Middle English “to say”; French “healthy female”).
      • “alinger” – “Along”, “a-lingering”, “aligner”, “aliger” (Latin “winged”).
      • “Billding Reord” – “Billing Road” (the location of both School and Hospital) , “building (where children are) reared”, “bill” (demand for payment) “ding” (inflict a penalty) “reord” (Old English “voice; language”).
  • Page 897
  • Paragraph 54
    Her excitingly grubby rural lover clasps one of her buttocks in his leathery palm, a solitary moistened digit working its way up her anus to the knuckle while he plows her furrow, fucks her jointly, you might say posternally, thrusting his oily hard-on frantically right up to her middle-class front gate. Deep in her valley, Lucia knows that it will not be long before she cums, and, looking up into her partner’s florid face, she thinks that he will very soon scatter his own seed in her nicely-irrigated pasture. Still of a lexical and poetic turn of mind, she can imagine splendid gushers of a liquified calligraphy erupting from his prick, in spurts of pearly white made from a hundred million wriggling characters; from his spermatazoa, his spontaneous ejaculation. Some will fall on barren ground or perish as they slip upstream, while others will splash on to find an ovum or perhaps a brain, a fertile spawning ground they can inseminate with all their poetry and wisdom of the universal genetic chalk-marks.

    • Heor sexsightingley gruabby reurhol loveher clups winover boytucks innos laethery porm, a solivary muistend digsit wonking ids whay ulp har heinus t’ dir nocall wellhe proughs hair fur-ow, foxhare johntly, hu mourght say pa’stournallie, thrustic hi soily ghard-on ferntickly rouight upt’er meddle-cliss fornt ge’at.

      • “Heor” – “Her”, “he or”, “Heorot” (from Beowulf), “here”, “whore”.
      • “sexsightingley” – “Excitingly”, “sex sigh tingly”, “sight”, “sighting”, “ley” (lines).
      • “gruabby” – “Grubby”, “grabby”. Possibly “grua” (Irish “facet; edge”).
      • “reurhol” – “Rural”, “rear hole”, “re: your whole”.
      • “loveher” – “Lover”, “love her”.
      • “clups” – “Clasps”, “claps”, “cups”.
      • “winover” – “One of her”, “win over”.
      • “boytucks” – “Buttocks”, “boy tucks”.
      • “innos” – “In his”, “innocent”, “inn” “os” (mouth; cervix).
      • “laethery” – “Leathery”, “lathery”. Possibly “lathe”, “ether”, “ethereal”, “theory”, “laethe” (Irish dialect “days”)
      • “porm” – “Palm”, “porn”, “paw”.
      • “solivary” – “Solitary”, “salivary” (moistened with spit; inciting hunger).
      • “muistend” – “Moistened”, “must end”, “distend”, “mist”. Possibly “muist” (Romanian “cocksucker”).
      • “digsit” – “Digit” (finger; but also numerical figure), “digs it”, “dig sit”.
      • “wonking” – “Working”, “wanking” (masturbating), “won king”.
      • “ids” – “Its”, “ids” (primal desires).
      • “whay” – “Way”, “hay” (as in “roll in the hay”, slang (originally rural) for “have sex”).
      • “ulp” – “Up”, “gulp”, “ulp” (expression of alarm).
      • “har” – “Her”, “hard”, “hair”, “har har” (laughter).
      • “heinus” – “Anus”, “heinous” (reprehensible), “hiney” (informal “buttocks”).
      • “t’ dir” – “To the”, “dirt”.
      • “nocall” – “Knuckle”, “no call”.
      • “wellhe” – “While he”, “well he”, “willy” (childish slang “penis”).
      • “proughs” – “Ploughs”, “prow” (metaphor for “penis”?), “proud”.
      • “hair fur-ow” – “Her furrow” (plowed trench, metaphorically “vagina”), “hair fur” “ow” (painful expression)
      • “foxhare” – “Fucks her”, “fox hare”.
      • “johntly” – “Jointly”, “John”, “jauntily”.
      • “hu mourght” – “You might”, “humour”.
      • “pa’stournallie” – “Posternally” (by way of the back door), “pa’s turn a lie” (possibly referring to Audrey Vernall’s abuse), “pastorally”, “paternally”, “tournament”, “ally”. Possibly “stour” (dialect “strong; rough”).
      • “thrustic” – “Thrusting”, “rustic”.
      • “hi soily” – “His oily”, “hi soily” (greeting dirty-ness?), “high”.
      • “ghard-on” – “Hard-on” (erect penis), “ghardaí” (Irish “guards; policemen”), “gardon” (type of fish), “guerdon” (archaic “reward”).
      • “ferntickly” – “Frantically”, “fern tickly”, “frenetically”.
      • “rouight” – “Right”, “rough”.
      • “upt’er” – “Up her”, “up to her”, “tupped her” (slang “had sex with her”), “upper”. Possibly “upter” (Australian slang “useless”).
      • “meddle-cliss” – “Middle-class”, “meddle” (interfere with, sometimes in a sexual sense), “clitoris”. Possibly “clissar” (Catalan “to understand”).
      • “fornt ge’at” – “Front Gate”, “font” (fountain; metaphorically “vagina”) “get at”, “fornicate”. Possibly “Geat” (North Germanic tribe).
    • Dreepin her velley, Lucia knaws tha’tit Wale knobby-long bifur shrie cwyms, end, luciang uppearntoher partinher’s flurid fiarce, shay dhinks dirtywill verisioon spurtter hissun saed inheer noycely-inringdated pussture.

      • “Dreepin” – “Deep in”, “dripping”. Possibly “dreep” (Scots “to drop down from a height”).
      • “velley” – “Valley” (metaphorically “vagina”), “vellum”, “velvety”, “velleity” (very small wish). Possibly “velle” (French “female calf”; Latin “to wish”).
      • “knaws” – “Knows”, “gnaws”.
      • “tha’tit” – “That it”, “the tit”.
      • “Wale” – “Will”, “Wales” (possible reference to the Prince of Wales?; suggest??), “wale” (texture; ridge; choice).
      • “knobby-long” – “Not be long”, “knobby (and) long” (presumably describing Clare’s penis).
      • “bifur” – “Before”, “bifurcate” (split in two). Possibly “Bifur” (character from The Hobbit).
      • “shrie” – “She”, “shriek” (in orgasm), “shrive”.
      • “cwyms” – “Cums” (slang “orgasms”), “cwm” (Welsh “valley”), “cwymp” (Welsh “fall, tumble, collapse”), “cwyn” (Welsh “complaint”).
      • “end” – “And”, “end” (in the sense of “complete”, and also “bottom”).
      • “luciang” – “Looking”, “Lucia”, “ciangottare” (Italian “to stammer”).
      • “uppearntoher” – “Up into her”, “upper earn”, “appear”
      • “partinher’s” – “Partner’s”, “part in hers” (“part” here means “sexual organ”; his is in hers).
      • “flurid” – “Florid” (red), “lurid” (shocking; melodramatic). Possibly “fluoride”?
      • “fiarce” – “Face”, “farce”, “fiance”, “fiacre” (small carriage for hire).
      • “shay” – “She”, “hay”, “shay” (small carriage).
      • “dhinks” – “Thinks”, “dink” (slang “penis”).
      • “dirtywill” – “That he will”, “dirty” (both physically and mentally) “will” (both “desire” and “penis”).
      • “verisioon” – “Very soon”, “verisimilitude”, “version”.
      • “spurtter” – “Scatter”, “spurt her”, “spatter”. Possibly “spurtti” (Finnish “a short run”).
      • “hissun” – “His own”, “his sun”, “hiss on”, “hissen” (dialect “himself”).
      • “saed” – “Seed” (metaphorically “semen”), “said”.
      • “inheer” – “In her”, “inhere” (to be essential), “in here”, “heer” (Dutch “gentleman”; Middle English “hair”).
      • “noycely-inringdated” – “Nicely-irrigated”, “Joyce” “in ring dated”, “inundated”.
      • “pussture” – “Pasture”, “pussy” (slang “vagina”), “posture”. Possibly “pustule”?
    • Stylluvver lexual en’ pornobetic turn-onf mindge, she carnymaginck splermdid gershes ova lingquefied cummigraphy eruptung froam hespreack, inspwurds o’ peurly whrite madde ferm a handrit milliong wriddling coreactors; fairmess spermAtoZoa, hes spawntaneous injeculation.

