RtB section 12 – Dusty Springfield

Up to “Round the Bend”.

Back to Section 11 – Audrey Vernall

In which Lucia reminisces about Charlie Chaplin and her parents, then meets Dusty Springfield. Lucia and Dusty have passionate lesbian sex while Dusty recounts her life story. As Lucia contemplates 1960s surrealism, Patrick McGoohan (aka The Prisoner) rides by.
Significant characters and themes in this section:

Dusty Springfield, 1967
Dusty Springfield, 1967
  • Dusty Springfield (1939-199) was an English singer, acclaimed as “the finest white soul singer of her era”. She was generally considered to be a lesbian, and had lasting relationships with several women. Per Wikipedia, “In the 1970s and early 1980s, Springfield’s alcoholism and drug addiction affected her musical career. She was hospitalized several times for self-harm by cutting herself, and was diagnosed with bipolar disorder.” Apparently, these included a brief stay at Saint Andrews in 1967.
  • Patrick McGoohan, co-creator and star of The Prisoner, a ground-breaking and surrealistic British television program of 1967-1968. In The Prisoner, McGoohan plays a Britosh spy who has resigned from his job, only to awaken in a mysterious place known only as The Village, a “retrement home for spies” from which there seems to be no escape. There, names are not used, so McGoohan’s character is only ever referred to as “Number Six”. Moore claims that McGoohan spent some time in Saint Andrew’s in the 60s, but details are scant.
  • James Joyce (1882-1941) was an extremely famous writer and Lucia Joyce’s father.
  • The River Liffey is a river in Ireland which, in Finnegans Wake, is referred to many times, and is metaphorically linked to the female protagonist (who is, in some senses, Lucia).
  • World mythology, especially Irish, Greek, Roman, Norse, and Egyptian.
  • Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass by Lewis Carroll, classic children’s books whose themes include childhood, madness, wordplay, and doubled characters.
    • In a 2009 interview, Moore stated: “There are also references to Alice in Wonderland, almost like a reprise to Lost Girls. But that’s because James Joyce identified his daughter with Lewis Carroll’s Alice – Lucia is almost an anagram of Alice.”
  • Page 924 (continued)
  • Paragraph 198
    Crunching through the leaves and deadfall underfoot Lucia thinks about her father, grateful that he loved her through his language rather than in the too literal way that Audrey’s father did. Her daddy, on the other hand, had genuinely been a magical and an enchanting creature. She recalls one night in Paris, when they’d heard that Charlie Chaplin was in town and she’d been just a little girl. Her own dear father had decided to go out and take an evening stroll, just on the inconceivably slim chance they might bump in to the great man, the millionaire tramp, Lucia’s idol, there in that immense and teeming city.
  • Crounching through deliefs and dreadfall hinderfoot Lucia tinks abelle earthather, graveful daddy luft her t’rue his manguage frather den ‘n der toi-leteral way that Audnry’s further hid.

    • “Crounching” – “Crunching”, “crouching”.
    • “deliefs” – “The leaves”, “beliefs”.
    • “dreadfall” – “Deadfall”, “dread fall”.
    • “hinderfoot” – “Underfoot”, “hinder foot”.
    • “tinks abelle” – “Thinks about”, “a belle”, Tinker Bell” (fairy from Peter Pan, introducing a fairy-tale theme through the next several sentences).
    • “earthather” – “Her father”, “earth at her”, possibly “rather”.
    • “graveful daddy” – “Grateful that he”, “grave-ful” (filling a grave; full of gravitas) “daddy”.
    • “luft her t’rue” – “Loved her through”, “luft” (German “air”) “true”, “left her to rue”.
    • “manguage” – “Language”, “mangled”. Possibly “man gauge”.
    • “frather” – “Rather”, “father”.
    • “den ‘n der” – “Than in the”, “then and there”, “den under”.
    • “toi-leteral” – “Too literal”, “toilet era”, possibly “toy little”.
    • “Audnry’s” – “Audrey’s”, “ordinary”.
    • “further” – “Father”, “further” (too far), possibly “führer”.
    • “hid” – “Had”, “hid”.
  • Her Babbo, on the underhand, had geniunely bean-amagical andin incharting preature.

    • “underhand” – “Other hand”, “underhanded”.
    • “geniunely” – “Genuinely”, “genie”.
    • “bean-amagical” – “Been a magical”, “a magic bean” (referring to “Jack and the Beanstalk“).
    • “andin” – “And an”, possibly “undine”, suggest??
    • “incharting” – “Enchanting”, “in charting”.
    • “preature” – “Creature”, “preacher”, “pre- nature”.
  • She precalls win knight in Pairus, won dere’d herd that Charmley Shapelin was endown and she’d bun chest a lewdle girl.

    • “precalls” – “Recalls”, “pre- calls”.
    • “win” – “One”, “win”.
      • The words relating to victory, in close proximity with “knight”, suggest victory in some sort of contest.
    • “knight” – “Night”, “knight”.
    • “Pairus” – “Paris”, “pair (of) us”.
    • “won” – “When”, “won”.
    • “dere’d” – “They’d”, “there’d”, “deride”, “the red”.
    • “herd” – “Heard”, “herd”.
    • “Charmley Shapelin” – “Charlie Chaplin“, “charm” “ley” (Ley line?) “shapely”.
    • “endown” – “In town”, “endowed”.
    • “bun chest” – “Been just”, “bun chest” (that is, her breasts were still small).
    • “lewdle” – “Little”, “lewd”.
      • When this happened, Lucia was 14. According to Moore, she has been sexually active with her brother for four years already, hence “lewd”, though “little”.
  • Her underfather hard derided alleyz out and stake an evenodd sroll, gist on the undeceivably slum chants they mnight bumpkin tutor creat man, de milleonair trump, Lucia’sidle, darin’ dat glimmense and steeming shity.

    • “underfather” – “Own dear father”, “under (the ground; that is, dead) father”.
    • “hard” – “had”, “hard”.
    • “derided” – “Decided”, “derided”.
    • “alleyz” – “To go” (French “allez”), “alleys”.
    • “stake” – “Take”, “stake” (bet).
      • This introduces a brief sequence of gambling terms.
    • “evenodd” – “Evening”, “even odd” (types of bets in roulette).
    • “sroll” – “Stroll”, “roll (dice?)”.
    • “gist” – “Just”, “gist”.
    • “undeceivably” – “inconceivably”, “undeceived by a lie”.
    • “slum” – “Slim”, “slum”.
    • “chants” – “Chance”, “chants”.
    • “mnight” – “Might”, “night”.
    • “bumpkin” – “Bump in”, “bumpkin”.
    • “tutor” – “To the”, “tutor”.
    • “creat” – “Great”, “create”, possibly “creature”.
    • “de milleonair trump” – “The millionaire tramp”, “DeMille on air Trump”, “trump” (term in some card games). Possibly “demon”, “mille” (French “thousand”) (as in “thousand-to-one shot”?).
      • Cecil B. DeMille was an American filmmaker between 1914 and 1958.
      • Donald Trump was a famous (if tasteless) American rich man. At the time Jerusalem was written, he was best known as a real estate mogul and reality television star. Inconceivably, he was elected President of the United States the same month Jerusalem was published.
    • “Lucia’sidle” – “Lucia’s idol”, “Lucia sidles”.
    • “darin’ dat” – “There in that”, “daring” “dat” (Latin “he gives”).
    • “glimmense” – “Immense”, “glimmering”.
    • “steeming” – “Teeming”, “steaming”. Possibly “esteeming”.
    • “shity” – “City”, “shitty”.
      • This episode is documented by Shloss, chapter 3:
        […] in 1921, Chaplin had come to Paris to promote The Kid […] After they had seen it, Joyce and the fourteen-year-old Lucia had ventured out again, hoping for a glimpse of the actual man who was visiting their city. It was a long shot by anyone’s calculations.
  • Paragraph 199
    By some miracle, that was exactly what had happened. They’d noticed Chaplin as he stood and watched the Petit Guignol’s puppet show, his lovely eyes intelligent and sad, his body limp and supple like that of a living puppet. Lucia had worshipped him; could still do an immaculate impression of him: how he walked and the way he was holding himself. When she’d heard that some of Chaplin’s earliest performances had been in Northampton as a seven-year-old child she’d been astonished and had felt the meshing of enormous clockwork cogs of destiny that had everyone caught in their messy workings, very like the ones in Modern Times. Sure, hadn’t his own mother ended up stuck in a mental home?

    • Pi sum mirascule, that was exfactly what had happyend.

      • “Pi sum” – “By some”, “pi sum” (suggesting a mathematical equation of probability).
      • “mirascule” – “Miracle”, “minuscule (chance)”.
      • “exfactly” – “Exactly”, “fact”, “X-factor” (unknown quality which affects the outcome). Possibly “ex (post) facto” (legal term)
      • “happyend” – “Happened”, “happy ending”.
    • Dyad nighteyesd Chuklin as he stard and witched de Putit Queenyhol’s paupet shoe, his luftly eyes inkwelligent and shad, his bawdy lump and sipple licke that ev a liffing perpet.

      • “Dyad” – “They’d”, “dad”, “dyad” (two things which are treated as one; suggesting Lucia’s close relationship with her father).
      • “nighteyesd” – “Noticed”, “night eyes”.
      • “Chuklin” – “Chaplin”, “chuckling”.
      • “stard and witched” – “Stood and watched”, “stared bewitched”.
      • “de Putit Queenyhol” – “The Petit Guignol”, “put (it) in Queeny’s hole”, possiby “deputize”.
        • Guignol is a popular French puppet character, originated in 1808. He is in some ways similar to the English character Punch. Shows featuring the character later became known as “Petit” (small) Guignol, in order to distinguish them from the popular Grand Guignol theater (founded in 1897, and taking its name from the puppet).
      • “paupet shoe” – “Puppet show”, “pauper’s shoe”.
      • “luftly” – “Lovely”, “luft” (German “air, sky”).
      • “inkwelligent” – “Intelligent”, “inkwell gent”.
      • “shad” – “Sad”, “shad” (type of fish), “shaded”, “shadows”.
        • Per Shloss, Lucia described Chaplin’s eyes in an essay as “intelligent and sad”.
      •  (chapter 3)”bawdy” – “Body”, “bawdy”.
      • “lump and sipple” – “Limp and supple”, “lumpy and simple”.
      • “licke” – “Like”, “lick”.
      • “ev a” – “Of a”, “ever”.
      • “liffing” – “Living”, “River Liffey“.
      • “perpet” – “Puppet”, “perpetual”, “per pet”.
        • Shloss, chapter 3, quoting Lucia Joyce about this incident:
          “He had neither his cane nor his droll walk, [so] I didn’t recognize him until he stopped at the Petit Guignol to watch the spectacle that had captured the lively interest of the children.” There, she explained, “his gestures and his attitudes finally unmasked him to me. Those little kids, screaming with joy at the puppets, what would they have done if they had known that the real, the living puppet was behind them?”
    • Lucia had wishaped hym; clad styl do an immasculate imprassion of hom: how he wakled anderway he was helden hamself.

      • “wishaped” – “Worshipped”, “wish shaped”, possibly “we aped”.
      • “hym” – “Him”, “hymn”.
      • “clad styl” – “Could still”, “clad (in his) style”.
      • “immasculate” – “Immaculate”, “emasculate”.
      • “imprassion” – “Impression”, “passion”. Possibly “imp ration”.
      • “hom” – “Him”, “homo” (Latin “man”), possibly “home”.
      • “wakled” – “Walked”, “wake led”.
      • “anderway” – “And the way”, “underway”.
      • “helden” – “Holding”, “held in”, “Hel den”. Possibly “helden” (Dutch “they inclined”?).
      • “hamself” – “Himself”, “ham” (a performer who delights in outsize, exaggerated parts).
    • When Cia’d heardt that sumyth Chirpling’s earlibirdiest prefamences hid bon eerin Nothankton haz a sylvan-yearn old charld shitbin hystonished and hardfelt the meching of enumerous clickwork cogns of dustineye that had everywhen courtin their progressy workins, vary slite the winsin Madearn Teems.

      • “Cia’d” – “She’d”, “Lucia”, possibly “ciao” (Italian “hello/goodbye”).
      • “heardt” – “Heard”, “heart”.
      • “sumyth” – “Some of”, “sum myth”.
      • “Chirpling” – “Chaplin”, “chirp” (sound a baby bird makes) “-ling” (suffix denoting youth”.
      • “earlibirdiest” – “Earliest”, “early bird i(s b)est” (alluding to the folk wisdom “The early bird catches the worm”).
      • “prefamences” – “Performances”, “pre- fame”. Possibly “menses” (menstruation).
      • “hid bon” – “Had been”, “hid” “bon” (French “good”), possibly “hidden”.
      • “eerin” – “Here in”, “eerie”, possibly “earring”.
      • “Nothankton” – “Northampton”, “No thank town”.
      • “haz” – “As”, “hazard”, possibly “haze”.
      • “sylvan-yearn old” – “Seven-year-old”, “sylvan yearning”.
      • “charld” – “Child”, “Charlie”, possibly “charred”.
      • “shitbin” – “She’d been”, “shit-bin”.
      • “hystonished” – “Astonished”, “hysterical”.
      • “hardfelt” – “Had felt”, “hard felt”, “heartfelt”.
      • “meching” – “Meshing”, “mechanical”.
      • “enumerous” – “Enormous”, “numerous”, possibly “enumerate”.
      • “clickwork” – “Clockwork”, “click work”.

        Modern Times gears
        Modern Times gears
      • “cogns” – “Cogs”, “cons”.
      • “dustineye” – “Destiny”, “dust in eye”.
      • “everywhen” – “Everyone”, “every when”.
      • “courtin” – “Caught in”, “courting”.
      • “progressy workins” – “Messy workings”, “Work in Progress“.
      • “vary slite” – “Very like”, “varying slightly”.
      • “winsin” – “Ones in”, “win sin”
      • Madearn Teems” – “Modern Times“, “dear ma teems”.
        • Modern Times was a 1936 Chaplin film, and the source for the name of the earlier Jerusalem chapter “Modern Times”, starring a young Chaplin. It had a notable scene featuring Chaplin’s character caught within gigantic gearworks.
    • Cher, hidden’t his own moider unded upstick entimental harme?

      • “Cher” – “Sure”, “cher” (French “dear”).
      • “hidden’t” – “Hadn’t, “hidden”.
      • “moider” – “Mother”, “moider” (to bewilder; dialect “murder”).
      • “unded” – “Ended”, “undead”.
      • “upstick” – “Up stuck”, “up (a) stick”. Possibly “stick-up” (armed robbery).
      • “entimental harme” – “In a mental home”, “sentimental harm”.
        • Obiwanspicoli notes:
          Hannah Chaplin (1865-1928) had syphilis and was suffering from the effects which included dementia and hallucinations.  She spent time at Cane Hills asylum. Charlie Chaplin did well enough that he was able to move her to the United States where she was cared for until her death in Hollywood.
  • Paragraph 200
    Meticulously stepping in between the dandelions, she thinks back to that supernaturally perfect evening, back to watching the sadistic marionettes, observing one of this world’s most esteemed and influential men while in the company of another one, her father. Even though she knows that he is everywhere around her, there are times when Lucia misses Daddy terribly. She’d been shut up in France during the Nazi occupation when she’d heard daddy was dead; when all the ‘mentally enfeebled’ who spent long years nervously awaiting the arrival of the cattle-wagons that would take them off to the extermination camps, to the gas-chambers for recycling. Needless to say, she’d not had a gregarious letter nor a visit from her own family after this point. Neither had she ever heard a word of them again, not until she was settled in Saint Andrews Hospital during the March of nineteen fifty-one. It had been just (of course) a few weeks later on the tenth of April that same year that she had been informed of her mother’s death, which hit her harder than she’d thought it would. She realizes now she’d loved the woman who had birthed her all along. All that she’d ever wanted was the slightest glimmer of reciprocation for that love, just the least drop of watery hope from the maternal nipple rather than all the milk (too late!) and the affection being expressed only to her older brother, for his changeling delectation.

    • Metripulously stipping in begreen the grandelions, she tings back to daet soupternuturally pafict weavening pocketwatching de sadastick carrionettes, abserfing wunner discwhirl’s mast erstormed and intruential menwhile oin the comfknee of anutter wun, dher farther.

      • “Metripulously” – “Meticulously”, “me trip you lousily”. Possibly “meretricious”.
      • “stipping” – “Stepping”, “stippling”.
      • “begreen” – “Between”, “be green”.
      • “grandelions” – “Dandelions”, “grand lions”.
      • “tings” – “Thinks”, “ting” (bell sound).
      • “daet” – “That”, “date”, possibly “daet” (Middle Dutch “deed, act”).
      • “soupternuturally” – “Supernaturally”, “soup to nuts” (covering the entire range).
      • “pafict” – “Perfect”, “pa fiction”.
      • “weavening” – “Evening”, “weaving” (possibly alluding to the Fates).
      • “pocketwatching” – “Back to watching”, “pocketwatch” (possible allusion to The White Rabbit).
      • “de sadastick” – “The sadistic”, “de Sade“, “sad stick” (perhaps in opposition to “slapstick”).
      • “carrionettes” – “Marionettes”, “carrion eats”.
      • “abserfing” – “Observing”, “ab(ject) serf”.
      • “wunner” – “One of”, “winner”.
      • “discwhirl’s” – “This world’s”, “disc whirls”. Possibly “Discworld“.
      • “mast erstormed” – “Most esteemed”, “master stormed”.
      • “intruential” – “Influential”, “instrumental”. Possibly “in truant”.
      • “menwhile” – “Men while”, “meanwhile”.
      • “oin” – “In”, “on”, “loin”.
      • “comfknee” – “Company”, “comfy knee”.
      • “anutter” – “Another”, “a nutter”.
      • “wun, dher” – “One, her”, “wonder”.
      • “farther” – “Father”, “farther”.
    • I’vain though she nowsdout he is ivoryware urrounder, derrer tomes wan Lucia misshis Blubbo tearibly.

      • “I’vain” – “Even”, “I (am) vain”. Possibly “Yvain” (an Arthurian knight).
      • “nowsdout” – “Knows that”, “no doubt”, possibly “now stout”.
      • “ivoryware” – “Everywhere”, “ivory ware” (teeth?).
      • “urrounder” – “Around her”, “surrounded”.
      • “derrer” – “There are”, “derriere” (bottom).
      • “tomes” – “Times”, “tomes”.
      • “wan” – “When”, “wan” (pale).
      • “misshis” – “Misses”, “miss his”.
      • “Blubbo” – “Daddy”, “blubbering” (crying).
      • “tearibly” – “Terribly”, “tear audibly”.
    • Shae’d bane shorn ape inf’rance jewring the Nazti okruppation when she’d hurt deddy was dad; winnow the ‘meantally enfabled’ who spurnt lang yeurs gnawvously awaything the horrival oder curttale-weergones dedwood tick them off tether exsquirmo’nation cramps, to the ghas-clambers for rezykling.

