RtB section 2 – Illusionary Giorgio Joyce

Up to “Round the Bend”.

Back to Section 1 – Breakfast.

In which Lucia recalls her childhood relationships with her family, especially her  incestuous relationship with her brother Giorgio, whom she seems to see an image of.

Significant characters and themes in this section:

  • James Joyce (1882-1941) was an extremely famous writer and Lucia Joyce’s father.
    • The Joyce family, 1924
      The Joyce family, 1924

      The River Liffey is a river in Ireland which, in Finnegans Wake, is referred to many times, and is metaphorically linked to the female protagonist (who is, in some senses, Lucia).

  • Nora Barnacle (1884-1951) was James Joyce’s wife and Lucia Joyce’s mother.
  • Giorgio Joyce (1905-1976) was the son of James and Nora, and Lucia’s older brother. Moore suggests that he may not have been James’ son, but the result of an affair between Nora and a lover. Moore also suggests that an incestuous affair took place between Giorgio and Lucia. This incestuous relationship is a theory of Moore’s, not attested to by the historical record, but not contradicted by it, either.
  • World mythology, especially Greek, Roman, Norse, and Egyptian.
  • Arthurian legend, especially Tristan and Iseult.
  • The Pilgrim’s Progress, by John Bunyan.
  • Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass by Lewis Carroll, classic children’s books whose themes include childhood, madness, wordplay, and doubled characters.

 

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  • Paragraph 17
    Down at the bottom of the slope the ground in once more flat and level for some distance. Lucia believes this area of the walled woods is abutted by a golf course, for the grass around her slippered feet is cut short as a military hairstyle. Nibbling her fingernail she wanders onwards until she arrives at an indentation in the green, a shallow dip descending to a wide unruffled pond, almost completely circular and shaped as if it were a joyous wedding ring. Delicately-colored petals and leaves are floating on the surface like a fleet of tiny galleons, each one exquisitely reflected in the diamond mirror of the water. Hesitantly, she makes her way down the gentle gradient to the water’s edge.

    • Dewnacht the bossom av the slorpe the groind is wincemare flut end liffel farsome destince.

      • “Dewnacht” – “Down at”, “dew” “nacht” (German “night”), “do not”.
      • “bossom” – “Bottom”, “blossom”.
      • “av” – “Of”, “avid”, “aver”.
      • “slorpe” – “Slope”, “slurp” (eat or drink with loud sucking noise).
      • “groind” – “Ground”, “groin” “groined” (vaulted architecture).
      • “wincemare” – “Once more”, “wince” “mare”.
      • “flut” – “Flat”, “flute”, “flutter”.
      • “end” – “And”, “end”.
      • “liffel” – “Level”, “River Liffey“.
      • “farsome” – “For some”, “fearsome”.
      • “destince” – “Distance”, “destiny”.
    • Lucia beleaves dis iraea afder waldwords ars aboutted tae a goltcurse, fur ther gress arand her slappered faet escut shart us a malletory herrsteel.

      • “beleaves” – “Believes”, “be leaves”.
      • “dis iraea” – “This area”, “Dies Irae” (“Day of Wrath”, 13th century Latin hymn).
      • “afder” – “Of the”, “after”.
      • “waldwords” – “Walled woods”, “wald” (German “forest”) “words”.
      • “ars” – “Is”, “arse”.
      • “aboutted” – “Abutted” (next to), “about”.
      • “tae” – “To”, “tae” (Irish “tea”).
      • “goltcurse” – “Golf course”, “gold curse” (see notes on Nibelung, next sentence), “got”.
      • “fur” – “For”, “fur”.
      • “ther gress” – “The grass”, “egress” (exit), “egrets” (water birds).
      • “arand” – “Around”, “randy” (lustful), “random”.
      • “slappered” – “Slippered”, “slap her head”.
      • “faet” – “Feet”, “fate”, “fae” (fairies).
      • “escut” – “Is cut”, “escutcheon” (heraldic shield; medical “the distribution of pubic hair”), possibly “ascot” (a type of necktie).
      • “shart” – “Short”, “sharp”, “hart” (stag).
      • “us” – “As”, “us”.
      • “malletory” – “Military”, “mallet” (hammer) “Tory” (British conservative political party). Possibly “Malory” (Thomas, author of Le Morte d’Arthur).
      • “herrsteel” – “Hairstyle”, “herr” (German “mister”), “steel”.
      • Although golf course normally have close-cropped grass, it is unclear why the presence of such a course on the other side of a wall should lead to short grass here.
      • There are several golf courses in Northampton. At this time, none of them appear to be next to the grounds of Saint Andrews.
    • Nibbelung her finngonill she wagnders unwoods intel sea arriversit on inDantetion unther greend, a shwallow dup dissending tua wade onriffled pend, urmosst cumfretely sychular ound shlaped ossif atvar a joyan’ce woddeng rong.

      • “Nibbelung” – “Nibbling”, “Nibelung”.
        • Der Ring des Nibelungen (The Ring of the Nibelungs) is an epic 4-part opera by German composer Richard Wagner, based on Norse saga and myth. It features cursed gold (see previous sentence) as a major plot device.
      • “finngonill” – “Fingernail”, “Finn go nill” (Finnegan dies, will he, nill he).
      • “wagnders” – “Wanders”, “Wagner” (see note to Nibbelung, above).
      • “unwoods” – “Onwards”, “out of the woods”.
      • “intel” – “Until”, “intel” (information about one’s enemies).
      • “sea” – “She”, “sea”.
      • “arriversit” – “Arrives at”, “a river sit” (a pond could be said to be where a river sits).
      • “on” – “An”, “on”.
      • “inDantetion” – “Indentation”, “Dante” (14th century poet, author of The Divine Comedy, most famous for its depiction of Hell).
      • “unther” – “In the”, “under”. Possibly “Gunther”?
      • “greend” – “Ground”, “green”.
      • “shwallow dup” – “Shallow dip”, “swallowed up”.
      • “dissending” – “Descending”, “dissenting”.
      • “tua” – “To a”, “tua” (Irish “axe”; Italian “your”).
      • “wide” – “Wide”, “wade”.
      • “onriffled” – “Unruffled” (still), “on” “riffle” (to flip through quickly; a rocky or shallow part of a stream with rough water).
      • “pend” – “Pond”, “pend” (to depend; archaic “to confine”; to postpone).
      • “urmosst” – “Almost”, “ur-” (primal) “moss”.
      • “cumfretely” – “Completely”, “cum” (orgasm) “frère” (French “brother”).
      • “sychular” – “Circular”, “secular”, “sych” (Welsh “dry”), “psych”.
      • “ound” – “And”, “round”, “Oundle” (town in Northamptonshire).
      • “shlaped” – “Shaped”, “schlepped” (carried), suggest??
      • “ossif” – “As if”, “ossify” (become bone; become stagnant).
      • “atvar” – “It were”, “at war”, “avatar”.
      • “joyan’ce” – “Joyous”, “joyance” (archaic “enjoyment”), “Joyce”, “Joycean”.
      • “woddeng” – “Wedding”, “wooden”, “Woden” (Odin), “wode” (archaic “insane”).
      • “rong” – “Ring”, “wrong”, “rung”.
    • Deliciately-kellered pattles undid liffs er flatrin onder surfish luke a flit of timey girlleons, ich von exquicitly perflected oin daddiamonde merrer off d’waughter.

      • “Deliciately-kellered” – “Delicately-colored”, “delicious”, “de” (Latin “of”) “Lucia”, “keller” (German “basement”).
      • “pattles” – “Petals”, “paddles”.
      • “undid” – “And”, “undid”. Possibly “undine”.
      • “liffs” – “Leaves”, “River Liffey“.
      • “er” – “Are”, “er” (expression of uncertainty).
      • “flatrin” – “Floating”, “flattering”, possibly “flatiron”.
      • “onder” – “On the”, “under”, “yonder”.
      • “surfish” – “Surface”, “sur-” (above) “fish”.
      • “luke” – “Like”, “Luke” (book of the Bible; alternate form of Lucia).
      • “flit” – “Fleet”, “flit” (to move about quickly; slang “homosexual”).
      • “timey” – “Tiny”, “timely”, “old-timey”.
      • “girlleons” – “Galleons”, “girl lions”.
      • “ich” – “Each”, “ich” (archaic “I”; German “I”).
      • “von” – “One”, “von” (German “of”), “won”.
      • “exquicitly” – “Exquisitely”, “ex- quick”.
      • “perflected” – “Reflected”, “perfected”.
      • “oin” – “In”, “coin”.
      • “daddiamonde” – “The diamond”, “daddy, a world”.
      • “merrer” – “Mirror”, “mere” (only; pond), “merry”, “error”.
      • “off” – “Of”, “off”.
      • “d’waughter” – “The water”, “daughter”.
    • Hcetanzly, she wakes her may doone the gential glardient tother wetter’sage.

      • “Hcetanzly” – “Hesitantly”, “HCE” (Finnegans Wake character) “tansy” (herb, mentioned in Ulysses as an aphrodisiac).
      • “wakes her may” – “Makes her way”, “wake” (Finnegans), “May” (spring month).
      • “doone” – “Down”, “Doone” (Lorna Doone, 1869 novel by Richard Doddridge Blackmore), “doon” (Middle English “done”).
      • “gential” – “Gentle”, “genital”, “gentian” (type of herb), “gentile” (non-Jewish).
      • “glardient” – “Gradient” (slope), “glad”, “glade” (open spot in a wood), “radiant”.
      • “tother” – “To the”, “t’other” (the other).
      • “wetter’sage” – “Water’s egde”, “wetter” “sage” (type of herb; wise person).
  • Paragraph 18
    Here Lucia can see what looks to be the very likeness of her older brother Giorgio, composed of twigs and leaves and all the negative spaces in between the light of them. Part of her realizes that this is an optical illusion, brought about by accidental incidences of light to form a visual coincidence, and yet a part of her can see him as though he were really crouching in the rushes, not five feet away from her. Self-involved as always, the young egghead is posed after the style of a Surrealist genius such as Salvador Dali. His head bowed, he stares down into the reflective depths. His pilgrimage has led him to the slough of this pond where he squats now, mesmerized by his own likeness, eyes fixed upon the large and finely-chiseled cranium that gazes backwards at him from the mirrored surface, whence he cannot look away, trapped there by his vanity and fairness. Lucia stands completely still, fearful that if she moves the mirage will be shattered into fragments, of necessity. She hears the birds sing from the branches and is almost fluent in their language, as if she’d been bathing in the blood of dragons, and could understand what every bird meant, apparently.

    • Halucia ken scri wat larks tubbe the fery licheness uffer alder bordher Gorgeou, compised uffe twiks un liffs intalder negetific spierces unbetween daylite ofirm.

      • “Halucia” – “Here Lucia”, “hallucinate”.
      • “ken” – “Can”, “ken” (know).
      • “scri” – “See”, “scry” (see via magic).
      • “wat” – “What”, “wat” (Middle English “person”; Middle English “rabbit”).
      • “larks” – “Looks”, “lark” (type of bird; fun).
      • “tubbe” – “To be”, “tub”, “tube”, “tubby” (fat).
      • “fery” – “Very”, “fiery”, “faerie” (alternate spelling of fairy), possibly “ferry”.
      • “licheness” – “Likeness”, “lichen”.
      • “uffer” – “Of her”, “duffer” (incompetent person).
      • “alder” – “Older”, “alder” (type of tree).
      • “bordher” – “Brother”, “border”, “bord” (archaic “board”) “her”.
      • “Gorgeou” – “Giorgio”, “gorgeous”.
      • “compised” – “Composed”, “comprised”, possibly “compromised”, “com” (with) “piss head”.
      • “uffe” – “Of”, “duffer” (see above).
      • “twiks” – “Twigs”, “twink” (twinkle; chaffinch; young gay man).
      • “un” – “And”, “un-” (prefix of negation), “un” (French “one”).
      • “liffs” – “Leaves”, “River Liffey“.
      • “intalder” – “And all the”, “into alder”.
      • “negetific spierces” – “Negative spaces”, “not getting fiction”?, “spices”, “spires”, “pierces”.
      • “unbetween” – “In between”, “not between”.
      • “daylite” – “The light”, “daylight”, “delight”.
      • “ofirm” – “Of them”, “O firm!”.
    • Pert of her realeyesays thort thus as an Alchembold olusion, broight abite by eccedintal incandingensces of lighn to firm a virsual coercedance, undyet aport aver kin seahym alstho hewer reilly crotching inther rashes, nort feev fiyt awar form er.

      • “Pert” – “Part”, “pert” (attractive; cheeky).
      • “realeyesays” – “Realizes”, “real eye says”.
      • “thort” – “That”, “thought”, possibly “short”, “hurt”.
      • “thus” – “This”, “thus”.
      • “as” – “Is”, “as”.

        Arcimboldo: "Le Vertumne - Rudolf II"
        Arcimboldo: “Le Vertumne – Rudolf II”
      • “Alchembold olusion” – “Optical illusion”, “Alchemical” “bold”, “Arcimboldo” (Giuseppe (1526-1593), an Italian painter best known for creating portraits made entirely of other objects) “lesion” (wounded area).
      • “broight” – “Brought”, “bright”.
      • “abite” – “About”, “a bite”.
      • “eccedintal” – “Accidental”, “eccedentesiast” (one who fakes a smile), possibly “exceeding”.
      • “incandingensces” – “Incidences” (angles), “incandescence”, “incanting” (chanting), possibly “candy”, “genius” (as in genius loci).
      • “lighn” – “Light”, “line”.
      • “firm” – “Form”, “firm”.
      • “virsual” – “Visual”, “virtual”.
      • “coercedance” – “Coincidence”, “coerce dance”.
      • “undyet” – “And yet”, “undying”, “undies” (informal “underwear”), “nyet” (Russian “no”), “undine” (water spirit).
      • “aport” – “A part”, “a-port” (nautical “to the left”), “apart”.
      • “aver” – “Of her”, “aver” (to state).
      • “kin” – “Can”, “kin” (relative).
      • “seahym” – “See him”, “sea hymn”.
      • “alstho” – “As though”, “also”.
      • “hewer” – “He were”, “hewer” (one who chops).
      • “reilly” – “Really”, “O’Reilly” (Irish name which appears in Finnegans Wake).
      • “crotching” – “Crouching”, “crotch”.
      • “inther” – “In the”, “into her”.
      • “rashes” – “Rushes” (tall weeds; acts hastily), “rash”.
      • “nort” – “Not”, “north”.
      • “feev” – “Five”, “fee”, “fever”.
      • “fiyt” – “Feet”, “fit”, “fight”.
      • “awar” – “Away”, “a war”.
      • “form” – “From”, “form”.
      • “er” – “Her”, “er” (expression of uncertainty).
    • Soulfin-verved hiz eelways, the yearng eggoheed es poused aftor the steale ova slureelisd genuis serchez selfadore daili.

      • “Soulfin-verved” – “Self-involved”, “soul” “fin” “verve” (vigor).
      • “hiz” – “As”, “his”.
      • “eelways” – “Always”, “eel ways” (that is, rivers).
      • “yearng” – “Young”, “yearn”.
      • “eggoheed” – “Egghead” (intellectual), “ego heed”.
      • “es” – “Is”, “es” (Spanish “is”).
      • “poused” – “Posed”, “paused”, “pouse” (Haitian Creole “grow (a plant)”).
      • “aftor” – “After”, “aft or”, “actor”.
      • “steale” – “Style”, “steal”, “stele” (botanical: “core of the stem and root”; archaeological “gravestone”).
      • “ova” – “Of a”, “ova” (eggs).
      • “slureelisd” – “Surrealist”, “slur” “eel” “id”.
      • “genuis” – “Genius”, “genuflect” (kneel), “sui generis” (unique).
      • “serchez” – “Such as”, “searches”. Possibly “Sanchez”?
      • “selfadore daili” – “Salvador Dalí“, “self adore daily”.
    • Hes hid bawed, he stires drowninter the revlerctif dapths.

      • “he’s” -“His”, “he’s”.
      • “hid” – “Head”, “hid”.
      • “bawed” – “Bowed”, “bawled” (cried), “baw” (Scots “ball, testicle”; Welsh “dirt, shit”).
      • “stires” – “Stares”, “stirs”.
      • “drowninter” – “Down into”, “drown inter”.
      • “revlerctif” – “Reflective”, “reveler” (partier) “caitiff” (archaic “contemptible person), suggest??
      • “dapths” – “Depths”, “dap” (a fishing technique). Possibly “Daphne”.
    • Has pulchrimage huss ladim tye the slow o’ dis pond wheary squarts neow, mimireysed be heson liffleyness, I’s vixed apain the lurge ent fainly-chessult carnium thut glaces beckwise ett ham fom the mimmored sourface, whonce he carenot lack a way, traipped thoer boye hison Vinitee un Fayrniss.