      • “Stylluvver” – “Still of a”, “sty lover”.
      • “lexual” – “Lexical” (related to words), “sexual”.
      • “en’” – “And”, “letter N”.
      • “pornobetic” – “Poetic”, “pornographic”, “porno bet, ick”, “porn, O be tic”.
      • “turn-onf” – “Turn of”, “turn-on”, “turn-off”.
      • “mindge” – “Mind”, “minge” (slang, “pubic hair and vulva”)
      • “carnymaginck” – “Can imagine”, “carny magic”, “ink”.
      • “splermdid” – “Splendid”, “sperm did”.
      • “gershes” – “Gushers”, suggest?? Possibly “gërshet” (Albanian “braid”).
      • “ova” – “Of a”, “ova” (eggs).
      • “lingquefied” – “Liquified”, “linguified” (made of language?).
      • “cummigraphy” – “Calligraphy”, “cumming” (slang “orgasming”) “rape-y”.
      • “eruptung” – “Erupting”, “tongue”.
      • “froam” – “From”, “foam”. Possibly “froamd” (Saterland Frisian “strange”).
      • “hespreack” – “His prick”, “he speak”, “preach”, “sprack” (British dialect “lively”).
      • “inspwurds” – “In spurts”, “inspiring words”, “inwards”
      • “peurly” – “Pearly”, “purely”, “peur” (French “fear”), “lie”.
      • “whrite” – “White”, “write”, “writhe”, “what rite?”.
      • “madde” – “Made”, “madden”, “madder” (type of plant or dye).
      • “ferm” – “From”, “ferm” (Scots “farm”), “firm”, “fern”, “ferment”.
      • “handrit” – “Hundred”, “handwritten”, “handrit” (Icelandic “manuscript”).
      • “milliong” – “Million”, “milling”.
      • “wriddling” – “Wriggling”, “riddling”, “widdling” (slang “urinating”).
      • “coreactors” – “Characters”, “co-reactors” (things that react with other things), “core actors”, “correctors”.
      • “fairmess” – “From his”, “fair mess”, “fairness”.
      • “spermAtoZoa” – “Spermatozoa” (sperm cells), “A to Z”.
      • “hes” – “His”, “he is”.
      • “spawntaneous” – “Spontaneous”, “spawn” (reproduce, espedially in fish) “tenuous”.
      • “injeculation” – “Ejaculation” (orgasm; sudden short verbal utterance), “injection”.
    • Salm willfaill oin borrin’ groind err parush astrhey lipp popsdream, whilde authers well splassion twofinned a wovumb operharps a Brainh, afar-toile spanwing graond decan insemilise wit’ ollder parentry iand wisedome uphter injoyverseul geniutic Cholkmahk.

      • “Salm” – “Some”, “salmon” (formally introducing a sequence of salmon reproductive imagery, which started last sentence with “spawn”), “psalm”.
      • “willfaill” – “Will fall”, “fail”, “willfull”.
      • “oin” – “On”, “in”. Possibly “oin” (Basque “foot”; Finnish “thorns”).
      • “borrin’” – “Barren”, “boring”, “born”.
      • “groind” – “Ground”, “groin”, “grind”.
      • “err” – “Or”, “err” (to mistake).
      • “parush” – “Perish”, “pa rush”, “parish”, “parus” (Latin “tit-bird”).
      • “astrhey” – “As they”, “astray”, “astre” (French “star”) “hey”.
      • “lipp” – “Leap”, “lip” (kiss), “lipp” (Estonian “chess queen”).
      • “popsdream” – “Upstream” (like salmon returning to their spawning grounds), “pop’s dream”.
      • “whilde” – “While the”, “wild”, “Wilde” (Oscar Wilde, who had two children despite being a homosexual).
      • “authers” – “Others”, “authors”.
      • “well” – “Will”, “well” (in a good manner; wellspring).
      • “splassion” – “Splash on”, “passion”, “dispassionate”.
      • “twofinned” – “To find”, “two-finned”, “Finnegans”.
      • “a wovumb” – “An ovum”, “a womb”, “woven”.
      • “operharps” – “Or perhaps”, “opera harps”, “open sharp”.
      • “Brainh” – “Brain”, “Binah” (the third sephira in the Kabbalistic Tree of Life, “Understanding”).
      • “afar-toile” – “A fertile”, “afar toil” (possibly referring to the salmon’s efforts to reach the spawning ground), “toile” (French “web”), “fart”, “toilet”.
      • “spanwing” – “Spawning”, “wingspan”.
      • “graond” – “Ground”, “grand”, “groaned”.
      • “decan” – “They can”, “decan” (zodiacal subdivision).
      • “insemilise” – “Inseminate”, “fertilise”. Possibly “milis” (Irish “sweet”; Scots Gaelic “melodious”).
      • “wit’” – “With”, “wit”.
      • “ollder” – “All their”, “older”. Possibly “olldord” (Irish “contrabass” (type of musical instrument)).
      • “parentry” – “Poetry”, “parent-ry”.
      • “iand” – “And”, “iamb” (unit of poetic meter; perhaps metaphorically a gene-pair).
      • “wisedome” – “Wisdom”, “wise dome”.
      • “uphter” – “Of the”, “up to her”. Possibly “upter” (Australian slang “useless”), “upher” (obsolete “wooden pole used as scaffolding”.
      • “injoyverseul” – “Universal”, “in joy (of) verse you all”, “enjoy”.
      • “geniutic” – “Genetic”, “genius”, “genuine”.
      • “Cholkmahk” – “Chalk marks”, “Chokmah” (the second sephira of the Kabbalistic Tree of Life, “Wisdom”).
  • Paragraph 55
    She supposes that that whole phenomenon is just a matter of semantics, as Alfred Korzybski would have put it. It is quite clear to Lucia that her awareness of existence is a heady mixture of noise and signal, although paradoxically it is the noise that holds most of the information. In an infant’s picture book there’s just pure signal, although in the subsequent accompanying text nothing of value is conveyed. Upon the other hand, her Daddy’s masterpiece was an abominable noise that had the entire cosmos thundering within it, and she understands that in both the beginning and the end of this infinite all-of-us, this sweaty fornication, this Big Bang, there is the Word, there is the Logres. Oh, our rich linguistic human caucus-race, our endless dance of vowels and consonants is quite glorious, Lucia thinks, with his hard L immersed in her soft O. Why, this must be the spoken language of the herald angels, she concludes.

    • She supposits dashdot whorlde phonemenon ias jestermutter ob sementrics, ais Alphread Korzubstynz wourd heav peut itr.

      • “supposits” – “Supposes”, “supposition”, “suppository”
      • “dashdot” – “That that”, “dash dot” (suggesting Morse Code).
      • “whorlde” – “Whole”, “word”, “world”, “whorled”.
      • “phonemenon” – “Phenomenon”, “phoneme non”.
      • “ias” – “Is”, “as”, “say”. Possibly “ias” (Portuguese “you were going”).
      • “jestermutter” – “Just a matter”, “jester mutter”.
      • “ob sementrics” – “Of semantics”, “obstetrics”, “ovum” (egg) “semen tricks”.
      • “ais” – “As”, “is” (parallel to “ias”, above).
      • “Alphread Korzubstynz” – “Alfred Korzybski”, “alph(abet) read” suggest??. Possibly “core”, “stains”, “steins”, “kor” (Scandinavian languages “choir”), “zub” (Czech “tooth”), “stynja” (Icelandic “to groan”).
        • Alfred Korzybski (1879-1950) developed the field of general semantics. He argued an idea (important to Moore) that we do not have direct access to reality, only to our brain’s interpretation of sense data. “The map is not the territory.”
      • “wourd” – “Would”, “word”, “wound”.
      • “heav” – “Have”, “heave”.
      • “peut itr” – “Put it”, “peut-être” (French “maybe”).
    • It ixquiste claer t’ Lucia dit hoeur awaertness o’ fixinstants isay hoddy mexture uf annoise ind singal, allthrough papadoxically et es denoys dat hords mustapha lingformention.

      • “ixquiste” – “Is quite”, “exquisite”. Possibly “Ixquic” (Mayan mythological figure).
      • “claer” – “Clear”, “Clare”.
      • “dit” – “That”, “dit” (obsolete “word”; French “says; said”).
      • “hoeur” – “Her”, “whore”, “hoe-r”, “hour”, “soeur” (French “sister”).
      • “awaertness” – “Awareness”, “alertness”. Possibly “awerthan” (Old Saxon “to die; to wither”).
      • “fixinstants” – “Existence”, “fix(ed) in stance”, “fixing”, “instants”, “fixin’s” (ingredients).
      • “isay” – “Is a”, “I say”.
      • “hoddy” – “Heady”, “hoddy” (laborer who carries things (often bricks) in a hod). Possibly “hoddydoddy” (obsolete “foolish person”).
      • “mexture uf” – “Mixture of”, “texture rough”. Possibly “Mex”(ican).
      • “annoise” – “Noise”, “annoys”, “annoint”.
      • “ind” – “And”, “send”, suggest??
      • “singal” – “Signal”, “sing all”, “sin gal”.
      • “allthrough” – “Although”, “all through”.
      • “papadoxically” – “Paradoxically”, “papa doxie ally”.
      • “et” – “It”, “ate”, “yet”.
      • “es” – “Is”, “letter S”, “multiple letter Es”.
      • “denoys” – “The noise”, “de- noys” (dialect “making an injury right”?) . Possibly “dénoyer” (French “to drain”).
      • “dat” – “That”, “data”.
      • “hords” – “Holds”, “hoards”, “words”.
      • “mustapha” – “Most of the”, “Mustapha” (Arabic given name (significance suggest??)).
      • “lingformention” – “Information”, “ling” (tongue) “for mention”, “form”, “mentation” (thought).
    • Inaen infanct’s speechture blook dare’s gist puer sign-all, altsough indee say-spit-runt accomfortying talkst neuthink o’ wellyou is kenvade.