      • “Shae’d bane” – “She’d been”, “banshee”, “shae” (Scots “shoe”) “bane”.
      • “shorn ape” – “Shut up”(?), “shorn” (naked) “ape”.
      • “inf’rance” – “In France”, “inference”.
      • “jewring” – “During”, “Jew ring” (conspiracy?).
      • “Nazti” – “Nazi”, “nasty”.
      • “okruppation” – “Occupation”, “O Krupp nation”.
        • The Krupps were an German industrial dynasty who were an instrumental part of the Nazi war machine.
      • “hurt” – “Heard”, “hurt”.
      • “deddy was dad” – “Daddy was dead”, “that he was dead”, “dead was dad”.
      • “winnow” – “When all”, “winnow” (cull).
      • “meantally” – “Mentally”, “mean tally”.
      • “enfabled” – “Enfeebled”, “en- fabled” (made into a story).
      • “spurnt” – “Spent”, “spurned”, possibly “spurt”.
      • “lang yeurs” – “Long years”, “languorous”, “your language”.
      • “gnawvously” – “Nervously”, “gnaw” “vous” (French “you”; Czech “beard”).
      • “awaything” – “Awaiting”, “away thing”.
      • “horrival” – “Arrival”, “horror”.
      • “oder” – “Of the”, “odor”, “oder” (German “or; is it not?”).
      • “curttale-weergones” – “Cattle-wagons”, “curt tale: we’re gone”
        • The trains which took victims to German extermination camps were more commonly referred to as cattle-cars.
      • “dedwood” – “That would”, “deadwood”.
      • “tick” – “Take”, “tick” (clock sound; insect).
      • “tether” – “To the”, “tether”.
      • “exsquirmo’nation” – “Extermination”, “ex squirm of nation” (that which used to upset the nationalists?).
      • “cramps” – “Camps”, “cramps”.
      • “ghas-clambers” – “Gas chambers”, “ghastly clamber”.
        • When people were killed in the gas chambers, they often tried to clamber over one another to escape the gas.
      • “rezykling” – “Recycling”, “Zyklon”.
        • Zyklon B was a poison gas used in the Nazi extermination camps.
    • Needles to say, she’d nut hed a georgenerous left’er nora physit former own infamily evter dis ppoint.

      • “Needles” – “Needless”, “needles”.
      • “nut hed” – “Not had”, “nut-head” (crazy person).
      • “georgenerous” – “Gregarious”, “George (Joyce) generous”, suggest??
      • “left’er” – “Letter”, “left her”.
      • “nora” – “Nor a”, “Nora (Barnacle)”.
      • “physit” – “Visit”, “physic” (archaic “medicine”).
      • “former” – “From her”, “former”.
      • “infamily” – “Family”, “infamy”.
      • “evter” – “After”, “ever”.
      • “dis ppoint” – “This point”, “disappoint”.
    • Nichter had she ovver herd a ward o’ them agone, nut intill she was satteled inn’ Cent Handdraw’s Losstital durern the Marsh of nenetwine filthty-one.

      • “Nichter” – “Neither”, “nicht wahr” (German “not true”). Possibly “nicht” (Scots “night”; Dutch “female cousin”).
      • “ovver herd” – “Ever heard”, “overheard”, “of her herd”, possibly “ova” (eggs), “overhead”.
      • “ward” – “Word”, “ward” (section of hospital; protective spell).
      • “agone” – “Again”, “a-gone”, “agony”.
      • “nut” – “Not”, “nut”.
      • “intill” – “Until”, “in till” (possibly in the sense of “cash register”?).
      • “satteled” – “Settled”, “satellite”, “saddled”.
      • “inn’ Cent Handdraw’s Losstital” – “In Saint Andrew’s Hospital”, “innocent hand-drawn lost it all”.
      • “durern” – “During”, “durer” (French “to last”), “(Albrecht) Dürer” (German painter).
      • “Marsh” – “March”, “marsh”.
      • “nenetwine filthty-one” – “Nineteen fifty-one”, “(the River) Nene twines” “filthy one”.
    • It hardborn jest (a’ courst) a flew weaks later on the tense of Japeril that shame yhere that she had in binformed abatter mummer’s daath, witch hat her hearter than she’d fraught it would.

      • “hardborn” – “Had been”, “hardly to be borne”, “born hard”.
      • “jest (a’ courst)” – “Just (of course)”, “court jester” (possibly referring to the Danny Kaye film).
      • “flew” – “Few”, “flew”.
      • “weaks” – “Weeks”, “weak”.
      • “tense” – “Tenth”, “tense”.
      • “Japeril” – “April”, “jape” (joke) “peril”. Possibly “Jap” (derogatory “Japanese person”) “era”.
      • “shame yhere” – “Same year”, “shame here”.
      • “in binformed” – “Been informed”, “in (the loony) bin formed”.
      • “abatter” – “About her”, “a batter”, possibly “abattoir” (slaughterhouse).
      • “mummer’s” – “Mother’s”, “mummer” (actor in a primitive religious play).
      • “daath” – “Death”, “Daath”.
        • Daath is, in some versions of the Kabbalah, a central location in the Tree of Life. Moore wrote about Daath at length in issue #20 of Promethea.
      • “witch hat” – “Which hit”, “witch hat”.
      • “hearter” – “Harder”, “heart”.
      • “fraught” – “Thought”, “fraught”.
    • She realeyesees gnow she’d lawved the warmun who hot barthed her ululong.

      • “realeyesees” – “Realizes”, “real eye sees”.
      • “gnow” – “Now”, “gnaw”, possibly “gnosis”.
      • “lawved” – “Loved”, “law”, suggest??
      • “warmun” – “Woman”, “warm one”.
      • “hot barthed” – “Had birthed”, “hot bath”. Possibly “barth” (dialect “cattle shelter”; Welsh “domain”).
      • “ululong” – “All along”, “ululate” (howl).
    • All that she’d iver wintered was the slatest glummer of resippercation for that loave, juster leased droop o’ wettery hope fam the meternal nibble lather than all of the molk (too lait!) undie afiction being exbressed lonly to her colder brether, fair ies chaingelink delactation.

      • “iver” – “Ever”, “I’ve”, possibly “diver”.
      • “wintered” – “Wanted”, “wintered”.
      • “slatest” – “Slightest”, “latest”, possibly “slate”, “test”.
      • “glummer” – “Glimmer”, “more glum”.
      • “resippercation” – “Reciprocation”, “me sipper lactation”.
      • “loave” – “Love”, “loaf”.
      • “juster” – “Just the”, “jester”.
      • “leased” – “Least”, “leased” (rented, as opposed to owned).
      • “droop” – “Drop”, “droop”.
      • “wettery” – “Watery”, “wetter”.
      • “fam” – “From”, “family”, possibly “famine”.
      • “meternal” – “Maternal”, “me eternal”.
      • “nibble” – “Nipple”, “nibble”.
      • “lather” – “Rather”, “lather”.
      • “molk” – “Milk”, “yolk”, suggest??
      • “lait” – “Late”, “lait” (French “milk”). Possibly “lait” (obsolete “lightning flash”; “to seek”).
      • “undie” – “And the”, “undine” (water spirit), “undies” (informal “underwear”).
      • “afiction” – “Affection”, “a fiction”, possibly “affliction”.
      • “exbressed” – “Expressed”, “ex-” (from) “breast”.
      • “lonly” – “Only”, “lonely”.
      • “colder” – “Older”, “colder”.
      • “brether” – “Brother”, “breather”. Possibly “tether”.
      • “fair ies” – “For his”, “fairies”.
      • “chaingelink” – “Changeling”, “chain link”.
        • Referring to the possibility that Giorgio was not James’ child (see section 2, paragraph 20).
      • “delactation” – “Delectation”, “de- lactation”.
  • Page 925
  • Paragraph 201
    She pointlessly inspects the crocuses and primroses that seem to suddenly be blooming all around her fluffy slippers and suspects that she has roamed into a different sacre du printemps and another season, not to mention, she sincerely hopes, another place. Encouragingly, she thinks that she recognizes a distinctively gnarled elm, which leads her to believe that she is back in her own proper institution. Even so, the pop song which she can hear on the transistor radio that’s playing somewhere between the trees suggests that she might be a decade or two off from her own period of time: “There is no other day. Let’s try it another way …” Lucia can’t think fluidly enough to quite recall the pop-group’s name, which is embarrassing, but she’s an idea that they were popular around the middle of the nineteen-sixties. Hadn’t their singer make a record that had Daddy’s Golden Hair upon it?

    • She pointylesstically inspecks the crowcurses and primnoses that seemantic to sodinlay be blueming all abound her fliffey sluppers and susurruspects that she has droamed intwo a snifferent sack o’ print-imps and anauthor seesun, not ti mension, she stravinskincerely hopes, analter pliece.

      • “pointylesstically” – “Pointlessly”, “pointillistically”, “pointy less tic ally”.
      • “inspecks” – “Inspects”, “in specks”.
        • Pointillism is, of course, a style of painting “in specks”.
      • “crowcurses” – “Crocuses”, “crow curses”.
      • “primnoses” – “Primroses”, “prim noses”.
      • “seemantic” – “Seem”, “semantic”, “antic”.
      • “sodinlay” – “Suddenly”, “sod inlay”.
      • “blueming” – “Blooming”, “blue Ming“.
      • “abound” – “Around”, “abound”.
      • “fliffey” – “Fluffy”, “River Liffey“.
      • “sluppers” – “Slippers”, “suppers”.
      • “susurruspects” – “Suspects”, “susurrus” (a rustling sound).
      • “droamed” – “Roamed”, “dreamed”.
      • “intwo” – “Into”, “in two”.
      • “snifferent” – “Different”, “sniff” (perhaps what “prim noses” do).
      • “sack o’ print-imps” – “Sacre du printemps” (French “Rite of spring”), “sack of print imps”.
        • The Rite of Spring is a famous ballet composed by Igor Stravinsky. Moore depicted its 1913 premiere in his Lost Girls.
      • “anauthor” – “Another”, “an author”.
      • “seesun” – “Season”, “see sun”.
      • “not ti mension” – “Not to mention”, “no dimension”.
      • “stravinskincerely” – “Sincerely”, “Stravinsky”, possibly “stroking skin surely”.
      • “analter pliece” – “Another place”, “an altarpiece”.
    • Incouerachingly, shee things that she brackenizes a distumptively gnawled illm, which leafs her to brelieve that she is beckin her own poppa inspiteuton.

      • “Incouerachingly” – “Encouragingly”, “in” “couer” (French “heart”) “aching lie”.
      • “shee things” – “She thinks”, “see things”.
      • “brackenizes” – “Recognizes”, “bracken”.
      • “distumptively” – “Distinctively”, “this stump ivy”, possibly “consumptively”.
      • “gnawled” – “Gnarled”, “gnawed”.
      • “illm” – “Elm”, “ill”.
      • “leafs” – “Leads”, “leaf”.
      • “brelieve” – “Believe”, “relieved”.
      • “beckin” – “Back in”, “beckon”.
      • “poppa” – “Proper”, “poppa”.
      • “inspiteuton” – “Institution”, “in spite futon”, possibly “spit upon”.
    • Heaven so, the poppysong which she canear on the tanzsister rudeo that’s playnting summerwhere retwurn the treeze surgusts that she mote be a decayd or two afframe heroine pèreodd o’ tame:

      • “Heaven” – “Even”, “heaven”.
      • “poppysong” – “Pop song”, “poppy (flower)”.
        • Poppies are the source of opium, appropriate to the psychedelic sixties we are now in.
      • “canear” – “Can hear”, “tin ear” (lack of musical ability).
      • “tanzsister” – “Transistor”, “Tanz” (German “dance”) “sister”.
      • “rudeo” – “Radio”, “rude”.
      • “playnting” – “Playing”, “planting”, Possibly “plaintive”.
      • “summerwhere” – “Somewhere”, “summer here”.
      • “retwurn” – “Between”, “return”.
      • “treeze” – “Trees”, “treize” (French “thirteen”). Possibly “(Henry) Treece“, referenced in sections 7 and 11.
      • “surgusts” – “Suggests”, “surge gusts”.
      • “mote” – “Might”, “mote”.
      • “decayd” – “Decade”, “decayed”.
      • “afframe” – “Off from”, “a frame”, possibly “affirm”.
      • “heroine” – “Her own”, “heroine”, “heroin”.
      • “pèreodd” – “Period”, “père” (French “father”) “odd”.
      • “tame” – “Time”, “tame”.
    • Dairies know udder day.

      • Dairies” – “There is”, “dairies”.
      • know” – “No”, “know”.
      • udder” – “Other”, “udder” (introducing a brief theme of mothers and milk).
    • Les try it amother whey

      • Les” – “Let’s”, “les(bian)”.
      • amother” – “Another”, “a mother”.
      • whey” – “Way”, “whey”.
        • Obiwanspicoli identifies this song as “See Emily Play” by Pink Floyd. It was their second single, released in June 1967. The immediately following line begins “You’ll lose your mind”, appropriate to this chapter. The final verse contains the words “Float on a river forever and ever”, which chimes with both Eternalism, and Lucia’s identification with the River Liffey.
    • Lucia can’t pthink fluydly enearth to quoite recool the pap-grope’s Nam, which is unbarretting, but cia’s an eyedear that daywear bopular aranter muddle o’ the whineteen-sextries.

      • “pthink fluydly” – “Think fluidly”, “Pink Floyd“.
      • “enearth” – “Enough”, “unearth”.
      • “quoite” – “Quite”, “quote”.
      • “recool” – “Recall”, “be cool”.
      • “pap-grope’s” – “Pop group’s”, “papa gropes”.
      • “Nam” – “Name”, “(Viet)nam”.
        • Pink Floyd, along with many other rock bands of the sixties, opposed the Vietnam War.
      • “unbarretting” – “Embarrassing”, “un- Barrett -ing”
        • Syd Barrett, though extremely influential and a founding member of Pink Floyd, was the first to leave the group, in 1968.
      • “cia’s” – “She’s”, “Lucia’s”.
      • “eyedear” – “Idea”, “eye dear”.
      • “daywear” – “They were”, “daywear”.
      • “bopular” – “Popular”, “bop” (a type of pop music).
      • “aranter” – “Around the”, “a ranter”.
      • “muddle” – “Middle”, “muddle”.
      • “whineteen-sextries” – “Nineteen-sixties”, “whiny teen tries sex”.
        • Lucia is a bit off here. While they were formed in 1965, the band didn’t release records until 1967. Their popularity remained high throughout the 1970s
        • Dadn’t their singlar make a rackerd that had Babbo’s Geldin Heir apun it?
          • “Dadn’t” – “Hadn’t”, “dad nut”.
          • “singlar” – “Singer”, “singular”.
          • “rackerd” – “Record”, “rack (on) her”, “racket”.
          • Geldin Heir” – “Golden Hair“, “gelding the heir”.
          • “apun” – “Upon”, “a pun”.
      • Obiwanspicoli:
        Yes, he did.  Syd Barrett, original singer of Pink Floyd set James Joyce’s poem “Golden Hair” from the collection Chamber Music to music and recorded it for his solo record The Madcap Laughs after he left Pink Floyd.
  • Paragraph 202
    She continues on between the rustling branches of the birch trees, following the radio’s tinny siren-call as if she is locked-on to a peat-brown sailor, brave Ulysses. Pausing at the edge of an idyllic sunlit glade from whence the music seems to issue she catches her breath, confronted by a tableau of near-mythic beauty.

    • She swantinues on betune the wristling blanches o’ the birge trys, fellowing the ladyo’s teenny sir-encall asylph she is piblokton to a peat-brown tailor breve Youlasses.

      • “swantinues” – “Continues”, “swans” (British “to move about in a pretentiously casual way”).
      • “betune” – “Between”, “be (a) tune”.
      • “wristling” – “Rustling”, “wrist” (possibly alluding to “limp-wristed” – “homosexual”?).
      • “blanches” – “Branches”, “blanches”.
      • “birge” – “Birch”, “barge”, “bird”.
      • “trys” – “Trees”, “try”, “tryst”.
      • “fellowing” – “Following”, “fellow-feeling”.
      • “ladyo” – “Radio”, “lady, oh!”.
      • “teenny” – “Tinny”, “teeny”.
      • “sir-encall” – “Siren-call”, “sir” “encallar” (Spanish “to run aground”). Possibly “enculé” (French “done in the ass”, “bugger”).
      • “asylph” – “As if”, “a sylph”.
      • “piblokton” – “Locked-on”, “piblokto” (Arctic hysteria).
        • Piblokto! was the name of a band Pete Brown (see below) headlined after leaving Cream, active between 1969 and 1971.

          Pete Brown circa 1969
          Pete Brown circa 1969
      • “peat-brown” – “Peat-brown”, “Pete Brown”.
        • Pete Brown (1940-) was an English poet, lyricist, and singer best known for his work with the band Cream.
      • “tailor breve Youlasses” – “Sailor, brave Ulysses”, “tailor breve (Italian “short”) you lasses” (perhaps referring to the 1960s fashion for short skirts?), “Tales of Brave Ulysses”.
        • Tales of Brave Ulysses” is a 1967 song by Cream.
        • The meaning of these last few words is slightly obscure. It seems that Lucia is feeling attracted by the music in much the same way Ulysses was. The wording has been somewhat strained, however, in order to work in alternate meanings referencing “Tales of Brave Ulysses”.
    • Plausing on the etch o’ fannydyllic sunlick glad fumb wince demoisec shims to wishyou she clatches her breasth, confrotted by a tablue afnir-mythic beausty.

      • “Plausing” – “Pausing”, “plausible”
      • “etch” – “Edge”, “etch”.
        • The word “etch” evokes the phrase “come up to see my etchings”, a now-cliche pickup line.
      • “o’ fannydyllic” – “Of an idyllic”, “O fanny!” (British slang “vagina”). Possibly “dildo”.
      • “sunlick” – “Sunlit”, “lick”.
      • “glad” – “Glade”, “glad”.
      • “fumb wince” – “From whence”, “fumble wince”.
      • “demoisec” – “The music”, “demoiselle” (young lady).
      • “shims” – “Seems”, “shimmers”.
      • “wishyou” – “Issue”, “wish you” (Possible reference to Pink Floyd’s song “Wish You Were Here“).
      • “clatches her breasth” – “Catches her breath”, “clutches her breast” (usually an expression of aversion, but here probably better read as sexual).
      • “confrotted” – “Confronted”, “frotted” (rubbed genitals against).
      • “tablue” – “Tableau”, “taboo”, “ta” (goodbye) “blue” (here probably in the sense of “sexual or pornographic”).
      • “afnir-mythic” – “Of near-mythic”, “Fafnir” (dragon from Norse mythology), suggest??
      • “beausty” – “Beauty “, “busty”.
  • Paragraph 203
    Lying fave up on a towel that’s bubble-colored tangerine and purple is a most attractive young woman, listening to the psychedelic music on her nearby handbag-sized transistor radio while wearing absolutely nothing save for an ash-blonde beehive hairpiece and false eyelashes that flutter at Lucia now like amorous tarantulas.

    • Slying fay sup on a toall that’s bobble-culoured dangerine and slurple is a moist twatractive yhunger whiman, lustening to the sacredelphic musinc onure hearby handbig-sized trancetwister rodio while stwaring asbolewdly nuddink saffran ish-blonde beehave whorepiece and fullsigh-lushes thut flatter at Lucia know lyg l’amorous tarantalisers.