      • “Has” – “His”, “has”.
      • “pulchrimage” – “Pilgrimage”, “pulchritude” (beauty) “image”, “mage”.
      • “huss” – “Has”, “hussy” (impudent or immoral woman). Possibly “hussar” (light cavalry soldier).
      • “ladim” – “Led him”, “laden” (loaded), possibly “ladies’ man”.
      • “tye” – “To”, “yet”, “tie”, “to ye”.
      • “slow o’ dis pond” – “slough (swamp) of this pond”, “Slough of Despond” (“Swamp of Despair”, location in Pilgrim’s Progress, where sinners sink from the weight of their guilt), “slow”, “Dis” (city in Hell).
      • “wheary” – “Where he”, “weary”.
      • “squarts” – “Squats”, “quarts”, possibly “squirts”.
      • “neow” – “Now”, “meow” (cat noise).
      • “mimireysed” – “Mesmerized”, “Mimir” (Norse mythological figure of wisdom and prophecy, associated with a well where Odin[s sacrificed eye is hidden) “eye said”.
      • “be” – “By”, “be”.
      • “heson” – “His own”, “he (is the) son”.
      • “liffleyness” – “Likeness”, “River Liffey“, possibly “River Ness” (in Scotland).
      • “I’s” – “Is”, “I am”, “mine”.
      • “vixed” – “Fixed”, “vexed” (bothered). Possibly “vixen” (female fox; quarrelsome woman).
      • “apain” – “Upon”, “a pain”.
      • “lurge” – “Large”, “lurgey” (a fictitious disease), “Lurg” (barony in Northern Ireland).
      • “ent” – “And”, “Ent” (tree spirit).
      • “fainly-chessult” – “Finely-chiseled”, “fain” (archaic “pleased”) “chess” “ult-” (final), possibly “chestnut”.
      • “carnium” – “Cranium” (skull, head), “carny” (person who works with a traveling carnival), carnal (lustful, worldly).
      • “thut” – “That”, “hut”, “thought”.
      • “glaces” – “Gazes”, “glace” (French “mirror; glass; ice”), “glances”.
      • “beckwise” – “Backwards”, “in a beckoning manner”.
      • “ett” – “At”, “ett” (suggest??).
      • “ham” – “Him”, “ham”, “Ham” (son of Noah; component of various place names).
      • “fom” – “From”, “foam” (suggestive of the birth of Aphrodite).
      • “mimmored” – “Mirrored”, “Mimir” (see above), “mimmer” (archaic “actor”; “to dream”).
      • “sourface” – “Surface”, “sour face”.
      • “whonce” – “Whence”, “once”, possibly “nonce” (the present; invented word; British slang “sex offender”; “stupid or worthless person”).
      • “carenot” – “Cannot”, “care not”.
      • “lack a way” – “Look away”, “lack a way”.
      • “traipped” – “Trapped”, “traipse” (walk), “tripped”.
      • “thoer” – “There”, “the whore”, suggest??
      • “boye” – “By”, “boy”, “boye”, suggest??
      • “hison” – “His own”, “his on”. Possibly “bison”.
      • “Vinitee un Fayrniss” – “Vanity and fairness”, “Vanity Fair” (location in Pilgrim’s Progress), “vine” “tee” “un-” “fay” “earnest”.
        • The image of Giorgio mesmerized by his own reflection is an allusion to the myth of Narcissus, which will be more fully developed in paragraphs 25-29.
    • Lucia staynds compliatley stall, fafir thetiff shimmoves the myrage well beshittered enti frigments, awf narcissity.

      • “staynds” – “Stands”, “stains”, “stays”.
      • “compliatley” – “Completely”, “compliantly” (Alan Moore has some negative personal associations with the term “compliant“).
      • “stall” – “Still”, “stall” (sales stand; animal compartment; to stop, to delay; British “ground floor seats in a theater”).
      • “fafir” – “For fear”, “Fafnir” (dragon associated with Wagner’s Ring, see notes to paragraph 17), “fa” (musical note) “fir” (type of tree).
      • “thetiff” – “That if”, “the tiff” (quarrel).
      • “shimmoves” – “She moves”, “shimmer”.
      • “myrage” – “Mirage”, “my rage”.
      • “well” – “Will”, “well” (suggesting Mimir’s Well, see above).
      • “beshittered” – “Be shattered”, “beshit” (to foul oneself).
      • “enti” – “Into”, “entity”.
      • “frigments” – “Fragments”, “frig” (fuck; masturbate; refrigerator). Possibly “Frigg” (Odin’s wife).
      • “awf” – “Of”, “awful”.
      • “narcissity” – “Necessity”, “Narcissus” (see above).
    • Schaharz the bards sieng friem der bronches undes alchmoist flewent in th’air longuish, asurf shaed byrn bithing anthe songre o’ drugins, encoude hinderstant wit aviry verdi mont, operantly.

      • “Schaharz” – She hears”, “Schehrazade” (storyteller from The Arabian Nights).
      • “bards” – “Birds”, “bards” (poets, especially Irish).
      • “sieng” – “Singing”, “sighing”.
      • “friem” – “From”, “friem” (Latin “I would break”), “fry them”.
      • “der” – “The”, “der” (German “the”).
      • “bronches” – “Branches”, “bronchitis” (Giogio had an attack of bronchitis in 1906).
      • “undes” – “And is”, “undies”, “undine”
      • “alchmoist” – “Almost”, “alchemist”, “moist”.
      • “flewent” – “Fluent”, “flew went”.
      • “th’air” – “Their”, “the air”.
      • “longuish” – “Language”, “languish”, “longing”.
      • “asurf” – “As if”, “a surf”.
      • “shaed” – “She’d”, “shade”.
      • “bym” – “Been”, “by him”, suggest??
      • “bithing” – “Bathing”, “biting”, “birthing”.
      • “anthe” – “In the”, “anthem”, “anthus” (Latin “small bird”).
      • “songre” – “Blood” (Spanish “sangre”), “song”.
      • “drugins” – “Dragons”, “drug in”.
      • “encoude” -“and could”, “encode”, “en coude” (French “in the elbow”).
      • “hinderstant” – “Understand”, “hinder stint”.
      • “wit” – “What”, “wit” (knowledge; sound a bird makes).
      • “aviry” – “Every”, “aviary” (large birdcage).
      • “verdi mont” – “Birdie meant”, “Verdi” (Giuseppe (1813-1901), Italian opera composer), “Monteverdi” (Claudio (1567-1643), Italian opera composer who composed an opera about Ulysses, and another about Orpheus (who could talk to birds)), possibly “verdant mountain”.
        • The Norse hero Sigurd (source for Siegfried in Wagner’s Ring) bathes in the blood of a dragon, gaining invulnerability, then drinks some of the blood, which gives him the ability to understand birds.
      • “operantly” – “Apparently”, “opera”, “operant” (that operates to produce an effect; psychology: a method of conditioning).
  • Paragraph 19
    Poor Giorgio, petrified by his conceit. For all he had delved clumsily inside the rabbit-hole upon occasions, he had never managed to pass through and get beyond this looking-glass the way Lucia had. She always was the best at everything while he had very little talent, to be fair. You’d never think, to look at him, that Giorgio might seriously be his father’s son, as was so evident with Lucia herself. What had gone on between them wouldn’t sit so heavily upon her conscience, like a lead sarcophagus, if she was not fully his sister. Of course, the doctors would just say she was in full denial, or suffering from senile dementia.

    • Puer Geodge, pitryfide bouyis consciet.

      • “Puer” – “Poor”, “puer” (Latin “boy”).
      • “Geodge” – “Giorgio” (George), “geode” (hollow crystal formation inside a rock).
      • “pitryfide” – “Petrified”, “pity” “fide” (Latin “faithful”).
      • “bouyis” – “By his”, “buoy is”, “boyish”.
      • “consciet” – “Conceit” (self-pride; clever idea; archaic “thought”), “conscience”.
    • Ferall ehad delfed clamsilly inscite the rubbithole upawn errcasions, hihad nefare manitched to pastrue angit behond t’his loiking-glaz the whay Lucia hard.

      • “Ferall” – “For all”, “feral” (wild, bestial).
      • “ehad” – “He had”, “head”.
      • “delfed” – “Delved” (explored), “delf” (mine, quarry, pit, ditch). Possibly “Delft” (type of pottery).
      • “clamsilly” – “Clumsily”, “clam” (sometimes a euphemism for vagina) “silly”.
      • “inscite” – “Inside”, “incite” (encourage), inscite (Latin “Idiot!”).
      • “rubbithole” – “Rabbit-hole”, “rub it hole”.
        • This refers both literally to Lucia’s vagina, and metaphorically to “going down the rabbit hole” (like Alice in Wonderland) to a realm of madness.
      • “upawn” – “Upon”, “you pawn”.
        • In the game of chess, pawns have the least power (although, under rare circumstances, they may be promoted to powerful queens). In the second Alice book, Alice plays the part of a pawn. Arguably, Lucia was a pawn under the control of Giorgio.
      • “errcasions” – “Occasions”, “err” (to make mistakes) “caisson” (French “box”).
      • “hihad” – “He had”, suggest?? Possibly “jihad” (Islamic holy war).
      • “nefare” – “Never”, “nefarious” (wicked).
      • “manitched” – “Managed”, “man itched”.
      • “pastrue” – “Pass through”, “past” “rue” (deeply regret), “pa’s true”.
      • “angit” – “And get”, “hang it!” (exclamation), “angit” (Latin “he hurts”).
      • “behond” – “Beyond”, “behind”.
      • “t’his” – “This”, “to his”.
      • “loiking-glaz” – “Looking-glass”, “liking” “glaze”.
        • “Looking-Glass”, in this context, refers to the second Alice book, and is a metaphor for madness, and/or the sort of not-obeying-the-ordinary-nature-of-space-and-time realm that Lucia is now in.
      • “whay” – “Way”, “whay” (obsolete form of “whey” (liquid remaining after milk has been curdled)), “why”, possibly “hay”.
      • “hard” – “Had”, “hard” (difficult; solid and unyielding; erect (of a penis)).
    • She alicewise the bost et iffeything whilne he harb vari liddel tellent, to be fraire.

      • “alicewise” – “Always was”, “in the manner of Alice”.
      • “bost et” – “Best at”, “boasted”.
      • “iffeything” – “Everything”, “River Liffey“.
      • “whilne” – “While”, “whine”.
      • “harb” – “Had”, “harbored”.
      • “vari” – “Very”, “variable”.
      • “liddel” – “Little”, “Liddell” (Alice Liddell, Lewis Carroll’s model for Alice).
      • “tellent” – “Talent”, “tell” “ent”.
      • “fraire” – “Fair”, “fraire” (Occitan “brother”).
    • Y’d norva thank, to luc atem, thot’ Cheurgey mite osiriously bey hors fayther’sun, aswiz so efferdent whit Lucia horuself.

      • “Y’d” – “You’d”, “id”.
      • “norva” – “Never”, “Nora”.
      • “thank” – “Think”, “thank”.
      • “luc” – “Look”, “Lucia”.
      • “atem” – “At him”, “Atem” (creator god in Egyptian mythology).
      • “thot'” – “That”, “thought”.
      • “Cheurgey” – “Giorgio” (Georgey), “chemurgy” (branch of applied chemistry), “theurgy” (magic for communicating with deities; supernatural intervention in human affairs).
      • “mite” – “Might”, “mite” (very small thing).
      • “osiriously” – “Seriously”, “Osiris” (Egyptian god of the underworld), “Sirius” (Name of a star; dog who was a companion to Orion in Greek myth).
      • “bey” – “Be”, “bey” (Turkish “chieftain”).
      • “hors” – “His”, “Horus” (Egyptian sky god, son of Osiris).
      • “fayther’sun” – “Father’s son”, “fay there sun”, “fate”.
      • “aswiz” – “As was”, “Aswan” (major city in Egypt), “wizard”.
      • “efferdent” – “Evident”, “Efferdent” (denture cleaner brand), “effort”, “effervescent”.
      • “whit” – “With”, “whit” (very small amount).
      • “horuself” – “Herself”, “Horus elf”.
    • Wiet hud gom orhn bedwhen thime wadjent set seur heffily apern heir constients, licca laed succophagous, if shem wes nuit fuolly isister.

      • “Wiet” – “What”, “wiet” (Dutch “weed, marijuana”; Frisian “white”).
      • “hud” – “Had”, “hud” (British dialect “hull of a nut”).
      • “gorn” – “Gone”, “gorn” (Welsh “horn”), “gurn” (British “funny face”).
      • “orhn” – “On”, “horn”.
      • “bedwhen” – “Between”, “bed when”.
      • “thime” – “Them”, “time”.
      • “wadjent” – “Wouldn’t”, “Wadjet” (Egyptian goddess).
      • “set” – “Sit”, “set”.
      • “seur” – “So”, “seur” (Old French “on top”), “sure”, “sieur” (French “sir”), “siegneur” (lord; see also “droit de siegneur“).
      • “heffily” – “Heavily”, “heffalump” (childish “elephant”).
      • “apern” – “Upon”, “ape”, “apern” (Scots “apron”).
      • “heir” – “Her”, “heir”.
      • “constients” – “Conscience”, “constituents”.
      • “licca” – “Like a”, “Lucia”, “licker”.
      • “laed” – “Lead” (heavy metal; to show the way), “layed” (be entombed; had sex with).
      • “succophagous” – “Sarcophagus”, “suck off” (have oral sex), “succor” (aid).
      • “shem” – “She”, “Shem” (character in Finnegans Wake; son of Noah).
      • “wes” – “Was”, “we are”, “west”.
      • “nuit” – “Not”, “Nuit” (Thelemic version of Egyptian sky goddess), “nuit” (French “night”).
      • “fuolly” – “Fully”, “folly”.
      • “isister” – “His sister”, “Isis” (Egyptian goddess, wife — and sister — of Osiris).
    • I’curas, the dogstors wadjest saigh sho wers in foold denile, ar sefferin form senial dimentians.

      • “I’curas” – “Of course”, “Icarus” (Mythological figure, son of Daedalus).
        • Obiwanspicoli notes “Icarus, Daedalus’ son. Daedalus is also the last name of Stephen, the Character in Portrait and Ulysses that represents James Joyce. Since Joyce named himself Stephen Daedalus in his works, Icarus (son of Daedalus) would be Giorgio.”
        • One of Daedalus’ notable achievements was the creation of the original Labyrinth. Arguably Joyce (and here Moore) engage in creating verbal labyrinths.
      • “dogstors” – “Doctors”, “Dog Star” (common name for the star Sirius, also alluded to two sentences ago).
      • “wadjest” – “Would just”, “Wadjet” (Egyptian goddess), “wad” (slang “sperm”) “jest”.
      • “saigh” – “Say”, “sigh”.
      • “sho wers” – “She was”, “showers”.
      • “foold” – “Full”, “fooled”.
      • “denile” – “Denial”, “the Nile River”.
      • “ar” – “Or”, “are”, “Ra” (Egyptian sun god).
      • “sefferin” – “Suffering”, “Sefkhet” (Egyptian goddess of writing).
      • “form” – “From”, “form”.
      • “senial” – “Senile”, “denial”.
      • “dimentians” – “Dementia”, “dimensions”.
  • Paragraph 20
    Even after what he did to her, she finds she still feels sorry for the poor benighted creature. She had loved him once, in the enchanted linen-filtered light beneath their clean, unwritten sheets. He had been all of her adventures. To be fair, the pair of them had been brought up within an atmosphere of open sexuality, what with their parents’ sexual circle, all the Soupalts and the Guggenheims and so forth. Lucia and her brother had been an inseparable couple from the outset. It was only natural, she supposed, that when her brother reached the age of hairy balls and wanking into handkerchiefs, he would wish to include her in his sport. Their physical relationship had spanned Lucia’s teenage years, woven amongst her other girlish pastimes. She remembers when she was fifteen, stood at the table pasting images inside her scrapbook of Napoleon who always had one hand inside his jacket. Giorgio, behind her, took the opportunity to lift her skirts up at the back, pull down her little bloomers and insert his manhood, thrusting it into his sister brutally while Lucia gasped and moaned, her face just inches from the spread-wide pages of her scrapbook, while her cunny shuddered and recoiled, discharging spumes of a pale gray. He’d pulled it out of her at the last minute, whereupon he’d shot his load across the tabletop where all the family would eat their Sunday dinner. His semen, o delicious!, was upon examination the same color as the glue she had been using.

    • Evin ofter twhat hy ded to hoeur, she fainds schistel fils seurry ferthur par beneuted cradure.

      • “Evin” – “Even”, “evince” (reveal).
      • “ofter” – “After”, “oft her”.
      • “twhat” – “What”, “twat” (vulgar “vagina”).
      • “hy” – “He”, “I”, “high”, “hymen”.
      • “ded” – “Did”, “dead”, “deed”.
      • “hoeur” – “Her”, “hoeur” (Irish slang “loose woman”).
      • “fainds” – “Finds”, “fain” (willingly).
      • “schistel” – “She still”, “schist” (type of rock) “steel”.
      • “fils” – “Feels”, “fils” (son).
      • “seurry” – “Sorry”, “seur” (Old French “on top”; “sure”; “elderberry”).
      • “ferthur” – “For the”, “father”, “further”.
      • “par” – “Poor”, “par” (equal; young salmon), “parent”.
      • “beneuted” – “Benighted” (unenlightened), “be neutered”.
      • “cradure” – “Creature”, “cradle”, “endure”.
    • Shy hert lorvedim wence, in the uncharnted lyrnen-feltered lait burneth thir claen, unroten schreets.

      • “Shy” – “She”, “shy”.
      • “hert” – “Had”, “heart”, “hurt”.
      • “lorvedim” – “Loved him”, suggest??
      • “wence” – “Once”, “whence”, “wench”.
      • “uncharnted” – “Enchanted”, “uncharted”.
      • “lyrnen” – “Linen” (cloth; type of paper), “learning”, “hymen”.
      • “feltered” – “Filtered”, “felt her (maiden-)head”.
      • “lait” – “Light”, “laid” (had sex with).
      • “burneth” – “Beneath”, “burneth” (archaic “burns” (with passion)).
      • “thir” – “Their”, “to her”.
      • “claen” – “Clean”, “clan” (family).
      • “unroten” – “Unwritten”, “un-rotten”.
      • “schreets” – “Sheets” (on a bed; of paper), “screeds”, suggest??
      • The imagery here is doubled: before her brother’s abuse, the bedsheets are unstained, and the metaphorical pages of Lucia’s (sexual) experience are blank.
    • He haert baen aluver hedventsures.

      • “haert” – “Had”, “heart”, possibly “hart”, “hare”.
      • “baen” – “Been”, “bane”, “bae” (darling).
      • “aluver” – “All of her”, “a lover”, “alluvial” (silt deposited by water).
      • “hedventsures” – “Adventures”, “he’d vent (puncture) sure”, “head ventures”.
    • Tibby fur, the peirt a’ theem hot bairn brattap wethen ain itmusphele ev hopen socuality, whit wath thea pierrants sexial circul, illthe Shopperillas ante Gigglehems and shoforth.