      • “Inaen” – “In an”, “inane”.
      • “infanct’s” – “Infant’s”, “in fact”.
      • “speechture” – “Picture”, “speech true”, “sculpture”.
      • “blook” – “Book”, “look”, “bloom”, “(Leopold) Bloom” (protagonist of James Joyce’s Ulysses).
      • “dare’s” – “There’s”, “dares”.
      • “gist” – “Just”, “gist”. Possibly “gism” (slang “semen”).
      • “puer” – “Pure”, “puer” (Latin “boy”).
      • “sign-all” – “Signal”, “sign all”.
      • “altsough” – “Although”, “alt(ernate) sought”, “sough” (gentle breeze; sigh).
      • “indee” – “In the”, “indeed”.
      • “say-spit-runt” – “Subsequent”, “say spit runt”. Possibly “suspirant” (Latin “they sigh”).
      • “accomfortying” – “Accompanying”, “a comforting”, “forty”, “tying”.
      • “talkst” – “Text”, “talks to”, “stalk”.
      • “neuthink” – “Nothing”, “new think”, “any (of) you think”. Possibly “neu” (Basque “I”; Catalan “snow”; Old French “knot”; Welsh “or”).
      • “wellyou” – “Value”, “well you”.
      • “kenvade” – “Conveyed”, “ken” (to know) “evade”, “invade”.
    • Uponder othor harnd, heir Babbo’s misstoplease weis un abombinbabel gnois daat hiddy entime cosmyth dundering wi’din it, aln cie wunderstands that un birthdey begoming end dei und o’des infarnight alli’verse, thus swaety fornelation, dis Pig Pang, daer isthee Workd; daer isthee Logress.

      • “Uponder” – “Upon the”, “up yonder”, “you ponder”.
      • “othor” – “Other”, “author”, “O Thor“. Possibly “othar” (Scottish Gaelic “wages; sick”).
      • “harnd” – “Hand”, “hard”, “harmed”.
      • “heir” – “Her”, “heir”.
      • “misstoplease” – “Masterpiece”, “miss to please” (referring to Lucia, as James’ primary audience?).
      • “weis un” – “Was an”, “wise one”, “way sun”.
      • “abombinbabel” – “Abominable”, “a bomb in Babel“.
      • “gnois” – “Noise”, “gnosis”, “know is”.
      • “daat” – “That”, “data”, “Da’at” (in the Kabbalistic Tree of Life, “Knowledge”). Possibly “dath” (Irish “color; dye”), “daatsaah” (Navajo “he/she is ill”).
      • “hiddy” – “Had the”, “hidden”, “heady”, “giddy”.
      • “entime” – “Entire”, “in time”.
      • “cosmyth” – “Cosmos”, “because myth”, “cousin”.
      • “dundering” – “Thundering”, “dunderhead”, wandering”.
        • Obiwanspicoli notes that

          Finnegans Wake literally contains what have been referred to as “thunder words”. They’re one hundred letter words that appear at significant moments of major change in human history. This first appears on page 3 in the third paragraph: “The fall (bababadalgharaghtakamminarronnkonnbronntonnerronntuonnthunntrovarrhounawnskawntoohoohoordenenthurnuk!)of a once wallstrait oldparr is retaled early in bed and later on life down through all christian minstrelsy.”  It simultaneously refers to the fall of Tim Finnegan, HCE, Humpty Dumpty and all human kind.

      • “wi’din” – “Within”, “why din”, “wide in”.
      • “it, aln” – “It, and”, “Italian”, suggest??
      • “cie” – “She”, “cielo” (Italian “sky; heaven”), “cie” (French “company”; Latin “act!; move!; summon!; invoke!”).
      • “wunderstands” – “Understands”, “wonder stands”.
      • “un” – “In”, “on”, “un”, “an”.
      • “birthdey” – “Both the”, “birthday”.
      • “begoming” – “Beginning”, “becoming”, “beg, O Ming”.
      • “end” – “And”, “end”.
      • “dei” – “The”, “dei” (Italian “gods”).
      • “und” – “End”, “and”.
      • “o’des” – “Of this”, “odes”.
      • “infarnight” – “Infinite”, “in far night”.
      • “alli’verse” – “All-of-us”, “universe”, “ally verse”.
      • “thus” – “This”, “thus”.
      • “swaety” – “Sweaty”, “sweety”.
        • Moore has rendered Glycon’s name in English as “Sweety“.
      • “fornelation” – “Fornication”, “formulation”, “foreign relations”.
      • “dis” – “This”, “Dis“.
      • “Pig Pang” – “Big Bang“, “pig pang” (animal emotion?).
      • “daer” – “There”, “dear”, “dare”. Possibly “daer” (Kashmiri “window”).
      • “isthee” – “Is the”, “is thee”, “isthmus”.
      • “Workd” – “Word”, “work” (particulary in the sense of the Great Work).
      • “daer” – See above.
      • “isthee” – See above.
      • “Logress” – “Logres” (King Arthur’s territory; the chivalric code of Camelot), “Progress”, “ogress”, “log rest”.
        • Obiwanspicoli points out that this is another appearance of Work in Progress.
    • O, awr ringlinguistic youmean ciarcus-race, awr undless dence ov owels ‘n’ cormsorants is quoite gelirious, Lucia thianks, wordis haird Ell inmorsed innear surft Oh.

      • “O, awr” – “Oh, our”, “oar”, “O R”, “awe”, “awr” (Welsh “hour”).
      • “ringlinguistic” – “Rich linguistic”, “ritualistic”, “Ringling” (Brothers circus).
      • “youmean” – “Human”, “you mean” (“mean” in multiple senses: “intend; signify; common; poor; contemptible; stingy; cruel; average”)
      • “ciarcus-race” – “Caucus-race” (from Alice, a race involving lots of activity to no purpose), “circus parade”.
        • The Alice race mostly involved birds, connecting with “owls” and “cormorants” below.
      • “awr” – See above.
      • “undless” – “Endless” (both “unending” and “without purpose”), “undress”, “unless”.
      • “dence” – “Dance”, “dense”, “dunce”.
      • “ov owels” – “Of vowels”, “of owls”.
      • “‘n’” – “And”, “N” (possible reference to Toys ‘R’ Us, which Moore referred to disparagingly in Voice of the Fire).
      • “cormsorants” – “Consonants”, “cormorants”.
      • “quoite” – “Quite”, “quote”, “quoit” (old-fashioned game).
      • “gelirious” – “Glorious”, “delirious”, “gelatinous”, “jealous”.
      • “thianks” – “Thinks”, “thanks”, “tanks”.
      • “wordis” – “With his”, “word is”.
      • “haird” – “Hard”, “haired”, “hairy dell”.
      • “Ell” – “L” (metaphorically “penis”), “ell” (unit of cloth measure).
      • “inmorsed” – “Immersed”, “in morse code”, “morsel”, “immortal”.
      • “innear” – “In her”, “inner”, “inn near”, “ear”.
      • “surft” – “Soft”, “surfeit” (overfilled), “surfed”.
      • “Oh” – “O” (metaphorically “vagina”), “Oh!” (exclamation of surprise or delight).
    • Whee, thus mist be Dee sparken wuinglash iof thye hearalld angles, she kinclues.

      • “Whee” – “Why”, “whee” (expression of delighted excitement), “we”.
      • “thus” – “This”, “thus”.
      • “mist” – “Must”, “mist”, “missed”.
      • “Dee” – “The”, “Dee” (John Dee claimed to speak the language of angels).
      • “sparken” – “Spoken”, “en- spark”. Possibly “sparken” (Swedish “a kick”).
      • “wuinglash iof” – “Language of”, “wing lash if”, “wooing la shove”. Possibly “iofs” (Swedish “when thinking about it”).
      • “thye” – “The”, “they”, “to ye”. Possibly “Thyestes” (Greek mythological king).
      • “hearalld” – “Herald”, “hear all the”.
      • “angles” – “Angels”, “angles”.
      • “kinclues” – “Concludes”, “kin clues”. Possibly “King of Clubs”, “inclue” (to make someone aware of).
  • Paragraph 56
    She studies his flushed, laboring features and decides that he’s not so much her mad hatter as her white knight, Lewis Carroll’s alter-ego, finally in longed-for literary congress with his little muse, having reached the correct square of the chessboard so that he can mate. It is at this point that she notices in wonderment that crumpled bits of paper are emerging from his ears on either side, as if pushed out by some explosive force within his cranium. As they are ejected, they unfold themselves like bread-and-butterflies and are borne dancing off into the sky on an asylum breeze. To Lucia’s surprise, as they swirl off away from her, she sees that on each crinkled sheet there is a letter of the alphabet inscribed as an illuminated capital. Even more mystifyingly, she recognises them as her own work, the gentle, patient letterings that her Daddy had encouraged her to make, back when both of them still believed that she might, somehow, put the sensuous energy of her lost dance career into the swoops and curlicues of decorative calligraphy. She watches in amazement as three or four color pages blow out, only to be replaced immediately by two more scraps of paper peeking from her suitor’s earholes as he nears his orgasm. As if embarrassed by this cerebral incontinence when he’s about to shoot his load, he wryly smiles and tries to make a jest of it, with his enunciation hampered by his heavy breathing.