      • “Slying” – “Lying” (prone), “lying” (prevaricating), “sly”.
      • “fay sup” – “Face up”, “fay sup” (fairy eats, possibly implying a gay person having oral sex).
      • “toall” – “Towel”, “to all”, possibly “total”.
      • “bobble-culoured” – “Bubble-colored”, “bobble”, “cul” (French “ass”).
      • “dangerine” – “Tangerine”, “danger”.
      • “slurple” – “Purple”, “slurp”.
      • “moist twatractive” – “Most attractive”, “moist twat”, possibly “reactive”.
      • “yhunger” – “Younger”, “hungry”.
      • “whiman” – “Woman”, “whim”.
      • “lustening” – “Listening”, “lust”.
      • “sacredelphic” – “Psychedelic”, “sacred Delphic (oracle)”.
      • “musinc” – “Music”, “muse inc(orporated)”.
      • “onure” – “On her”, suggest?? Possibly “onure”, (Italian “burden, responsibility”), “inure”, “ordure”, “honour”.
      • “hearby” – “Nearby”, “hear by”, possibly “hereby”.
      • “handbig-sized” – “Handbag-sized”, “big hand size” (apocryphally linked to penis size).
      • “trancetwister” – “Transistor”, “trance twister”.
      • “rodio” – “Radio”, “rodeo”, “rod”.
      • “stwaring” – “Wearing”, “staring”.
      • “asbolewdly” – “Absolutely”, “ASBO” (Anti-Social Behaviour Order, see chapter “ASBOs of Desire”) “lewdly”.
      • “nuddink” – “Nothing”, “nude dink”.
      • “saffran” – “Save for an”, “saffron”.
      • “ish-blonde” – “Ash-blonde”, “blonde-ish”, suggest??
      • “beehave whorepiece” – “Beehive hairpiece”, “behave, whore piece”.
      • “fullsigh-lushes” – “False eyelashes”, “full, lush sigh”, possibly “lushes” (alcoholics).
      • “thut flatter” – “That flutter”, “thoughts flatter”.
      • “know lyg” – “Now like”, “know” “lyg” (Norwegian “lie”), “knowledge”.
      • “l’amorous” – “Amorous”, “l’amour” (French “love”), possibly “glamorous”.
      • “tarantalisers” – “Tarantulas”, “tantalizers”.
        • Throughout this sentence there are phallic terms (rod, dink, big hand), and terms which are generally applied to male homosexuals (fay, cul). This seems worth noting near the start of a segment which is largely about lesbian sex, with no men involved.
  • Paragraph 204
    “Well, I didn’t know I’d got an audience, at least not a distinguished-looking audience like you. Why don’t you sit down on the towel next to me and introduce yourself? I’m sorry about all the tits and pussy, but I was just sunbathing alone out here until you came along.”

    • “Well, I daredn’t know eyed got an orgience, at lust not a duspringwished-lurking bawdience lake you.

      • “daredn’t” – “Didn’t”, “dared not”.
      • “eyed” – “I’d”, “eyed”.
      • “orgience” – “Audience”, “orgy”.
      • “lust” – “Least”, “lust”.
      • “duspringwished-lurking” – “Distinguished-looking”, “Dusty Springfield wished lurking”.
      • “bawdience” – “Audience”, “bawd” (lewd woman).
      • “lake you” – “Like you”, “you (are a) lake” (though Lucia more typically is identified as a river).
    • Widen’t you slit-down un der toewell nextasy and interjuice yearnself?

      • “Widen’t” – “Why don’t”, “widen it” (your legs?).
      • “slit-down” – “Sit down”, “slit-down” (slit here meaning vulva).
      • “un der” – “On the”, “under”.
      • “toewell” – “Towel”, “toe well” (proposing some toe-sex?).
      • “nextasy” – “Next to me”, “ecstasy”.
      • “interjuice” – “Introduce”, “inter-juice” (mingle our sexual juices).
      • “yearnself” – “Yourself”, “yearns elf”.
    • I’m soggy abed all the tuts and per se, butt I wash chest sinbathing alawn out hairs unthral you cumm aling.”

      • “soggy” – “Sorry”, “soggy” (sexually aroused).
      • “abed” – “About”, “abed”.
      • “tuts” – “Tits”, “tuts” (scolding noises, often uttered by prudes).
      • “per se” – “Pussy”, “per se”.
      • “butt” – “But”, “butt”.
      • “wash” – “Was”, “wash”.
      • “chest” – “Just”, “chest”.
      • “sinbathing” – “Sunbathing”, “sin”.
      • “alawn” – “Alone”, “a lawn” (alluding to her pubic hair).
      • “hairs” – “Here”, “hairs”.
      • “unthral” – “Until”, “enthrall”.
      • “cumm aling” – “Came along”, “cumming” (slang “reaching orgasm”), “cunnilingus”.
  • Paragraph 205
    Enthralled, Lucia lowers herself to the grass and mud there beside the naked and reclining goddess, marveling at the crushed-velvet tones of the young peek-a-beautie’s voice, both vulnerable and powerful at the same time. She thinks she can detect on Irish lilt beneath the smoky, polished surface of it, and as she replies she tries to keep her wandering eye from wandering too obviously on the snowy, strawberry-peaked slopes of the young lady’s jiggling bosom, much less in the mossy crevice of her slightly parted thighs.

    • Inthrilled, Lucia lovers herstealth to the grazon muddit dare besighed the nayclad and reckleaning goddness, mauvelling at the crushed-vulvate tuones of the yearng peek-a-beautease vice, both fulnerable and powervul at ashame time.

      • “Inthrilled” – “Enthralled”, “thrilled (to be) in”.
      • “lovers” – “Lowers”, “lovers”.
      • “herstealth” – “Herself”, “her stealth”.
      • “grazon muddit” – “Grass and mud”, “graze on”, suggest??
      • “dare” – “There”, “dare”.
      • “besighed” – “Beside”, “sighed”.
      • “nayclad” – “Naked”, “nay clad”.
      • “reckleaning” – “Reclining”, “reckless”, “leaning”.
      • “goddness” – “Goddess”, “goodness”.
      • “mauvelling” – “Marveling”, “mauve” (pale purple, sometimes the color of a vagina’s interior).
      • “crushed-vulvate” – “Crushed-velvet”, “vulva”.
      • “tuones” – “Tones”, “tunes”.
      • “yearng” – “Young”, “yearn”.
      • “peek-a-beautease” – “Peek-a-beauties” (combining “beauties”, with the (in this context) sexual teasing of “peek-a-boo”), “beau tease”, possibly “peak”.
      • “vice” – “Voice”, vice”.
      • “fulnerable” – “Vulnerable”, “fun”, “full nor able”.
      • “powervul” – “Powerful”, “vulva”.
      • “ashame time” – “The same time”, “a shame time”.
    • She finnshagen detecton Eyerush lullt bonita smirky, pawleashed sufface of it, an dishy replays she trysttokeep her onedaring ai-ai-ai from skwandering too onviously ob thisnohe, rawberry-peeked slurpes o’ the jong leurty’s jugalong blosom, matchless in the moissy cravish offer slewdly perted thys.

      • “finnshagen” – “Thinks she can”, “Finnegans“.
      • “detecton” – “Detect an”, “detection”, suggest??
      • “Eyerush” – “Irish”, “eye rush”.
      • “lullt” – “Lilt”, “lull”.
      • “bonita” – “Beneath the”, “bonita” (Spanish “pretty”).
      • “smirky” – “Smoky”, “smirk”.
      • “pawleashed” – “Polished”, “paw leashed” (restraining one’s “animal” nature, perhaps).
      • “sufface” – “Surface”, “suffice”.
      • “an dishy” – “And as she”, “dishy” (slang “pretty”).
      • “replays” – “Replies”, “replays”.
      • “trysttokeep” – “Tries to keep” “tryst to keep”.
      • “onedaring” – “Wandering”, one daring”, possibly “endearing”.
      • “ai-ai-ai” – “Eye”, “ai-ai” (a type of Madagascar lemur).
        • Referring to Lucia’s strabismus, see section 4, paragraph 70.
      • “skwandering” – “Wandering”, “squander”.
        • The earlier “wandering” is in the sense of “twitching due to strabismus”; this one is in the sense of “looking at someone’s sex organs”.
      • “onviously ob” – “obviously on” (spoonerized), possibly “enviously”.
      • “thisnohe” – “The snowy”, “this (is) no he”.
      • “rawberry-peeked” – “Strawberry-peaked”, “raw” (slang “naked”), “peek”.
      • “slurpes” – “Slopes”, “slurp” (licking sound).
      • “jong leurty’s” – “Young Lady’s”, “jongleur” (archaic “singer, juggler”). Possibly “(Carl) Jung“.
      • “jugalong” – “Jiggling”, “jug along”. Possibly “gigolo”, “Juggalo”.
      • “blosom” – “Bosom”, “blossom”.
      • “matchless” – “Much less”, “matchless” (superlative).
      • “moissy” – “Mossy”, “moist”.
      • “cravish” – “Crevice”, “craves”.
      • “offer” – “Of her”, “offer”.
      • “slewdly” – “Slightly”, “lewdly”.
      • “perted” – “Parted”, “pert” (attractive; impertinent; obsolete “unhidden”).
      • “thys” – “Thighs”, “this”, “thy ‘s” (yours).
  • Paragraph 206
    “I am Lucia Joyce, a dancer by profession, and please don’t apologize for either your pudendum or your equally delightful mammary endowments, since I am sufficiently familiar with women’s bodies not to take offense. Indeed, I am enjoying looking at both the items that you mentioned, and I would be disappointed if you were to suddenly conceal them. Am I right in thinking that you are the singer Dusty Springfield, and to whom I think I can remember lusting after from a distance when you were a patient in Saint Andrew’s there in nineteen sixty-seven?”

    • “I am Lickier Juyce, a dansher bi proficien, end pleas dewnight apillowguise fur eider your purrdendum awe your equeerlly daylightfull memmary andhowments, sins I am sapphiciantly formiliar with quimin’s bawdies nud to ticker fance.

      • “Lickier Juyce” – “Lucia Joyce”, “lick your juice”.
      • “dansher” – “Dancer”, “dans” (French “into”) “her”.
      • “bi proficien” – “By profession”, “bi(sexually) proficient”.
      • “end” – “And”, “end”.
      • “pleas” – “Please”, “pleas”.
      • “dewnight” – “Do not”, “dew night” (referring poetically to female sexual secretions).
      • “apillowguise” – “Apologize”, “a pillow guise”.
      • “fur” – “For”, “fur”.
      • “eider” – “Either”, “eider” (a type of duck whose feathers were often used to make bedding or pillows).
      • “purrdendum” – “Pudendum”, “purr” (happy cat noise).
      • “awe” – “Or”, “awe”.
      • “equeerlly” – “Equally”, “queer”.
      • “daylightfull” – “Delightful”, “daylight full” (that is, easily seen, not hidden).
      • “memmary” – “Mammary”, “memory”, “me Mary”.
      • “andhowments” – “Endowments”, “and how!” (emphatic confirmation).
      • “sins” – “Since”, “sins”.
      • “sapphiciantly” – “Sufficiently”, “sapphic” (lesbian).
      • “formiliar” – “Familiar”, “form (is) a liar”.
      • “quimin’s” – “Women’s”, “quim” (slang “vagina”) “in”.
      • “bawdies” – “Bodies”, “bawdy”.
      • “nud” – “Not”, “nude”.
      • “ticker fance” – “Take offence”, “tickle your fancy” (be attracted to; stroke the genitals of), “ticker” (slang “heart”) fence”.
    • Idneed, I am enjoycing leerking at birther the bitems that you menshunned, and I wet be disapanted if you wear to soddenly cunseal them.

      • “Idneed” – “Indeed”, “id need”.
      • “enjoycing” – “Enjoying”, “Joyce”.
      • “leerking” – “Looking”, “leering”.
      • “birther” – “Both of”, “birther”.
        • Probably a reference to reproduction, hence sex. It might be a reference to the conspiracy theory surrounding US President Barack Obama, but that seems unlikely.
      • “bitems” – “Items”, “bite ’em”.
      • “menshunned” – “Mentioned”, “shunned men”.
      • “I wet” – “I would”, “I (am) wet”.
      • “disapanted” – “Disappointed”, “dis- panted”.
      • “wear” – “Were”, “wear”.
      • “soddenly” – “Suddenly”, “sodden” (very wet).
      • “cunseal” – “Conceal”, “cunt seal”.
  • Page 926
  • Paragraph 106 (continued)
    • Amoright in thinging that you earthy sinker Dust’ny Singfeeld, mentalwhom I think Icon remumble lostin afther former dustdance wan you were inpatient inSaned Onboo’s direin naintain sixties-heven?”

      • “Amoright” – “Am I right”, “amor” (Latin “love; sex”).
      • “thinging” – “Thinking”, “thing” (slang for “penis”?) “in”.
      • “earthy” – “Are the”, “earthy” (natural, down-to-earth, often used in a “talking about sex” context).
      • “sinker” – “Singer”, “sinker” (that is, “one who goes down”, or “one who gives oral sex”).
      • “Dust’ny Singfeeld” – “Dusty Springfield”, “destiny sing feel”.
      • “mentalwhom” – “And to whom”, “mental home”.
        • The next few words seem to paint a picture of Lucia as infirm and almost senile in the “real” 1967, whereas in her “present”, she is timeless.
      • “Icon” – “I can”, “icon”.
      • “remumble” – “Remember”, “mumble again”.
      • “lostin” – “Lusting”, “lost in”.
      • “afther” – “After”, “aft (of) her”.
      • “former” – “From a”, “former”.
      • “dustdance” – “Distance”, “dust dance”.
      • “wan” – “When”, “wan”.
      • “inpatient” – “A patient”, “inpatient”, “impatient”.
      • “inSaned Onboo’s” – “In Saint Andrew’s”, “insane on boos”.
      • “direin” – “There in”, “dire in”, possibly “the rein”.
      • “naintain sixties-heven” – “Nineteen sixty-seven”, “maintain (that the) sixties (were) heaven”.
  • Paragraph 207
    Crinkling her spidery eyelids in amusement, the blonde chanteuse lets one of her slim hands fall almost casually upon the darker curls surmounting her silken and glittering treasure chest, fingertips strumming absentmindedly upon a cerise jewel positioned just inside the narrow fissure of the opening.

    • Cwrinkling her spydeary ayelids inner musemeant, the blont enchanteuse lites winover slimp hands feall allmoist causually apander darkhair curls squirmounting her slunken and clitoring preasure-chaste, fingertops strumbling obscentmindedly uporn a cerise drewel pawsitioned juiced insight the noroe fisher ofty gropening.

      • “Cwrinkling” – “Crinkling”, “wrinkling”.
      • “spydeary” – “Spidery”, “spy deary”.
      • “ayelids” – “Eyelids”, “aye” (indicating consent).
      • “inner musemeant” – “In amusement”, “inner muse meant”.
      • “blont” – “Blonde”, “blunt”.
      • “enchanteuse” – “Chanteuse” (female singer), “enchantress”.
      • “lites” – “Lets”, “lights”.
      • “winover” – “One of her”, “win over”.
      • “slimp” – “Slim”, “limp” (“limp wrists” are sterotypically associated with (male) homosexuals).
      • “feall” – “Fall”, “feel”.
      • “allmoist” – “Almost”, “all moist”.
      • “causually” – “Casually”, “causal”, “usually”, “cause ally”.
      • “apander” – “Upon the”, “a pander”.
      • “darkhair” – “Darker”, “dark hair”.
      • “squirmounting” – “Surmounting”, “squirming”, ‘mounting”.
      • “slunken” – “Silken”, “sunken”, possibly “slinky”.
      • “clitoring” – “Glittering”, “clitoris”, “ring”.
      • “preasure-chaste” – “Treasure-chest”, “pressure (to be) chaste”, pleasure chased”.
      • “fingertops” – “Fingertips”, “finger tops”.
      • “strumbling” – “Strumming”, “stumbling”.
      • “obscentmindedly” – “Absent-mindedly”, “obscene”.
      • “uporn” – “Upon”, “you porn”.
      • “cerise” – A deep red color tinted with pink. From the French word for “cherry”.
      • “drewel” – “Jewel”, “drool”, “drew L”. Possibly “Dremel” (a type of drill), “dewel” (Middle English “devil”).
      • “pawsitioned” – “Positioned”, “paws it on”.
      • “juiced” – “Just”, “juiced”.
      • “insight” – “Inside”, “in sight”.
      • “noroe fisher” – “Narrow fissure”, “no roe fisher”.
        • Roe are fish eggs. This may be an oblique way of referring to the fact that neither woman had any children.
      • “ofty” – “Of the”, “oft I”, “of thy”
      • “gropening” – “Opening”, “grope”.
  • Paragraph 208
    “Actually, my right name is Mary Isobel Catherine Bernadette O’Brien, a parade of all the saints who my peculiar parents were presumably convinced I’d follow in the steps of. My mom’s name was Kay, whereas my dad was always known as OB, this being a contraction of O’Brien, you understand, rather than over on the side of classical allusions.”

    • “Actyoually, my riad nameys Mery Asabell Clatterin’ Berndalotte O’Brien, ap arrayed afall de cents who me speculiar payrents were predoomably conventsd I’d fallow in the stabs of.

      • “Actyoually” – “Actually”, “act you(r) ally”.
      • “my riad nameys” – “My right name is”, “myriad names”.
      • “Mery Asabell Clatterin’ Berndalotte” – “Mary Isobel Catherine Bernadette” (Springfield’s birth name), “merry as a bell” “clattering” “burned a lot”.
      • “ap arrayed” – “A parade”, “ap” (Old Irish “abbot; leader”) “arrayed”.
      • “afall” – “Of all”, “a fall”.
      • “de cents” – “The saints”, “decent”, “cents”, “descent”.
      • “me speculiar” – “My peculiar”, “me spectacular”, possibly “speculative”, “special”.
      • “payrents” – “Parents”, “pay rents”.
      • “predoomably” – “Presumably”, “doomed”.
      • “conventsd” – “Convinced”, “convents”.
      • “fallow” – “Follow”, “fallow”.
      • “stabs” – “Steps”, “stab”.
    • Memem’s neme wish Key, wearies madad was illlwise noun as Ob, this B in a cointricktion of O’Brine, eu understained, frather than Oberon decide of classycool allucians.”