      • “Tibby” – “To be”, “tibby” (word appearing in Finnegans Wake, probably standing for the Latin “tibi”, “to you”), “Tibby” (diminutive of “Isabel”), “tibia” (leg bone) “tib” (female cat; obsolete “prostitute”; “sweetheart”) “by”.
      • “fur” – “Fair”, “fur”.
      • “peirt” – “Pair”, “pert” (attractive; impertinent), “peir” (Italian “for the”).
      • “a’ theem” – “Of them”, “athame” (ritual knife), “a theme”.
      • “hot” – “Had”, “hot” (sexually aroused).
      • “bairn” – “Been”, “bairn” (Scots “child”), “bare”.
      • “brattap” – “Brought up”, “brat” (misbehaving child) “tap” (slang “have sex with”).
      • “wethen” – “Within”, “weten” (Dutch “to know, to remember”), “wether” (a castrated goat or ram; archaic “wheather”).
      • “ain” – “An”, “Ain” (river in France), “ain” (Scots “own”; Old Irish “protect!”).
      • “itmusphele” – “Atmosphere”, “it must feel”.
      • “ev” – “Of”, “evade”, “ever”, “event”.
      • “hopen” – “Open”, “hope”.
      • “socuality” – “Sexuality”, “social”.
      • “whit wath” – “What with”, “whit” (very small amount), “was”, “wash”, “wrath”.
      • “thea” – “Their”, “Thea” (female name, suggest??).
      • “pierrants” – “Parents”, “Pierrot” (pantomime clown who is in love with Columbine) “ants” (“in pants” = horny).
      • “sexial” – “Sexual”, “axial” (around an axis).
      • “circul” – “Circle”, “circul” (Old Irish “circle”), “cul” (French vulgar “butt”).
      • “illthe” – “All the”, “filthy”, “ill, they”.
      • “Shopperillas” – “Soupalts” (? see note below), “small shoppers”.
      • “ante” – “And the”, “ante” (initial bet; Latin “before”).
      • “Gigglehems” – “Guggenheim”, “giggle hems”.
        • Peggy Guggenheim (1898-1979), American heiress and art collector. She was a friend of the Joyces, and had many lovers, including Samuel Beckett and Giorgio Joyce. (Thanks to Obiwanspicoli for the initial identification.)
      • “shoforth” – “So forth”, “show fourth”.
    • Lucia ender bither hidban ein unseferable carple form dher hartset.

      • “ender” – “And her”, “ender”.
      • “bither” – “Brother”, “ar bith” (Irish “any, at all).
      • “hidban” – “Had been”, “hid” “ban” (forbid). Possibly “headband”.
      • “ein” – “An”, “ein” (German “one”).
      • “unseferable” – “Insuperable” (unable to be separated), “insufferable” (very annoying), “sephira” (Jewish Kabbalah “node on the Tree of Life”).
      • “carple” – “Couple”, “carp” (type of fish; to complain), “carpal” (relating to the wrist; see next sentence), “purple”.
      • “form” – “From”, “form”.
      • “dher” – “The”, “do her” (have sex with her) “dhe” (Irish “from him”).
      • “hartset” – “Outset”, “heart set” (to “have one’s heart set” is to desire overwhelmingly), “hart”.
  • Page 890
    • Itwise hornly noctural, she suppast, detwain har frother richt theurge of hury bells ornd hankrin ointer winkerchiefs, hewad wrishter inclewd herine hes spuert.

      • “Itwise” – “It was”, “in the manner of it”.
      • “hornly” – “Only”, “horny”.
      • “noctural” – “Natural”, “nocturnal” (at night; see also “nocturnal emission”).
      • “suppast” – “Supposed”, “sup past” (Lucia feeds upon her memories).
      • “detwain” – “That when”, “the two”.
      • “har” – “Her”, “hair” (pubic hair, indicating puberty).
      • “frother” – “Brother”, “father”, “froth” (foam; metaphorically “semen”).
      • “richt” – “Reached”, “richt” (Scots “right; sane”).
      • “theurge” – “The age”, “urge”, “theurge” (miracle worker).
      • “hury” – “Hairy”, “hurry”.
      • “bells” -“Balls” (testicles), “bells”.
      • “ornd” – “And”, “horndog” (horny person).
      • “hankrin ointer winkerchiefs” – “Wanking (masturbating) into handkerchiefs”.
      • “hankrin” – “Wanking”, “hankering” (desire).
      • “ointer” – “Into”, “onto”, “inter”, “pointer” (penis?). Possibly “oinker” (slang “pig; ugly woman”).
      • “winkerchiefs” – “Handkerchiefs”, “wink her chiefly”.
      • “hewad” – “He would”, “he-wad” (masculine ejaculate).
      • “wrishter” – “Wish to”, “wrist-er” (session of masturbation involving the wrist).
      • “inclewd” – “Inclewd”, “incest lewd”. Possibly “clew” (archaic “clue”; see note below).
        • In Greek mythology, the string given by Ariadne to Theseus to navigate the Labyrinth was a “clew”. Perhaps significantly, shortly after this Theseus abandoned Ariadne, much as Lucia will feel abandonded by Giorgio.
      • “herine” – “Her in”, “heroine”.
      • “he’s” – “His”, “he is”.
      • “spuert” – “Sport”, “spurt” (ejaculate), “puer” (Latin “boy”).
    • Thore pharsycal releashemslip hard spenned Luckiher’s tuneage tyears, woevin amust erother garlish pranstighms.

      • “Thore” – “Their”, “sore”. Possibly “Thor“.
      • “pharsycal” – “Physical”, “farcical” (ridiculous), “Pharaohs” (Egyptian monarchs who not infrequently married incestuously, leading to genetic problems from inbreeding) “sick all”. Possibly “sycamore” (type of tree).
      • “releashemslip” – “Relationship”, “release hem slip”.
      • “hard” – “Had”, “hard” (erect penis).
      • “spenned” – “Spanned”, “penned” (captive; written).
      • “Luckiher” – “Lucia”, “lucky her”, “Lucifer”.
      • “tuneage” – “Teenage”, “age of music”.
      • “tyears” – “Years”, “tears”.
      • “woevin” – “Woven”, “woe” “vin” (wine; vine).
      • “amust” – “Amongst”, “a must” (requirement; fruit juice that will ferment; elephant mating frenzy).
      • “erother” – “Her other”, “erotic”, “brother”.
      • “garlish” – “Girlish”, “garland”, “gar” (dialect “gore”; archaic “spear”; European “type of fish”; British dialect “to make”; Irish “near, easy”), “garnish”.
      • “pranstighms” – “Pastimes”, “tight pants”, “pranks and sighs”.
    • She remoinders wincy wish flirfteen, stird ut the terble passton omages intide her scapeblook iv Nipullyon huw isleways hiad winn hund ixight his jiggit.

      • “remoinders” – “Remembers”, “reminders”, suggest??. Possibly “remoinho” (Portuguese “whirlpool”), “moin” (German “hello”).
      • “wincy” – “When she”, “in a wincing manner”.
      • “wish” – “Was”, “wish”.
      • “flirfteen” – “Fifteen”, “flirty”.
      • “stird ut” – “Stood at”, “stirred up”.
      • “terble” – “Table”, “terrible”.
      • “passton” – “Pasting”, “pass” (as in sexual proposition) “ton” (fashion), “passed on”.
      • “omages” – “Images”, “homages”.
      • “intide” – “Inside”, “in tide”
      • “scapeblook” – “Scrapbook”, “escape block”, “landscape blue”.
      • “iv” -“Of”, “IV” (Roman numeral “4”; Latin abbreviation “Jupiter”)
      • “Nipullyon” – “Napoleon” (Bonaparte (1769-1821), French Emperor), “yon nipple”, “pull on nip”.
      • “huw” – “Who”, “huw” (Dutch, “I wed”).
      • “isleways” – “Always”, “isle ways” (Napoleon ended his life in exile upon an island).
      • “hiad” – “Had”, “hid”.
      • “winn” – “One”, “winn” (Low German “gain, winnings, profit), “win”, “winner”.
      • “hund” – “Hand”, “hund” (Old English “dog”), “hundred”.
      • “ixight” – “Inside”, “six height”?, suggest??
      • “jiggit” – “Jacket”, “jigger” (many meanings, including slang for sexual organs), “jig” (type of dance; fishing lure). Possibly also “pocket”, as a hand inside a pocket may be used for masturbation.
        • Napoleon had several portraits painted in the then-fashionable “hand-in-jacket” pose.
    • Giorgolo, behider, tic the uppertinity to lafft her scairts upart the beck, pawl don hwern milliblumers unt insirt hos menhard, thorsting urt ettu has caestar brutuly wail Lucia gosped and murned, her firce jushed inshes ferm the spaerdweyed pageures havher scribwoork, whorther cunnins shottherd end recolled, discharculating splurmes of a pall gris.

      • “Giorgolo” – “Giorgio”, “gigolo” (high-class male prostitute).
      • “behider” – “Behind her”, “being one who hides”.
      • “tic” – “Took”, “tic” (sudden, repetitive, nonrhythmic motor movements).
      • “uppertinity” – “Opportunity”, “upper trinity”, “operating”.
      • “lafft” – “Lift”, “laughed”, “River Liffey“, “laff” (German dialect “tasteless”).
      • “scairts” – “Skirts”, “scared”, “scairt” (Irish “shout, shriek”).
      • “upart” – “Up at”, “apart”, “you part”.
      • “beck” – “Back”, “beck” (motion of beckoning (“she was aking for it”); English dialect “small river”).
      • “pawl” – “Pull”, “paw”, “pawl” (type of clockwork mechanism), “awl” (tool for piercing), possibly “pall”.
      • “don” – “Down”, “don” (University professor; to put on clothing).
      • “hwern” – “Her”, “worn”, “wearing”.
      • “milliblumers” – “Little bloomers”, “Molly Bloom” (Ulysses character), suggest??
      • “unt” – “And”, “und” (archaic “a wave”; German “and”), “cunt”.
      • “insirt” – “Insert”, “in sir it” (put his male member inside).
      • “hos” – “His”, “ho’s” (slang “whores”), “hose” (slang “penis”; stockings).
      • “menhard” – “Manhood”, “men hard”.
      • “thorsting” – “Thrusting”, “thirsting”, “the whore sting”.
      • “urt” – “It”, “hurt”.
      • “ettu” – “Into”, “et tu” (The last words of Roman Emperor Julius Caesar, upon being assassinated, were “et tu, Brute?” (“You too, Brutus?”).
      • “has” – “His”, “has”.
      • “caestar” – “Sister”, “Caesar” (Julius (100 BC – 44 BC), Emperor of Rome).
      • “brutuly” – “Brutally”, “Brutus” (Marcus Junius Brutus the Younger (85 BC – 42 BC), Roman politician and one of the instigators of Caesar’s assassination) “Tully” (Marcus Tullius Cicero (106 BC – 43 BC), Roman politician who championed a return to republican government).
      • “wail” – “While”, “wail”.
      • “gosped” – “Gasped”, “gospel”.
      • “muned” – “Moaned”, “mun” (dialect “must; mouth”), “mune” (Scots “moon”), “mooned” (displayed bare buttocks).
      • “firce” – “Face”, “fierce”, “farce”.
      • “jushed” – “Just”, “joshed” (teased).
      • “inshes” – “Inches”, “in she is”.
      • “ferm” – “From”, “firm”, “ferment”, “ferm” (archaic “farm”).
      • “spaerdweyed” – “Spread-wide”, “spared”, “speared”, “spae” (to foretell), “Wey” (English river), “eyed”, possibly “wyrd” (fate).
      • “pageures” – “Pages”, “pa”, “gueres” (Middle French “barely”), “guerre” (French “war”), suggest??.
      • “havher” – “Of her”, “have her”.
      • “scribwoork” – “Scrapbook”, “scribbled work”.
      • “whorther” – “While her”, “with her”, “worthier”, “whore her”, “hurt”, “whether or not”.
      • “cunnins” – “Cunny” (slang “vagina”), “cunningness”.
      • “shottherd” – “Shuddered”, “shot heard” (“shot heard round the world” refers to an event that starts a major conflict. In this context, probably the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand in 1914, starting World War I.).
      • “end” – “And”, “end”.
      • “recolled” – “Recoiled”, “recalled”, “coll” (embrace).
      • “discharculating” – “Discharging”, “ejaculating”, possibly “charcoal”?
      • “splurmes” – “Spumes” (foamy liquids), “splurts”, “spurts”, “plumes” (feathers; sprays of liquid; to write).
      • “pall” – “Pale”, “pall” (gloomy feeling; to become dull).
      • “gris” – “Grey”, “gris” (French “grey; tipsy”), “grease”.
    • Him pelled itight herfur ather lust menit, whoruporn heed showt hes lowd ocourse the trubletup ware ilther famity wed eeght thur Sundry dennier.

      • “Him pelled” – “He pulled”, “impelled”, “him” “pell” (to knock about; fur; parchment; pond), “pallid”.
      • “itight” – “It out”, “I (am) tight”.
      • “herfur” – “Of her”, “her fur” (pubic hair).
      • “ather” – “At the”, “father”, “at her”.
      • “lust” – “Last”, “lust”.
      • “menit” – “Minute”, “men it”.
      • “whoruporn” – “Whereupon”, “whore you porn”.
      • “heed” – “He’d”, “heed” (to pay attention; to guard).
      • “showt” – “Shot”, “show”, “shout”.
      • “hes” – “His”, “he is”.
      • “lowd” – “Load”, “lewd”, “loud”.
        • “Shot his load” means “ejaculated”.
      • “ocourse” – “Across”, “of course”.
      • “trubletup” – “Tabletop”, “trouble”, “terrible”, “tup” (slang “to have sex with”).
      • “ware” – “Where”, “beware”.
      • “ilther” – “All the”, “filthier”, “ill there”.
      • “famity” – “Family”, “famish” (to starve), “amity” (friendship).
      • “wed” – “Would”, “wed”.
      • “eeght” – “Eat”, “eight”, “eeugh” (expression of disgust).
      • “thur” – “Their”, “through”, “Thursday”.
      • “Sundry” – “Sunday”, “sundry” (diverse), “sun dry”.
      • “dennier” – “Dinner”, “denier” (old coin, suggestive of prostitution in context; person who denies).
    • His seman, odelissyus, wasserpon eggsalmonation the sim coolour iz ther gleu schehard bien yewsing.

      • “seman” – “Semen”, “see man”, “semantic” (relating to the meaning of words).
      • “odelissyus” – “O delicious!” (exclamation of delight), “Odysseus“, “odalisque” (harem slave), “odious” (detestable).
      • “wasserpon” – “Was upon”, “wasser” (German “water; brandy”) “pond”.
      • “eggsalmonation” – “Examination”, “eggs salmon nation”.
      • “sim” – “Same”, “sim” (simulation, Latin “I would be”), simple.
      • “coolour” – “Color”, “cooled ardour”.
      • “iz” – “As”, “iz” (Turkish “footprint; clue”), suggest??
      • “ther” – “The”, “their”, “there”.
      • “gleu” – “Glue”, “gleus” (Scottish Gaelic “condition; mood; musical key”), “glee” (happiness; type of song).
      • “schehard” – “She had”, “Schererazade” (storyteller of The Arabian Nights), “she hard”.
      • “bien” – “Been”, “bien” (French “well; pretty; a possession”).
      • “yewsing” – “Using”, “you sing”, “yew” (type of tree).
  • Paragraph 21
    She regards the optical illusion of her brother, crouching near the waterside, composed from random bits of light and shadow. When she had been a little girl, she had imagined that their passion would be legendary. Posterity would cast her as a Jezebel to Giorgio’s little cockerel, or some such bollocks. She would always have him as her alibi, romantically entwined within her jewelry heart throughout eternity. They had been trysting until he sold her down the river. They had been cast from the same substance, licked free from some primordial glacier by the great cow of their mother. Naturally, this was all before she’d realized that upon close inspection he would break her heart, becoming different, callous. This was back when Lucia had still believed that he knew his ass from his elbow, back before she had been exiled.

    • Schere ligards the aptocul ilesion of herbrusher, creaching nere the wuttersite, compaste frm rendom blits o’ lucht an’ sheandow.

      • “Schere ligards” – “She regards”, “schere” (German “scissors; gap”), “Scheherazade“, “lizards”, “ligar” (Spanish “to flirt; to join).
      • “aptocul” – “Optical”, “apt to” “cul” (French vulgar “butt”), “apocalyptic”, “apto” (Latin “I fit”), “apoculo” (Latin “I leave”).
      • “ilesion” – “Illusion”, “I (make a) lesion”.
      • “herbrusher” – “Her brother”, “hairbrush-er” (hairbrushes, in addition to their primary function, have been commonly used as spanking implements and as female masturbation devices).
      • “creaching” – “Crouching”, “creach” (Scottish Gaelic “to rob; to ruin”).
      • “nere” – “Near”, “nere” (Italian feminine “blacks”), “nereid” (water spirit).
      • “wuttersite” – “Waterside”, “wutter” (suggest?? – possibly “wuther” (archaic “to shake; to make a whizzing sound”)?) “site” (location).
      • “compaste” – “Composed”, “compost”, “com” (Latin “with”) “paste” (as in the glue from the previous paragraph).
      • “frm” – “From”, suggest??
      • “rendom” – “Random”, “rend om” (to violently separate from meditation?), “ren” (Egyptian mythology “name, as part of the soul”) “dom” (Catholic religious title).
      • “blits” – “Bits”, “Blitz” (German bombing of London during WWII), “blister”.
      • “lucht” – “Light”, “Lucia”, “lucht” (Irish “people; cargo”).
      • “sheandow” – “Shadow”, “she, and how!”, “here and now”, “shandy” (mixture of beer and lemonade).
    • Wunshade bun a lietel gull, she haft imagoend thout dere puission wordby largeandire.