    • Shigh stairdies hes fleushed, labiarin peatures undecedes dadee’s nutso murch haer maidhurtter asore whit-kniht, Lewdwish Girrull’s palter-pego, phoenally in langued-far literlmary comgreiff witties liddel mews, huffing reatched the corrept squiare ofther chasebard sir thathee ken maet.

      • “Shigh” – “She”, “sigh”, “high”, “shy”. Possibly “shigha” (Dongxiang “to pound; to approach”).
      • “stairdies” – “Studies”, “stair dies”, “sturdy”, “steadies”.
      • “hes” – “His”, “he is”.
      • “fleushed” – “Flushed”, “flesh”. Possibly “fleuchen” (German “to fly”).
      • “labiarin” – “Laboring”, “labia are in”, “labyrinth”.
      • “peatures” – “Features”, “pictures”, “peat ores”.
      • “undecedes” – “And decides”, “undeceased”, “undeceives”.
      • “dadee’s” – “That he’s”, “daddy’s”.
      • “nutso” – “Not so”, “nutso” (slang “crazy”).
      • “murch” – “Much”, “March”, “merch”(andise).
      • “haer” – “Her”, “Hare”.
      • “maidhurtter” – “Mad Hatter”, “maid hurter”.
      • “asore” – “As her”, “a sore”.
      • “whit-kniht” – “White Knight”, “whit” (small amount) “knit”.
        • The White Knight is another Alice character (from Looking-Glass), and is generally supposed to stand for Carroll himself.
      • “Lewdwish Girrull’s” – “Lewis Carroll‘s”, “lewd wish girls”.
      • “palter-pego” – “Alter-ego”, “paltry pego” (small penis).
      • “phoenally” – “Finally”, “phoenix ally”, “phoneme”.
      • “langued-far” – “Longed for”, languaged far”. Possibly “langued” (heraldry “having the tongue visible”).
      • “literlmary” – “Literary”, “little Mary” (that is, Mary Joyce), “literal marry”.
      • “comgreiff” – “Congress” (sexual union), “with grief”, suggest?? Possibly “gryphon” (another Alice character).
      • “witties” – “With his”, “wittiest”, “wit ties”.
      • “liddel” – “Little”, “Liddell” (Alice Liddell, basis for the literary Alice).
      • “mews” – “Muse”, “mews” (narrow passage; place to house falcons; cat sounds).
      • “huffing” – “Having”, “huffing”. Possible reference to the train puffing mentioned in Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There.
      • “reatched” – “Reached”, “retched”.
      • “corrept” – “Correct”, “corrupt”.
      • “squiare” – “Square”, “squire” (a beau).
      • “ofther” – “Of the”, “other”, “offer”, “author”, “oft her”.
      • “chasebard” – “Chessboard”, “chase bard”, “barred” (forbidden).
        • In the game of chess, a pawn which reaches the opposite side of the board can be promoted to any other type of piece (usually the powerful queen). In Looking-Glass, an important plot point is when the Alice character, initially a pawn, gets promoted to queen.
      • “sir” – “So”, “sir” (title of a knight).
      • “thathee” – “That he”, “Hatter”, “thee”, suggest??
      • “ken” – “Can”, “ken” (understanding).
      • “maet” – “Mate” (both in terms of sex and chess), “meat”, “meet” (appropriate).
    • Itty saddis’point dout she naltices in wondermlent dit crownpulled bets o’ pappyer err imarging formis eaurs en aetherside, asl eaf pubshdate by seme explusive farce wordhin his crannyhum.

      • “Itty” – “It is”, “itty” (very small), “titty”.
      • “saddis’point” – “At this point”, “saddest”, “sad disappoint”. Possibly “sadist”.
      • “dout” – “That”, “doubt”, “douse”.
      • “naltices” – “Notices”, “entices”, “Alice
      • “wondermlent” – “Wonderment”, “Wonderland“.
      • “dit” – “That”, “dit” (French “said”).
      • “crownpulled” – “Crumpled”, “crown” (regalia of royalty; forehead) “pulled”.
      • “bets” – “Bits”, “bets” (betting slips?).
      • “pappyer” – “Paper”, “her pappy”.
      • “err” – “Are”, “err”.
      • “imarging” – “Emerging”, “imaging”, “in margins”.
      • “formis” – “From his”, “forms”, “for miss”.
      • “eaurs” – “Ears”, “eau” (French “water”; Lincolnshire “brook”), “ewers”, “yours”.
      • “en” – “On”, “N”.
      • “aetherside” – “Either side”, “aethers” (heavens) “ide” (type of fish).
      • “asl” – “As”, “all”. Possibly “ASL” (American Sign Language; Age/Sex/Location).
      • “eaf” – “If”, “leaf”. Possibly “EAF” (Eid al-Fitr, Muslim holiday).
      • “pubshdate” – “Pushed out”, “pubs date”, “publication date”.
      • “seme” – “Some”, “semen”.
      • “explusive” – “Explosive”, “exclusive”, “X plus I’ve”.
      • “farce” – “Force”, “farce”.
      • “wordhin” – “Within”, “word hint”.
      • “crannyhum” – “Cranium”, “cranny” (crevice, metaphorically “vagina”; British dialect “giddy”) “hum”.
    • Asday ur earjected, deu unfurld thinselves luc breeadin’ blitterflaps end aire borne duncing iff unti th’ skyte ons an esylium preeze.

      • “Asday” – “As they”, “Asmoday“, “as day”.
      • “ur” – “Are”, “ur-” (original), “Ur“.
      • “earjected” – “Ejected”, “ear rejected”.
      • “deu” – “They”, “due”, “deus” (god). Possibly “deu” (Aragonese “ten”; Middle French “owed”?).
      • “unfurld” – “Unfold”, “Unfurled”.
      • “thinselves” – “Themselves”, “thin selves”.
      • “luc” – “Like”, “Lucia”, “luck”.
      • “breeadin’ blitterflaps” – “Bread-and-butterflies” (fanciful insects from Looking-Glass), “breeding bitter flaps”, “litter”.
      • “end” – “And”, “end”, “send”.
      • “aire borne” – “Are borne”, “airborne”.
      • “duncing” – “Dancing”, “dunces”. Possibly “dunking”, “Dunning”(-Kruger Effect).
      • “iff” – “Off”, “if”, “River Liffey“.
      • “unti th’” – “Into the”, “until the”, “un tithe”, “unto”, “cunt”.
      • “skyte” – “Sky”, “skate”, “skyte” (Norwegian “to shoot”).
      • “ons an” – “On an”, “un-sane”.
      • “esylium” – “Asylum”, “Elysium” (paradise), “cilium” (hair).
      • “preeze” – “Breeze”, “please” (multiple senses), “prize”.
    • To Loosear’s sirprise, usty swail af farway firma, she seezdit oneeach qrinkled sheet deris a lietter lofthe upperbit enscribt asun illoonimated capitall.

      • “Loosear’s” – “Lucia’s”, “loose ears”. Possibly “loo sears”.
      • “sirprise” – “Surprise”, “sir prys”, “prize”.
      • “usty” – “As they”, “musty”, “us tie”.
      • “swail” – “Swirl”, “swallow”, “swain” (rural lover). Possibly “swai” (type of fish).
      • “af” – “Off”, “laugh”. Possibly “af” (As Fuck).
      • “farway” – “Away”, “faraway”, “fairway”.
      • “firma” – “From her”, “firm” (solid; corporation), “(terra) firma” (solid ground), “firma” (Italian “signature”; Latin “tribute”).
      • “seezdit” – “Sees that”, “seized it”, “seedy”, “Seezunge” (German “sole (fish)”).
      • “oneeach” – “On each”, “one each”. Possibly “ongeacht” (Dutch “regardless of”), “neach” (Irish “person”).
      • “qrinkled” – “Wrinkled”, “crinkled”, queer ink led”.
      • “deris” – “There is”, “the rise”, “debris”, “derides”. Possibly “deris” (Latin “you would have been given”?).
      • “lietter” – “Letter”, “litter”.
      • “lofthe” – “Of the”, “lofty”, “loft he”, “love thee”.
      • “upperbit” – “Alphabet”, “upper bit”.
      • “enscribt” – “Inscribed”, “N script”.
      • “asun” – “As an”, “a sun”. Possibly “asun” (Aromanian “I call”; Basque “nettle”; Finnish “I live”)
      • “illoonimated” – “Illuminated”, “I, loony, mated”, “ill who animated”.
      • “capitall” – “Capital”, “cap it all”.
  • Page 898
    • Evernmore mystufflyingly she precognises dim ashur unwork, de gentel-patient let’erins doteher Daddo hed inkcouraged hereto mwake, beckwhon botherdom sterl byliffed dut sheermight, someshow, patter sinsuous innerjoy offher laostdance careern intinder sweops un gurlyQs o’ deporative kelligraphy.