      • “Memem” – “My mom”, “meme”.
      • “neme” – “Name”, “meme”, “Nene“.
      • “wish Key” – “Was Kay”, “wish key”, “whiskey”.
        • This was technically her mother’s nickname.
      • “wearies” – “Whereas”, “wearies”.
      • “madad” – “My dad”, “mad ad”.
      • “illlwise” – “Always”, “ill-wise” (in a poor manner; of poor wits).
      • “noun” – “Known”, “noun”.
      • “Ob” – “OB”, “Ob” (Russian river), “ob” (historical “halfpenny”).
        • Wikipedia seems to claim that his nickname was spelled with both letters capitalized, but Moore doesn’t seem to follow that convention.
      • “B in” – “Being”, “be-in” (a gathering of hippies).
      • “cointricktion” – “Contraction”, “coin trick”.
      • “O’Brine” – “O’Brien”, “of brine”.
      • “eu” – “You”, “eu” (Europe, euro, French “one”).
      • “understained” – “Understand”, “under stained”.
      • “frather” – “Rather”, “father”. Possibly “frat her”.
      • “Oberon” – “Over on”, “Oberon” (king of the fairies).
      • “decide” – “The side”, “decide”. Possibly “deicide” (the killing of a god).
      • “classycool” – “Classical”, “classy cool”.
      • “allucians” – “Allusions”, “all Lucian’s”, “Lucia”. Possibly “all you Christians”.
        • Probable allusion to Lucian of Samosata, the chronicler from whom we get our only information on Moore’s personal deity, Glycon.
  • Paragraph 209
    Every bit as fascinated by the woman’s narrative as by her lazy, flagrant and entirely riveting auto-erotic stimulation, Lucia at this point makes an interjection.

    • Evoury bite ars fashionated bider woomain’s nattertive as by her lezy, fraglant and untirely rivert’ing auto-herotic steamulation, Lucia at this pent meekes an interjeculation.

      • “Evoury” – “Every”, “devour”.
      • “bite” – “Bit”, “bite”.
      • “ars” – “As”, “arse”.
      • “fashionated” – “Fascinated”, “fashioned”.
      • “bider” – “By the”, “bidet”. Possibly “one who bides”.
      • “woomain’s” – “Woman’s”, “woo main”.
      • “nattertive” – “Narrative”, “I’ve nattered”.
      • “lezy” – “Lazy”, “lez -y” (lesbian).
      • “fraglant” – “Flagrant”, “fragrant”.
      • “untirely” – “Entirely” “un-tired”.
      • “rivert’ing” – “Riveting”, “river-thing”, possibly “reverting”.
      • “auto-herotic” – “Auto-erotic”, “her”, “possibly “hero tic”.
      • “steamulation” – “Stimulation”, “steamy”. Possibly “emulation”.
      • “pent” – “Point”, “pent”(-up desire).
      • “meekes” – “Makes”, “meek”.
      • “interjeculation” – “Interjection”, “ejaculation” (in both a verbal and sexual sense).
  • Paragraph 210
    “My dad had a nickname, too. You were OB’s bab, and I was Babbo’s, putting it anagramatically. And might I offer my assistance in the petting of that splendid feline creature you have there? I promise that I shall endeavor not to wake her up.”

    • “My dadada mickname, too.

      • “dadada” – “Dad had a”, “dada” (childish form of “daddy”; surrealist art movement).
      • “mickname” – “Nickname”, “mick” (slang “Irishman”).
    • Hue err Ob’s bab und eyewash Babbo’s, pudding it anatrammagically.

      • “Hue” – “You”, “hue”.
      • “err” – “Are”, “err”.
      • “Ob’s bab” – “OB’s bab” (O’Brien’s baby).
      • “und” – “And”, “under”, “undine”.
      • “eyewash” – “I was”, “eye wash”.
      • “pudding” – “Putting”, “pudding”.
      • “anatrammagically” – “Anagramatically”, “and a tram magically”.
        • “Ob’s bab” is, indeed, an anagram of “Babbo’s”.
    • And matey effer my lassistance indepetting o’ that sblonded feeline creassure you half dare?

      • “matey” – “Might I”, “matey” (friend, mate, informal way of referring to a ship’s mate).
      • “effer” – “Offer”, “ever”, “effervesce”.
      • “lassistance” – “Assistance”, “lass is dance”, possibly “lassitude”.
      • “indepetting” – “In the petting”, “independent”.
      • “sblonded” – “Splendid”, “blonde-haired”.
      • “feeline” – “Feline”, “feeling”.
      • “creassure” – “Creature”, “your crease”.
      • “half dare” – “Have there”, “half dare”.
    • I premise that I shell indiver nauti-wake her oop.”

      • “premise” – “Promise”, “premise”.
      • “shell” – “shall”, “shell”.
      • “indiver” – “Endeavor”, “in diver”, “dive in”.
      • “nauti-wake” – “Not to wake”, “naughty”, “nautical wake”.
      • “oop” – “Up”, “oops”, possibly “poo”.
  • Paragraph 211
    Taking Lucia’s hand and guiding it to the appointed place the singer genially goes on with her monologue while the excited older woman’s fingers dally in the younger lady’s nicely-inundated quiff, meddlesome digits dip in her beautiful cunt.

    • Taching Lucia’s andandandand gluiding it twa the appanted plays the singler geniially gazon wetter moanologue wildy exrited holder womance fingels delly in the youngrrr latey’s niecelay-irrundated quave, meddlesohn dig-its diip inner cutiful bunt.

      • “Taching” – “Taking”, “suggest?? Possibly “Tao Te Ching“.
      • “andandandand” – “Hand and”, “and and and and” (the stuttering repetition suggests sexual excitement).
      • “gluiding” – “Guiding”, “gliding”, possibly “fluid”.
      • “twa” – “To”, “twat”, (slang “vagina”), “twa” (Scots “two”).
      • “appanted plays” – “Appointed place”, “pants”, “a panto play”.
      • “singler” – “Singer”, “singular”.
      • “geniially” – “Genially”, “genii (genies) ally”.
      • “gazon” – “Goes on”, “gaze on”, suggest??
      • “wetter” – “With her”, “wetter”.
      • “moanologue” – “Monologue”, “moan”.
      • “wildy” – “While the”, “wildly”.
      • “exrited” – “Excited”, “sex rites”, possibly “ex-writer”.
      • “holder” – “Older”, “hold her”.
      • “womance” – “Woman’s”, “romance”.
      • “fingels” – “Fingers”, “fine gels” (Victorian slang “good-looking women”), “fin”.
      • “delly” – “Dally”, “dell”.
      • “youngrrr” – “Younger” “grrr” (growling noise; possible allusion to the Riot Grrrl movement).
      • “latey’s” – “Lady’s”, “late yes”.
      • “niecelay-irrundated” – “Nicely-inundated”, “niece lay” (again suggesting the incest theme) “irrigated”, “I run dated”.
      • “quave” – “Quiff” (slang “vagina”), “quaver”.
      • “meddlesohn” – “Meddlesome”, “Mendelssohn”.
        • Julian Mendelsohn (1954-) is an Australian record producer. In 1990, he worked on Dusty Springfield’s album Reputation, which revived her career after a long fallow period.
        • The double s (not part of Julian’s last name) suggests Felix Mendelssohn, 19th century German composer.
      • “dig-its” – “Digits”, “dig it” (a 60’s hippy phrase, meaning approximately “like it”, “understand it”, or “approve of it”).
      • “diip” – “Dip”, suggest?? Possibly “dii” (Italian “gods”), “deep”.
      • “inner” – “In her”, “inner”.
      • “cutiful bunt” – “Beautiful cunt”, “full cutie” “bunt” (to rear up).
  • Paragraph 212
    “I was born near the Edgeware Road during the mousetrap spring of nineteen thirty-nine, some months before the war commenced. We were evacuated to High Wycombe for a while, but in nineteen-fifty when I was eleven we came back to live at Kent Gardens in Ealing. I must say, you’re very skilled at doing that. I think there’s room for you to put another finger up there if you wanted to.”

    • “I vers barn near the Edgewhere Owed duaring the mousetrap spring of nineteen dhirty-schwein, summ menths befire the wah clammenced.

      • “vers” – “Was”, “verse”.
      • “barn” – “Born”, “barn”. Possibly “bairn” (Scots “baby”).
      • “Edgewhere Owed” – “Edgware Road”, “edge where owed”.
      • “mousetrap spring” – Why “mousetrap”? Suggest??
      • “nineteen dhirty-schwein” – “Nineteen thirty-nine”, “dirty” “schwein” (German “swine”).
      • “summ” – “Some”, “summer”.
      • “menths” – “Months”, “men”. Possibly “meths” (methylated spirits).
      • “befire” – “Before”, “be fire”.
      • “wah” – “War”, “waah!” (wail of a baby).
      • “clammenced” – “Commenced”, “clammed (up)” (stopped talking). Possibly “clamor”.
        • Springfield was born on 16 April, 1939. World War II is generally held to have started with Hitler’s invasion of Poland on 1 September of that year.
    • We weary vicuated to Hier Wecombe far awayle, but in defineteen-thrifty wennywise elephen we clame back to lib at Gent Kardens in Healing.

      • “weary vicuated” – “Were evacuated”, “weary victualled”. Possibly “vicar”, “curated”.
      • “Hier Wecombe” – “High Wycombe”, “here we come”, possibly “hierophant”, “heir”, “higher”.
      • “far awayle” – “For awhile”, “far away”.
      • “defineteen-thrifty” – “Nineteen-fifty”, “define teen” “thrifty”.
        • The word “teenager” only dates back to 1922, and the modern concept of the teenager only started to crystallize in the 1950s.
      • “wennywise elephen” – “When I was eleven” (not quite a teen), “penny-wise elephant”.
      • “clame back” – “Came back”, “clamber”. Possibly “lame back”.
      • “lib” – “Live”, “lib” (probably meant to suggest the “Women’s Lib” (now generally referred to as first-wave feminism) movement starting in the late 1960s).
      • “Gent Kardens” – “Kent Gardens”, “gent car-dens”.
      • “Healing” – “Ealing”.
        • Kent Gardens is a street in Ealing, a district of west London.
        • Obiwanspicoli notes:

          Almost all of these details, including Edgware, the list of her names, High Wycombe, the dates and Kent Gardens appear almost verbatim in Chapter 2 of Dancing with Demons: The Authorized Biography of Dusty Springfield, in fact flipping through through that helped me with some of the spellings of place names.

    • I moist sigh, you’re vaery skoolled at dewing that.

      • “moist sigh” – “Must say”, “moist sigh”.
      • “vaery” – “Very”, “vary” (a varied rhythm is generally held to be more exciting in sex than a steady one).
      • “skoolled” – “Skilled”, “schooled” (educated), “skool” (common humorous misspelling of “school”).
      • “dewing” – “Doing”, “dewy” (moist).
    • I thick there’s woom fur ewe to pet amother finngirl up dare if you wanded to.”

      • “thick” – “Think”, “thick”.
      • “woom” – “Room”, “womb”.
      • “fur” – “For”, “fur” (pubic hair).
      • “ewe” – “You”, “ewe” (female sheep).
      • “pet” – “Put”, “pet”.
      • “amother” – “Another”, “a mother”.
      • “finngirl” – “Finger”, “Finn(egan) girl”, “fin-girl” (mermaid). Possibly “Finn” (girl from Finland).
      • “dare” – “There”, “dare”.
      • “wanded” – “wanted”, “wand” (magical instrument often symbolically identified with the phallus).
  • Paragraph 213
    Lucia complies enthusiastically, fondly remembering the velvet hole of Myrsine Moschos as she does so. There is something lyrical about the genitals of her own gender, with the oceanic savor of those sighing mermaid lips, or the hungry perfume of that beautiful mane, and while her preference tends usually towards the sculpted marble extrusion of a hardened phallus there are those occasions when Lucia feels the need to lose herself within the soft interior of another woman. Fashioning her gushed-on hand like the pretend-gun of a little boy she works it in and out with increased rapidity, the accidental liquid music of the movement growing noticeably more delicious and more audible with every thrust. Affecting unconcern but starting to rotate her hips excitedly, Miss Springfield carries on the conversation as if she’s not being masturbated to the brink of climax out there in the empty woods; in the middle of nowhere.

    • Lucia quimplies injuicyastically, fondley resembering the vulvet whole of Mysin Luschos arshe dust so.

      • “quimplies” – “Complies”, “quim” (slang “vagina”) “plies”.
      • “injuicyastically” – “Enthusiastically”, “in juicy ass tickle lie”.
      • “fondley” – “Fondly”, “fondle”.
      • “resembering” – “Remembering”, “resemblance”.
      • “vulvet whole” – “Velvet hole”, “vulva wholly wet”.

        Sylvia Beach and Myrsine Moschos
        Sylvia Beach and Myrsine Moschos
      • “Mysin Luschos” – “Myrsine Moschos”, “my luscious sin”.
        • Obiwanspicoli notes:
          Moschos was Sylvia Beach’s assistant.  According to Shloss, Moschos was Lucia’s companion and their relationship had “sexual overtones” and they “slept together” at the Joyces’ apartment” (Shloss 509). Sylvia Beach, incidentally, was an American bookseller, publisher and owner of Shakespeare and Company, Ulysses original publisher.
      • “arshe” – “As she”, “arse”.
      • “dust so” – “Does so”, “dust”, “just so”.
    • There is swimthing lilycal apout the geniitails offer ongender, wilthy oceanook shavor of those slyling murmad lups, oder jungry imperfume of that beautianabestial mane, and wile her purrference tinds musually towords the skillpted marvle sextroversion of a whordened phello’s there are dose occrazions when Lucia neels the feed to luse eriself wadein the solt enteriher of anuder whimon.

      • “swimthing” – “Something”, “swim(ming) thing”.
      • “lilycal” – “Lyrical”, “lily”.
      • “apout” – “About”, “a pout”.
      • “geniitails” – “Genitals”, “genies’ tails”.
      • “offer” – “Of her”, “offer”.
      • “ongender” – “Own gender”, “engender”.
      • “wilthy” – “While the”, “wealthy”, “will thy”.
      • “oceanook” – “Oceanic”, “ocean nook”.
      • “shavor” – “Savor”, “shaver”.
      • “slyling” – “Sighing”, “slyly”, “ling” (tongue).
      • “murmad” – “Mermaid”, “murmur”, “mad”.
      • “lups” – “Lips”, “lupus” (Latin “wolf”).
      • “oder” – “Of the”, “odor”.
      • “jungry” – “Hungry”, “Jung” (early psychotherapist who briefly treated Lucia).
      • “imperfume” – “Perfume”, “imperfect”, possibly “impersonate”.
      • “beautianabestial” – “Beautiful”, “Beauty and the Beast“, “bestial”.
      • “wile” – “While”, “(feminine) wiles”.
      • “purrference” – “Preference”, “purr”.
      • “tinds” – “Tend”, “tinder”.
      • “musually” – “Usually”, “muse you ally”.
      • “towords” – “Towards”, “to words”.
      • “skillpted” – “Sculpted”, “skilled”.
      • “marvle” – “Marble”, “marvel”.
      • “sextroversion” – “Extroversion”, “sex trove version”.
      • “whordened” – “Hardened”, “whore den”.
      • “phello’s” – “Phallus”, “fellows”.
      • “dose” – “Those”, “dose”.
      • “occrazions” – “Occasions”, “craze”.
      • “neels the feed” – “Feels the need”, “kneels to feed”.
      • “to luse” – “To lose”, “Toulouse“, “to Lucia”.
        • Toulouse is a Large French city. This might also be a reference to Henri de Toulouse-Latrec, a 19th century French painter.
      • “eriself” – “Herself”, “Eris” (Greek goddess of Chaos) “elf”.
      • “wadein” – “Within”, “wade in”.
      • “solt” – “Soft”, “salty”.
      • “enteriher” – “Interior”, “enter in her”.
      • “anuder” – “Another”, “a nude her”.
      • “whimon” – “Woman”, “on (a) whim”.
    • Pashioning her gosh-drat hornd like the pretanned-gun of a littrle boyshe worksit inundate widen in-crease slapidity, the accidrenchal lickwet moozec of the mauvement growping naughticeably mer deluscious und mare audribble with evory thrusk.

      • “Pashioning” – “Fashioning”, “passion”.
      • “gosh-drat” – “Gushed-on” (?), “gosh-darn”, “drat”.
      • “hornd” – “Hand”, “horny”, possibly “horned” (archaic slang “cuckolded”).
      • “pretanned-gun” – “Pretend-gun”, “pre-tanned”.
      • “littrle” – “Little”, “literal”.
      • “boyshe” – “Boy she”, “bush” (pubic hair). Possibly “Bolshevik“.
      • “worksit” – “Works it”, “work sit”.
      • “inundate” – “In and out”, “inundate”.
      • “widen” – “With an”, “widen”.
      • “in-crease” – “Increased”, “in (her) crease”.
      • “slapidity” – “Rapidity”, “slap”, possibly “id”, “idiot”.
      • “accidrenchal” – “Accidental”, “drenched”.
      • “lickwet” – “Liquid”, “lick wet”.
      • “moozec” – “Music”, “ooze”, possibly “moo”.
      • “mauvement” – “Movement”, “mauve” (pale purple, a color sometimes descriptive of the inside of a vagina).
      • “growping” – “Groping”, “grow”. Possibly “pingo” (conical mound of earth; Latin “I paint”).
      • “naughticeably” – “Noticeably”, “naughty”.
      • “mer” – “More”, “mer(maid)”.
      • “deluscious” – “Delicious”, “luscious”, possibly “delusion”.
      • “und” – “And”, “und(ine)”, “under”.
      • “mare” – “More”, “mare” (female horse; nightmare; Italian “sea”).
      • “audribble” – “Audible”, “dribble”.
      • “evory thrusk” – “Every thrust”, “ivory tusk”.
    • Aficting incuntsern but startling to frotate her hep sextightedly, Mess Wringfeel clarries on the perversation ‘asoff she’s not boying misterbaited to the blink of crymax outdare in the untowoods; in the meddle of no-wear.

      • “Aficting” – “Affecting”, “a fiction”. Possibly “afflicting”.
      • “incuntsern” – “Unconcern”, “in cunts earn”.
      • “startling” – “Starting”, “startling”.
      • “frotate” – “Rotate”, “frot” (rub against in a sexual manner).
      • “hep sextightedly” – “Hips excitedly”, “hep” (1950s and 60s slang “up-to-date, sophisticated”) “sex tight”.
      • “Mess Wringfeel” – “Miss Springfield”, “mess wring feel(ings)”.
      • “clarries” – “Carries”, “(John) Clare”, “clarifies”.
      • “perversation” – “Conversation”, “perverse”.
      • “‘asoff” – “As if”, “has off” (slang “reaches orgasm”).
      • “boying” – “Being”, “boying” (acting like a boy).
      • “misterbaited” – “Masturbated”, “mister bait”.
      • “blink” – “Brink”, “blink”.
      • “crymax” – “Climax”, “cry (out at) max(imum volume)”.
      • “outdare” – “Out there”, “outdare” (dare more than).
      • “untowoods” – “In the woods”, “unto”, “untoward” (improper).
      • “meddle” – “Middle”, “meddle”.
      • “no-wear” – “Nowhere”, “wear(ing) no(thing)”.
  • Page 927
  • Paragraph 214
    “My parents were both inconstant mental-cases in their different ways, and I’m afraid the bottle got a lot to do with it. My mother Kay was very sweet and a tremendous laughingstock, but her idea of having fun was throwing things and breaking them. We used to smash a lot of crockery together, me and her. It was a habit I took with me into later life, forever getting friends to let me borrow their Fulham apartments if I was in town and then wrecking the place while in an access of high spirits. There was never any malice in it. It was just her way of letting off steam, grown out of the loving vandalism that I shared with my deranged old mother.”

    • “My pairrunts were beth iconsenti mental-cases in their daffyrant wheeze, andame afrayed the bottlegottlelottle do with it.