      • “Wunshade” – “When she’d”, “un-shade” (reveal?), “wunsch” (German “wish”) “aid”.
      • “bun” – “Been”, “bun” (baby; rabbit; pastry).
      • “lietel” – “Little”, “lie tell”, “liet” (Norman “bed”) “all”, “liete” (Italian feminine plural “happy”).
      • “gull” – “Girl”, “gull” (sea bird; to deceive), “Gull” (Sir William Gull (1816-1890), main character of Moore’s From Hell).
      • “haft” – “Had”, “haft” (handle; mountain pasture).
      • “imagoend” – “Imagined”, “imago” (idealized concept of a loved one, formed in childhood) “end”.
      • “thout” – “that”, “without”, “thought”.
      • “dere” – “Their”, “dere” (British dialect “harm”), possibpy “dear”, “deer”.
      • “puission” – “Passion”, “puissance” (power), “poisson” (French “fish”).
      • “wordby” – “would be”, “byword” (proverbial saying; object of notoriety).
      • “largeandire” – “Legendary”, “large and ire”, “… dire”.
    • Pasterritry weyed casthor els a jazzophon to Gregio’s libbel corckoral, arsum stich pollox.

      • “Pasterritry” – “Posterity”, “pa’s territory”, “past errantry”.
      • “weyed” – “Would”, “wide-eyed”, “weighed”.
      • “casthor” – “Cast her”, “Castor” (Greek mythological figure, one of a pair of twins who had the same mother, but different fathers), “castor” (oil).
      • “els” – “As”, “else”.
      • “jazzophon” – “Jezebel“? (biblical figure associated with prostitutes), “jazz” (musical style; dated slang “to have sex”), “gramophone” (early device for playing musical recordings), “colophon” (afterword of a text containing information about its production), “jazzophone” (brass instrument similar to a saxophone).
        • This word is particularly difficult to interpret; it has many obvious components, but no single one appears dominant.
      • “Gregio’s” – “Giorgio’s”, “egregious” (shocking; exceptional).
      • “libbel” – “Little”, “libel” (a written statement seeking to unjustly damage someone’s reputation), “libella” (a small balance; a level).
      • “corckoral” – “Cockerel” (young male chicken), “cock oral”, “cork”, “coral”, “or all”.
        • The relationship of this word to “jazzophon” is obscure.
      • “arsum” – “Or some”, “arse sum”.
      • “stich” – “Such”, “stitch”, “stich” (part of a line of poetry or Scripture; obsolete “row of trees”).
      • “pollox” – “Bollocks” (nonsense; testicles), “Pollux” (twin to Castor, see above).
    • Sheword eloise heavem ashur alerbide, romoentikly intwinned worthinner jewelly hart s’thruwelt peternity.

      • “Sheword” – “She would”, “she-word”.
      • “eloise” – “Always”, “Heloise”.
        • Heloise (1100-1164), French nun and scholar, best known for her love affair and correspondence with Peter Abelard.
      • “heavem” – “Have him”, “heave them”, “Heaven”.
      • “ashur” – “As her”, “Ashur” (Biblical grandson of Noah; Assyrian deity).
      • “alerbide” – “Alibi”, “aler” (Middle French “to go”) “bide” (to remain), “ale”, “alewife” (type of fish; archaic “woman who keeps an alehouse”, “bride”.
      • “romoentikly” – “Romantically”, “Romeo” (Shakespearean lover) “antic” (bizarre – Shakespeare uses this word in Romeo and Juliet and Hamlet), “ticklish”.
      • “intwinned” – “Entwined”, “become twins”.
      • “worthinner” – “Within her”, “worthiness”, “war thinner”.
      • “jewelly” – “Jewelry”, “jewel-like”, “Jewry”.
        • The meaning of “jewelry heart” is obscure. Suggest??
      • “hart” – “Heart”, “hart” (deer).
      • “s’thruwelt” – “Throughout”, “it’s through” “welt” (raised mark on the body caused by a blow), “Welt” (German “world”), “strew”
      • “peternity” – “Eternity”, “paternity”.
        • An “Eternity”/”Paternity” pun appears in Moore’s Cinema Purgatorio issue 11.
    • Drey humbin trystan’ til isolde danser riverhine.

      • “Drey” – “They”, “drey” (British “squirrel’s nest”; German obsolete “three”), “dry”.
      • “humbin” – “Had been”, “humping” (see below), “humble”, “humain” (French “human”), “humbird” (obsolete “hummingbird”), “humbug” (slang “prank; fraud; nonsense”, Britain “type of candy”).
        • Obiwanspicoli interprets the first two words as “Dry humping” (to rub genitals together while remaining clothed).
      • “trystan’” – “Trysting” (meeting, especially as lovers), “Tristan” (and Isolde, see below).
      • “til” – “Until”, “till” (cash register; to cultivate; dialect “manure used for fertilizer”).
      • “isolde” – “He sold”, “Isolde“.
      • “danser” – “Down the”, “danser” (French “to dance”).
      • “riverhine” – “River”, “Rhine” (river which features prominently in the story of Tristan and Isolde).
        • “Sold down the river” means “to betray”. It derives from the slave trade along the Mississippi River. (Thanks to obiwanspicoli for identifying this rather obscured phrase within the text.)
    • Tay hadsbin carst frame the som sibbsdance, licht frey froz thersym premardial glosier baethir garte cow hather m’udder.

      • “Tay” – “They”, “Tay” (the longest river in Scotland), “tay” (obsolete “outer membrane of the brain”).
      • “hadsbin” – “Had been”, “hadst” (archaic “had”) “bin” (container for waste).
      • “carst” – “Cast”, “carst” (Irish “karst” (land formation with caves)), “cursed”.
      • “frame” – “From”, “frame” (many meanings, including “to wash ore with the aid of a frame”).
      • “som” – “Same”, “Somme” (battle in World War II), “soma” (the axial portion of an animal; a ritual drink in ancient Vedic culture).
      • “sibbsdance” – “Substance”, “subsidence”, “sibb” (Old English “kinship; peace”), “sib’s dance”.
      • “licht” – “Licked”, “licht” (Scots “Light”).
      • “frey” – “Free”, “Frey” (Norse deity), “fray” (battle, to unravel).
      • “froz” – “From”, “frozen”.
      • “thersym” – “The same”, “thyrsus” (staff with conical top, carried by Bacchus; technical term in botany). Possibly “theremin” (electronic musical instrument developed in 1920).
      • “premardial” – “Primordial”, “pre mardi” (before Tuesday), “pre mar dial” (before the circle is broken).
        • “Mardi” is French for Tuesday, meaning literally “day of Mars” (Roman god of war). The English “Tuesday” is derived from “Tiw‘s day”, Tiw being an Anglo-Saxon name for the Norse war-god Tyr. Given the other Norse mythological references in this sentence, the connection seemed worth pointing out.
      • “glosier” – “Glacier”, “glosser” (one who glosses — like me!), “glossier”.
      • “baethir” – “By the”, “bae” (darling) “thir” (Scots “these”; Welsh “land”), “bather”.
      • “garte” – “Great”, “garte” (German “garden”?), “garter” (device for holding stockings; type of snake).
      • “cow” – In modern times, a derogatory term for a woman. (In more ancient times, when cows were more of a status symbol, things were rather different. See note to “hather m’udder” below.)
      • “hather” – “of their”, “Hathor” (Egyptian goddess associated with motherhood and cows).
      • “m’udder” – “Mother”, “my udder”.
      • “hather m’udder” can also be read as “Auđumla“. In Norse mythology, Auđumla was a primordial cow who, in licking a glacier, uncovered Búri (first of the gods, and Odin’s grandfather). Lucia seems to be drawing a metaphor where she and Giorgio are both divine, and were “licked free” by their “great cow” of a mother.
    • Nordurally, thus wasail biforst shead rayolighsed thertupon glose inspryctrum hewit b’lake hurp-hart, becurmong diffirent, callours.

      • “Nordurally” – “Naturally”, “In the manner of the Norse”, “not your ally”.
      • “thus” – “This”, “thus”.
      • “wasail” – “Was all”, “wassail” (revelry).
      • “biforst” – “Before”, “Bifröst” (Norse mythology: a rainbow bridge that connects Asgard (the realm of the gods) with Midgard (the realm of man)). This introduces a running theme in the sentence of light/spectrum/prism imagery.
      • “shead” – “She’d”, “is head”, “shed” (small structure; to lose).
      • “rayolighsed” – “Realized”, “ray of light said”.
      • “thertupon” – “That upon”, “there” “tup” (slang “have sex with”) “on”, possibly “put-upon”.
      • “glose” – “Close”, “glose” (archaic “gloss” (interpret)).
      • “inspryctrum” – “Inspection”, “in spry spectrum”.
      • “hewit” – “He would”, “he-wit” (masculine cleverness?).
      • “b’lake” – “Break”, “be like”, “Blake” (William Blake (1757-1827), English poet, painter, madman, and major influence on Moore).
      • “hurp-hart” – “Her heart”, “apart”, “her part” (maidenhead?), “hur” (lower-class laughing sound) “fart”.
      • “becurmong” – “Becoming”, “be cur among” (be among dogs?), “monger” (seller).
      • “diffirent” – “Different”, “diffident” (lacking self-confidence).
      • “callours” – “Callous” (unfeeling), “colors”.
        • Part of the sentence may also be read, as a unit, as “a ray of light that, upon [passing through a prism, will] break apart, becoming different colors.”
    • Thuswise beckwhem Lucia idstil becieved thort anu hes Arsk femm es Elba, bick befwar shehid ban axisled.

      • “Thuswise” – “This was”, in that manner”.
      • “beckwhem” – “Back when”, “beckon” “whelm” (to overcome).
      • “idstil” – “Had still”, “id style”.
      • “becieved” – “Believed”, “deceived”.
      • “thort” – “That”, “throat”, “thought”, “Thor” (Norse deity).
      • “anu” – “He knew”, “Anu” (Middle-Eastern sky-god), “anew”.
      • “hes” – “His”, “he is”.
      • “Arsk” – “Arse”, “Arsk” (town in Russia), “Askr” (in Norse mythology, the first male human).
        • “He doesn’t know his arse from his elbow” is a saying indicating that the person in question is an idiot.
      • “femm” – “From”, “femme” (feminine).
      • “es” – “His”, “is”, “the letter S”, “es” (Latin “be!; eat!”).
      • “Elba” – “Elbow”, “Elba” (Mediterranean island, over 2,000 miles from Arsk), “Embla” (Norse mythology: first female human).
        • Napoleon (mentioned in the previous paragraph) spent about a year in exile upon Elba.
      • “bick” – “Back”, “bic” (Old Irish “small”), “biche” (French “sweetheart”).
      • “befwar” – “Before”, “be for war”, “beware”.
      • “shehid” – “She had”, “she hid”.
      • “ban” – “Been”, “banish”.
      • “axisled” – “Exiled”, “ax-ed” (fired) “island” (often a site of exile, especially for Napoleon).
  • Paragraph 22
    With hindsight, it appears she had always been a pretty hors-d’oeuvre, passed around between her father’s visitors. When Giorgio had wearied of her, once he had commenced his Oedipal affairs with older women, he had introduced her to his hokum-pokum promiscuous and flippant Roaring Twenties crowd. They’d handed her among themselves … that unspeakable incident with the white dog, the poodle-hound when she was drinking up a storm … and then when she was badly damaged, treacherous Giorgio had announced that he would marry with Helen Kastor, some eleven years his senior, and be Lucia’s no more. It was for Helen that he he had betrayed her, for his sins! Lucia wouldn’t nurse a grudge, but everybody knew that Helen had been more attracted to the father than the son.

    • We behineside, et apertisif shyhart allust bon apritti whors-d’ouvrire, pesteround betworn Hcer falther’s quisitors.

      • “We” – “With”, “we”, “wee”.
      • “behineside” – “Hindsight”, “behind” “hiney” “backside”, “be hid inside”.
      • “et” – “It”, “ate”.
      • “apertisif” – “Appears as if”, “is aperitif” (alcoholic drink served as appetizer).
      • “shyhart” – “She had”, “shy heart”.
      • “allust” – “Always”, “all lust” (and no love).
      • “bon apritti” – “Been a pretty”, “bon appétit” (good appetite!).
      • “whors-d’ouvrire” – “hors-d’oeuvre” (appetizer; by extension, anything of secondary importance), “whores”, “ouvrir” (French “to open; to begin”), “ouvriere” (French “female laborer”).
      • “pesteround” – “Passed around”, “pester” “hound” (especially in the sense of “to harrass” – the implication seems to be that Giorgio (or her father?), sees Lucia as an annoyance).
      • “betworn” – “Between”, “become worn and torn”.
      • “Hcer” – “Her”, “HCE” (father figure in Finnegans Wake).
      • “falther’s” – “Father’s”, “fault (is) hers”, “falters”.
      • “quisitors” – “Visitors”, “inquisitors”.
    • Whane Girgiolo hardwaerid offher, whonce hayhed carnenced his Oeblical afreres wid allder whimmin, heherrd sintreduced hur tyo whis hocum-cok’em promiscrupulous en flapparnt Roring Twendies cruwd.

      • “Whane” – “When”, “wane” (grow smaller).
      • “Girgiolo” – “Giorgio”, “gigolo” (male prostitute, especially one who entertains wealthy older women).
      • “hardwaerid” – “Had wearied”, “hard-wired”, “hardware id”.
      • “offher” – “Of her”, “off her” (get off of her; kill her).
      • “whonce” – “Once”, “whence” (from where).
      • “hayhed” – “He had”, “hay-head”.
      • “carnenced” – “Commenced”, “carnal”.
      • “Oeblical” – “Oedipal” (see below), “biblical”.
        • Oedipus is a figure in Greek myth who married his own mother. Freudian psychology uses the term oedipal to refer to men who are attracted to their mothers or, by proxy, to older women who represent them.
      • “afreres” – “Affairs”, “a freres” (French “of brothers”).
      • “wid” – “With”, “widow”.
      • “allder” – “Older”, “all the”, “alder” (type of tree).
      • “whimmin” – “Women”, “whim” “min” (minimum; minute; dialect “less”; obsolete “to remember”).
      • “heherrd” – “He had”, “herd”, “hurried”, “harried”.
      • “sintreduced” – “Introduced”, “reduced to sin”, sinter (geology “an alluvial sediment deposited by a mineral spring”).
      • “hur” – “Her”, “hur” (laugh sound associated with lower classes).
      • “tyo” – “To”, “toy”.
      • “whis” – “His”, “whisk” (to move something quickly with no warning), “wish”, “whisker”.
      • “hocum-cok’em” – “Hokum-pokum” (absurd), “ho, cum! cock them!”. Possibly also “coke” (cocaine).
      • “promiscrupulous” – “Promiscuous”, “promise scrupulously” (but do they keep those promises?).
      • “en flappant” – “And flippant”, “en passant” (in passing; the capture of a chess pawn in a specific way), “flappers” (1920s young women who rebelled against social and sexual norms).
      • “Roring Twendies” – “Roaring Twenties” (the 1920s, seen as a time of economic prosperity and cultural progress), “boring trendies”, “wendy” (British slang “coward”).
      • “cruwd” – “Crowd”, “crude”.
    • Theyre’d harmdid hore amonst themserves … thaght enspicable insidernt wet der veise darg, deepuddl-haund winse shae wors drungen apar starm … on dien whone shivvus bedly demiged, trickherous Jawgeo hoyd ennounced darty wedmamarry par Helen Kasther, sum aleaven yerns hes sinnier, ambi Lucia’s n’amor.

      • “Theyre’d” – “They’d”, “there had”, “they, red”.
      • “harmdid” – “Handed”, “did harm”.
      • “hore” – “Her”, “whore”.
      • “amonst” – “Amongst”, “a monster”.
      • “themserves” – “Themselves”, “to serve them”.
      • “thaght” – “That”, “thought”.
      • “enspicable” – “Unspeakable”, “despicable”.
      • “insidernt” – “Incident”, “inside her cunt”.
      • “wet” – “With”, “wet” (perhaps a suggestion that part of her shame is that she was sexually aroused by the incident).
      • “der” – “The”, “der” (German “the”; French “last”).
      • “veise” – “White”, “vice”, “vise”, “Weisse (German “white woman”).
      • “darg” – “Dog”, “darg” (Scots “a day’s work”). Possibly “d’argent” (French “of money”).
        • Carol Loeb Shloss, in Lucia Joyce: To Dance in the Wake, writes: “When she was in emotional trouble in 1934, she hinted to her companion, Cary Barnes, that something sinister had happened to her, and she spoke of a little white dog”.
      • “deepuddl-haund” – “The poodle-hound”, “deep puddle haunt”.
      • “winse” – “When”, “wince”, “wine”, possibly “rinse”.
      • “shae” – “She”, “shae” (Scots “shoe”).
      • “wors” – “Was”, “worse”, “wars”.
      • “drungen” – “Drinking”, “drunken”, “drugged”.
      • “apar” – “Up a”, “apart”, possibly “party”.
      • “starm” – “Storm”, “stare”, “star”, “starmi” (Italian “I stop myself”).
        • “Drinking up a storm” means to drink excessively.
      • “on dien” – “And then”, “undine” (water spirit), “on” “dien” (German “serve!”).
      • “whone” – “When”, “who one”.
      • “shivvus” – “She was”, “shivers”, “Shiva” (Hindu god of destruction and transformation).
      • “bedly” – “Badly”, “by means of a bed”.
      • “demiged” – “Damaged”, “demigod”.
      • “trickherous” – “Treacherous”, “trick her, O us”, possibly “trickster”.
      • “Jawgeo” – “Giorgio”, “jaw” (to talk; to scold), “geo” (geology; a cleft in a cliff).
      • “hoyd ennounced” – “Had announced”, “hoyden” (rude girl) “nonce” (made-up word).
      • “darty” – “That he”, “dirty”, “in the manner of a dart (penis)”.
      • “wedmamarry” – “Would marry”, “wed mama”, “mammary” (relating to a woman’s breast).
      • “par” – “With” (derived from French), “fair”.
      • “Kasther” – “Kastor”, “cast her” (cast her aside).
        • Helen Kastor had been married to Leon Fleischman when Giorgio began his affair with her, but presumably had become divorced by the time the new engagement was announced. (Thanks to Obiwanspicoli for this information.)
      • “sum” – “Some”, “sum” (mathematical addition; Latin “I am”).
      • “aleaven” – “Eleven”, “a leaven” (agent which makes dough rise; figuratively, anything that makes an assimilating change), “a leaving”.
      • “yerns” – “Years”, “yearns”.
      • “hes” – “His”, “he is”.
      • “sinnier” – “Senior”, “more sin-like”, “sin” “nier” (French “to deny”).
      • “ambi” – “And be”, “ambiguous”, “ambivalent”, “ambitious”. Possibly “ambidextrous”?
      • “n’amor” – “No more”, “no amor” (no love).
    • Etwas fiar Hellin diety had betroyter, par ‘is sinse!