      • “Evernmore” – “Even more”, “Nevermore” (as in Poe’s “The Raven“).
      • “mystufflyingly” – “Mystifyingly”, “my stuff lyingly”.
      • “precognises” – “Recognises”, “precognition”.
      • “dim” – “Them”, “dim”.
      • “ashur” – “As her”, “Ashur” (an Assyrian city/god; grandson of Noah).
      • “unwork” – “Own work”, “unwork”.
      • “de” – “The”, “D”.
      • “gentel-patient” – “Gentle, patient”, “mental patient”, “genteel”, “genital”.
      • “let’erins” – “Letterings”, “let her in”, “Erin” (poetic “Ireland”), “Eris” (Greek goddess of Discord).
      • “doteher” – “That her”, “daughter”, “dote (on) her”.
      • “hed” – “Had”, “head”, “he’d”.
      • “inkcouraged” – “Encouraged”, “ink courage”.
      • “hereto” – “Her to”, “hereto” (so far), “to here”.
      • “mwake” – “Make”, “wake”. Possibly “mwake” (Swahili “in their”?).
      • “beckwhon” – “Back when”, “beckon”, “beck won”.
      • “botherdom” – “Both of them”, “bother-dom”, “boredom”.
      • “sterl” – “Still”, “sterling”, “stern”, “monster”.
      • “byliffed” – “Believed”, “by (the river) Liffey“, “libed”, “lift”. Possibly “bailiff”.
      • “dut” – “That”, “dut” (wooly hat; Scottish Gaelic “for you”), “doubt”.
      • “sheermight” – “She might”, “sheer might”.
      • “someshow” – “Somehow”, “some show”.
      • “patter” – “Put her”, “patter”, “father”.
      • “sinsuous” – “Sensuous”, “sinuous”, “sins you owe us”.
      • “innerjoy” – “Energy”, “innerjoy”.
      • “offher” – “Of her”, “off her”, “offer”.
      • “laostdance” – “Lost dance”, “last dance”. Possibly “Laos” (Asian country).
      • “careern” – “Career”, “careen” (tilt violently).
      • “intinder” – “In tender”, “intender”, “tinder”.
      • “sweops” – “Swoops”, “sweeps”.
      • “un” – “And”, “un-“.
      • “gurlyQs” – “Curlicues”, “girly Qs”.
      • “deporative” – “Decorative”, “deport”, “deplorable”.
      • “kelligraphy” – “Calligraphy”, “Kells” (as in The Book of Kells, an ancient Irish bible which is beautifully illuminated).
    • Seeh swatches inner mazemeant astrey owtearcolour pidges blow owow, inly t’ be deplaced immederately by twumor scrips o’ puaper peoking pharma suither’s aurholes izzy nearsighs eargasm.

      • “Seeh” – “She”, “see”. Possibly “Seehund” (German “seal”).
      • “swatches” – “Watches”, “swatches”.
      • “inner mazemeant” – “In amazement”, “inner maze meant”.
      • “astrey” – “As three”, “as the”, “astray”, “astre” (French “star”).
      • “owtearcolour” – “Or four color”, “watercolor”, “ow tear”, “outer”.
        • four-color” is the technical term for the process by which most comic books were colored in the twentieth century.
      • “pidges” – “Pages”, “pigeons”, “pidgins”.
      • “blow owow” – “Blow out”, “blow away”, “ow ow ow!” (expression of pain), “bowowow” (dog noise).
      • “inly” – “Only”, “inwardly”. Possibly “inléite (Irish “legible”), “inlé” (Lapine “the moon”).
      • “deplaced” – “Replaced”, “displaced”.
      • “immederately” – “Immediately”, “immoderately”.
      • “twumor” – “Two more”, “tumor”. Possibly “twunt” (British slang “fool; objectionable person”).
      • “scrips” – “Scraps”, “scripts”, “scrips”.
      • “puaper” – “Paper”, “pauper”, “her pupa”.
      • “peoking” – “Peeking”, “poking”. Possibly “Peking“.
      • “pharma” – “From her”, “pharma”(ceutical).
      • “suither’s” – “Suitor’s”, “suit her”.
      • “aurholes” – “Ear-holes”, “aureoles” (halos).
      • “izzy” – “As he”, “dizzy”.
      • “nearsighs” – “Nears his”, “near sighs”.
      • “eargasm” – “Orgasm”, “ear-gasm”, “ear gams”.
    • Ossif enbareassed blythis sylebral discontinence whinnie’s abatter shuot hes luod, he smyly wriles en’tires t’ maske a jisst afit, wit’is henonsayation humpered byish heavny breedhing.

      • “Ossif” – “As if”, “ossify” (to become bone). Possibly “Offisa Pup” (comic strip character).
      • “enbareassed” – “Embarrassed”, “en- bare-assed”.
      • “blythis” – “By this”, “belie this”, “blythe”.
      • “sylebral” – “Cerebral”, suggest??
      • “discontinence” – “Incontinence”, “discontent”, “discontinuity”.
      • “whinnie’s” – “When he’s”, “whinnies”.
      • “abatter” – “About to”, “a batter”.
      • “shuot” – “Shoot”, “shout”.
      • “hes” – “His”, “he is”.
      • “luod” – “Load”, “loud”, “lewd”. Possibly “luod” (Cebuano “disgusting, yucky”).
      • “smyly wriles” – “Wryly smiles”, “smiley” (face) “writes” (possibly referring to Moore’s authorship of Watchmen), “riles” (angers), “writhes”.
      • “en’tires” – “And tries”, “entire”, “enters”, “and tires”.
      • “maske” – “Make”, “mask”.
      • “jisst” – “Jest”, “jissum” (slang “sperm”), “gist”.
      • “afit” – “Of it”, “a fit”.
      • “wit’is” – “With his”, “wit is”.
      • “henonsayation” – “Enunciation”, “pronunciation”, “hen on say”, “salvation”, suggest??
      • “humpered” – “Hampered”, “humped” (had sex with). Possible reference to Humbert Humbert (character in Lolita).
      • “byish” – “By his”, “boyish”.
      • “heavny” – “Heavy”, “heavenly”.
      • “breedhing” – “Breathing”, “breeding” (upbringing/social class; sexual activity).
  • Paragraph 57
    They pull … the letters … of the alphabet … out of my ears … and then … expect me … to write poetry,” he says with a self-deprecating shrug as he continues to impale her.

    • “Thye puall … the fletters … o’ dee orphebet … auto’my earrs … undeon … expoet me … t’ writhe poergetry,”

      • “Thye” – “They”, “thy” (archaic “yours”), “ye” (archaic “you”), possibly “see”, “sigh”, “thigh”. Possibly “Thyestes” (Greek mythological king).
      • “puall” – “Pull”, “pall” (cloak; to lose strength), “poo all”.
      • “fletters” – “Letters”, “fetters” (chains), “flutters”.
      • “dee” – “The”, “Dee” (John Dee).
      • “orphebet” – “Alphabet”, “Orpheus” (Greek mythological poet), “orphan bet”.
      • “auto’my” – “Out of my”, “automatically”, “autonomy”, “my auto”.
      • “earrs” – “Ears”, “errs”, “rears”, “earr” (Irish “end, tail”).
      • “undeon” – “And then”, “undone”.
      • “expoet me” – “Expect me”, “me, (an) ex-poet”, “expert”.
      • “writhe” – “Write”, “writhe”, “rite”, withe (a flexible twig or shoot, often used to bind).
      • “poergetry” – “Poetry”, “poor gentry”, “Poe” “get try”. Possibly “porgere” (Italian “to give”).
    • he saighs witter serf-dipprickitin’ sharg ushee cuntinuse t’ enpole her.

      • “saighs” – “Says”, “sighs”. Possibly “saighead” (Irish “arrow; Ogham punctuation mark”).
      • “witter” – “With a”, “witter” (to speak at lengty of trivia; obsolete “certain”), “writer”, “wittier”.
      • “serf-dipprickitin’” – “Self-deprecating”, “serf dip prick in it”.
      • “sharg” – “Shrug”, “shag” (slang “have sex with”). Possibly “shrag” (twig cut from a tree).
      • “ushee” – “As he”, “us heed”, “hussy”.
      • “cuntinuse” – “Continues”, “cunt in use”.
      • “t’ enpole” – “To impale”, “tentpole” (a very large phallic symbol), “ten (inch) pole”.
  • Paragraph 58
    Lucia knows exactly what he means. She also feels like she’s got all the language and the information trapped inside her where it can’t get out, except in mangled form, as if she were one of those cosmological black wholes they talked about. It is as though the inner soul, the very light of Lucia, has been extinguished, and the blessed mental working processes, as bright as any sun, have been collapsed into a new material, into a literature and form of speech so dense that not even the light of meaning can escape its dreadful gravity. Not even light itself can travel over that event horizon.