      • “pairrunts” – “Parents”, “pair (of) runts”.
      • “beth” – “Both”, “beth” (second letter of the Hebrew alphabet; Welsh “what?”).
      • “iconsenti mental-cases” – “Inconstant (?) mental-cases”, “I consent”, “sentimental”.
      • “daffyrant” – “Different”, “daffy rant”.
      • “wheeze” – “Ways”, “wheeze” (slang “something laughable”).
      • “andame” – “And I’m”, “(gr)and dame”.
      • “afrayed” – “Afraid”, “frayed”.
      • “bottlegottlelottle” – “Bottle got a lot to”.
    • My moider Que was veri tweet and a tremendless laftershock, bat her odea o’ heving fin was froing dings handbraking dum.

      • “moider” – “Mother”, “moider” (to muddle or perplex; slang “murder”).
      • “Que” – “Kay”, “qué” (Spanish “what, which”).
      • “veri” – “Very”, “veritable”.
      • “tweet” – “Sweet”, “tweet” (bird sound), possibly “twee” (overly cute).
      • “tremendless” – “Tremendous”, “mindless”, “tremor”, “mend-less” (not fixable).
      • “laftershock” – “Laughingstock”, “aftershock”, “laughter”.
      • “bat” – “But”, “bat” (crazy person).
      • “odea” – “Idea”, “ode”.
      • “heving” – “Having”, “heaven”, “heaving”.
      • “fin” – “Fun”, “fin” (fish or mermaid).
      • “froing” – “Throwing”, “fro-ing” (as in “going to and fro”)
      • “dings” – “Things”, “dings” (small marks from damage).
      • “handbraking” – “And breaking”, “handbrake”.
      • “dum” – “Them”, “dumb”.
    • We yester smosh a lotto crackery tocletter, meand’er

      • “yester” – “Used to”, “yesterday” (possibly referring to the Beatles’ song).
      • “smosh” – “Smash”, “mosh” (to dance wildly). Possibly “smoosh”, “smother”.
      • “lotto” – “Lot of”, “lotto” (a game of chance).
      • “crackery” – “Crockery”, “cracked” (broken; insane).
      • “tocletter” – “Together”, “to clatter”, possibly “clutter”.
      • “meand’er” – “Me and her”, “meander”.
    • Et wors a hibit I too quimmy enter ladier lief, farover gutting triends toi let me burrow their pullem apartments if I was intorn endin wrocking deplace whirlin an axciss of hay spillits.

      • “Et” – “It”, “et” (dialect “eaten”; Latin “and”)
      • “wors” – “Was”, “worse”.
      • “hibit” – “Habit”, “inhibit”. Possibly “high bit”.
      • “too quimmy” – “Took with me”, “too quimmy” (too sexually attracted to women?).
      • “enter ladier lief” – “Into later life”, “(I) lief” (archaic “prefer”) “(to) enter ladies”.
      • “farover” – “Forever”, “far over”, possibly “fare over”.
      • “gutting” – “Getting”, “gutting” (destroying the interior of a building).
      • “triends” – “Friends”, “trends”.
      • “toi let” – “To let”, “toilet”.
      • “burrow” – “Borrow”, “burrow” (like an animal), “The Boroughs”.
      • “pullem” – “Fulham” (an area of the London borough of Hammersmith), “pull ’em”.
      • “intorn” – “In town”, “torn in (pieces)”.
      • “endin” – “And then”, “end in”, possibly “ending”.
      • “wrocking” – “Wrecking”, “rocking”.
      • “deplace” – “The place”, “replace”, “déplacé” (French “inappropriate”).
      • “whirlin” – “While in”, “whirling” (possibly referring to the whirling dervishes, who dance as a form of worship).
      • “axciss” – “Access” (outburst of emotion), “excess”, “ax cis” (remove the notion of heteronormativity).
      • “hay” – “High”, “hay” (possibly as in “roll in the hay”, slang for having sex).
      • “spillits” – “Spirits”, “spill it” (make a mess; slang “confess”).
    • Darewise never many alice in it.

      • “Darewise” – “There was”, “dare wise” (dare to be wise); inna daring fashion).
      • “many alice” – “Any malice”, “many Alice” (referring to Alice of Wonderland fame).
    • It was jesterway o’ louding off stim, groan autoady lauving fondalism that I shard with me dearaged oild mot’”

      • “jesterway” – “Just a way”, “jester”.
      • “louding” – “Letting”, “loud”, “ding”.
      • “stim” – “Steam”, “stimulation”.
      • “groan” – “Grown”, “groan”.
      • “autoady” – “Out of the”, “automatically”, possibly “toady”.
      • “lauving” – “Loving”, “lauv” (Norwegian “leaf”), suggest?? Possibly “lauvene” (Latvian “lioness”).
      • “fondalism” – “Vandalism”, “fondle”.
      • “shard” – “Shared”, “shard”.
      • “dearaged” – “Deranged”, “dear aged”, possibly “de-raged”.
      • “oild” – “Old”, “oiled” (possibly suggesting sexual excitement?).
      • “mot’er” – “Mother”, “mot” (witty remark; British slang “woman; prostitute”) “her”.
  • Paragraph 215
    Lucia pauses in her amorous manipulations here to offer comment.

    • Lucia pawsies inner amorous manypullations haire to off’er cumment.

      • “pawsies” – “Pauses”, “paws she”, possibly “posies”.
      • “inner” – “In her”, “inner”.
      • “manypullations” – “Manipulations”, “many pulls”.
      • “haire” – “Here”, “(pubic) hair”.
      • “off’er” – “Offer”, “(bring) her off” (make her reach orgasm).
      • “cumment” – “Comment”, “cumming” (slang “orgasming”), possibly “cunt”.
  • Paragraph 216
    “I once threw a table at my mother, but I never threw things with her. She sounds like a very entertaining character, but what about your father? Was he not an inspiration to you, as would be the case with me?”

    • “I wince thrue a terrble at me mouther, batty never through thinks with her.

      • “wince” – “Once”, “wince”.
      • “thrue” – “Threw”, “true”, possibly “rue” (regret).
      • “terrble” – “Table”, “terrible”.
        • Shloss’ biography of Lucia Joyce recounts Lucia throwing a chair at her mother during a party for her father’s 50th birthday on February 2, 1932 (Shloss, chapter 9). I can find no account of her ever throwing a table.
      • “mouther” – “Mother”, “mouther” (someone whomspeaks a lot, or abusively).
      • “batty” – “But I”, “batty” (slang “crazy”).
      • “through thinks” – “Threw things”, “thought things through”.
    • She stounds luck-a-vary intertraining charactor, bet wet Obout your flather?

      • “stounds” – “Sounds”, “astounds”.
      • “luck-a-vary” – “Like a very”, “luck varies”. Possibly “luck of the Irish”.
      • “intertraining” – “Entertaining”, “in to training”, “inter-training” (suggesting that each trained the other). Possibly “inter” (bury).
      • “charactor” – “Character”, “actor”.
      • “bet” – “But”, “bet”.
      • “wet” – “What”, “wet”.
      • “Obout” – “About”, “Ob out” (see paragraph 208).
      • “flather” – “Father”, “flat her”, “lather”, possibly “flatter”.
    • Woozy nut an inspirocean tu/you, ashwood be decays with me?”

      • “Woozy nut” – “Was he not”, “woozy nut” (sleepy madman).
      • “inspirocean” – “Inspiration”, “ocean in spirit”.
      • “tu/you” – “To you”, “tu” (French informal “you”).
      • “ashwood” – “As would”, “ash wood”.
      • “decays” – “The case”, “decays”.
  • Paragraph 217
    On the transistor radio another pop song from the mid-to-late sixties is now playing, which Lucia thinks was done by that nice-looking boy from Newcastle, the one that was a former Animal: “This is the house that Jack built, buddy, and it reaches up to the skies.” The lyrics make her think of the unpleasant J.K. Stephen and then of Sir William Withey Gull, the ward of mad women kept for him at Guy’s Hospital. The naked chanteuae shrugs and shakes her beehive with an expression of fatigued exasperation.

    • On the transistine hit paradio anutter pep-song from the muddle-too-late Fixties is nho playing, which Lucia trinks was din by that nooce-liking boy from Newguzzle, the windirt was a famer Anymale:

      • “transistine” – “Transistor”, “Sistine (Chapel)“.
      • “hit paradio” – “Radio”, “hit parade”.
      • “anutter” – “Another”, “a nutter”.
      • “pep-song” – “Pop-song”, “pep” (energy).
      • “muddle-too-late” – “Middle-to-late”, “muddle too late”.
      • “Fixties” – “Sixties”, “fifties”, “fix ties”.
      • “nho” – “Now”, “Noho” (slang “Northampton”), possibly “hop”.
      • “trinks” – “Thinks”, “Trinks”, possibly “trinkets”.
        • The Trinks were a Kinks analogue in the 1990s police procedural TV show “Heartbeat” (set in the 1960s).
      • “din” – “Done”, “din”.
      • “nooce-liking” – “Nice-looking”, “noose-liking” (the connotation might be “destined to be hanged”).
      • Newguzzle” – “Newcastle“, “new guzzle”.
        • Newcastle was a significant location in the early back-story of John Constantine, in Moore’s Swamp Thing.
      • “windirt” – “One that”, “win dirt”.
      • “famer” – “Former”, “fame”.
      • “Anymale” – “Animal”, “any male”.
        • The Animals were an English rock band formed in the 1960s.
    • Diseas the owzat Jack pilled, booby, and it screaches up to disguise.”

      • Diseas” – “This is”, “disease”.
      • “owzat” – “House that”, “how’s that?”.
      • “pilled” – “Built”, “pilled” (given a pill). Possibly “pillaged”.
      • “booby” – “Baby”, “booby” (idiot; a type of sea bird — see references to gulls in the next sentence).
      • “screaches” – “Reaches”, “screeches”.
      • “disguise” – “The skies”, “disguise”.
        • obiwanspicoli writes:
          The House That Jack Built
          The House That Jack Built

          The House that Jack Built” composed and performed by Alan Price, the nice-looking boy from Newcastle.  The song appeared on his second album The Price on his Head and reached number three on the UK Charts in 1967.

        • “The House that Jack Built” describes a series of odd, possibly insane people, and may have been an influence on Moore’s The Bojeffries Saga. Within the song, “the house that Jack built” might be a madhouse, an allusion to the Tower of Babel, or perhaps even a metaphor for the world.
    • Delirics murk her thick of the unpresant J.K. Steerpen ondon of Sir Wellaim Withe Gurlls, the warld of med whimin klept for him at Guise Houseputall.

      • “Delirics” – “The lyrics”, “delirium”.
      • “murk her thick” – “Make her think”, “her thick murk”.
      • “unpresant” – “Unpleasant”, “un- present” (not here). Possibly “unrepentant’.
      • “J.K. Steerpen” – “J.K. Stephen” (see section 5), “steer pen”.
      • “ondon” – “And then”, “on” “don” (Oxford professor). Possibly “undone”.
      • “Sir Wellaim Withe Gurlls” – “Sir William Withey Gull“, “well, I am with the gulls”, “aim(s) well with the girls”.
        • Sir William Withey Gull (1816-1890) was an English physician who became one of Queen Victoria’s personal physicians. He also did significant research on lunatics in Guy’s Hospital (see below). Notably, in Moore’s From Hell Gull is identified as Jack the Ripper. Gull imagery recurs throughout From Hell, and the last chapter features Gull’s disembodied spirit flying in a cloud of gulls.
      • “warld” – “Ward”, “world”.
      • “med whimin” – “Mad women”, “med(ical) whim(s) in(dulged)”.
        • In From Hell, Gull’s experiments on mad women are portrayed in a very negative light.
      • “klept” – “Kept”, “klept(omania)”. Possibly “klept” (Dutch “chatter!”).
      • “Guise Houseputall” – “Guy’s Hospital”, “(a) house (to) put all (madwomen, under the) guise (of helping them)”.
    • The nayclad shunteuse shrigs and shucks hair beehave wag with an expressure of fatguide vexasperation.

      • “nayclad” – “Naked”, “nay clad”.
      • “shunteuse” – “Chanteuse” (French “singer”), “shun tease”.
      • “shrigs” – “Shrugs”, “frigs” (masturbates).
      • “shucks” – “Shakes”, “shucks” (removes clothing).
      • “hair beehave wag” – “Her beehive wig”, “hair, behave (instead of) wag(ging)”.
      • “expressure” – “Expression”, “sex pressure”.
      • “fatguide” – “Fatigued”, “fat guide”.
      • “vexasperation” – “Exasperation”, “vex”. Possibly “aspiration” (ambition; breathing).
  • Paragraph 218
    “It was Ob’s ambition that I should become a singer. He’d literally drummed a feel for time and rhythm into me by smacking me upon the hand with every beat, a cruelty he later claimed had never happened. I suppose it must have worked. When I was just nineteen I joined the Lana Sisters and we did that novelty about the seven little girls all sitting in the back seat, kissing and hugging with Fred. Shortly after that I bleached my hair and changed my name from Mary to Dusty and from O’Brien into Springfield, which was what my big brother Tom formerly Dionysus had decided we should call ourselves in order to be popular. I don’t know precisely how he worked that out, but anyway, I went along with it. Aaaah, God, I don’t suppose that you could rub me just a bit more quickly, could you?”

    • “It wah sOb’s gambition that I shout becomb a sinker.

      • “wah sOb’s” – “Was Ob’s”, “wah sob”.
      • “gambition” – “Ambition”, “gambit”.
      • “shout” – “Should”, “shout”.
      • “becomb” – “Become”, “be comb”, “bee (honey)comb”.
      • “sinker” – “Singer”, “sinker”.
    • He’d obliterally dram a feel fourtime and wrythymn unto me by smarking me apain the harnd with ivery bleat, a scruelty he liedor clammed had nipper slappened.

      • “obliterally” – “Literally”, “obliterate”, “Ob”, possibly “originally”.
      • “dram” – “Drummed”, “dram” (alcoholic drink), “drama”.
      • “fourtime” – “For time”, “four(/four) time” (a common musical rhythm).
      • “wrythymn” – “Rhythm”, “wry hymn”. Possibly “writhe”, “wyrm”.
      • “unto” – “Into”, “unto”.
      • “smarking” – “Smacking”, “marking”.
      • “apain the harnd” – “Upon the hand”, “a hard pain”.
      • “ivery” – “Every”, “I very”, “ivory” (suggesting piano keys).
      • “bleat” – “Beat”, “bleat (in pain)”.
        • Obiwanspicoli writes “According to her official biography he did literally do this.”
      • “a scruelty” – “A cruelty”, “as cruel tie”, possibly “screw”.
      • “liedor clammed” – “Later claimed”, “lie slammed (the) door”, “clammed (up)” (stopped speaking).
      • “nipper slappened” – “Never happened”, “slapped the (little) nipper”.
    • I sorepose it misterworked.

      • “sorepose” – “Suppose”, “sore pose”.
      • “misterworked” – “Must have worked”, “mister”.
    • Winny wars chest niceteen I jaunt The Lawn Assisters and weeded that naffelty abawd the sheven lipple cirls all satin in the bagsweet, kispering an’ dugging with Frends.

      • “Winny wars” – “When I was”, “win wars”, possibly “whinny”.
      • “chest niceteen” – “Just nineteen”, “nice chest, teen”.

        The Lana Sisters
        The Lana Sisters
      • “jaunt” – “Joined”, “jaunt”.
      • “The Lawn Assisters” – “The Lana Sisters“, “the lawn assisters”.
        • The Lana Sisters were a British vocal group (not actually sisters) formed in 1958. Mary O’Brien (later Dusty Springfield) joined soon after.
      • “weeded” – “We did”, “weeded”.
      • “naffelty” – “Novelty”, “naff” (British slang “not good”).
      • “abawd” – “About”, “a bawd”.
      • “sheven” – “Seven”, “heaven”, “shaven”.
      • “lipple” – “Little”, “lip”.
      • “cirls” – “Girls”, “curls”.
      • “satin” – “Sat in”, “satin”.
      • “bagsweet” – “Back seat”, “bag (of) sweet(s)”.
      • “kispering” – “Kissing”, “whispering”.
      • “dugging” – “Hugging”, “digging” (60s slang “enjoying”).
      • “Frends” – “Fred”, “Friends”.
        Sheet music for "Sitting on the Back Seat"
        Sheet music for “Sitting on the Back Seat”
        • Obiwanspicoli:

          Seven Little Girls in the Backseat” with Al Saxon (1959).
          The song is from the driver’s perspective.  All the girls are in the back seat kissing and hugging on Fred and when the driver asks for at least one of them to come sit beside him all seven reply that he needs to mind the road.  Even when he accepts his fate and says he is going home, the girls tell him to keep driving. Evidently Fred had something the driver did not.

    • Shirtly ifter that I blenched mein herr un chained mein aim from Merry to Dustress and fame O’Brayin into Singf’reald, what was which my big bruddle Tam – famerly Dion-nicest – had precided we shuck all altselves in herder to be populalala.

      • “Shirtly” – “Shortly”, “shirt”, “shirtily” (in an annoyed manner).
      • “ifter” – “After”, “if the”.
      • “blenched” – “Bleached”, “blanched”, possibly “clenched”, “blended”.
      • “mein herr” – “My hair”, “mein herr” (German “sir”).
      • “un chained” – “And changed”, “Unchained”.
      • “mein aim” – “My name”, “mein” (German “my”) “aim”.
      • “Merry” – “Mary”, “merry”.
      • “Dustress” – “Dusty”, “distress”, possibly “mistress”.
      • “fame” – “From”, “fame”.
      • “O’Brayin” – “O’Brien”, “O, braying (one)”.
      • “Singf’reald” – “Springfield”, “sing for real”.

        Tom Springfield
        Tom Springfield
      • “what was which” – “Which was what”.
      • “bruddle” – “Brother”, “muddle”, possibly “bundle”.
      • “Tam” – “Tom”, “Tam (Lin)” (folklore hero who became involved in fairy matters).
        • Tom Springfield (1934-), born Dionysus P.A. O’Brien, was a British musician during the 1960s.
      • “famerly” – “Formerly”, “family”, “fame really”.
      • “Dion-nicest” – “Dionysus”, “nicest”. Possibly “incest”.
      • “precided” – “Decided”, “precise”. Possibly “preemptively decided”.
      • “shuck all” – “Should call”, “shuck all” (become naked). Possibly “aw, shucks” (expression of humility).
      • “altselves” – “Ourselves”, “alt(ernate) selves”.
      • “herder” – “Order”, “herder” (suggestive that the music audience is a “herd”, which can be easily led).
      • “populalala” – “Popular”, “la la la” (simple rendition of music; sometimes used in childish expression “La la la, I can’t hear you”).
    • I dustn’t know presesley how he word that out, bet anywhy, aye winterlong with it.

      • “dustn’t” – “Don’t”, “dust”, “mustn’t”.
      • “presesley” – “Precisely”, Elvis Presley” (an extremely popular musician who never changed his name).
      • “word” – “Worked”, “word”.
      • “bet” – “But”, “bet” (a reminder that all attempts to make popular art are a gamble).
      • “anywhy” – “Anyway”, “why”.
      • “aye winterlong” – “I went along”, “aye” (archaic “forever; all”) “winter long”.
    • Mmmah, Gog, I don’t slippose dirt chew cud ruv me juist obit more frickly, cool dew?”