      • “Etwas” – “It was”, “etwas” (German “something; somewhat”).
      • “fiar” – “For”, “fair”, “fire”, possibly “liar”.
      • “Hellin” – “Helen”, “containing Hell”
        • Possible reference to “Fair Helen“, a Scottish ballad lamenting lost love.
      • “diety” – “That he”, “diety” (good for a diet), “deity” (god or goddess), “ditty”.
      • “betroyter” – “Betrayed her”, “betrothal”, “Troy” (referring to Helen of Troy).
      • “par” – “For”, “par” (with; equal).
      • “‘is” – “His”, “is”, “I’s”.
      • “sinse” – “Sins”, “since”, “sense”.
    • Lucia woodenorse a gurge, bet iffybawdy knu dad Holen hartpin ma etoricted tither fethar rethar tanzer sonne.

      • “woodenorse a gurge” – “Wouldn’t nurse a grudge”, “wouldn’t nurse Giorgio”, “wooden horse” (continuing the themes of Troy and treachery), “gurge” (obsolete “to swallow up; a whirlpool”), “gorge” (deep ravine; throat; to eat greedily).
      • “bet” – “But”, “bet” (wager; Hebrew letter).
      • “iffybawdy” – “everybody”, “iffy” (dubious) “bawdy”, “River Liffey“.
      • “knu” – “Knew”, “knut” (Edwardian “idle man-about-town”).
      • “dad” – “That”, “dad”.
      • “Holen” – “Helen”, “hole in”, “ho” (whore) “length”.
      • “hartpin” – “Had been”, “heart pin”, possibly “hatpin”.
      • “ma etoricted” – “More attracted”, “mate directed”, “ma” (mother).
      • “tither” – “To the”, “tither” (one who pays to the church; obsolete “tighter; more nimble”), possibly “hither”.
        • This introduces a sequence of nearly rhyming words. The significance is unclear — suggest??
      • “fethar” – “Father”, “feather”.
      • “rethar” – “Rather”, “wreather”.
      • “tanzer” – “Than the”, “Tänzer” (German “dancer”), possibly “tansy” (type of flower).
      • “sonne” – “Son”, “Sonne” (German “sun”), “Somme” (river in France; WWI battle)
        • Despite Lucia’s claim to not nurse a grudge, this sentence is full of barely-repressed anger and insult.
  • Paragraph 23
    On top of all her other problems, Lucia had taken the announcement quite badly. When she’d started acting up, Giorgio had been the first to raise the subject of incarceration in the mental hospital, supported by the totally impartial mama dear. Now that Lucia thinks about it, Giorgio had done the same with Helen later in their marriage when she’d had her mental breakdown. It would seem to be his preferred method of escaping from an inconvenient relationship, and Lucia wonders if this madness be itself a symptom of her brother’s own mental confusion, of his pathological self-adoration.

    • Introp of iller mutter pablames, Lucia hartachen the annunciment quate bodly.

      • “Introp” – “On top”, “intro”, “in” “troppo” (Australian slang “crazy”; Italian “too much”).
      • “iller” – “All her”, “more ill”.
      • “mutter” – “Other”, “mutter” (to speak indistinctly; German “mother”).
      • “pablames” – “Problems”, “pablum” (bland or simplistic language), “pa blames”.
      • “hartachen” – “Had taken”, “heart aching”, “her taken”.
      • “annunciment” – “Announcement”, “Annunciation” (Christianity: the announcement by the angel Gabriel to marry that she would bear Jesus; the word also features prominently in Moore’s Neonomicon).
      • “quate” – “Quite”, “equate”, “quake”.
      • “bodly” – “Badly”, “body”, “boldly”. Possibly “Bodleian” (research library at Oxford).
    • Thwen shud startard asctin ep, Judgio harbinder fist to relsh the sobjerkt if unglarceration imper meantall hospitty, supp’ertit boyther tittily impourshewil mamerderer.

      • “Thwen” – “When”, “then”, possibly “the wen” (cyst on the skin).
      • “shud” – “She’d”, “shudder”, “should”.
      • “startard” – “Started”, “bastard”, “star” “retard”.
      • “asctin” – “Acting”, “asking”, “tasking”, “ascetic”, suggest??
      • “ep” – “Up”, “episode”.
      • “Judgio” – “Giorgio”, “judge-y”.
      • “harbinder” – “Had been the”, “harbinger” (something that foreshadows or foretells), “hard bind her”.
      • “fist” – “First”, “fist”.
      • “relsh” – “Raise”, “relish” (to take pleasure in).
      • “sobjerkt” – “Subject”, “sob” (Lucia’s reaction to Giorgio being a) “jerk”.
      • “if” – “Of”, “if”.
      • “unglarceration” – “Incarceration”, “un- glare” (removed from angry vision), “un-glacier” (see notes about Auđumla in paragraph 21).
      • “imper” – “In the”, “imperative”, “imperial”, “imperfect”.
      • “meantall” – “Mental”, “mean to all”, “mean (average) tall”, “meant (it) all”.
      • “hospitty” – “Hospital”, “spit-upon whore”, “horse pity”.
      • “supp’ertit” – “Supported”, “sup (at) her tit”.
      • “boyther” – “By the”, “boy there”, “bother”.
      • “tittily” – “Totally”, “having titties”, possibly “titillatingly”.
      • “impourshewil” – “Impartial”, “impoverish”, “she, our imp, will”, “I’m poor”.
      • “mamerderer” – “Mama dear”, “murderer”, “ma merde” (French “my shit”).
    • Nodabt Lucia thanks abaretit, Glorgyo hedon thishame twih Helplen liter indire morrage wan shettarder marntal shrakedrown.

      • “Nodabt” – “Now that”, “no doubt”, “nod at”.
      • “thanks” – “Thinks”, “thanks”.
      • “abaretit” – “About it”, “a bare tit”, possibly “abated”.
      • “Glorgyo” – “Giorgio”, “orgy”, “glory hole” (slang “hole for the purpose of anonymous sex”).
      • “hedon” – “Had done”, “hedonist” (one devoted to pleasure), “head on”.
      • “thishame” – “The same”, “this shame”.
      • “twih” – “With”, “to”, possibly “twee” (overly cute).
      • “Helplen” – “Helen”, “hell plan”, “help length”.
      • “liter” – “Later”, “liter” (fluid measure), “lit her”, “lighter”, “literal”, “litter”.
      • “indire” – “In their”, “in dire (straits)”, “indirect”, “indire” (Italian “to announce; to call an election”).
      • “morrage” – “Marriage”, “mortgage”, “Morrigan” (Celtic war goddess), “morra” (type of game)
      • “wan” – “When”, “wan” (pale, sickly-looking; Ireland “woman”).
      • “shettarder” – “She’d had her”, “shattered”, “shet” (shut) “tardier”.
      • “marntal” – “Mental”, “marital”, “marn” (Italian “marl” (type of sandy dirt)).
      • “shrakedrown” – “Breakdown”, “shakedown”, “shrike” (type of bird) “drown”, “she-rake” (promiscuous woman).
    • Iterd saem turbi hes preverred mythod of extrapin formern encarnvanient reliesonship, end Lucia whenders oftis madnut behitself a symbtomb ova barsther’s sown minterrl confission, avers pitho’logecal serv-idorlatrion?

      • “Iterd” – “It would”, “I, turd”, “iterated”.
      • “saem” – “Seem”, “same”.
      • “turbi” – “To be”, “turbulent” (possible reference to Henry II’s cry against Thomas Becket “Will no one rid me of this turbulent priest?”).
      • “hes” – “His”, “he is”.
      • “preverred” – “Preferred”, “prevaricated” (misled or lied), “pervert”.
      • “mythod” – “Method”, “myth” (untrue story) “OD” (overdose), “odd”.
      • “extrapin” – “Escaping”, “extricating”, “extracting”, “extra” “pin” (to keep in place).
      • “formern” – “From an”, “former”, “four men”.
      • “encarnvanient” – “Inconvenient”, “en- carnal vain”, “carnival van tent”.
      • “reliesonship” – “Relationship”, “relies on ship”, “lies again once hip”.
      • “end” – “And”, “end”.
      • “whenders” – “Wonders”, “when does”, “wanders”.
      • “oftis” – “If this”, “oft ’tis” (poetic “often it is”), “lofty”.
      • “madnut” – “Madness”, “made nuts”.
      • “behitself” – “Be itself”, “hit by self”.
      • “symbtomb” – “Symptom”, “symbolic tomb”, “symbiotic womb”.
      • “ova” – “Of her”, “ova” (eggs), “over”.
      • “barsther’s” – “Brother’s”, “burst hers”, “barrister” (lawyer).
      • “sown” – “Own”, “sown”. Giorgio is both confused himself, and sows confusion.
      • “minterrl” – “Mental”, “minimum terror”, “mint err”.
      • “confission” – “Confusion”, “confession”, “con fission” (a deception splitting in two).
      • “avers” – “Of his”, “averse”, “avers” (asserts).
      • “pitho’logecal” – “Pathological”, “pithot” (Norman “gander”), “path of”, “pith” (center, vital part), “loge” (exclusive seating area in a theater), suggest??
      • “serv-idorlatrion” – “Self-adoration”, “serve idolatry”, self-adulation”.
  • Page 891
  • Paragraph 24
    Standing motionless beside the pond she looks at his illusory likeness made from light and vegetation, and at last she understands that poor dead Giorgio was more a prisoner of his inheritance than she had ever been … and he was in all likelihood not even Daddy’s natural offspring. It was possible that he was the result of an affair with Cosgrave the invincible. Lucia’s father, the unfortunate cuckolded creature, had asked Nora, “Is he my own?” to which she had not replied. Uncertain of his firstborn’s parentage, James had left poor bull-headed Giorgio to his mother’s labyrinthine passageways from which he never would completely free himself, a hairy monster roaring in his personal darkness. Meanwhile, Daddy had transferred all of his best attentions to his littlest child, his daughter. She reminisces how he used to dandle her upon his knee. Together they’d escape their most amazing family on wings of writing paper bound by sealing wax. He should’ve known it wouldn’t work: Lucia had already flown too near the sun.

    • Stirrdin mishiomless besurd the punnd she lacs atis eyelusiary lakeness maidform laten vaguetation, enditlost behinderstance det poer deid Gurgio wist merr a proisonder o’ dhis inhorridance danshe hid elver byrn … ande wasin noral likeyhard nat urvan Babbo’s notyoural iffspring.

      • “Stirrdin” – “Standing”, “stirred in”.
      • “mishiomless” – “Motionless”, “mission”, “homeless”.
      • “besurd” – “Beside”, “be absurd”, “be sure”.
      • “punnd” – “Pond”, “punned”.
      • “lacs” – “Looks”, “lactates”, Lancelot du “Lac”.
      • “atis” – “At his”, “at is”, “Attis” (Greek and Phrygian god of death and resurrection).
      • “eyelusiary” – “Illusory”, “(by the) eye (of) Lucia”.
      • “lakeness” – “Likeness”, “lake-ness”, “Loch Ness” (Scottish lake famed for its monster).
      • “maidform” – “Made from”, “maid form”.
      • “laten” – “Light and”, “latent” (dormant, concealed), “laten” (to grow later).
      • “vaguetation” – “Vegetation”, “vague hesitation”.
      • “enditlost” – “And at last”, “end it lost”.
      • “behinderstance” – “She understands”, “stands more behind”, “be hinder stance”.
      • “det” – “that”, “det” (Irish “from your”).
      • “poer” – “Poor”, “puer” (Latin “boy”), “Poe-r” (Edgar Allan Poe).
      • “deid” – “Dead”, “deid” (Scots “died”).
        • Giorgio died in 1976, age 70.
      • “Gurgio” – “Giorgio”, “gurge” (gorge).
      • “wist” – “Was”, “wist” (archaic “know”).
      • “merr” – “More”, “mer-” (sea-related), “merry”, “mere” (pond).
      • “proisonder” – “Prisoner”, “poisoned her”.
      • “‘dhis” – “His”, “dhise” (Scottish Gaelic “to her”).
      • “inhorridance” – “Inheritance”, “in horrid dance”.
      • “danshe” – “Than she”, “dance”.
      • “hid” – “Had”, “hid”.
      • “elver” – “Ever”, “elven”, “elver” (young eel).
      • “byrn” – “Been”, “byrnie” (chain mail shirt), “born”.
      • “ande” – “And he”, “Andes” (mountains), “ande” (British dialect “breath”; obsolete “Envy”).
      • “wasin noral” – “Was in all”, “wasting”, “wa” (Old English “woe”; Scots “wail”) “sin”, “Nora”, “oral”.
      • “likeyhard” – “Likelihood”, “likely hard”.
      • “nat” – “Not”, “natural” (among other meanings, “illegitimate”).
      • “urvan” – “Even”, “ur-” (primal) “van” (caravan; vanguard).
      • “Babbo’s” – “Daddy’s” (Italian).
      • “notyoural” – “Natural” (again, the sense of “illegitimate” seems relevant), “not yours (at) all”.
      • “iffspring” – “Offspring”, “River Liffey spring”, “iffy”.
    • Ift was parsibhael thut hayways the rensult ovan athair wud Cowsgrief the invincibull.

      • “Ift” – “It”, “lift”, “often”, “Ifrit” (genie).
      • “parsibhael” – “Possible”, “Parsifal” (Wagner opera about Arthurian knight), “parish” “Ba’al” (fertility god), “parse”, “par sib” “hael” (Old English “omen”).
      • “thut” – “That”, “thud”.
      • “hayways” – “He was”, “hay ways”.
      • “rensult” – “Result”, “insult”, “ren” (Egyptian mythology “name, as part of the soul”) “salt”.
      • “ovan” – “Of an”, “oven”, “ova” (eggs).
      • “athair” – “Affair”, “at hair”, “ether”.
      • “wud” – “With”, “wud” (dialect “mad”; Scots “wood; would”).
      • “Cowsgrief the invincibull” – “Cosgrave the invincible” (see notes to paragraph 3), “cow’s grief” “bull”.
        • “Cow” and “bull” introduce the Minotaur theme that will continue for the rest of this section.
    • Lucia’s forther, the inferdunach cockhulted creter, hed ankst Gnora, “Is i mineos?” taer whitch shae heid nit repolide.

      • “forther” – “Father”, “for their”, “forth her”, “fort”.
      • “inferdunach” – “Unfortunate”, “infernal” “dunch” (British “to jog, to hit”), “ferd” (Scotland “speed”, obsolete “band; fear”), “dun” (brownish-grey; demand for payment; Celtic hill-fort), “ach” (Irish “but”; German “oh”; Welsh “kinship”).
      • “cockhulted” – “Cuckolded”, “cock halted”.
      • “creter” – “Creature”, “Creator”, “crater”, “Crete” (site of the Minotaur legend).
      • “hed” – “Had”, “he’d”, “head”.
      • “ankst” – “Asked”, “angst”, “ankh” (Egyptian symbol of life).
      • “Gnora” – “Nora”, “gnawer”. The initial silent G helps connect her to Giorgio.
      • “i” – “he”, “it”, “I”.
      • “mineos” – “My own”, “Minos” (cuckolded ‘father’ of the Minotaur); “mine” “os” (bone; mouth; ridge raised by deposits of a stream underneath a glacier).
      • “taer” – “To”, “taer” (Icelandic “clear”), “-taur” (bull-related), “tarry”.
      • “whitch” – “Which”, “witch”.
      • “shae” – “She”, “shae” (Scots “shoe”).
      • “heid” – “Had”, “heed”, “heid” (Scots “head”).
      • “nit” – “Not”, “nit” (louse egg; British slang “fool”).
      • “repolide” – “Replied”, “reptile”, “re” (concerning) “polite”, “repo” (to repossess) “lied”.
    • Unsiretin of heirs fiercebarn’s pparentage, Shaems hard lifft pere bawl-hieded Taurgio terr hist monther’s labiarinfine pussageways ferm whatch enerva wourd cowpately frie hismylth, a hairny mumster reoaring innes poisonal darnknesst.