    • Lucia nows exertly wetty moans.

      • “nows” – “Knows’, “nows” (simultaneous experiences of multiple timelines), possibly “snow”.
      • “exertly” – “Exactly”, “exert lie”, “expertly”.
      • “wetty” – “What he”, “in a moist manner”, “I (am) wet”.
      • “moans” – “Means”, “moans” (in pleasure).
    • She allthtim faels lacke she-ghot ollder longage undie infiremotion troped insadder w’her int ken’t guttout excerpt in mangold feor’m, as ipsy werd wonderdose catsmileogical blanck whoels they teched apout.

      • “allthtim” – “Also”, “all the time”, suggest??
      • “faels” – “Feels”, “fails”, “fae” (fairy). Possibly “faeles” (Latin “cat”), “fælsian” (Old English “to cleanse”).
      • “lacke” – “Like”, “lack”, “lackey”.
      • “she-ghot” – “She’s got”, “she-goat”. Possibly “ghoti” (“fish”).
      • “ollder” – “All the”, “older”, “olldord” (Irish “musical instrument”), “told her”.
      • “longage” – “Language”, “long age”.
      • “undie” – “And the”, “undies” (underwear), “undine” (water spirit), “un-dying”.
      • “infiremotion” – “Information”, “fire in motion”.
        • See also Voice of the Fire, in which fire is a recurring symbol of language and imagination.
      • “troped” – “Trapped”, “trope-d”.
      • “insadder” – “Inside her”, “in sadder”.
      • “w’her” – “Where”, “with her”.
      • “int” – “It”, “integer”, “interior”.
      • “ken’t” – “Can’t”, “ken (know) it”. Possibly “Kant” (German philosopher), “Kent” (Superman‘s alter-ego).
      • “guttout” – “Get out”, “gut tout”, “gutter out”.
      • “excerpt” – “Except”, “excerpt”.
      • “mangold” – “Mangled”, “man gold”, “Mansoul”.
      • “feor’m” – “Form”, “for him”. Possibly “feorm” (obsolete “farm”), “feor” (Old English “far; perverse”), “feorh (Old English “soul; person”).
      • “ipsy” – “If she”, “tipsy”. Possibly “ipse dixit” (argument from authority).
      • “werd” – “Were”, “word”, “weird” (strange; destiny).
      • “wonderdose” – “One of those”, “wonder dose”.
      • “catsmileogical” – “Cosmological”, “cat smile” (reference to the Cheshire Cat from Alice) “logical”.
      • “blanck whoels” – “Black holes“, “blank wholes”, “blanc” (French “white”) “whores”.
      • “teched” – “Talked”, “touched” (including in the sense of “mentally disturbed”), “teached”, “tech-ed” (made technical?).
      • “apout” – “About”, “a pout” (an inward contraction of the lips).
    • It iswas thoughty innher sol, devoury lught a’ Licia, hers pen extinctwished, inder blissing mindtoil workin’ procresses, aspright as innay son, ev baen oclapsed sunto a numiterial, into a letterchewer in’ formerspeech so danse datenot evern daelight o’ meanhim cannyskip is’t dadfull graphity.

      • “iswas” – “Was as”, “is/was” (suggesting confusion of past and present). Possibly “iswa” (Catabwa “river”).
      • “thoughty” – “Though the”, “thought-y” (relating to thought). Possibly “doughty”v(strong).
      • “innher” – “Inner”, “in her”, “inn”.
      • “sol” – “Soul”, “Sol” (the sun). Possibly “innersole” (shoe cushion).
      • “devoury” – “The very”, “devouring”, “devout”.
      • “lught a’ Licia” – “Light of Lucia”, spoonerized. Possibly “lught” (Manx “folk; content”), “Licia” (Italian name).
      • “hers pen” – “Has been”, “pen (of) hers”, “her spend” (slang “orgasm”).
      • “extinctwished” – “Extinguished”, “extinct wished”.
      • “inder” – “And the”, “in the”, “under”, suggest??
      • “blissing” – “Blessed”, “missing”, “bliss(-mak)ing”.
      • “mindtoil” – “Mental”, “mind toil”.
      • “workin’ procresses” – “Working processes”, “Work in Progress“.
      • “aspright” – “As bright”, “asp right”, “a spright” (spirit, soul; fairy).
      • “innay” – “Any”, “in a”, “I (say) nay”.
      • “son” – “Sun”, “son”.
      • “ev” – “Have”, suggest??
      • “baen” – “Been”, “bane”.
      • “oclapsed” – “Collapsed”, “eclipsed”, “O, clasped (one)”.
      • “sunto” – “Into”, “sun to”.
      • “numiterial” – “New material”, “numinous”, “miter”.
      • “letterchewer” – “Literature”, “letter chewer”.
      • “in’ formerspeech” – “And form of speech”, “in former speech”, “informer”.
      • “danse” – “Dense”, “dance”, “danse” (as in danse macabre).
      • “datenot” – “That not”, “date not” (within a black hole, time ceases to exist).
      • “evern” – “Even”, “ever”.
      • “daelight” – “The light”, “delight”, “daylight”.
        • The combined appearance of “son”, “oclapsed sunto”, and “daelight” suggest that this is referring again to the myth of Daedalus and Icarus.
      • “meanhim” – “Meaning”, “mean, him”.
      • “cannyskip” – “Can escape”, “canny skip”.
      • “is’t” – “Its”, “is it”.
      • “dadfull” – “Dreadfull”, “dad full”, “fool”, “fell”.
      • “graphity” – “Gravity”, “graph it”, “graphite” (pencils).
    • Noteben literself contravail eover daddyvent hereye’son.

      • “Noteben” – “Not even”, “nota bene” (note well).
      • “literself” – “Light itself”, “Lucia herself”, “litter self”, “lighter self”, “literal”.
      • “contravail” – “Can travel”, “con travail”, “cunt ravel”.
      • “eover” – “Over”, “ever”.
      • “daddyvent” – “That event”, “daddy vent”.
      • “hereye’son” – “Horizon”, “here ye son”, “heresy on”.
        • The event horizon of a black hole is the boundary beyond which nothing can ever return.
  • Paragraph 59
    At this point her train of thought is interrupted by their mutual narrative climax. The unending stream of alphabetical ejaculations from his ears is now erupting in astonishing profusion like a string of colored scarfs pulled by a conjuror, away into the madhouse firmament. He calls out incoherently, a joyous howl of long-deferred fulfillment, as he noisily releases what appears to be a massive and prolific volume of his liquified genetic lineage, flooding Lucia’s major literary outlet. For her part, she has both of her long and shapely dancer’s legs thrust in the air, as taut as gypsy violin strings, pounding with her hands upon the ground beneath her naked arse in a flamenco flourish, making noises like an avant-garde improvisational jazz quintet tuning up, and flowing like a fountain or a river. Losing herself in this horizontal ballet is adorable, like being drunk on absinthe or whiskey. This is an alchemic wedding, wherein poetry and motion are fused into a new alloy, where the lyrical is sublimated in the farcical, where her Light and his Clarity can come together in a clamorous, ecstatic mingling of fluids, in an unimaginable new conception. Then the river in her bursts its banks and for a very short while she is without boundaries or limits like her inmate lover. Like him, she is everybody: she is he as I is she as they is me and we are all together. Lucia’s very identity is dribbling down her thighs until she is no more than her own orgasm. She is the walrus and he is her carpenter.

      • At des pant’er tryin o’ thwart is inherupted botheir mateual narrital gleemax.

        • “des pant’er” – “This point her”, “she pants”, “de-pants her”, “disappointer”.
        • “tryin o’ thwart” – “Train of thought”, “trying to thwart” (“thwart” possibly in sense of “across”).
        • “inherupted” – “Interrupted”, “up in her” “ted” (to spread hay for drying).
        • “botheir” – “By their”, “bother”, “both heir”.
        • “mateual” – “Mutual”, “mate you all”.
        • “narrital gleemax” – “Narrative climax”, “marital glee max”.
      • The onandong staerm of helpherbetical ejectulations form hes haers is neow eariptorn’ in asongasing pronfusion lucca strang o’ coolaired scoffs pelled by a kinjuror, awhigh intoday mudharse formoment.