      • “Mmmah, Gog” – “Ahhhh, God”, “ma”, “Magog” (Biblical figure).
      • “slippose” – “Suppose”, “slip pose” (Dusty’s pose of non-excitement is slipping).
      • “dirt” – “That”, “dirt”.
      • “chew cud” – “You could”, “chew cud”.
      • “ruv” – “Rub”, “love”.
      • “juist” – “Just”, “juiced”.
      • “obit” – “A bit”, “obit(uary)”.
      • “frickly” – “Quickly”, “frick” (weaker slang for “fuck”).
  • Paragraph 219
    Despite a slight cramp in her wrist, Lucia makes an effort to comply, redoubling the pace of her successive penetrations and withdrawals. Evidently satisfied the younger lady continues her story, even though this is now hyphenated by her many gasps and giggles of delight.

    • Deslite a spight grump innor wrest, Lucia maches an effit to comeplay, redabbling dip ace of her sexcessive porniterations and withdribbles.

      • “Deslite” – “Despite”, “Delight”, “this light”.
      • “spight” – “Slight”, “spite”, “spight” (woodpecker).
      • “grump” – “Cramp”, “grump”.
      • “innor wrest” – “In her wrist”, “inner wrest”. Possibly “Northwest”.
      • “maches” – “Makes”, “maches” (Spanish “grind!”), possibly “matches”, “mach” (the speed of sound).
      • “effit” – “Effort”, “f(uck) it”, “efrit” (genie).
      • “comeplay” – “Comply”, “come-play”.
      • “redabbling” – “Redoubling”, “re- dabbling”.
      • “dip ace” – “The pace”, “dip ace” (implying that Lucia is skilled at dipping her fingers in someone).
      • “sexcessive” – “Successive”, “sex excessive”.
      • “porniterations” – “Penetrations”, “porn iterations”.
      • “withdribbles” – “Withdrawals”, “with dribbles”.
    • Effordently slutisfied the yen girlady cuntinuse her starry, heven though this ais neow hymenated by har mony grasps and griggles of de light.

      • “Effordently” – “Evidently”, effortlessly”. Possibly “effervescent”.
      • “slutisfied” – “Satisfied”, “slut”.
      • “yen girlady” – “Younger lady”, “yen (for a) girl”.
      • “cuntinuse” – “Continues”, “cunt in use”.
      • “starry, heven” – “Story, even”, “starry heaven”.
      • “ais” – “Is”, “as”, suggest??
      • “neow” – “Now”, “new”.
      • “hymenated” – “Hyphenated”, “hymen mated”.
      • “har mony” – “Her many”, “harmony”.
      • “grasps” – “Gasps”, “grasp”.
      • “griggles” – “Giggles”, “wriggles”.
      • “de light” – “Delight”, “the light”.
    • Paragraph 220
      “I first went solo in September, nineteen sixty-three, which was coincidentally when I began my first passionate dalliance with another woman. My stifled sexuality had by that point become a maddening bell that I could no longer refuse. My lover was as sensual and exotic as a made-up character within a novel; as a piece of Blue Mink. That next year I had my first hit with ‘I Only Want To Be with You’, and when I sang it, it was always about her. Her skin was rich black velvet, so that when I licked her it was like kissing under Night itself. Is it a wonder I declined to play to segregated audiences in South Africa? It’s been a dreadful pressure on me, though,  pretending that I fancy boys, pretending to be something that I’m not. I get all anxious and depressed, and then I have a break, and then I smash things up and hurt myself, and then I end up back here in Saint Andrews. Here, I’ll tell you what, how would you feel about a bit of the old sixty-nine? I’d like the opportunity to pay you back for all that you been doing for me.”

      • “I farst went solow in Saptimber, pineteen sixty-t’ree, witchwise commencidentily when I begland me feast portionate dolliance with anether warm’un.

        • “farst went solow” – “First went solo”, “fast then slow”, “farce” “so low”.
        • “Saptimber, pineteen sixty-t’ree” – “September, nineteen sixty-three”, “sap timber pine tree”, “pin(ing) teen”.
          • Per Wikipedia, Springfield’s first solo number was actually recorded in October, and released in November of 1963. Of course, she was probably setting things up in September.
        • “witchwise” – “Which was”, “witch-wise” (the wisdom of a witch; in the manner of a witch).
        • “commencidentily” – “Coincidentally”, “commenced identity”.
        • “begland” – “Began”, “be (influenced by my) gland(s)”, “be glad”.
        • “feast” – “First”, “feast”.
        • “portionate” – “Passionate”, “ate (my) portion”.
        • “dolliance” – “Dalliance”, “doll”, possibly “alliance”.
        • “anether” – “Another”, “an ether(eal woman)”. Possibly “a nigger”.
        • “warm’un” – “Woman”, “warm one”.
      • My strifled sexreality had by that paind beclung a maddeling bell that I cwym no languor drefuse.

        • “strifled” – “Stifled”, “strife led”. Possibly “rifled”.
        • “sexreality” – “Sexuality”, “sex reality”.
        • “paind” – “Point”, “pained”.

          Madeline Bell in 1963
          Madeline Bell in 1963
        • “beclung” – “Become”, “clung”.
        • “maddeling bell” – “Maddening bell”, “Madeline Bell”.
          • Madeline Bell (1942-) is an American soul singer who rose to prominence in the 1960s. She worked as a backup singer for Dusty Springfield. Madeline and Dusty were certainly close friends, and there are rumors that they were lovers.
        • “cwym” – “Could”, “cwm” (Welsh “valley”), “quim” (archaic “cunt”).
        • “languor” – “Longer”, “languor”.
        • “drefuse” – “Refuse”, “defuse”.
      • Me lovher was as sinsual an’ sexotic as a maid-up charmacter wittin a knowvell; as a pisce o’ bloom ink.

        • “lovher” – “Lover”, “love her”.
        • “sinsual” – “Sensual”, “usual sin”.
        • “sexotic” – “Exotic”, “sex”. Possibly “quixotic”.
        • “maid-up” – “Made-up”, “maid”.
        • “charmacter” – “Character”, “charm actor”.
        • “wittin” – “Within”, “witting” (knowledgeably).
        • “knowvell” – “Novel”, “know well”. Possibly “vellum”, “vowel”.
        • “pisce” – “Piece”, Pisces” (fish imagery is often associated with female sexuality).
        • “bloom ink” – “Blue Mink”, “Bloom” (Ulysses character) “ink” (indicative of blackness).
          • Obiwanspicoli notes:

            Blue Mink was a British pop group from 1969-1974 that featured Madeline Bell on vocals.  The implication here is that Madeline Bell and Dusty Springfield were lovers but any hard source seems to disagree.  However, according to Dancing with Demons Dusty once “announced very loudly that her first lover had been black.”

  • Page 928
  • Paragraph 220 (continued)
    • That knix cheer I had my thirstit with ‘I Only Wander By with Ewes’, and win I slang it, it was galwise abeaut her.

      • “knix cheer” – “Next year”, “knickers cheer”, possibly “Bronx cheer”.
      • “thirstit” – “First hit”, “thirst”, “tit”.

        "I Only Want to Be with You"
        “I Only Want to Be with You”
      • “I Only Wander By with Ewes” – “I Only Want to Be with You”, “I only wander by with ewes”.
      • “win” – “When”, win”.
      • “slang” – “Sang”, “slang”.
      • “galwise” – “Always”, “gal-wise”. Possibly “(truth) gal(ls the) wise”.
      • “abeaut” – “About”, “a beaut”.
    • Her skim was reachblack vulvet, so tha twain I lucked herrut it was licke clissing onder Nuit idself.

      • “skim” – “Skin”, “skim (milk)” (suggesting whiteness).
      • “reachblack” – “Rich black”, “reach back”.
      • “vulvet” – “Velvet”, “vulva”.
      • “tha twain” – “That when”, “the twain”.
      • “lucked” – “Licked”, “lucked (out)”.
      • “herrut” – “Her it”, “her rut”. Possibly “Heorot” (location in Beowulf).
      • “licke” – “Like”, “lick”.
      • “clissing” – “Kissing”, “clit”.
      • “onder” – “On the”, “under”.
      • “Nuit” – “Night”, “Nuit” (Egyptian sky goddess).
        • This introduces a sequence of Egyptian deity names over the next few sentences, emphasizing the African-ness of Springfield’s lover.
      • “idself” – “Itself”, “id, self”.
    • Isis a wonder I decrimed to ploy to snegrogated boerkdiences in Soulth Afrigger?

      • “Isis” – “Is it”, “Isis” (Egyptian goddess).
      • “decrimed” – “Declined”, “de- crime -d” (that is, refused to participate in a criminal system).
      • “ploy” – “Play”, “ploy”.
      • “snegrogated” – “Segregated”, “negro gated”.
      • “boerdiences” – “Audiences”, “Boer die”.
      • “Soulth Afrigger” – “South Africa”, “soul a nigger”, “soothe a frigger”.
        • In the 1960s, South Africa was still in a system of Apartheid, where black people and white people were kept apart in almost every aspect of life. In 1964, Springfield toured in South Africa, but insisted that she would only play to mixed audiences. Authorities disapproved, and her tour had to be cut short.
    • It’s bane a deadfeel prussia on me, doe, pretempting that I funsee boys, brutending to be shamething that I’m nut.

      • “bane” – “Been”, “bane”.
      • “deadfeel” – “Dreadful”, “(it made me ) feel dead”.
      • “prussia” – “Pressure”, “Prussia” (possibly suggesting a stereotypical stuffiness of character?).
      • “doe” – “Though”, “doe”.
      • “pretempting” – “Pretending”, “tempting”.
      • “funsee” – “Fansee”, “see (as) fun”.
      • “brutending” – “Pretending”, “brute ending”. Possibly “tending towards bro”.
      • “shamething” – “Something”, “shame thing”.
      • “I’m nut” – “I’m not”, “I’m a nut”.
    • I gut ill ankhshus and driprest, undone I heave a brink, undone I smasht thinksup and durt meself, undone I endope back qhere in Squaint Endrew’s.

      • “gut” – “Get”, “gut (feeling)”.
      • “ill” – “All”, “ill”.
      • “ankhshus” – “Anxious”, “ankh” (Egyptian symbol) “shush”.
      • “driprest” – “Depressed”, “drip rest”.
      • “undone” – “And then”, “undone”.
        • The fact that “undone” is repeated three times in this sentence cannot be accidental. Moore probably wishes to emphasize that hiding her true nature threatens to actually un-make her existence.
      • “heave a brink” – “Have a break”, “heave a brick”.
        • While the literal meaning of “heave a brick” certainly applies here, this is likely also a reference to Krazy Kat, in which a complex (and arguably genderqueer) set of romantic relationships are mediated by repeated acts of brick heaving.
      • “undone” – See above.
      • “smasht” – “Smash”, “mashed”, possibly “ash”.
      • “thinksup” – “Things up”, “thinks up”, possibly “think (about) sup(per)”.
      • “durt” – “Hurt”, “dirt”.
      • “undone” – See above.
      • “endope” – “End up”, “en-” (become) “dope” (foolish person; narcotic drugs).
      • “qhere” – “Here”, “queer”.
      • “Squaint Endrew’s” – “Saint Andrew’s”, “quaint end-rows”. Possibly “squint”, “quim”, “endre” (Norwegian “to change”).
    • Haire, I’ll till yer twhat, how wet you feel abatterbit o’ the ult lixty-mine?

      • “Haire” – “Here”, “hair”, “hairy”.
      • “till yer twhat” – “Tell you what”, “till” (plough) “your twat”.
      • “how wet you feel” – “How would you feel”, “how wet you feel!”.
      • “abatterbit” – “About a bit”, “a batter bit”, possibly “the biter bit” (expression for “a hurt person who has hurt others in the past”).
      • “ult” – “Old”, “ulterior”, possibly “exult”.
      • “lixty-mine” – “Sixty-nine”, “lick mine”.
    • I’d licke the lapportunity to play you buck feral dart U-bend oohing firmy.”

      • “licke” – “Like”, “lick”.
      • “lapportunity” – “Opportunity”, “lap”, possibly “porn”.
      • “play you buck” – “Pay you back”, “play your buck” (that is, take the aggressive role with you).
      • “feral” – “For all”, “feral” (wild, untamed).
      • “dart” – “That”, “dart” (Cupid‘s dart; slang “penis”).
      • “U-bend” – “You’ve been”, “U-bend” (a u-shaped bend in piping).
      • “oohing” – “Doing”, “ooh” (sigh of pleasure).
      • “firmy” – “For me”, “firmly”, “my fir” (or fur), possibly “fanny” (slang “vagina”), “filmy”.
  • Paragraph 221
    Having thought that her new-found friend would never ask, Lucia gives what is perhaps an overeager squeal of joyful acquiescence and positions herself face-up on the psychedelic tangerine and purple towel, hoping the gorgeous blonde will take the hint. Meanwhile, another pop song of the era has replaced the previous number on the radio, a rather jolly tune that she recalls as being by a group of boys called Manfred Mann. Curiously, it is another song about a lunatic asylum and conceals another reference to the giant-killer, the folkloric fiend of Whitechapel: “My name is Jack and I live in the back of the Greta Garbo Home …”

    • Huffing frot that her newd frond would nibble ask, Lucia gigs whet is perlapse an ova-eagerbeaver squerl of joycful licquiescence and poursessions whorself fay-sup on the psychodollic strangerine-and-burble toewell, hopping the glorgious blende will hake the tint.

      • “Huffing” – “Having”, “huffing” (breathing hard; inhaling intoxicating fumes).
      • “frot” – “Thought”, “frot” (to rub, usually in a sexual sense).
      • “newd frond” – “New-found”, “nude frond(s)”.
      • “nibble” – “Never”, “nibble”.
      • “gigs” – “Gives”, “giggles”, “gigs” (archaic “playful or wanton girls”).
      • “whet” – “What”, “whet” (increase, usually appetite).
      • “perlapse” – “Perhaps”, “per lapse”, possibly “prelapsarian” (relating to the period before the Fall of Man), “prolapse”.
      • “ova-eagerbeaver” – “Over-eager”, “ova-eager” (wanting to become pregnant?), “eager beaver” (idiomatic “a woman with a high sex drive”), possibly “eager (for) beaver” (slang “a desire for sex with a woman”).
      • “squerl” – “Squeal”, “squirrel”, “querl” (curl, twist).
      • “joycful” – “Joyful”, “Joyce”, possibly “juice-full”.
      • “licquiescence” – “Acquiescence”, “liquid essence”.
      • “poursessions” – “Positions”, “pour sessions”, possibly “possessions”.
      • “whorself” – “Herself”, “whore elf”.
      • “fay-sup” – “Face-up”, “fay” (fairy) “sup”.
      • “psychodollic” – “Psychedelic”, “psycho” (slang “insane”) “doll lick”.
      • “strangerine-and-burble” – “Tangerine-and-purple”, “stranger burble”.
      • “toewell” – “Towel”, “toe well” (possibly referring to foot-sex?).
      • “hopping” – “Hoping”, “hopping”.
      • “glorgious” – “Gorgeous”, “glorious”.
      • “blende” – “Blonde”, “blend”.
      • “hake the tint” – “Take the hint”, “hake” (type of fish) “tint”.
    • Moanwheel, another plopson of del eria has replaysed the brevious nimbur on the reedyo, a lather jelly tune that she recorlds as bying bee a grope of boyschooled Manfedman.

      • “Moanwheel” – “Meanwhile”, “moan wheel”.
      • “plopson” – “Pop song”, “plops on”.
      • “del eria” – “The era”, “deleriums”.
      • “replaysed” – “Replaced”, “replays”.
      • “brevious” – “Previous”, “abbreviated”.
      • “nimbur” – “Number”, “nimble”, “nimbus” (type of cloud), possibly “imbue”.
      • “reedyo” – “Radio”, “reedy”. Possibly “read, yo”.
      • “lather” – “Rather”, “lather”.
      • “jelly” – “Jolly”, “jelly”.
      • “recorlds” – “Recalls”, “records”.
      • “bying bee” – “Being by”, “bying bee”.
      • “grope” – “Group”, “grope”.
      • “boyschooled” – “Boys called”, “boy-schooled”.

        Manfred Mann circa 1968
        Manfred Mann circa 1968
      • “Manfedman” – “Manfred Mann”, “man fed man”.
    • Queriously, it is anutter songlongong abider lonlytic asylunce and conteals an auther ripperence to vagiant-killer, the forklyric fiendyfind o’ Nhitechapel:

      • “Queriously” – “Curiously”, “querulously”, possibly “seriously”.
      • “anutter” – “Another”, “a nutter”.
      • “songlongong” – “Song”, “gong”, suggest?? (obiwanspicoli reads “song, long gone,”).
      • “abider” – “About a”, “abider” (one who lives somewhere).
      • “lonlytic asylunce” – “Lunatic asylum”, “lonely silence”, “only dunce”.
        • The building in question was a hostel, not a lunatic asylum (see note to following sentence).
      • “conteals” – “Conceals”, “con” (Latin “with”) “teals” (type of duck), possibly “reveals”.
      • “an auther” – “Another”, “an author”.
      • “ripperence” – “Reference”, “(Jack the) Ripper“, possibly “reverence”.
      • “vagiant-killer” – “Giant-killer”, “vagina”, “vagrant”.
      • “forklyric” – “Folkloric”, “fork lyric” (suggesting that the song’s lyrics have two meanings).
      • “fiendyfind” – “Fiend”, “find”, “defined”.
      • “Nhitechapel” – “Whitechapel“, “night chapel”.
        • Compare to the use of “Nighthampton” for Northampton in Moore’s Show Pieces.
    • “Mine ’um ease Jack and eleven the bicker the Gretly Garbold Home

      • “Mine ’um ease” – “My name is”, “mine them easily”, “(take) mine ease”, “unease”.

        My Name is Jack
        My Name is Jack
      • “eleven” – “I live in”, “eleven” (significance -suggest??)
      • “bicker” – “Back of”, “bicker”.
      • “Gretly Garbold Home” – “Greta Garbo Home”, “greatly garbled”.
        • These are the first words of the song “My Name is Jack”, released by Manfred Mann in 1968. The song is about a resident of a hostel nicknamed “Greta Garbo Home for Wayward Boys and Girls”.
  • Paragraph 222
    As Lucia had hoped she would, the nude pop-idol alters her position so that she now kneels astride Lucia’s upturned face, urgently lowering soft lips upon soft lips as she lies supine with her head between Lucia’s parted thighs, the frock hurriedly pulled up to reveal the underwear-free mound of Venus hidden there beneath with all its curling auburn vegetation, with its burning gold. She cautiously extends her tongue so that it slides into the aromatic purse that spreads its scented mollusc frills across Lucia’s lower face, and at the same time she feels the singer’s hot breath on her own pudendum, feels the darting tip of her beloved’s lingual implement as it invades her own messy and slippery grotto. The two of them are soon locked in a wriggling ouroboros of mutual fulfillment, glorying in the flavor and perfume of womanhood while introducing fingers into any apertures that are available.