      • “Unsiretin” – “Uncertain”, “un sire tin”.
      • “heirs” – “His”, “heirs”.
      • “fiercebarn” – “Firstborn”, “fierce” (violent; Irish slang “excellent”) “barn” (dialect “child”).
      • “pparentage” – “Parentage”, “apparent age”.
      • “Shaems” – “James”, “shames”, “shae” (Scots “shoe”).
      • “hard” – “Had”, “hard”.
      • “lifft” – “Left”, “lift”, “River Liffey“.
      • “pere” – “Poor”, “pere” (French “father”).
      • “bawl-hieded” – “Bull-headed” (stubborn; Minotaur-like), “bawl” (sob) “hied” (hastened), “heid” (Scots “head”), “heeded”.
      • “Taurgio” – “Giorgio”, “taur-” (relating to bulls).
      • “terr” – “To”, “terror”, “terra” (earth).
      • “hist” – “His”, “history”, “hist” (archaic “shhh, pssst”).
      • “monther” – “Mother”, “monster”, “month-er” (referring to PMS?).
      • “labiarinfine” – “Labyrinthine” (the Minotaur was trapped within the Labyrinth), “labia are in fine”.
      • “pussageways” – “Passageways”, “pussy” (slang “vagina”).
      • “ferm” – “From”, “ferment”, “firm”, “ferm” (obsolete “farm”).
      • “whatch” – “Which”, “watch”, “hatch”, “thatch”.
      • “enerva” – “He never”, “enervate” (to weaken morally or mentally).
      • “wourd” – “Would”, “word”.
      • “cowpately” – “Completely”, “cow-pat” (bullshit) “lie”.
      • “frie” – “Free”, “fry”, “friend”.
      • “hismylth” – “Himself”, “his myth”, “high smith”.
      • “hairny” – “Hairy”, “horny”.
      • “mumster” – “Monster”, “mum-ster” (product of his mother).
      • “reoaring” – “Roaring”, “reo” (Irish “frost”; Italian “guilty”) “a ring”.
      • “innes” – “In his”, “inner”.
      • “poisonal” – “Personal”, “poison all”.
      • “darnknesst” – “Darkness”, “dank nest”, “darn” “Knesset” (Israeli parliament), “Knossos” (capital of Crete).
    • Mainwell, Daeddy hurd transfirrmed allovers berst antensions tow hes l’Icalust cherld, his doter.

      • “Mainwell” – “Meanwhile”, “main well” (primary source), “mean well”.
      • “Daeddy” – “Daddy”, “Daedalus” (creator of the Labyrinth).
      • “hurd” – “Had”, “herd”, “hurdle”, “hurds” (the coarse part of flax or hemp).
      • “transfirrmed” – “Transferred”, “transformed”.
      • “allovers” – “All of his”, “all lovers”, “all over”.
      • “berst” – “Best”, “burst”, “Oberst” (German “colonel”), “ber” (jujube; French “cradle that holds a ship before launch”; Old English “bier, a litter to transport corpses”).
      • “antensions” – “Attentions”, “an tensions”, “antenna”.
      • “tow” – “To”, “tow” (to pull; an untwisted bundle of fibers, by extension “light-colored hair”).
      • “hes” – “His”, “he is”.
      • “l’Icalust” – “Littlest”, “Lucia lust”, “Icarus” (son of Daedalus).
      • “cherld” – “child”, “churl” (peasant; boor), “cherish”, “her”, “herald”.
      • “doter” – “Daughter”, “dote-r” (object of great affection).
    • She remences ha hee yuthed tid daydle us abandis mnee.

      • “remences” – “Reminisces”, “re- menses” (menstruates again).
      • “ha” – “How”, “ha” (laugh sound).
      • “hee” – “He”, “hee” (laugh sound).
      • “yuthed” – “Used”, “youth”. Spelling “used” with a “th” is also suggestive of a small child’s lisping speech.
      • “tid daydle us” – “To dandle her” (“us” doesn’t quite fit “her”, but is probably only used here to enable the “Daedalus” reading), “tid” (obsolete “tender”; Old English “time”), “Daedalus” (see above).
      • “abandis” – “Upon his”, “abandon us”, “a band is”.
      • “mnee” – “Knee”, “Mnemosyne” (Greek mythology: personification of thought and memory), possibly “enemy”.
    • Tugather theord asclep thers mustymazin’ fomily on wimsoer writhinpapper boind bye silenwarx.

      • “Tugather” – “Together”, “tu” (French/Italian/Scottish Gaelic “you” (familiar); German “Do!”; Old English “two” “gather”.
      • “theord” – “They would”, “the word”, “theory”.
      • “asclep” – “Escape”, “Asclepius” (Greek god of doctors).
      • “thers” – “their”, “thyrsus” (staff carried by Bacchus, compare with rod of Asclepius), “to hers”.
      • “mustymazin’” – “Most amazing”, “musty” (smelling stale) “maze in” (trapped in a labyrinth).
      • “fomily” – “Family”, “foamily” (possibly referring to the Greek goddess of love, Aphrodite, who was born from sea-foam).
      • “wimsoer” – “Wings of”, “whatsoever”, “whims o’er”.
        • These wings are metaphorical, and also a reference to the myth of Icarus, developed further here and in the next sentence. When Daedalus was imprisoned by King Minos, he fashioned artificial wings out of feathers and wax. Daedalus and his son, Icarus, flew away from their prison using these wings. Icarus, however, flew too close to the sun, which melted his wings, and he fell to his death.
      • “writhinpapper” – “Writing paper”, “writhing papa”, “within pepper”.
      • “boind” – “Bound”, “bond”, “bind”, “boing” (bouncing noise).
      • “bye” – “By”, “bye”.
      • “silenwarx” – “Sealing wax”, “silent war”, “Silenus” (Greek myth: tutor of Dionysus (wine god)), “walks”, “warks” (pains; Scots “works”).
    • Hey shadowve norn it weddint wirk: Lucarus hurd illready flirn tooneerdy son.

      • “Hey” – “He”, “hey”, “hay”.
      • “shadowve” – “Should’ve”, “shadow weave”.
      • “norn” – “Known”, “norn” (obsolete “to complain; to say”), “Norn” (Norse myth: the three fates, who weave destiny).
      • “weddint” – “Wouldn’t”, “wedding”, “wed” “dint” (power).
      • “wirk” – “Work”, “wirk” (Scots “work”), “wink”.
      • “Lucarus” – “Lucia”, “Icarus” (see above).
      • “hurd” – “Had”, “hurdle”, “Urđr” (the Norn of the past).
      • “illready” – “Already”, “ill(-ness is) ready”.
      • “flirn” – “Flown”, “flirted”, “learn”.
      • “tooneerdy” – “Too near the”, “too needy”.
      • “son” – “Sun”, “son” (Giorgio).
        • In a metaphorical sense, Lucia, like Icarus, has flown too close to the sun. In a more literal sense, she has grown too close to the son, Giorgio, which is the proximate cause of her “fall” into madness.
  • Paragraph 25
    It seems to her as if the trick of light that so resembles her dead brother might be saying something to itself as it kneels gazing into its own eyes, reflected in the clare and lucid mirror of the waters at its feet. Tilting her head a little forwards, she strains to catch what it’s saying.

    • It syms tohear asylf the tricolite dadso risentles hyer dudd budder mughte besaen seemthink towhitsafe issit knils gaysing unterets oenice, perflected indur clare n luciad mirer eauf d’ weadters artis faet.

      • “syms” – “Seems”, “symbols”.
      • “tohear” – “To her”, “to hear”.
      • “asylf” – “As if”, “a sylph (air spirit), “as elf”.
      • “tricolite” – “Trick of light”, “trilobite” (fossil arthropod), “tricolor” (having three colors, often in reference to flags), “tricot” (French “to knit”).
      • “dadso” – “That so”, “dad’s, oh!”.
      • “risentles” – “Resembles”, “risen”, “resent”, “disgruntles”.
      • “hyer” – “Her”, “here”, “year”, “shyer”.
      • “dudd” – “Dead”, “dud” (useless), “dudder” (British dated “peddler”).
      • “budder” – “Brother”, “budder” (plant which buds), “buddy”, “Budddha”, “budd” (Welsh “profit”).
      • “mughte” – “Might”, “must”, “mighty”, suggest??
      • “besaen” – “Be saying”, “seen”, “sane”.
      • “seemthink” – “Something”, “seem (to) think”.
      • “towhitsafe” – “To itself”, “to whit, safe”.
      • “issit” – “As it”, “issir” (Middle French “to leave”), “I sit”.
      • “knils” – “Kneels”, “knells”, “nil”.
      • “gaysing” – “Gazing”, “gay sing”.
      • “unterets” – “Into its”, “hunter” (suggesting the myth of Actaeon and Artemis), “unter” (German “under”), “un” “teret” (obsolete “round”), suggest??
      • “oenice” – “Own eyes”, “Eunice” (female name), “oh, nice”, “oen-” (relating to wine) “ice”, “oe” (archaic “island”).
      • “perflected” – “Reflected”, “perfected”.
      • “indur” – “In the”, “Indus” (large Asian river), “indurable” (archaic “endurable”).
      • “clare” – “Clear”, “Clare” (John Clare, see section three).
      • “n” – “And”, suggest??
      • “luciad” – “Lucid” (transparent), “Lucia”, “Luciad” (an epic about Lucia), “Lucy had”.
      • “mirer” – “Mirror”, “mire-r” (one who causes things to get stuck), “mirer” (French “to stare”), “admirer”.
      • “eauf d'” – “Of the”, “oaf”, “eau” (Lincolnshire “brook”; French “water”), “eau d'” (French “fragrance of”).
      • “weadters” – “Waters”, “wed to his”, “weeds and trees”, “waders”.
      • “artis” – “At his”, “artisan”, “art is”, “artesian” (type of well).
      • “faet” – “Feet”, “fate”, “fae” (fairy).
    • Tiplting hearhaed elitle fourwords, sistrens teeketch wiet ils sayen.

      • “Tiplting” – “Tilting”, “tipping”, “tippling” (drinking alcohol).
      • “hearhaed” – “Her head”, “hear heed”, “haedus” (Latin “young goat”).
      • “elitle” -“A little”, “elite”.
      • “fourwords” – “Forwards”, “four words”, “for words”.
      • “sistrens” – “She strains”, “sistren” (archaic “sisters”), “cisterns” (reservoirs).
      • “teeketch” – “To catch”, “teek” (obsolete “teak” (type of wood)) “etch”, “tee” (obsolete “to lead”) “ketch” (type of boat; archaic “to hang”).
      • “wiet” – “What”, “wit” (to know), “wiet” (Dutch “weed, marijuana”).
      • “ils” – “It’s”, “fils” (French “son”), “ils” (French “they”).
      • “sayen” – “Saying”, “say end”.
  • Paragraph 26
    “Oh what a monstrosity I am thought to be by my mentally unstable women, when in fact to my discerning gilded eye, I am entirely lovable,” says her big brother, to which Lucia responds with “Bull.”

    • Moore now begins to echo the form of the Greek myth of Echo and Narcissus from Ovid’s Metamorphoses. Narcissus (from who we gain the modern term “narcissist”) is a beautiful youth who becomes entranced by his own reflection in a pool of water. The nymph Echo has fallen in love with him, but has been cursed to never be able to speak except by repeating what others say. As Narcissus declaims his own beauty, Echo answers him with echoes of his last syllable or two, which do form coherent (if brief) answers to what he says.Narcissus never perceives Echo’s presence, and eventually wastes away, trapped by his own self-love.
      • Giorgio insists upon his own beauty, disputing (ineffectually) his moral monstrosity (symbolized as the Minotaur).
    • “Oe witta manstrusty eyeam thwought ter beest bye mumtally instabelle whymen, whin infuct ter midascernin’ gilten I, eye hym untirely liveable,”

      • “Oe” – “Oh”, “oe” (archaic “island”).
      • “witta” – “What a”, “wit, ta” (farewell to sanity), “witta” (Old English “sanity”), “witter” (to speak trivially; obsolete “knowing”).
      • “manstrusty” – “Monstrosity”, “man is trusty” (something Giorgio may believe, but not Lucia), “man struts”.
      • “eyeam” – “I am”, “eye a yam”, “eyas” (young hawk).
      • “thwought” – “thought”, “wrought” (made), “would ought”, suggest??
      • “ter beest” – “To be”, “terrible”, the best”, “true beast”.
      • “bye” – “By”, bye”.
      • “mumtally” – “Mentally”, “mum” “tally” (count).
      • “instabelle” – “Unstable”, “instant” “belle” (attractive woman).
      • “whymen” – “Women”, “why men?”, “why me?”.
      • “whin” – “When”, “whinny” (horse sound), “win”.
      • “infuct ter” – “In fact to”, “I fucked her”, “infect-er”.
      • “midascernin’” – “My discerning”, “Midas” (Greek myth: king whose touch turned everything to gold, tragically) “caring”, “might ask her in”, possibly “kerning” (space between letters), “Cernunnos” (Celtic horned god).
      • “gilten” – “Gilded”, “glittering”, suggest??
      • “I, eye” – “Eye, I”.
      • “hym” – “Am”, “him”, “hymn”.
      • “untirely” – “Entirely”, “un- tired”.
      • “liveable” – “Lovable”, “liveable” (ironic speech from a dead person).
    • ces heer begbugger, t’whit Lucia rescornds wit, “Bul.”

      • “ces heer” – “Says her”, “says here”, “sister”, “incest here”, “heer” (lord).
      • “begbugger” – “Big brother”, “beg” “bugger” (sodomize), “bedbug”.
      • “t’whit” – “To which”, “to whit”, “twit” (idiot).
      • “rescornds” – “Responds”, “re- scorns”.
      • “wit” – “With”, “wit”.
      • “Bul” – “Bull” (bullshit), suggest??
        • “Bull” echos the last syllable of “lovable”. Lucia is calling bullshit on Giorgio’s claim.
  • Paragraph 27
    “Why must I be compared unflatteringly to my own father? How can I but suffer in comparison to such a deathless paragon?” cries Giorgio, to whom Lucia softly retorts, “Gone.”

    • “Wheymisteye decompered deflattringly tombhighon fearder?

      • “Wheymisteye” – “Why must I”, “whey mist eye”, suggest??
        • Why has this been combined into one compound word?
      • “decompered” – “Be compared”, “decomposed”, “deco” (art movement), “pere” (French “father”).
      • “deflattringly” – “Unflatteringly”, “deflating”.
      • “tombhighon” – “To my own”, “tomb high on”.
      • “fearder” – “Father”, “fear the”.
    • Hoken I bitt suffle incanperison t’serch a dithlis parargon?”

      • “Hoken” – “How can”, “hoke” (something contrived or artificial; Ireland “to scrounge”).
      • “bitt” – “But”, “bit”, “bitter”.
      • “suffle” – “Suffer”, “shuffle”.
      • “incanperison” – “In comparison”, “incant person”, “in (the) can, (which is slang for) prison”.
      • “t’serch” – “To such”, “to search”, “it’s arch”.
      • “dithlis” – “Deathless”, “dith” (Scottish Gaelic “of her”) “list”. (Lucia could make quite a list of the ways Giorgio is inferior .)
      • “parargon” – “Paragon”, “parar” (Spanish “to stop”), “argon” (chemical element), “Argonaut” (Greek mythological figure).
    • crites Blubbeo, t’whoo Lucia sifftly unsorts, “Gon.”

      • “crites” – “Cries”, “criticizes”, “sea rites”.
      • “Blubbeo” – “Giorgio”, “blubber” (to speak while crying).
      • “t’whoo” – “To whom”, “to woo”.
        • “tu-whit (from previous paragraph) tu-who” is the sound an owl makes, according to Shakespeare in Love’s Labour’s Lost.
      • “sifftly” – “Softly”, “stiffly”, “swiftly”, “River Liffey“.
      • “unsorts” – “Retorts”, un- sorts”, “inserts”.
      • “Gon” – “Gone”, “gon” (Scottish Gaelic “wound”).
        • “Gone” echoes the end of “paragon”. As far as Lucia is concerned, any reputation that Giorgio had is long gone.
  • Paragraph 28
    “Am I not quite the prettiest of them all? Why is my worth not recognized like destiny must surely have intended?” complains her elder sibling, to whom Lucia replies by saying, simply : “Dead.”

    • “Ahme nutquiet they princiest avdame ol’?

      • “Ahme” – “Am I”, “ah, me”, “ahem”.
      • “nutquiet” – “not quite”, “nut” (crazy person) “quiet”.
      • “they” – “The”, “they”.
      • “princiest” – “Prettiest”, “most prince-like”.
      • “avdame” – “Of them”, “average dame”.
      • “ol'” – “All”, “old”.
        • The phrasing (and the use of the word “prince” recalls the rhyme of the Evil Queen from the 1937 Snow White film: “Magic mirror on the wall, who is the fairest one of all?”.
    • Wigh est maworth nert reckoneyed lak desdeny mest sirely haf interrnded?”

      • “Wigh est” – “Why is”, “wight” (archaic “living creature, human; brave, strong”; poetic “ghost”), “highest”
      • “maworth” – “My worth”, “ma worth” (the worth of (only) the mother), “maw earth”.
      • “nert” – “Not”, “nert” (Old Irish “strength”), “nertz” (slang “nuts”).
      • “reckoneyed” – “Recognized”, “reckon eyed”.
      • “lak” – “Like”, “lake”, “lack”.
      • “desdeny” – “Destiny”, “these deny”.
      • “mest” – “Must”, “me-est” (most me), “messed (up)” (mistaken), “mest” (Old Saxon “most”).
      • “sirely” – “Surely”, “sire-ly” (in the manner of the father).
      • “haf” – “Have”, “half”, “haf” (Welsh “summer”).
      • “interrnded” – “Intended”, “interred” (buried), “intern dead”.
    • gonplainst her elda sabling, t’womb Lucia riplies bye-sighin’, samply : “Ded.”

      • “gonplainst” – “Complains”, “gon” (Scottish Gaelic “wound”) “plaint” (archaic “complaint”).
      • “elda” – “Elder”, “elda” (Icelandic “to cook; to dawn”), “el” (Spanish “the”) “da” (father).
      • “sabling” – “Sibling”, “sad language”, “stab long”, “sob linger”.
      • “t’womb” – “To whom”, “womb”.
      • “riplies” – “Replies”, “ripples” (in the clear surface of the pond?), “RIP” (rest in peace, often inscribed upon tombstones) “lies” (Giorgio will not rest in peace?).
      • “bye-sighin’” – “By saying”, “sighing ‘goodbye'”.
      • “samply” – “Simply”, “sample-y” (Echo’s speech is like sampled audio), “is amply”.
      • “Ded” – “Dead”, “ded” (Irish “from your”; Old English “deed”.
        • “Dead” echoes the end of “intended”. Though Giorgio may once have been handsome, now he’s just dead.
  • Paragraph 29
    At this point his voice grows fainter and she tries to move a little closer, whereupon she loses her specific viewpoint and the image vanishes, disintegrating into many pointillistic dots of light and shade, as sure as anything. Lucia turns her back upon him, just as he had done to her, and makes her way back up out of the hollow. Still considering the admonitory lesson of her brother, the queen’s ill-begotten child stuck outside in an inner maze where they would be forgotten, Lucia wanders once more into the sun-dappled woodlands, humming gaily as she goes.