        • “onandong” – “Unending”, “on and on”, “on a dong”.
        • “staerm” – “Stream”, “sperm”, “star me”, “stare”.
        • “helpherbetical” – “Alphabetical”, “help her be tickled”, “hell for bed I call”.
        • “ejectulations” – “Ejaculations” (both verbal and sexual), “eject ululations”.
        • “form” – “From”, “form”.
        • “hes” – “His”, “he is”.
        • “haers” – “Ears”, “hears”, “hares”, “hayers”.
        • “neow” – “Now”, “new”.
        • “eariptorn’” – “Erupting”, “ear I pee torn”.
        • “asongasing” – “Astonishing”, “a song I sing”, “as on gazing”, “orgasming”.
        • “pronfusion” – “Profusion”, “porn fusion”.
        • “lucca” – “Like a”, “Lucia”, “Lucca” (Italian city).
        • “strang” – “String”, “strange”, “strangle”.
        • “coolaired” – “Colored”, “cool aired”.
          • Possible reference to the Lovecraft short story “Cool Air“, which was pastiched in the first chapter of Moore’s Providence.
        • “scoffs” – “Scarfs”, “scoffs”.
        • “pelled” – “Pulled”, “spelled”, “pelled” (knocked about; Welsh “distant”).
        • “kinjuror” – “Conjurer”, “kin juror”.
        • “awhigh” – “Away”, “awe high”, “aw” (expression of disappointment), “a wight” (person).
        • “intoday” – “Into the”, “in today”.
        • “mudharse” – “Madhouse”, “mud h(er) arse”, “hearse”. Possibly “mudarse” (Spanish “to move”), “hares”, “Mad Hatter“, “mūdha” (Old Javanese “foolish”).
        • “formoment” – “Firmament”, “for (a) moment”.
      • He caws out incrowherently, a boyous vhowl o’ lung-defurred foolfilment, as he noisilly relooses whet upphers to be a messive ind pearlific vellume of his linguified geniitric liquage, flowdin’ Lucia’s maidjar sliterary outwet.

        • “caws” – “Calls”, “caws” (crow sounds), “cause”.
        • “incrowherently” – “Incoherently”, “in crow her and lie”.
        • “boyous” – “Joyous”, “boy-like”, “boisterous”, “boy o’ us”.
        • “vhowl” – “Howl”, “vowel”.
        • “lung-defurred” – “Long-deferred”, “lung de-fur-ed”.
        • “foolfilment” – “Fulfillment”, “fool fill meant”, “filament”.
        • “noisilly” – “Noisily”, “no, I (am) silly”.
        • “relooses” – “Releases”, “re- looses”.
        • “whet” – “What”, “wet”, “whet” (as in appetite?).
        • “upphers” – “Appears”, “up hers”, “on one’s uppers” (poor).
        • “messive” – “Massive”, “messy”.
        • “ind pearlific” – “And prolific”, “pearl of India” (suggesting the pearly-white color of semen).
        • “vellume” – “Volume”, “vellum”.
        • “linguified” – “Liquified”, “linguified” (made into language).
        • “geniitric” – “Genetic”, “genie trick”.
        • “liquage” – “Lineage”, “liquid age”.
        • “flowdin’” – “Flooding”, “flowed in”, “flow din”.
        • “maidjar” – “Major”, “maid jar”.
        • “sliterary” – “Literary”, “slit” (vagina) “her hairy”.
        • “outwet” – “Outlet”, “out wet”.
          • A “literary outlet” is a magazine or other venue which writing may be sold to.
      • Fur erpart, she highs bothov’er longin’ snakely dancerous ligs thurstin the irr, as tuat as typsy vitolin strincts, porndin wuth’er hinds apun de groind beneth’er nokid erse in a flamengurl fleurcrish, mayking newsays laek an affront-garb imprudisational jizz quimtit twonun up, end flowring licka fonteyne or nu reyver.

        • “Fur erpart” – “For her part”, “far apart” (her legs), “her part (has) fur”.
        • “highs” – “Has”, “(lifts) high”, “(emotional) highs”, “hies”.
        • “bothov’er” – “Both of her”, “both lover”, suggest??
        • “longin’” – “Long an”, “longing”.
        • “snakely” – “Shapely”, “snake-like”.
        • “dancerous” – “Dancer’s”, “dangerous”, “cancerous”.
        • “ligs” – “Legs”, “ligs” (British dialect “lays”). Possibly “ligs” (Danish “like”).
        • “thurstin” – “Thrust in”, “thirsting”.
        • “irr” – “Air”, “heir”, suggest??
        • “tuat” – “Taut”, “twat” (slang “vagina”), “too hot”, “tuath” (Irish “people”).
        • “typsy vitolin strincts” – “Gypsy violin strings”, “tipsy vital instincts”.
        • “porndin” – “Pounding”, “porn din”.
        • “wuth’er hinds” – “With her hands”, “Wuthering Heights“, “wuther” (to make a rushing sound; to shake vigorously) “hinds” (deer).
        • “apun” – “Upon”, “a pun”.
        • “de” – “The”, “D”.
        • “groind” – “Ground”, “groin”, “grind”.
        • “beneth’er” – “Beneath her”, “being ether”.
        • “nokid” – “Naked”, “no kid” (Lucia had no children).
        • “erse” – “Arse”, “else”, “erse” (Italian “having been erect”?).
        • “flamengurl” – “Flamenco”, “flaming earl”, “flow men girl”.
        • “fleurcrish” – “Flourish”, “fleur” (French “flower”) “crush” (both in the sense “crumple” and “infatuation”).
        • “mayking” – “Making”, “May king”
          • The King of the May is a mythological British/Irish ritual fertility figure. Voice of the Fire suggests some possible origins for such figures.
        • “newsays” – “Noises”, “new says” (original ideas).
        • “laek” – “Like”, “lake”, “leak”.
        • “affront-garb” – “Avant-garde”, “affront garb” (shocking clothing).
        • “imprudisational” – “Improvisational”, “impudent”, “imprudent”.
        • “jizz quimtit” – “Jazz quintet”, “jizz” (slang “semen”) “quim” (archaic slang “vagina”), “tit”.
        • “twonun” – “Tuning”, “two nun(s)”.
        • “end” – “And”, “end” (euphemism for “vagina”).
        • “flowring” – “Flowing”, “flowering”, “flow ring”.
        • “licka” – “Like a”, “lick her”, “licker”, “liquor”.
        • “fonteyne” – “Fountain”, “font”, “eyne” (obsolete “eyes”).
          • Possible reference to a Dr. Fontaine, who treated Lucia in 1933, but said there was nothing wrong with her.
          • Possible reference to Margot Fonteyn (1919-1991), English ballerina.
        • “nu” – “A”, “new”.
          • This is rather puzzling, as grammar would seem to demand “a”, but the word by itself seems to demand “new”, which doesn’t seem to make sense in context. Suggest??
        • “reyver” – “River”, “rey” (Spanish “king”) “ver” (Latin “Spring”; Spanish “to see”), suggest??
      • Lucing hersylph in thus herhizinterl bellet isadorable, luic boyin druncan ebbsenthe or ’nginski.

        • “Lucing” – “Losing”, “Lucia sing”.
        • “hersylph” – “Herself”, “her sylph”.
        • “thus” – “This”, “thus”, “hussy”.
        • “herhizinterl” – “Horizontal”, “her his internal”.
        • “bellet” – “Ballet”, “bell-end” (slang for “head of penis”), “bellet” (Latin “he/she would fight”?).
        • “isadorable” – “Is adorable”, “Isadora Duncan” (American dancer).
          • As mentioned in section 1, Lucia turned down a job at a dancing school run by Isadora’s sister Elizabeth.
        • “luic” – “Like”, “Lucia”.
        • “boyin” – “Being”, “boy in”.
        • “druncan” – “Drunk on”, “(Isadora) Duncan” (see above).
        • “ebbsenthe” – “Absinthe”, “ebb senses”, “sent he”.
        • “’nginski” – “Whiskey” (a rather strained reading, no doubt to fit in the Nijisky pun), “gin”, “Nijinsky”.
          • Vaslav Nijinsky (1889-1950) was an influential Russian ballet dancer and choreographer.
      • Th’isis an allchimeric waedin, whorein paetry and mashun are mused unto a neow alay, weir delirical is siblinmated in defiercycal, where’er Light undies Clareity kin khem togather in a clamorpuss, ecstotic mendeling o’ fluwits, inun animanageable noo kenception.