    • As Lucia hed hopped sheward, the newd popi-dol halters her poorsiton so that shyno kneeds aslide Lucia’s optuned phace, hergently f’lowering loft sips upoon soft lips ass she lies slurpine wetter head biteween Luckyher’s perted shighs, the fruck hairridly pawled up to refeel the wunderwhere-free monde o’ Penus hoyden there beneat with all its squrling aur-burn fidgetation, with its bornin gold.

      • “hed hopped” – “Had hoped”, “hopped (on her) head”, “hop-head” (slang “drug addict”).
      • “sheward” – “She would”, “she-ward” (towards her).
      • “newd” – “Nude”, “new”.
      • “popi-dol” – “Pop idol”, “Poppy doll”, “pop I dole”.
      • “halters” – “Alters”, “halter”.
      • “poorsiton” – “Position”, “sit on poor (Lucia)”.
      • “shyno” – “She now”, “no(t) shy”.
      • “kneeds aslide” – “Kneels astride”, “needs a slide”, “kneads ass lied”.
      • “optuned” – “Upturned”, “op tuned” (in sympathy with Op Art?), “opportune”.
      • “phace” – “Face”, “phase” (what lesbianism is often misidentified as being).
      • “hergently” – “Urgently”, “her gently”.
      • “f’lowering” – “Lowering”, “flowering”. Possibly “lowering” in the sense of “threatening”.
      • “loft sips” – “Soft lips”, “loft(y) sips”.
      • “upoon” – “Upon”, “you” “poon” (slang “pussy”).
      • “ass” – “As”, “ass”.
      • “slurpine” – “Supine”, “slurping”.
      • “wetter” – “With her”, “”wetter”.
      • “head” – Also in the sense “oral sex”.
      • “biteween” – “Between”, “bite” “ween” (archaic “think”; slang “penis”).
      • “Luckyher’s” – “Lucia’s”, “lucky her”.
      • “perted” – “parted”, “pert”.
      • “shighs” – “Thighs”, “sighs”.
      • “fruck” – “Frock”, “fuck”, “ruck” (to crease or fold).
      • “hairridly” – “Hurriedly”, “hairy”. Possibly “hair rid-ly”, suggestive of shaving off pubic hair, although neither woman here has done so.
      • “pawled” – “Pulled”, “pawed”.
      • “refeel” – “Reveal”, “re- feel”.
      • “wunderwhere-free” – “Underwear-free”, “wonder where”.
      • “monde o’ Penus” – “Mound of Venus”, “monde (French “world”) “penis”.
      • “hoyden” – “Hidden”, “hoyden” (archaic “rude woman”).
      • “beneat” – “Beneath”, “be neat”.
      • “squrling” – “Curling”, “squirreling”.
      • “aur-burn” – “Auburn”, “aur(um)” (gold) “burn” (see below), possibly “aura”, “aural”.
      • “fidgetation” – “Vegetation”, “fidgeting”.
      • “bornin gold” – “Burning gold”, “born in gold”.
        • “Burning Gold” is, of course, the title of the chapter after this one.
    • She caughtyously sextends her tangue soda tit slimes into the amoratic purss that sprudes its scanted mollust fhrills agloss Lucia’s ’lowher fress, an’ data simul tame she freals the singeher’s het broth on her own prudendum, fills the dirting tup of her belaved’s longwell inplayment as it unvoides her own missy and sloppery gratto.

      • “caughtyously” – “Cautiously”, “caught you, sly (one)”.
      • “sextends” – “Extends”, “tends (towards) sex”.
      • “tangue” – “Tongue”, “tang” (flavor), possibly “tango”.
      • “soda tit” – “So that it”, “soda tit” (perhaps suggesting that Dusty’s breasts are bubbly?).
      • “slimes” – “Slides”, “slime”.
      • “amoratic” – “Aromatic”, “romantic”, “amor” (Latin “love”) “Attic” (Ancient Greek).
        • “amor Attic” may be read as “Greek love”, which is itself a euphemism for homosexual activity.
      • “purss” – “Purse” (metaphorically “vagina”), “purrs”, “purse” (in the sense of “purse one’s lips”).
      • “sprudes” – “Spreads”, “prudes” (Neither woman is one, though).
      • “scanted” – “Scented”, “scanties” (slang “lingerie”).
      • “mollust” – “Mollusc” (metaphorically “labia”), “moll lust”.
      • “fhrills” – “Frills”, “thrills”.
      • “agloss” – “Across”, “gloss(y)”, “a gloss” (a way of interpreting a work — like these notes!).
      • “’lowher fress” – “Lower face”, “low, her dress”.
      • “an’ data” – “And at the”, “data”, suggest??
      • “simul tame” – “Same time”, “simultaneous”, “simul(ate) tame(ness)”.
      • “freals” – “Feels”, “real”.
      • “singeher’s” – “Singer’s”, “singe her”.
      • “het broth” – “Hot breath”, “het(erosexual) broth”.
      • “prudendum” – “Pudendum”, “prude end”.
      • “fills” – “Feels”, “fills”.
      • “dirting” – “Darting”, “dirty” (sexual).
      • “tup” – “Tip”, “tup” (slang “have sex with”).
      • “belaved’s” – “Beloved’s”, “be laved”.
      • “longwell” – “Lingual” (relating to the tongue), “long well”.
      • “inplayment” – “Implement”, “in play”, possibly “impale”, “meant in play”.
      • “unvoides” – “Invades”, “un- voids” (fills?).
      • “missy” – “Mossy”, “missy”.
      • “sloppery” – “Slippery”, “sloppy”, “slobbery”.
      • “gratto” – “Grotto”, “gratto” (Italian “I grind”), possibly “grat” (Scots “greeted”).
    • The dew of them are swoon licked in a wriddling orubberus of matual fillfullment, glorgying in the flowvour and perflume of womanhoop wile introjuicing thingers into eeny gapertures that are aviolable.

      • “dew” – “Two”, “dew” (metaphorically “vaginal juices”).
      • “swoon” – “Soon”, “swoon”.
      • “licked” – “Locked”, “licked”.

        Two-headed Ouroboros
        Two-headed Ouroboros
      • “wriddling” – “Wriggling”, “riddling”.
      • “orubberus” – “Ouroboros” (a snake – or sometimes two – eating its own tail), “O rubber us” (give us a condom?), “rub us”.
      • “matual” – “Mutual”, “mate you all”.
      • “fillfullment” – “Fulfillment”, “fill full”.
      • “glorgying” – “Glorying”, “gorging”, “orgy”.
      • “flowvour” – “Flavor”, “(de)vour flow”. Possibly “flower”.
      • “perflume” – “Perfume”, “per” (Latin “through”) “flume” (channel for liquids).
      • “womanhoop” – “Womanhood”, “woman-hoop”.
      • “wile” – “While”, “wiles”.
      • “introjuicing” – “Introducing”, “juicing”.
      • “thingers” – “Fingers”, “thingies” (slang “penises”).
      • “eeny” – “Any”, “eeny” (small).
      • “gapertures” – “Apertures”, “gaps”.
      • “aviolable” – “Available”, “violatable”, “a viola”, “labia”.
  • Paragraph 223
    Her squeals of laughter and of revelation are all lost or muffled in her lesbian partner’s surf and turf. She suddenly understands that this is a communion of great significance. This was enough to symbolize the moment when the literary, visionary tradition shared by Bunyan, William Blake, John Clare and her own father joined ecstatically with the pop-culture of the nineteen-sixties, merging in the psychedelic crucible with the experimental narratives of Mister William Seward Burroughs and the Lewis Carroll-like excursions into nonsense poetry of misters Lennon and McCartney and their imitators, such as currently were blasting out from the transistor radio and thus accompanying their cunnilingual activities.

    • Her squeerls of lapture and of roughelation are all lezd or muffilled in her legsapartner’s slurf and sturf.

      • “squeerls” – “Squeals”, “queers”, possibly “squirrels”.
      • “lapture” – “Rapture”, “lap”.
      • “roughelation” – “Revelation”, “rough elation”.
      • “lezd” – “Lost”, “lez -ed”.
      • “muffilled” – “Muffled”, “muff” (slang “vagina”) “filled”.
      • “legsapartner’s” – “Lesbian partner’s”, “legs apart”.
      • “slurf and sturf” – “Surf and turf”, “slurp and stuff”.
        • Surf and turf” is a type of meal which includes both fish (surf) and meat (turf). In this context, the surf/fish presumably stands for the vagina (sterotypically supposed to smell like fish), while the turf might represent abundant pubic hair.
    • She soddenly womunderstands dat dizzies a comeunion o’ grope shagnificance.

      • “soddenly” – “Suddenly”, “sodden” (very wet).
      • “womunderstands” – “Understands”, “woman”.
      • “dat” – “That”, “suggest??
      • “dizzies” – “This is”, “dizzies”.
      • “comeunion” – “Communion”, “come” (orgasm) “union”.
      • “grope” – “Great”, “grope”.
      • “shagnificance” – “Significance”, “shag” (slang “have sex with”).
    • This soize eneuf to squimbolise the moremeant windy lightorairy, fission’ry treaditon chered by Banyen, Willhim Flake, Jeun Clarryon and hero’n fether joint eggstartically witty pup-colture of the finequeen-pixties, marging in the pyschedeleclectic cruciabelle with the experigoric nullatives of Misfer Illaim Seeword Boroughs and the Blewish Carrollirical textcursions into nonesince-proetry o’ messers Lennin and McCarthy and their hymitators, searchers clarrently war plostin outform the transgresstor raveo enthus accomfannying their funnylingual squactivities.

      • This sentence calls back to Section 3, especially paragraph 50. It similarly surveys the historical development of English as a visionary language, but now extends that history to mainstream pop culture in the 1960s.
      • “soize enuf” – “Was enough”, “soixante-neuf” (sixty-nine).
      • “squimbolise” – “Symbolize”, “quim” (archaic “cunt”), possibly “squirm”.
      • “moremeant” – “Moment”, “meant more”.
      • “windy” – “When the”, “windy”.
        • Possibly referring to the 1967 pop song “Windy“.
      • “lightorairy” – “Literary”, “light or airy”.
      • “fission’ry” – “Visionary”, “fission”.
      • “treaditon” – “Tradition”, “tread on it”.
      • “chered” – “Shared”, “cher” (French “dear”), possibly “cherry”, “red”.
      • “Banyen” – “Bunyan”, “ban yen” (suggesting repressed desires).
        • John Bunyan (1628-1688), author of The Pilgrim’s Progress.
      • “Willhim Flake” – “William Blake”, “will he flake”.
        • William Blake (1757-1827) was an English visionary artist and writer.
      • “Jeun Clarryon” – “John Clare”, “jeune” (French “youth”) “clarion” (to sound a trumpet). Possibly “Carry On…”.
        • John Clare (1793-1864), “the peasant poet”, is, of course, the subject of Section 3 of this chapter, and also makes a substantial appearance in the chapter “The Steps of All Saints”.
      • “hero’n fether” – “her own father”, “heron feather”, “hero in faith”, “heroine”, “possibly “heroin”.
        • In case you’ve forgotten, Lucia’s father is famed modernist author James Joyce.
      • “joint” – “Joined”, “joint” (in multiple senses).
      • “eggstartically” – “Ecstatically”, “eggs start I see ally”, possibly “star” “tic” “a lie”.
      • “witty” – “With the”, “witty”.
      • “pup-colture” – “Pop-culture”, “pup colt”. Possibly “colture” (Italian “cultivations”).
      • “finequeen-pixties” – “Nineteen-sixties”, “fine queen pixies”.
      • “marging” – “Merging”, “margin”, possibly “marching”, “margarine”.
      • “pyschedeleclectic” – “Psychedelic”, “eclectic”, possibly “delectable psyche”.
      • “cruciabelle” – “Crucible”, “crucial belle”, possibly “Lucia”.
      • “experigoric” – “Experimental”, “paregoric” (painkiller). Possibly “expergor” (Latin “I am woken”), “categoric”.
      • nullatives” – “Narratives”, “null” (suggesting writing that has no narrative, or transcends ordinary ideas of narrative).

        William S. Burroughs in 1963
        William S. Burroughs in 1963
      • “Misfer Illaim Seeword Boroughs” – “Mister William Seward Burroughs”, “misfire ill aim” (see below) “see word” “Boroughs”.
        • William Seward Burroughs was an American postmodern writer best known for his novels of the 1950s. He was highly influential on the Beat Generation in general, and on Alan Moore in particular.
        • “misfire ill aim” is likely a reference to the 1951 incident in which Burroughs shot his second wife, Joan Vollmer, apparently by accident.
      • “Blewish Carrollirical” – “Lewis Carroll-like”, “blue-ish” “lyrical”, “blew wish”.
        "You don't look Blueish..."
        “You don’t look Blueish…”
        • In the Beatles film Yellow Submarine one of the villainous Blue Meanies asks at one point “Are you Blueish? You don’t look Blueish.” This, in turn, is a riff on the somewhat anti-semitic steretyped comment about not looking Jewish.
      • “textcursions” – “Excursions”, “text cursive”.
      • “nonesince-proetry” – “Nonsense-poetry”, “none since” (suggesting the Beatles since-unmatched creativity) “prose”, “pro try”.
      • “messers” – “Misters”, “mssrs.” (French “misters”), “mess-(mak)ers”.
      • “Lennin and McCarthy” – “Lennon and McCartney”, “Lenin and McCarthy”.
        • John Lennon and Paul McCartney are, of course, the two creative powerhouses of The Beatles. Some of their songs could fairly be called “nonsense-poetry”, prominently “Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds” and “I am the Walrus”. Their films were also noted for their surrealism, especially the above-mentioned Yellow Submarine.
        • Vladimir Lenin was the governmental head of Russia from 1917-1924. His influence continued throughout the Cold War, certainly still felt in the 1960s period this section discusses.
        • Joseph McCarthy was an American Republican Senator from 1947 to 1957. He became infamous with his “Red-baiting” tactics, whipping up anti-Communist paranoia, and increasing cultural conformity significantly (at least on the surface).
        • Bringing up these two prominent political Cold War figures in contrast with The Beatles subtly brings in the primary theme from Moore’s pornographic opus Lost Girls: the opposition of war and creativity.
      • “hymitators” – “Imitators”, “hymn”.
      • “searchers” – “Such as”, “searchers”.
      • “clarrently” – “Currently”, “(John) Clare” (see above).
      • “war” – “Were”, “war”.
      • “plostin” – “Blasting”, “plots in”, “lost in”, possibly “explosion”.
      • “outform” – “Out from”, “out-form”, possibly “outperform”.
      • “transgresstor” – “Transistor”, “transgressor”.
      • “raveo” – “Radio”, “rave”.
      • “enthus” – “And thus”, “enthuse”.
      • “accomfannying” – “Accompanying”, “accommodating fanny”.
      • “funnylingual” – “Cunnilingual”, “funny linguistic”.
      • “squactivities” – “Activities”, suggest?? Possibly “squat”, “squacco” (type of bird).
  • Page 929
  • Paragraph 224
    Talking with her mouth full she observes the upside-down world of the lunatic asylum glade as it appears to Lucia while looking upwards from between her lesbian lover’s open legs. In this inverted fashion, framed by luscious thighs and bottom-cheeks, she sees a man upon a penny-farthing bicycle ride through the clearing with his wry and handsome face somehow familiar. He wears a navy blazer with a pale blue trim and has a numbered badge on his lapel which sparks the realization that this is none other than Patrick McGoohan, the fine actor who had spent time in Saint Andrew’s during the late sixties when he suffered from his mad fits. She isn’t sure if this would be before or after his most famous television program and so cannot tell if the agreeable but sinister confining village in his story was a memory or a premonition of the mental institution’s supervised conviviality and flat baize lawns.

    • Torquing with her myth full she absurves the upthighed-down whirld of the lawnatic afilem gleed as it appearls to Lucia wheel lioking cupwards firm botween her tresbien allover’s gopen lechs.

      • “Torquing” – “Talking”, “torque -ing”.
      • “myth” – “Mouth”, “myth”.
      • “absurves” – “Observes”, “absurd”.
      • “upthighed-down” – “Upside-down”, “up (and) down thighs”.
      • “whirld” – “World”, “whirled”.
      • “lawnatic afilem” – “Lunatic asylum”, “lawn” “file ’em”.
      • “gleed” – “Glade”, “glee”. Possibly “greed”.
      • “appearls” – “Appears”, “pearls”.
      • “wheel” – “While”, “wheel”, “whee!”.
      • “lioking” – “Looking”, “licking”, “liking”. Possibly “(The) Lion King“.
      • “cupwards” – “Upwards”, “cup” “wards”, possibly “wands”.
      • “firm botween” – “From between”, firm bottom”. Possibly “bot ween”, “tween”.
      • “tresbien” – “Lesbian” “tres bien” (French “very good”).
      • “allover’s” – “Lover’s”, “all over”.
      • “gopen” – “Open”, “gaping”, groping”. Possibly “O pen”.
      • “lechs” – “Legs”, “lech” (sexual desire).
    • In this infurtied fishon, freamed by liscious thights and butterm-chicks, she seizur man apan a punny-nearthing boycycle rude through de claring witties rye and hauntsome fame seemwho faciliar.

      • “infurtied” – “inverted”, “tied in fur”, possibly “infuriated”.
      • “fishon” – “Fashion”, “fish on”, possibly “vision”, “fission”.
      • “freamed” – “Framed”, “free”, “reamed” (penetrated vigorously, usually in a sexual sense).
      • “liscious thights” – “Luscious thighs”, “delicious tights”, “lascivious”. Possibly “liscio” (Italian “smooth”).
      • “butterm-chicks” – “Bottom-cheeks”, “butter chicks”.
      • “seizur” – “Sees a”, “seizure”.
      • “apan” – “Upon”, “a pan” (possibly in the sense of “face”).
      • “punny-nearthing” – “Penny-farthing”, “pun -y near thing”. Possibly “Unearthing” (title of a Moore prose/performance piece about his friend Steve Moore).

        Number Six and a penny-farthing
        Number Six and a penny-farthing
      • “boycycle” – “Bicycle”, “boy cycle”.
        • The penny-farthing was an early form of the bicycle, popular in the 1870s and the 1880s. It appears here due to being frequently seen in The Prisoner. (Patrick McGoohan stated that the penny-farthing symbolically represented slowing down the wheels of progress.)
      • “rude” – “Ride”, “rude”.
      • “de claring” – “The clearing”, “declaring”.

        answers a prison...
        answers a prison…
      • “witties” – “With his”, “witty”, “wit ties” (suggesting The Prisoner aphorism “Questions are a burden to others; answers a prison for oneself.”).
      • “rye” – “Wry”, “rye”, suggest??
      • “hauntsome” – “Handsome”, “haunt some”, “haunted”.
      • “fame” – “Face”, “fame”.
      • “seemwho” – “Somehow”, “seem who”.
      • “faciliar” – “Familiar”, “facile”, “facilitate”, “facility”.
    • He wheres a novy bluzer with apeal blue traum and has a namebored batch on his lupel which spurks surrealisation that this is nonutter thuan Peatrick McGohang, define actor who had pent tame in Censd Angrew’s daring de lite Trixties win he seffered from his paddy fitz.