    • It disapoint hiss foice gras feinder anche trister maev a litterl clearsir, wearapen she lucesouer spacefic fewpaint an die himage vinishes, deseenthergazin unti mony poindrelistic douts olighten shead, e seuras unnythank.

      • “It disapoint” – “At this point”, “it disappoint(s)”.
      • “hiss” – “His”, “hiss” (snake or goose sound).
      • “foice gras” – “Voice grows”, “foie gras” (a delicacy made from goose liver), “first grass”.
      • “feinder” – “Fainter”, “feint-er” (one who makes deceived thrusts), “feign dear” (pretend to love).
      • “anche” – “And she”, “anche” (Italian “also”; French “musical reed”).
      • “trister” – “Tries to”, “Tristan“, “Trieste” (where Lucia was born), “tryst-er”, “trickster”, “sister”.
      • “maev” – “Move”, “Maeve” (possibly Maeve Binchy (1939-2012), Irish writer), “ma evade”.
      • “litterl” – “Little”, “litter” (trash; group of offspring; carrying platform), “literal” (exactly; made of letters).
      • “clearsir” – “Closer”, “clear sir”, “clears air”.
      • “wearapen” – “Whereupon”, “wear a pen”, “wear apron”, “we are raping”.
      • “lucesouer” – “Loses her” – “Lucia” “soeur” (French “sister”), “look sour”.
      • “spacefic” – “Specific”, “space fic” (space is just an illusion, fictional).
      • “fewpaint” – “Viewpoint”, “few paint”.
        • On a more general level, this can be taken as a warning against watered-down art. Each “specific viewpoint” should be valued.
      • “an die” – “And the”, “one die”, “Andy”, “die” (to cease living; German “the”).
      • “himage” – “Image”, “him age”.
      • “vinishes” – “Vanishes”, “vini” (Italian “wines”), suggest??
      • “deseenthergazin” – “Disintegrating”, “de-seen the gazing” (what was being looked at is no longer seen).
      • “unti” – “Into”, “until”, “unto”.
      • “mony” – “Many”, “Monet” (Claude Monet (1840-1926), French Impressionist painter), “money”, “moan-y”.
      • “poindrelistic” – “Pointillistic” (painting style), “pond realistic”.
      • “douts” – “Dots”, “doubts”.
      • “olighten” – “Of light and”, “o, lighten”.
      • “shead” – “Shade”, “she had”.
      • “e seuras unnythank” – “As sure as anything”, “e” (suggest??), “Seurat” (George Seurat (1859-1891), French pointillist painter), “un-thank”, “cunny” (slang “vagina”).
    • Lucia tarns heir boock ipayn hom, jesta seahag dante hur, unmix haway beckep autifti hellow.

      • “tarns” – “Turns”, “tarn” (small mountain lake, a word used notably in Poe’s The Fall of the House of Usher).
      • “heir” – “Her”, “heir”.
      • “booock” – “Back”, “book”, “boo-ock” (small scare?), “och” (expression of disapproval or surprise).
      • “ipayn” – “Upon”, “in pain”, “I” “payn” (Middle English “bread”), “paynim” (archaic “heathen”).
        • Possibly also “Payne’s process” (method for preserving timber), which suggests Pilgrim’s Progress.
      • “hom” – “Him”, “homo” (man, comsidered as a general class).
      • “jesta seahag” – “Just as he had”, “jester sea hag” (possible reference to the Sea Hag, an enemy of Popeye introduced in 1929).
      • “dante” – “Done to”, “Dante” (Dante Alighieri (1265-1321), Italian poet)
      • “hur” – “Her”, “hur” (lower-class laugh sound), “hurt”, possibly “Ben-Hur” (1880 novel and subsequent adaptations).
      • “unmix” – “And makes”, “un mix” (separate).
      • “haway” – “Her way”, “ha” (laugh sound), “haway” (cry of encouragement).
      • “beckep” – “Back up”, “Beckett” (Samuel Beckett (1906-1989) Irish writer, protégé of James Joyce), “beck” “ep” (suggest??).
      • “autifti” – “Out of the”, “autistic”, “tufty”, suggest??.
    • Stell kinsadring t’he adminotaury lessen afher breder, the queem’s ullbiggotin cheiled sdark outerzeit in unamaze ware dayward befurcotten, Lucia wenders whensmire enti der shun-dippled werdlens, humman gaeli ashe groes.

      • “Stell” – “Still”, “stellar”, “Stella”, “stell” (Scotland “prop, support”).
      • “kinsadring” – “Considering”, “kin sad ring”.
      • “t’he” – “The”, “to he”, “tee hee” (giggle noise).
      • “adminotaury” – “Admonitory” (warning), “daddy minotaur”, “A.D.”.
      • “lessen” – “Lesson”, “lessen”.
      • “afher” – “Of her”, “after”, “affair”.
      • “breder” – “Brother”, “breeder”.
      • “queem’s” – “Queen’s”, “squeamish”, “queers”, “quim’s” (of the vagina).
        • The “queen” is Nora, metaphorically identified with Pasiphae, mother of the Minotaur.
      • “ullbiggotin” – “Ill-begotten”, “ull” (Catalan “eye”; various Northern languages “wool”), “sullen”, “bigot”, “tin”.
      • “cheiled” – “Child”, “chilled”, “cèilidh” (social event with Celtic folk music, dancing, and/or storytelling), “cheileadh” (Irish form of the verb “ceil: to conceal”).
      • “sdark” – “Stuck”, “it’s dark”, “stark”.
      • “outerzeit” – “Outside”, “outer” “zeit” (German “time”), “zeitgeist”.
      • “unamaze” – “An inner maze”, “un- amaze”.
        • Giorgio’s entrapping Labyrinth is psychological, not physical.
      • “ware” – “Where”, “beware”, “ware”.
      • “dayward” – “He would”, “towards day”, “protected from daylight”.
      • “befurcotten” – “Be forgotten”, “bifurcated” (become two), “be fur cotton”.
      • “wenders” – “Wanders”, “wend-ers”, “wonders”.
      • “whensmire” – “Once more”, “whens” (different time periods), “whence”, “wens” (cysts), “mire” (deep mud; predicament; ant), “smile”.
      • “enti der” – “Into the”, “Enkidu” (companion of Gilgamesh, a “wild man”), “entire”, “en- tide -r”.
      • “shun-dippled” – “Sun-dappled”, “shun” “dip-led” (give up following a fool), “dipped”, “depleted”.
      • “werdlens” – “Woodlands”, “word-lens” (way of looking at the world through language), “weird” (strange; fate).
      • “humman” – “Humming”, “human”. Possibly “Haman” (biblical figure), “humman” (Finnish “of a horse”).
      • “gaeli” – “Gaily”, “Gaelic” (referring to various Celtic languages).
      • “ashe groes” – “As she goes”, “ash groves” (groups of trees; “Ash Grove” (Welsh folk song), “as he grows”.
  • Paragraph 30
    Some distance off between the trees she glimpses two old ladies, patients like herself here at Saint Andrews whom she thinks she recognizes, out upon a constitutional just as she is. Unless she’s mistaken they are psychological embarrassments to England’s royal family, casual relations of that Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon, whom the public knows more recently as the Queen Mother. although she herself demands her corgi’s breakfast is cut into perfect one inch cubes, and that the sterny angles better be dressed in fresh linen robes each day, it’s apparently considered that to have a couple of clearly deluded relations at large might give the regal bloodline something of a reputation for genetic frailty. In some ways it’s the same situation as when tormented King Minos had his adulterous wife’s terrible and deformed babe locked up inside a labyrinth. It is a pity, Lucia believes, that families from the most lauded to the lowest in the land have such ignorance and fear of mental divergence that they’d condemn their loved ones to an oubliette. She looks on as the two old biddies disappearing through the arbors, out of sight, and then continues with her own perambulations.

    • Sumdourstance iff beternitris she glintses towald laties, patience luccaself hereat Sent Endrows whome shythings shi wreckonoises, audopon a cantsitusual gist as shewise.

      • “Sumdourstance” – “Some distance”, “sum dour stance”.
      • “iff” – “Off”, “if”, “Liffey”.
      • “beternitris” – “Between the trees”, “be eternity triste (sad)”.
      • “glintses” – “Glimpses”, “glints”.
      • “towald” – “Two old”, “toward”, “to” “wald” (forest; British dialect “strength; command”).
      • “laties” – “Ladies”, “late ones”, “laity” (non-clergy; commoners).
      • “patience” – “Patients”, “patience”.
      • “luccaself” – “Like herself”, “Lucia-self”, “Lucca” (province of Italy).
      • “hereat” – “Here at”, “hereat” (at this time), possibly “Heorot” (location in Beowulf).
      • “Sent Endrows” – “Saint Andrews”, “sent end rows”.
      • “whome” – “Whom”, “home” (in this context, “nursing home”; “mental hospital”).
      • “shythings” – “She thinks”, “shy things”.
      • “shi wreckonoises” – “She recognizes”, “shipwreck noises”, “reckon”.
      • “audopon” – “Out upon”, “Aud” (Norwegian female name), suggest??
      • “cantsitusual” – “Constitutional” (healthy walk), “can’t sit (as) usual”.
      • “gist” – “Just”, “gist” (approximate meaning).
      • “shewise” – “She was”, “she’s wise”, “in her manner”.
    • Enlesshly’s medstaken dayare psympulogical unbareassments to Engrand’s reyal faminey, cousial relatids o’ dot Erisiblet Boozre-Lyon, wetdey publike knomore racintly ester Quain Memmer.

      • “Enlesshly’s” – “Unless she’s”, “endlessly”.
      • “medstaken” – “Mistaken”, “meds” (medicines, especially psychological ones) “taken”.
      • “dayare” – “They are”, “day our”.
      • “psympulogical” – “Psychological”, “symptom illogical”.
      • “unbareassments”, “Embarrassments”, “un-bare-ass” (clothed) “mental”.
      • “Engrand” – “England”, “become grand”.
      • “reyal” – “Royal”, “real”.
      • “faminey” – “Family”, “famine-like”.
      • “cousial relatids” – “Casual relations” (in between “close” and “distant” relations), “cousin-like related”.
      • “dot” – “That”, “dot”.
      • “Erisiblet Boozre-Lyon” – “Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon” (Mother of Queen Elizabeth II), “Eris” (Greek goddess of strife) “Iblis” (Islamic archdevil) “Beelzebub” (alternate name for the Devil), “her sibling” “boozer” (heavy drinker) “lion”.
        • The two women appear to be Katherine and Nerissa Bowes-Lyon, neices of QEBL, who were placed in Earlswood Hospital for the mentally disabled in 1941. Three other mentally disabled cousins of Queen Elizabeth II were also confined in Earlswood.
      • “wetday” – “Who the”, “wet day”.
      • “publike” – “Public”, “pub like” (which would seem to connect to “boozer”).
      • “knomore” – “Know more”, “no more”.
      • “racintly” – “Recently”, “racistly” (QEBL was accused of racism).
      • “ester” – “As the”, “ester” (chemical compound; Cornish “oyster”, possibly “Esther” (female name).
      • “Quain” – “Queen”, “quaint” (old-fashioned; archaic “cunt”).
      • “Memmer” – “Mother”, suggest?? Possibly “member”, “meme-r”, “Mimir“, “rememberer”, “mummer”?
    • Illthough she HRHself demends herr curgis’ barkfirst iscot intu peerfact whininch cutes, endas the sterny angles bedderbye dristin frish lenin rubbs ich diem, tis herparently constittered thot two harb a crupple o’ clarely delooted relataints outlarge mutt gifter regul blutlyin samethink awfur rippertation fur ginnotic failty.

      • “Illthough” – “Although”, “ill thought”.
      • “HRHself” – “Herself”, “HRH” (Her Royal Highness).
      • “demends” – “Demands”, “de-mends” (breaks?), “demented”.
      • “herr” – “Her”, “herr” (German “mister”)
        • The term “herr” is associated with Germanic fastidiousness. Ironically, QEBL was known for anti-German prejudice.
      • “curgis’” – “Corgi’s”, “cur urges”.
        • QEBL did have pet Corgi dogs, a tradition which Queen Elizabeth has kept to this day. I have found claims that QEII has her Corgis’ food cut into little cubes, but have not been able to substantiate them.
      • “barkfirst” – “Breakfast”, “bark first”.
      • “iscot” – “Is cut”, “ascot” (type of upper class tie).
      • “intu” – “Into”, “in” “tu” (French familiar “you”).
      • “peerfact” – “Perfect”, “peer fact” (trivia about a royal peer).
      • “whininch” – “One inch”, “winch”, “whining”.
      • “cutes” – “Cubes”, “cutest”.
      • “endas” – “And has”, “enders”.
      • “sterny angles” – “stony angels”? “stern angles”? suggest??
        • These two words are very unclear, leaving the meaning of the rest of the clause also in significant doubt.
      • “bedderbye” – “Better be”, “beddy-bye” (infantile “bedtime”), “bedded by”.
      • “dristin” – “Dressed in”, “dry as tin”, “Tristan“, “drifting”.
      • “frish” – “Fresh”, “fish”, possibly “frisson” (shiver).
      • “lenin” – “Linen”, “Lenin” (Russian dictator), “lenient”.
      • “rubbs” – “Robes”, “rubs”, “rubbers” (condoms).
      • “ich” – “Each”, “itch”, “ich” (obsolete or German “I”), “rich”.
      • “diem” – “Day”, “dime”, “die”.
      • “tis” – “It’s”, “’tis” (archaic “it is”), “ties”.
      • “herparently” – “Apparently”, “her parent lie”.
      • “constittered” – “Considered”, “constituted”, “cons” (deceits; studies; disadvantages) “tittered” (giggled; having breasts).
      • “thot” – “That”, “thought”, “Thoth” (Egyptian god of knowledge).
      • “two” – “To”, “two”.
      • “harb” – “Have”, “harbor”. Possibly “harbinger”.
      • “crupple” – “Couple”, “cripple”. Possibly “crumple”.
      • “clarely” – “Clearly”, “in the manner of John Clare” (see section three).
      • “delooted” – “Deluded”, “de-looted” (having had all their value stolen).
      • “relataints” – “Relations”, “real taints”.
      • “outlarge” – “At large” (unconfined), “out-large” (be bigger than).
      • “mutt” – “Might”, “mutt” (dog of no pedigree; idiot), “mutter”.
      • “gifter” – “Give the”, “gift-er”, “grifter” (con man).
      • “regul” – “Regal”, “regulation”.
      • “blutlyin” – “Bloodline”, “blunt lying”, “blut” (Dutch “bankrupt”) “Lyon”.
      • “samethink” – “Something”, “same think”.
      • “awfur” – “Of a”, “awful”, “aw” (expression of “isn’t that cute”) “fur”.
      • “rippertation” – “Reputation”, “Ripper” (some theories posit that Jack the Ripper was an insane member of the royal family; see “Dance of the Gull Catchers” in Moore’s From Hell) “nation”.
      • “fur” – “For”, “fur”.
      • “ginnotic” – “Genetic”, “gin” (type of alcohol; card game; trap), “jinn” (genie), “ginnet” (female donkey).
      • “failty” – “Frailty”, “fail”, “faulty”.
  • Page 892
    • Insaemwise ittws the shayme saduation isworn tormonsterd Kin Minus hidhas bulterous whirfe’s torroble an defarmed bublockt op insade a labortrynth.

      • “Insaemwise” – “In some ways”, “insane wise” “in Samwise” (loyal servant character in The Lord of the Rings).
      • “ittws” – “It was”, “twits”, suggest??
      • “shayme” – “Same”, “shame”, “shay” (small carriage) “me”.
      • “saduation” – “Situation”, “sad gradation”, “sadist nation”.
      • “isworn” – “As when”, “is worn”, “I swore”.
      • “tormonsterd” – “Tormented”, “tor” (rocky outcrop, hill; Irish “shrub; fruit”) “monstered”. Possible reference to Tor Johnson, an actor who often played monsters.
      • “Kin” – “King”, “kin” (family).
      • “Minus” – “Minos“, “minus”.
      • “hidhas” – “Had his”, “hid has”, possibly “Midas“.
      • “bulterous” – “Adulterous”, “bull”.
      • “whirfe’s” – “Wife’s”, “wharf”, “whirr”, suggest??
      • “torroble” – “Terrible”, “tor” “roble” (type of oak tree), “torrrent” “rubble”, “torn robe”.
      • “an” – “And”, “an”.
      • “defarmed” – “Deformed”, “de-farmed” (removed from a productive context?).
      • “bublockt” – “Babe locked”, “bullock” (young bull), “bub” (buddy; breast), “bubble”, “blub” (to cry) “ox”.
      • “op insade” – “Up inside”, “open sesame” (phrase from Arabian Nights), “op” (operation; optical) “in” “Sade” (Marquis de Sade (1740-1814), French writer, from whom we get the term “sadism”).
      • “labortrynth” – “Labyrinth”, “laboratory”, “labor try n-th”.
    • Itist a poty, Lucia belease, dirt samilies fam demonst laurded todey lowaste engeland haz sutur agnerants infeera mendle diverences dirtdeed contem dir luftwungs toin newbliette.