      • “Th’isis” – “This is”, “the Isis” (Egyptian goddess).
      • “allchimeric” – “Alchemic”, “all chimeric” (imaginary).
      • “waedin” – “Wedding”, “wading”, “wade in”, “wae” (Scotland “woe”) “din”.
        • The “alchemic wedding” is a ritual involving the union of opposites on both a physical and symbolic level.
      • “whorein” – “Wherein”, “whore in”, “whoring”.
      • “paetry and mashun” – “Poetry and motion”, “poetry in motion” (a common phrase describing skilled dancers and/or sexually attractive people), “pa-etry” (fatherhood?), “pa, he try”, “mash ‘un” (to sexually accost someone), “machine”.
      • “mused” – “Fused”, “muse” (Greek mythological spirit of inspiration), “mused” (considered).
      • “unto” – “Into”, “unto”, “undo”.
      • “neow” – “New”, “now”, “meow” (cat sound).
      • “alay” – “Alloy”, “a lay”, “allay”.
      • “weir” – “Where”, “weir” (adjustable dam; fish-catching fence)
      • “delirical” – “The lyrical”, “delirium”.
      • “siblinmated” – “Sublimated”, “sibling mated”.
      • “defiercycal” – “The farcical”, “the fire cycle”, “fierce”, “cycad” (type of plant).
      • “where’er” – “Where her”, “wherever”.
      • “Light” – “Light” (standing for Lucia).
      • “undies” – “And his”, “undies” (underwear).
      • “Clareity” – “Clarity” (standing for Clare).
      • “kin” – “Can”, “kin”.
      • “khem” – “Come” (both in the sense of “arrive” and “reach orgasm”), “Khem” (ancient Egyptian city). Possibly “khema” (Pali “safe”).
        • See also section 13, paragraph 238, for the use of “cem”.
      • “togather” – “Together”, “to gather”.
      • “clamorpuss” – “Glamorous”, “clamor” “puss” (slang “vagina”).
        • Possible reference to Glamourpuss, a comic by former Moore friend Dave Sim.
      • “ecstotic” – “Exotic”, “ecstatic”.
      • “mendeling” – “Mingling”, “Mendel” (Gregor Mendel (1822-1884) discovered the basic laws governing the inheritance of traits.
      • “fluwits” – “Fluids”, “flu wits”, “flue”.
      • “inun” – “In an”, “inundate”.
      • “animanageable” – “Unimaginable”, “anima” (female principle), “manageable”.
      • “noo” – “New”, “noos” (reason).
      • “kenception” – “Conception” (idea; fertilization), “ken” (understand)
    • T’ender riverina versts its vanks und forevery chortwheel she is widrought bindawrys err limints lie-cur in’mate l’of’her.

      • “T’ender” – “Then the”, “tender”, “to end her”
      • “riverina” – “River in her” (metaphorically, her orgasmic fluids), “riverine” (pertaining to rivers).
      • “versts” – “Bursts”, “verses”.
      • “vanks” – “Banks”, “vans” suggest?? Possibly “vanki “Finnish “prisoner”), “vanka” (Swedish “to stroll”).
      • “und” – “And”, “sound”, “under”.
      • “forevery” – “For a very”, “forever-y”, “for every”.
      • “chortwheel” – “Short while”, “chortle” (a word coined by Lewis Carroll), “cartwheel”.
      • “widrought” – “Without”, “why drought”, “wide”, “widow”.
      • “bindawrys” – “Boundaries”, “bind awry”, “arise”, “always”, “binderies” (places where books are bound).
      • “err” – “Or”, “err” (mistake).
      • “limints” – “Limits”, “liminal”.
      • “lie-cur” – “Like her”, “lie cur”.
      • “in’mate” – “Inmate”, “mate (who is) in (her)”. Possibly “material”?
      • “l’of’her” – “Lover”, “hell of her”, suggest??
    • Lay qhim, she is afreebody: shea is high as eye is shy as day is may ond’way are altargiddy.

      • “Lay qhim” – “Like him”, “lay” (have sex with) “quim” (slang “vagina”).
      • “afreebody” – “Everybody”, “a free body”.
      • “shea” – “She”, “sea”, “Shea” (Robert Shea (1933-1994), co-author of Illuminatus!, a hugely influential book for Moore.) Possibly “shea” (type of African tree).
      • “high” – “He”, “high” (intoxicated; drugged).
      • “eye” – “I”, “eye” (especially the Eye in the Pyramid, a symbol important in Illuminatus!).
      • “shy” – “She”, “shy”.
      • “day” – “They”, “day”.
      • “may” – “Me”, “May”, “may”.
      • “ond’way” – “And we”, “on the way”. Possibly “andouille” (cajun sausage).
      • “altargiddy” – “All together”, “altar giddy” (descriptive of Lucia’s feelings at this “marriage”, however brief and illusory).
        • These last words are, of course, a pastiche of the first line from The Beatles’ “I am the Walrus“: “I am he as you are he as you are me and we are all together”. Both sequences speak to the notion of universal oneness.
    • Lucia’s vaery idrenchidhe is drippling downyr theeghs intilled she misnomore din her oine orgushm.

    • “vaery” – “Very”, “vary”.
    • “idrenchidhe” – “Identity”, “I drenchéd he”, “id wrench id – hee!”
    • “drippling” – “Dripping”, “dribbling”, “stippling” (a technique Moore often uses in his drawings).
    • “downyr” – “Down her”, “downier”, “do winner”.
    • “theeghs” – “Thighs”, “seas”, “thee”, “trees”. Possibly “theaghlach” (Irish “immediate family”), “théigheadh” (Irish “might have gone”?).
    • “intilled” – “Until”, “tilled in” (metaphorically “fucked”).
    • “misnomore” – “Is no more”, “misnomer”.
    • “din” – “Than”, “din”. Possibly “Djinn”.
    • “oine” – “Own”, “nine”, “øine” (Danish “eyes”). Possibly “öinen” (Finnish “nocturnal”).
    • “orgushm” – “Orgasm”, “or gush ma’am”.
  • Page 899
    • She-is-thee wellrush and he-is-her corepentr’er.

      • “She-is-thee” – “She is the”, “she is thee” (calling back to the “Walrus” lyrics two sentences ago).
      • “wellrush” – “Walrus”, “well rush” (another allusion to her flowing orgasmic juices).
        • This is, of course, another near-quote from “I am the Walrus”.
      • “he-is-her” – “He is her” (another “Walrus” calback).
      • “corepentr’er” – “Carpenter”, “co-repenter”, “core pen try-er”, “painter”.
        • The Walrus and the Carpenter” is a poem by Lewis Carroll that appears in Looking-Glass. It is also apparently John Lennon’s source for the Walrus imagery in his song.
  • Paragraph 60
    As he sinks breathlessly atop her in the wake of his exertions, he stares lovingly down into Lucia’s eyes and utters his heartfelt indearments. There are no more letters coming from his ears, she notices.

    • As he sanks dreathlessly itup her inday Wake o’ his exhertions, he stars livingly drownin’ t’ Lucia’sighs an’utters his hatfelt indearmuffs.

      • “sanks” – “Sinks”, “sank” (confusion of tenses to go with overlapping timelines). Possibly “Sanskrit”?
      • “dreathlessly” – “Breathlessly”, “deathless”, “dream less lie”.
      • “itup” – “Atop”, “it up”, “I tup” (have sex with).
      • “inday” – “In the”, “in day” (day in, day out?). Possibly “India”.
      • “Wake” – “Wake”, (Finnegans) “Wake“.
      • “exhertions” – “Exertions”, “ex” ( out from) “her shins” (referring to his penis emerging).
      • “stars” – “Stares”, “stars”.
      • “livingly” – “Lovingly”, “living lie”.
      • “drownin’ t'” – “Down into”, “drowning”.
      • “Lucia’sighs” – “Lucia’s eyes”, “Lucia sighs”.
      • “an’utters” – “And utters”, “a nutter’s”, “another’s”.
      • “hatfelt” – “Heartfelt”, “felt hat” (referring to his wide-awake hat (see paragraph 34), and to the Mad Hatter from Alice).
      • “indearmuffs” – “Endearments”, “in the earmuffs”, “in dear” “muff” (slang “vulva”).
    • There err numir littres cummin’ farm er’s eers, she nowtosees.

      • “err” – “Are”, “err”.
      • “numir” – “No more”, “numinous”.
      • “littres” – “Letters”, “litters” (garbage; offspring), “belles-lettres” (literature).
      • “cummin’” – “Coming”, “cumming” (orgasming).
      • “farm” – “From”, “farm”.
      • “er’s” – “His”, “her ass”, “hers”, “arse”.
      • “eers” – “Ears”, “seer”.
      • “nowtosees” – “Notices”, “now to see is”.
  • Paragraph 61
    “Oh, Mary! Mary, how I love thee! When I was confined, they told me we were never wed and that I was a declared lunatic. They told me you were dead!”

    • “Oh, Myray! Myray, how I liff ‘ee!

      • “Myray” – “Mary”, “my ray” (of sunlight).
      • “liff ‘ee” – “Love thee”, “River Liffey“.
    • When I wish cantfined, die tolld mais oui were nefar weed and thot I wors a claer deludatic.

      • “wish” – “Was”, “wish”.
      • “cantfined” – “Confined, “can’t find”, “cant” (jargon; singsong; angle; overthrowing movement) “fined”.
      • “die” – “They”, “die” (cease living; randomizer for games).
      • “tolld” – “Told”, “tolled” (reference to John Donne: “…never send to know for whom the bell tolls; it tolls for thee.”).
      • “mais oui” – “Me we”, “mais oui” (French “of course”).
      • “nefar” – “Never”, “nefarious”, “not far”.
      • “weed” – “Wed”, “weed”, “wooed”.
      • “thot” – “That”, “thought”, “too hot”.
      • “wors” – “Was”, “worse”, “wars”.
      • “claer deludatic” – “Declared lunatic”, “Clair de Lune” (French “light of the moon”), “Clare” “deluded tic”.
    • Die tolld me-you we’re dead!”

      • “Die” – See previous sentence.
      • “tolld” – See previous sentence.
      • “me-you” – “Me you”, “me-you” (seen as a single unit, as in the end of paragraph 59).
      • “we’re” – “Were”, “we are”.

Forward to Section 4 – Chaplin films and dark days