      • “wheres” – “Wears”, “where’s?” (suggesting the frequent question in The Prisoner, of where The Village is located)

        Number Six in costume
        Number Six in costume
      • “novy” – “Navy”, “nový” (Czech “new”).
      • “bluzer” – “Blazer”, “blue”, “(the) blues”.
      • “apeal” – “A pale”, “appeal”.
      • “traum” – “Trim”, “trauma”.
        • Moore’s description of the costume‘s color scheme is not very accurate.
      • “namebored” – “Numbered”, “name-board”, “bored (of having a) name”.
      • “batch” – “Badge”, “batch”.
        • In The Prisoner all residents of The Village wore badges with their identifying numbers (often inside a penny-farthing symbol). These numbers were used in place of names, which were forbidden.

          Number 6 badge
          Number 6 badge
      • “lupel” – “Lapel”, suggest?? Possibly “lupellus” (Latin “wolf cub”).
      • “spurks” – “Sparks”, “spurs”.
      • “surrealisation” – “The realization”, “surreal -ization” (as will soon become explicit, this section is about the way surrealism bled into mainstream culture in the 1960s).
      • “nonutter” – “Non other”, “no nutter”.
      • “thuan” – “Than”, suggest?? Possibly “thua” (Irish “axe”), “huan” (Irish “lamb”; “froth”).
      • “Peatrick McGohang” – “Patrick McGoohan“, “peat rick”, “go hang” (reminiscent of Number Six’s attitude towards his captors), “pea trick” (suggestive of the frequent trickery employed in The Prisoner).
      • “define” – “The fine”, “define”.
        • One of the, if you will, defining characteristics of Number Six is his refusal to be defined.
      • “pent” – “Spent”, “pent” (imprisoned).
      • “tame” – “Time”, “tame”.
      • “Censd Angrew’s” – “Saint Andrew’s”, “incensed, angry”, possibly “censored”.
      • “daring” – “During”, “daring”.
      • “de lite” – “The late”, “delight”.
      • “Trixties” – “Sixties”, “tricksters”, “pixies”.
      • “win” – “When”, “win”.
      • “seffered” – “Suffered”, “severed”. Possibly “Serf” (a pseudonym McGoohan used when directing two episodes of The Prisoner).
      • “paddy fitz” – “Mad fits”, “Paddy Fitz”.
        • The Prisoner episode “Free For All” was written by McGoohan under the pseudonym “Paddy Fitz”.
    • She isn’t sherrif this weird be befire or lafter his most flameous tellaversion progrimme and so kennot tael if the agreenable bats inastir conforning feelage in dhistory was a murmury or promanotion of demental monstertution’s stuporvised convivriality and flot baize lawnorders.

      • “sherrif” – “Sure if”, “sheriff”.
        Sheriff or not?
        Sheriff or not?
        • In the Prisoner episode “Living in Harmony”, the bulk of the action is transposed to the American Wild West, with the primary conflict being whether McGoohan’s character will be willing to be sheriff.
      • “weird” – “Would”, “weird” (unusual; archaic “fate”).
      • “befire or lafter” – “Before or after”, “be fire or laughter”.
      • “flameous” – “Famous”, “flame”.
      • “tellaversion” – “Television”, “tell aversion”.
        • Several episodes of The Prisoner deal with aversion therapy of one sort or another. Almost every episode centers around an attempt by the Village to make Number Six tell his secrets.
      • “progrimme” – “Programme”, “Grimm” (as in Grimm’s Fairy Tales).
        • The Prisoner sometimes had fairy-tale themes, especially the episode “The Girl Who Was Death”.
      • “kennot” – “Cannot”, “ken” (know) “not”.
      • “tael” – “Tell”, “tale”. Possibly “tael” (Asian unit of measurement).
      • “agreenable” – “Agreeable”, “a green Abel”.
      • “bats inastir” – “But sinister”, “bats in a stir”.
      • “conforning” – “Confining”, “conforming”, possibly “fornication”.

        Village map
        Village map
      • “feelage” – “Village”, “feel age”.
        • The setting for The Prisoner, “The Village” is indeed “abreeable but sinister”, and is both confining and conforming.
      • “in dhistory” – “In his story”, “ind(ependent) history”, possibly “distortion”.
      • “murmury” – “Memory”, “murmur”.
      • “promanotion” – “Premonition”, “pro man ocean”, “prom”, “pro ma notion”, “moan”.
      • “demental” – “The mental”, “demented”.
      • “monstertution’s” – “Institution’s”, “monster tuition”.
      • “stuporvised” – “Supervised”, “stupor” “vised” (imprisoned?).
      • “convivriality” – “Conviviality”, “converse (to) reality”.
      • “flot” – “Flat”, “float”.
      • “baize” – A green cloth. Here used metaphorically for “grass-colored”.
      • “lawnorders” – “Lawn”, “law and order” (probably another reference to the episode “Living in Harmony”).
        • Lucia’s uncertainty about the timing may reflect Moore’s. Neither I nor obiwanspicoli have been able to find any documentation about McGoohan’s time in Saint Andrew’s, apart from a few mentions in Moore interviews.
  • Paragraph 225
    As he rolls past he gets an eyeful of the interlocking females and gives a licentious smirk. “Be seeing you,” he quips, and taking one hand from the handlebars performs a strangely staged salute, touching his thumb and index finger to each other so that the hand seems to form the numeral six, tapped lightly on his brow. He cycles onwards, out of sight, and after a few moments more of licking at the entertainer’s pussy, Lucia is startled to observe a large and wobbling white balloon that bounces cheerily across the clearing as if in pursuit of the escaping actor, somehow roaring like a prehistoric monster as it does … or perhaps the noise is that made by Lucia and her partner as they reach their mutual climax in the heady joss-stick ambience of that extraordinary decade; this extraordinary place.

    • As he roles passed he gecks an eyefeel of the interlapping fameels and glibs a luciantious squirk.

      • “roles” – “Rolls”, “roles”.
      • “passed” – “Past”, “passed”.
      • “gecks” – “Gets”, “geck” (scorn; archaic “fool”). Possibly “gecko”.
      • “eyefeel” – “Eyeful”, “I feel”.
      • “interlapping” – “Interlocking”, “overlapping”, “in her lap, lapping”.
      • “fameels” – “Females”, “fam(ily) eels” (see chapter “Forbidden Worlds”), “fame”.
      • “glibs” – “Gives”, “glib”.
      • “luciantious” – “Licentious”, “Lucia”, possibly “anxious”.
      • “squirk” – “Smirk”, “quirk”.
        • In reality, both McGoohan and Number Six were opposed to anything “licentious”, to the extent that even while acting, McGoohan never kissed a woman.
    • “Be seeding you,” he quirps, anticking one hang from the anglebars poorforms a stagely stranged salude, twuching his thimb and undex fringer to itch ether so that the handsums deform the numenal sieze, topped ’litely on his brew.

      • “seeding” – “Seeing”, “seeding”.
      • “quirps” – “Quips”, “chirps”.
      • “anticking” – “And taking”, “antic”, “a ticking”, possibly “antiquing”.
      • “hang” – “Hand”, “hang”.
        • In the episode “Living in Harmony”, Number Six is almost hanged by a lynch mob.
      • “anglebars” – “Handlebars”, “angle”, “angel”.
      • “poorforms” – “Performs”, “poor form”.
      • “stagely stranged” – “Strangely staged”, “sagely strangled”.
      • “salude” – “Salute”, suggest?? Possibly “quaalude”.
      • “twuching” – “Touching”, “twitching”.
      • “thimb” – “Thumb”, “thimble”, “him”.
      • “undex fringer” – “Index finger”, “un-dex(trous?) fringe”.
        • Possibly “un-indexed”. One of Number Six’s most famous speeches is “I will not be pushed, filed, stamped, indexed, briefed, debriefed, or numbered!” (emphasis added).
      • “itch” – “Each”, “itch”.
      • “ether” – “Other”, “ether”.
      • “handsums” – “Hand seems”, “sums”, “handsome”.
      • “deform” – “To form”, “deform”.
      • “numenal” – “Numeral”, “numinous”, “new menial”.

        Be seeing you
        Be seeing you
      • “sieze” – “Six”, “seize”, “seis” (Spanish “six”), suggest??
      • “topped” – “Tapped”, “topped”.
      • “’litely” – “Lightly”, “politely”.
      • “brew” – “Brow”, “brew”.
        • This describes the traditional farewell salute of Village inhabitants, usually accompanied by the phrase “Be seeing you”.
    • He psychles inwords, out of shight, an’ dafter a flew merments mare o’flicking at the intertwainer’s pissy, Lucia is snortled to obserd a lurge an’ bwobbling whide babloon that pounces cleerily becross the quearing as ifan purswoop oddy escraping ector, somehowl grroaring like a prehysteric manstare haz it dizzle …

      • “psychles” – “Cycles”, “psyche”.
      • “inwords” – “Onwards”, “inwards”, “in words”.
      • “shight” – “Sight”, “sigh”.
      • “an’ dafter” – “And after”, “dafter man”.
        • Possibly Danger Man, a television spy show starring McGoohan that many people view The Prisoner as a sequel to.
      • “flew” – “Few”, “flew”.
      • “merments” – “Moments”, “mermaids” (Rover – see below – lives underwater when not on active duty).
      • “mare” – “More”, “(night)mare”, “mare” (Italian “sea”).
      • “o’flicking” – “Of licking”, “o flicking (tongue)”.
      • “intertwainer’s” – “Entertainer’s”, “intertwines”.
      • “pissy” – “Pussy”, “pissy”.
      • “snortled” – “Startled”, “snorted”.
      • “obserd” – “Observe”, “absurd” (Rover is absurd — yet terrifying).
      • “lurge” – “Large”, “lunge”, “lurgey” (a fictitious disease).
      • “bwobbling” – “Wobbling”, “bobbing “.
      • “whide” – “White”, “wide”.

        Number One
        Number One
      • “babloon” – “Balloon”, “baboon”.
        • In the final episode of The Prisoner, the mask of Number One is ripped off, only to reveal another mask — of an ape.
      • “pounces” – “Bounces”, “pounces”.
      • “cleerily” – “Cheerily”, “eerily”.
      • “becross” – “Across”, “be cross”.
      • “quearing” – “Clearing”, “queer”.
      • “ifan” – “If in”, “I (am a) fan”.
      • “purswoop” – “Pursuit”, “pure swoop”.
      • “oddy” – “Of the”, “oddly”.
      • “escraping” – “Escaping”, “scraping (by?)”.
      • “ector” – “Actor”, “ectoplasm”. Possibly “Hector“.
      • “somehowl” – “Somehow”, “some howl”.
      • “grroaring” – “Roaring”, “grr”, possibly “groaning”.
      • “prehysteric” – “Prehistoric”, “hysteric”.
      • “manstare” – “Monster”, “man stare”.
      • “haz” – “As”, “haze”, “hazard”.
      • “dizzle” – “Does”, “sizzle”, possibly “drizzle”.
        Rover
        Rover
        • Described here is the Village’s ultimate means of pursuing and retrieving prisoners who attempt escape: a mysterious white blob called Rover. It’s a very simple creation, which sounds silly when described, but is (at least to most viewers) uncannily frightening in practice.
    • or poorharps the noyce is dirt maid bi Lucia undher pertner as they rich their clutural crymax in the hevdy joyc-tick flambience o’ tat exstrawberrymerry decayd; tis eggstoredinhurry playce.

      • “poorharps” – “Perhaps”, “poor harps”.
      • “noyce” – “Noise”, “Joyce”.
      • “dirt maid” – “That made”, “dirty maid”.
      • “bi” – “By”, “bi(sexual)”.
      • “undher” – “And her”, “under”.
      • “pertner” – “Partner”, “pert”.
      • “rich” – “Reach”, “rich”.
      • “clutural” – “Mutual”, “cultural”.
      • “crymax” – “Climax”, “cry max”.
      • “hevdy” – “Heady”, “heavy”.
      • “joyc-tick” – “Joss-stick” (incense; metaphorically marijuana), “Joyce tic”.
      • “flambience” – “Ambience”, “flame”.
      • “tat” – “That”, “tat” (British “sleaze”).
      • “exstrawberrymerry” – “Extraordinary”, “ex- strawberry merry”.
      • “decayd” – “Decade”, “decayed”.
      • “tis” – “This”, “’tis”.
      • “eggstoredinhurry” – “Extraordinary”, “eggs stored in (a) hurry”.
      • “playce” – “Place”, “Joyce”, “play”.
  • Paragraph 226
    Exhausted and completely satisfied the two girls reel apart to catch their breath and wipe their chins, entirely confident that in their thrilling and serpentine union they have ensured the fusion of the avant-garde and genuinely popular, a necessary intermingling for the betterment of culture and of mankind as a whole.

    • Sexhausted and cwympletely satisfade the goo twirls reill opart to kitsch their berth and weepe their chains, untiredly comefident that in their t’rilling and slurpentine lunion day have inshored the floozyon of the savant garde ‘n’ gemyouwinly popalure, a nicessary intermangling forder buttermint of cunture and of minkhind as a hole.

      • “Sexhausted” – “Exhausted”, “sex”.
      • “cwympletely” – “Completely”, “cwmp” (Welsh “a fall; labor (of a woman in childbirth)”).
      • “satisfade” – “Satisfied”, “fade”.
      • “goo twirls” – “Two girls”, “goo twirls”.
      • “reill” – “Reel”, “O’Reilly” (suggest??).
      • “opart” – “Apart”, “Op Art“.
      • “kitsch” – “Catch”, “kitsch”.
      • “berth” – “Breath”, “berth”.
      • “weepe” – “Wipe”, “weep”.
      • “chains” – “Chins”, “chains”.
      • “untiredly” – “Entirely”, “untiringly”.
      • “comefident” – “Confident”, “come”.
      • “t’rilling” – “Thrilling”, “trilling”.
      • “slurpentine” – “Serpentine”, “slurp”. Possibly “turpentine”.
      • “lunion” – “Union”, “lunar”, “lunatic”, possibly “onion”.
      • “day” – “They”, “day”.
      • “inshored” – “Ensured”, “in- shored” (perhaps “brought safely to shore”).
      • “floozyon” – “Fusion”, “floozy”.
      • “savant garde ‘n’” – “Avant-garde and”, “savant garden”.
      • “gemyouwinly” – “Genuinely”, “gem you win lie”.
      • “popalure” – “Popular”, “pop (culture) a lure”.
      • “nicessary” – “Necessary”, “Nice”.
      • “intermangling” – “Intermingling”, “mangling”.
      • “forder” – “For the”, “forder” (something or someone that fords a river).
      • “buttermint” – “Betterment”, “butter mint”.
      • “cunture” – “Culture”, “your cunt”.
      • “minkhind” – “Mankind”, “mink hind”.
      • “as a hole” – “As a whole”, “asshole”.
        • Obiwanspicoli notes: “This reminds me of William Gull’s real mission in From Hell to carry-out a ritual which will ensure the continued dominance of men in the twentieth century.”
  • Paragraph 227
    They kiss each other tenderly, tasting their own intimate juices on each other’s lips and then congratulate themselves on their proficiency at mutual cunnilingus. Straightening her skirt to hide her glistening thighs, Lucia explains that she’s expected back at the main house of the asylum in time for tea and asks her new friend for directions to the later reaches of the nineteen seventies, upon which Dusty Springfield genially points her the right way and then sprawls on her belly and continues listening to her portable wireless.

    • They kress ouch either tinderly, teasting their own entermate jisess on each other’ slips and then cungratiflate dameselves on their profishinsea at meetyouwell cumulonimbus.

      • “kress” – “Kiss”, “caress”. Possibly “cress” (type of plant used in salads), “kres” (Polish “limit, boundary”).
      • “ouch either” – “Each other”, “either ouch”.
      • “tinderly” – “Tenderly”, “tinder lie”.
      • “teasting” – “Tasting”, “teasing”, possibly “testing”.
      • “entermate” – “Intimate”, “enter mate”.
      • “jisess” – “Juices”, “jism” (slang “orgasmic fluids”). Possibly “sess” (assess, tax).
      • “other’ slips” – “Other’s lips”, “other slips”.
      • “cungratiflate” – “Congratulate”, “cunt gratify late”.
      • “dameselves” – “Themselves”, “dames elves”.
      • “profishinsea” – “Proficiency”, “pro fish in sea”.
      • “meetyouwell” – “Mutual”, “meet you well”.
      • “cumulonimbus” – “Cunnilingus”, “cumulonimbus” (type of cloud).
    • Straightawning her sqirt to whide her glossening theys, Lucia askplains dashy’s expictured beckett d’main hows o’ the massylum in spacetime for tea an’ dusks her newd frond four dimections to delayter roaches of the ninespleen severties, upunk which Lusty Flingspieled gentially paints her the light ray and then sprolls on her plurabelly and confinues glistening to her sportable wearless.

      • “Straightawning” – “Straightening”, “straight awning”.
      • “sqirt” – “Skirt”, “squirt” (slang “female ejaculation”).
      • “whide” – “Hide”, “wide”, “white”.
      • “glossening” – “Glistening”, “gloss”, possibly “glossolalia”.
      • “theys” – “Thighs”, “they”.
      • “askplains” – “Explains”, “ask plain(ly)”.
      • “dashy’s” – “That she’s”, “dashy” (showy).
      • “expictured” – “Expected”, “ex pictured”.
      • “beckett” – “Back at”, “Beckett”.
        • Samuel Beckett (1906-1989) was an Irish writer and playwright best known for his absurdist plays. A forthcoming chapter, “The Steps of All Saints” is in the style of a Beckett play, and also includes Samuel Beckett as a character.
      • “d’main” – “The main”, ‘domain”, possibly “demon”.
      • “hows” – “House”, “hows” (means by which).
      • “massylum” – “Asylum”, “mass”.
      • “spacetime” – “Time”, “spacetime”.
      • “an’ dusks” – “And asks”, “at dusk”.
      • “newd” – “New”, “nude”.
      • “frond” – “friend”, “frond”.
      • “four dimections” – “For directions”, “four dimensions”.
      • “delayter” – “The later”, “delayed her”.
      • “roaches” – “Reaches”, “roaches”.
      • “ninespleen severties” – “Nineteen seventies”, “spleen sever ties”, possibly “severity”.
        • Only now, when the chapter is almost over, do we get a fairly clear idea of what time period it is “set” in (though, of course, little of it takes place then) – the late 1970s.
      • “upunk” – “Upon”, “you punk”.
      • “Lusty Flingspieled” – “Dusty Springfield”, “lusty fling” “spieled” (slang “talked, often deceptively”).
      • “gentially” – “Genially”, “gently”, “genital”.
      • “paints” – “Points”, “paints”.
      • “light ray” – “Right way”, “light ray”.
      • “sprolls” – “Sprawls”, “strolls”, “rolls”.
      • “plurabelly” – “Belly”, “(Anna Livia) Plurabelle” (Finnegans Wake character who is cognate to Lucia).
      • “confinues” – “Continues”, “confines”.
      • “glistening” – “Listening”, “glistening”.
      • “sportable” – “Portable”, “sporty”.
      • “wearless” – “Wireless”, “wear less”.

Forward to Section 13 – Asylum Song