      • “Itist” – “It is”, “elitist”? Suggest??
      • “poty” – “Pity”, “poetry”, “pot-y” (like a pot?), “potty” (infantile “toilet”; slang “insane”).
      • “belease” – “Believes”, “be lease”, “bell ease”.
      • “dirt” – “That”, “dirt”.
      • “samilies” – “Families”, “same lies”, possinly “similes”.
      • “fam” – “From”, “family”, “fame”, “famish”.
      • “demonst” – “The most”, “de-monster”, “demonstrate”, “demons true”.
      • “laurded” – “Lauded” (praised), “lorded”, “lured”.
      • “todey” – “To the”, “today”, “toady” (sycophant), “to dye”.
      • “lowaste” – “Lowest”, “lo, waste”.
      • “engeland” – “In the land”, “England”, “Engels” (Friedrich Engels (1820-1895) German writer and partner of Karl Marx who wrote often about class issues).
      • “haz” – “Have”, “haze”, “hazard”.
      • “sutur” – “Such”, “suture”, “Surtur” (Norse mythology: fire giant).
      • “agnerants” – “Ignorance”, “Agni” (Hindu fire god) “rants”, “degenerates”, “Agnes” (suggest??), “aging ants”.
      • “infeera” – “And fear of”, “infernal”, “in fee” “Ra” (Egyptian sun god).
      • “mendle” – “Mental”, “Mendel” (Gregor Mendel (1822-1884), early researcher into the heritability of traits (such as mental instability)), “meddle”, “mend all”.
      • “diverences” – “Divergences”, “differences”, “diverse experiences”. Possibly “diver”.
      • “dirtdeed” – “That they’d”, “dirty deed”.
      • “contem” – “Condemn”, “contemplate”, “contempt”.
      • “dir” – “Their”, “dire”, “direct”.
      • “luftwungs” – “Loved ones”, “Luftwaffe” (German airforce that devastated England during WWII), “lift wings”.
      • “toin” – “To an”, suggest?? Possibly “bastion” (fortification).
      • “newbliette” – “Oubliette” (dungeon), “new”, “newbie” (slang “newcomer”).
    • She lucs on este twa albiddes diserpair entruthe erbers, ultersighd, undin canthearnews wutheroam paramjewelations.

      • “lucs” – “Looks”, “Lucia”, “lux” (Latin “light”).
      • “este” – “As the”, “este” (obsolete “grace; favor”), “(House of) Este” (Italian royal family).
      • “twa” – “Two”, “twa” (Scots “two”), “twat” (slang “vagina; idiot”). Possible allusion to folk song “Twa Corbies“.
      • “albiddes” – “Old biddies (old women)”, “abides”, “all biddest”, “albidus” (Latin “white”), “Albion” (poetic “Britain”).
      • “diserpair” – “Disappear”, “disrepair”, “dice pair” (pair o’ dice = paradise?).
      • “entruthe” – “Into the”, “entrust”, “in truth”.
      • “erbers” – “Arbors” (grove of trees), “embers”, “Erebus” (Greek mythology: “primordial god of darkness; region of the Underworld”).
      • “ultersighd” – “Out of sight”, “utter sigh”, “outside”, “ulterior”.
      • “undin” – “And then”, “undine” (water spirit) “un-” “din” (loud noise).
      • “canthearnews” – “Continues”, can’t hear news”, “cant” (jargon; hypocrital speech; corner; angle). Possibly “cantharides” (an aphrodisiac), “thews” (muscles).
      • “wutheroam” – “With her own”, “wuther” (to make a rushing sound) “roam”.
      • “paramjewelations” – “Perambulations”, “pa ram jewel relations”. Possibly “parameter”, “revelations”.
  • Paragraph 31
    Strange elliptic eyes peer from the dull metallic trunks of silver birches, and Lucia womders, not for the first time, wat madness truly is. In her opinion, although she had never concentrated and had thus not greatly learned the trick of mathematics, at its root insanity must by a question of geometry. Professor Einstein maintains that we are in a universe composed of four dimensions, only three of which are naturally visible. Might not our consciousness itself, ineffable to scientific scrutiny, be a phenomenon of four dimensions that has found itself contained within a mortal body and a world that would appear to have but three?

    • Stringe eglypted oeiys peerl form the deull mentallic trinks o’ sylvar burges, aund Lucia windors, nut fitty versetime, wit mednurse tyrelly is.

      • “Stringe” – “Strange”, “string”, “stringe” (Italian “he/she/it presses”), “stringent”.
      • “eglypted” – “elliptic” (oval), “Egypt”, “glyph”, “eclipsed”.
      • “oeiys” – “Eyes”, “oeil” (French “eye; glyph”), “oyes” (hear ye).
      • “peerl” – “Peer”, “peril”, “pearl”.
      • “form” – “From”, “form”, “fur”.
      • “deull” – “Dull”, “duel”, “dell”, “devil”.
      • “mentallic” – “Metallic”, “mental lice”, “lick”, “like”.
      • “trinks” – “Trunks”, “tricks”, “trinkets”.
      • “sylvar burges” – “Silver birches”, “sylvan verges” (forest borders), “burge” (Latin “o fort”), “burgess” (borough representative).
      • “aund” – “And”, “aunt”, “maunder” (to speak in a disorganized fashion). Possibly “maundy” Thursday, a Christian holy day.
      • “windors” – “Wonders”, “windows and doors”, “Windsor” (current British royal dynasty). Possibly “endorse”.
      • “nut” – “Not”, “nut” (crazy person), “Nut” (Egyptian sky goddess).
      • “fitty” – “For the”, “prone to fits”, “fifty”.
      • “versetime” – “First time”, “verse-time” (possibly time that repeats, like verses in a song), “worse”.
      • “wit” – “What”, “wit” (cleverness; sanity; humor; to know).
      • “mednurse” – “Madness”, “medical nurse”.
      • “tyrelly” – “Truly”, “really”, “tyre”, “Tyrell” (male name, suggest??), “Tyrolean” (someone from Tyrol).
    • Innur opinyawn, ulldo sheerhard nemer cosintrated and addthus netgrossly loarned the trig o’ mattermagics, addit sqroot unsamity mult piy a quantion o’ deomattry.

      • “Innur” – “In her”, “inner”, “inure” (to habituate).
      • “opinyawn” – “Opinion”, “open yawn” (is Lucia bored?), “o, pinion” (wing, feather; chain). Possibly “pinyin” (system of transliterating Mandarin Chinese to roman script).
      • “ulldo” – “Although”, “will do”, “ull” (Catalan “eye”; various Nordic languages “wool”).
      • “sheerhard” – “She had”, “sheer hard”, “shear head”.
      • “nemer” – “Never”, “no more”, “ne” (obsolete “not; nor”) “mere” (only; pond; boundary-marker).
      • “cosintrated” – “Concentrated”, “cosine” (geometry term, the first of many in this sentence) “treatise”.
      • “addthus” – “Had thus”, “add”, suggest??
      • “netgrossly” – “Not greatly”, “net gross” (financial/mathematical term).
      • “loarned” – “Learned”, “loaned” (more finance).
      • “trig o'” – “Trick of”, “trigonometry”.
      • “mattermagics” – “Mathematics”, “matter magics”.
      • “addit sqroot” – “At its root”, “add it square-root”, “addition”.
      • “unsamity” – “Insanity”, “un-same-y”. Possibly “samite” (rich silk).
      • “mult piy” – “Must be”, “multiply”. Possibly “molt by”.
      • “quantion” – “Question”, “quantion” (physics term), “quantum” (physics term).
      • “deomattry” – “Geometry”, “deo” (god) “matter”. Possibly “day of mattress”, “maternity”.
    • Parfacer Einisteim mentaimes dat wei err n a luniwerse khemprosed o’ fier dementions, inly tre awitcher nowtruly virisiable.

      • “Parfacer” – “Professor”, “pa face”, “par” (average, equal; young salmon). Possibly “parfait” (type of dessert; French “perfect”).
      • “Einisteim” – “Einstein” (Albert Einstein (1879-1955), famous physicist), “ein” (German “one”) “is time” (time is a single block).
      • “mentaimes” – “Maintains”, “mental times”, “men tames”.
      • “dat” – “That”, “data”.
      • “wei” – “We”, “weird”, “Wei” (common Chinese name, suggest??), “weir” (adjustable dam; fish trap).
      • “err n a” – “Are in a”, “earn”, “err” (to make a mistake).
      • “luniwerse” – “Universe”, “loony worse”, “luna verse”.
      • “khemprosed” – “Composed”, “Khem” (Egyptian god of reproduction) “prose”.
      • “fier” – “Four”, “fire”, “fie-r” (one who expresses disgust).
      • “dementions” – “Dimensions”, “dementia”.
      • “inly” – “Only”, “inlay”. Possibly “inléite” (Irish “legible”), “Inlé” (Lapine “the moon; darkness”).
      • “tre” – “Three”, “tree” (possibly an allusion to Yggdrasil, the tree at the center of all worlds in Norse mythology).
      • “awitcher” – “Of which are”, “a witcher”.
      • “nowtruly” – “Naturally”, “now truly”.
      • “virisiable” – “Visible”, very see-able”, “viridian” (green, growing).
    • Mighnd knot awer canseeusness hedself, uniffable ter sceeintestic scrupiny, beau a fairnuminon o’ far timersions datas foundedself contrained wittin a merdel blody end um werlt doutwit a’peer ta hove baret’ree?

      • Mighnd” – “Might”, “mind”, possibly “nigh MD” (almost a doctor).
      • “knot” – “Not”, “knot”.
      • “awer” – “Our”, “awe”.
      • “canseeusness” – “Consciousness”, “can-see-us-ness”.
      • “hedself” – “Itself”, “head-self”.
      • “uniffable” – “Ineffable” (indescribable), “unify fable”, “River Liffey”.
      • “ter” – “To”, “letter”, “term”.
      • “sceeintestic” – “Scientific”, “see in testicle”, “scene intestate”.
      • “scrupiny” – “Scrutiny”, “scrupulous”, “screw pity”.
      • “beau” – “Be”, “beau” (sweetheart; French “handsome”).
      • “fairnuminon” – “Phenomenon”, “fair numinous”.
      • “o’ far” – “Of four”, “afar”.
      • “timersions” – “Dimensions”, “time versions”, “immersions”.
      • “datas” – “That has”, “data’s”, “dataset”.
      • “foundedself” – “Found itself”, “founded self”.
      • “contrained” – “Constrained”, “con” (deceit) “trained”, “cunt rained”.
      • “wittin” – “Within”, “wit tin” (cleverness that isn’t very sturdy?), “witting” (aware). Possibly “Wittenburg” (German town).
      • “merdel” – “Mortal”, “merde” (French “shit”), “mere dell” (only a hollow), “del” (obolete “portion”).
      • “blody” – “Body”, “bloody”, “blodyn” (Welsh “flower”).
      • “end” – “And”, “end”.
      • “um” – “A”, “um” (expression of uncertainty), “dumb” (foolish; unable to speak).
      • “werlt” – “World”, “welt” (raised mark caused by a blow; to reinforce; German “world”).
      • “doutwit” – “That would”, “doubt wit”, “outwit”, “outwith” (outside of), “do it with”.
      • “a’peer” – “Appear”, “a peer” (to look carefully; colleague; nobleman).
      • “ta” – “To”, “ta” (farewell).
      • “hove” – “Have”, “hove” (heaved; dialect “to lift”; obsolete “to linger”), “hover”, “home”.
      • “baret’ree” – “But three”, “bare tree”, “barratry” (instigating multiple lawsuits; selling political offices; unlawful acts by naval crews).
  • Paragraph 32
    Lucia ponders while she skips along. Perhaps for some of us, our personality is constantly attempting to express itself in all its fourfold glory, is forever looking for that bend, that corner of horizon that is at right angles with the other three. Those of us who can navigate this turn successfully will be esteemed as bards and poets, while those of us who’re not so adroit in their tacking and maneuvering will be considered lunatics or simply fools. Of course, there are those who will be perceived as both poetic and deranged.

    • Lucia penders willshe skirps alonge.

      • “penders” – “Ponders”, “pending”, “depend”, “penned”.
      • “willshe” – “While she”, “wills he”, “will she”. Possibly “Welsh”.
      • “skirps” – “Skips”, “skirts” (clothing; slang “women”; edges; to avoid the center).
      • “alonge” – “Along”, “alone”.
    • Perhopes fearsum afuss, owr foursomality is consciantly outtempting to expierce itsolve inalys farfoold glarey, esperever luccinfer thort beond, thort quarner iff ourrizen dattiset wrytangles wideehighther fhree.

      • “Perhopes” – “Perhaps”, “per hopes”, “pére (Norman “father”). Possibly “Persephone” (wife of Hades).
      • “fearsum” – “For some”, “fearsome”, “fear sum”.
      • “afuss” – “Of us”, “a fuss”.
      • “owr” – “Our”, “row”, “owr” (Cornish “gold”).
      • “foursomality” – “Personality”, “foursome” (sex act with four people), “four sodality” (group of four companions).
      • “consciantly” – “Constantly”, “conscious ant lie”, “con scientifically”.
      • “outtempting” – “Attempting”, “tempting out”.
      • “expierce” – “Express”, “ex- (out from) pierce”.
      • “itsolve” – “Itself”, “solve it” (espedially as in the alchemic notion solve et coagula).
      • “inalys” – “In all its”, “in Alice“, “inner lies”.
      • “farfoold” – “fourfold”, “far-fooled”.
      • “glarey” – “Glory”, “glare-y”, “glareydagh” (Manx “linguistic”).
      • “esperever” – “Is forever”, “esper” (psychic) “ever”, “espe” (German “aspen tree”) “river”.
      • “luccinfer” – “Looking for”, “Lucia infer”, “Lucifer“, “Lucca” (Italian city).
      • “thort” – “That”, “thought”, “Thor“.
      • “beond” – “Bend”, “beyond”, “bond”, “be on the”.
      • “thort” – See above.
      • “quarner” – “Corner”, “quantum”, “quarter”. Possibly “quern” (primitive corn mill).
      • “iff” – “Of”, “if”, “River Liffey“.
      • “ourrizen” – “Horizon”, “our risen” (possibly a Christ reference), “ourie” (chill; bleak) “zen”.
      • “dattiset” – “That is at”, “dataset”, “daddy set”, “datti” (Italian “give!”).
      • “wrytangles” – “Right angles”, “wry tangles”, “wright angels”.
      • “wideehighther” – “With the other”, “width, height, depth-er”, “hight” (archaic “called”).
      • “fhree” – “Three”, “free”. Possibly “fréamh” (Irish “root”).
    • Theos ophus howcan nevagaet disctern succinctfully wellbe estymdust bairds ound purwits, waile daiz aveers huer nit slo adroept undare taclin un meanoeuthert’ing illbe consigndered luciatics ar slimpery faals.

      • “Theos” – “Those”, “theos” (Latin “god”), “the os” (mouth; bone).
      • “ophus” – “Of us”, “opus” (work), ophidian (relating to snakes), Ophüls (Max Ophüls (1902-1957), German film director). Possibly “Orpheus“.
      • “howcan” – “Who can”, “how can”. Possibly “toucan” (type of tropical bird).
      • “nevagaet” – “Navigate”, “never get it”, “vagina eat”.
      • “disctern” – “This turn”, “discern”, “disc terrain”. Possibly “disco tern”.
      • “succinctfully” – “Successfully”, “succinctly”, “sucked in fully”.
      • “wellbe” – “Will be”, “be well”.
      • “estymdust” – “Esteemed as”, “time’s dust”, “estimated”, “stymied us”.
      • “bairds” – “Bards”, “birds”, “Baird” (male name, suggest??).
      • “ound” – “And”, “sound”. Possibly “Oundle” (town in Northamptonshire).
      • “purwits” – “Poets”, “purr wits”.
      • “waile” – “While”, “wail”, possibly “whale”.
      • “daiz” – “Those”, “daze”, “daisy”.
      • “aveers” – “Of us”, “avers” (states), “veers”, “averse”.
      • “huer” – “Who are”, “hue-r” (one who shouts; one who colors).
      • “nit” – “Not”, “nit” (slang “fool”).
      • “slo” – “So”, “slow”, “sloe” (blackthorn fruit; possible allusion to song “Sloe Gin“).
      • “adroept” – “Adroit”, “adept” (skilled), “adore”.
      • “undare” – “In their”, “un-dare”, “under”.
      • “taclin” – “Tacking” (way of maneuvering a sailboat), “tackling”. Possibly “Tam Lin“.
      • “un” – “And”, “un-“.
      • “meanoeuthert’ing” – “Maneuvering”, “mean othering”, “me another thing”, suggest??
      • “illbe” – “Will be”, “be ill”, “bill”.
      • “consigndered” – “Considered”, “consigned”, “co-signed”, “consistently gendered”, “con sign the red”.
      • “luciatics” – “Lunatics”, “Lucia tics”. Possibly “fanatics”.
      • “ar” – “Are”, “ar” (Irish “on”).
      • “slimpery” – “Simply”, “slippery”, “limp”.
      • “faals” – “Fools”, “falls”.
    • A’curse, dorados eywool bay parcived as buth pohetic an dewrenched.

      • “A’curse” – “Of course”, “a curse”, “a cur, see”.
      • “dorados” – “There are those”, “El Dorado” (mythical “city of gold” in South America, often sought by the mad or foolish), “door adios”.
      • “eywool” – “Who will”, “eye wool”.
      • “bay” – “Be”, “bay”.
      • “parcived” – “Perceived”, “Parcival” (Arthurian knight who was a holy fool), “park ivy-ed”.
      • “buth” – “Both”, “bus”, “but”, suggest??
      • “pohetic” – “Poetic”, “prophetic”, “pope tic”, “poor het (heterosexual), ick”.
      • An” – “And”, “an”, “can”.
      • “dewrenched – “Deranged”, “de-wrenched” (torn away?).
        • “poetic and deranged” well describes John Clare, who we are about to meet.
  • Forward to Section 3 – John Clare.
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