RtB section 11 – Audrey Vernall

Up to “Round the Bend”.

Back to Section 10 – Cemetery.

In which Lucia meets Audrey Vernall, cousin of Alma Warren.

  • Page 919 (continued)
  • Paragraph 166
    Saint Crispin's Hospital
    Saint Crispin’s Hospital

    She’s not managed to progress in walk more than a dozen yards or so by this over-elaborate method of perambulation when a subtle shifting of the light informs her that she is no longer shuffling through the little stand of trees in Kingsthorpe Cemetery. Looking up she sees a red brick clock-tower, or perhaps it is a crematorium chimney rising up above the sparse green canopy. As other buildings of a similarly creepy nature start to come up into view Lucia understands that her misguided wanderings have indeed brought her to a madhouse, albeit not the one that she was hoping for. Whatever this place is, it isn’t half as beautiful as the teeming viridian expanses of Saint Andrew’s Hospital. This doesn’t seem to be the kind of place that you are sent to if you are sufficiently well-off to be classified as delightfully eccentric. Rather, this looks like the sort of edifice you might end up in if you were unfortunate enough to be not only insane but insolvent also.

    • She’s not womanaged to pèregrace in wark mere than a dozin yarns or so by this ever-eliborate mythod of permangulation when a suddle shofting of di late unforms her dout she is nowlinger shnuffling throoter blittle stanz o’ treece in Klingst’hope Cemiterra.

      • “womanaged” – “Managed”, “aged woman”.
      • “pèregrace in wark” – “Progress in walk”, “Work in Progress“, “père” (French “father”) “grace” “wark” (dialect “ache”).
      • “mere” – “More”, “mere” (body of water; boundary; only).
      • “dozin” – “Dozen”, “dozing”.
      • “yarns” – “Yards”, “yarns” (stories).
      • “ever-eliborate” – “Over-elaborate”, “ever liberate”.
      • “mythod” – “Method”, “odd myth”.
      • “permangulation” – “Perambulation”, “per mangle”, possibly “ululation” (long loud howl).
      • “suddle” – “Subtle”, “sudden”. Possibly “saddle”.
      • “shofting” – “Shifting”, “softening”.
      • “di late” – “The light”, “dilate”, “the late” (way of referring to a dead person).
      • “unforms” – “Informs”, “un- forms” (makes shapeless), “uniforms”.
      • “dout” – “That”, “doubt”, possibly “dout” (dialect “douse”).
      • “nowlinger” – “No longer”, “now linger”.
      • “shnuffling” – “Shuffling”, “snuffling”.
      • “throoter” – “Through the”, “root”, suggest??
      • “blittle” – “Little”, “brittle”, possibly “blitt” (Scandinavian languages “having become”?).
      • “stanz” – “Stand”, “stanza”.
      • “treece” – “Trees”, “Henry Treece” (1911-1966, British writer).
      • “Klingst’hope Cemiterra” – “Kingsthorpe Cemetery”, “clings to hope” “terra” (earth). Possibly “cemi” (local deities worshipped by the Caribbean peoples of the Taino culture).
  • Page 920
    • Luccing up she seize a redprick cock-tower, or perlapse it is a crowmaterium Jim’ny realing up abud de sperse greyn canoply.

      • “Luccing” – “Looking”, “Lucia”, “Lucca” (city in Italy).
      • “seize” – “Sees”, “seize”.
      • “redprick” – “Red brick”, “red (erect) prick”.
      • “cock-tower” – “Clock-tower”, “towering (erect) cock”.
      • “perlapse” – “Perhaps”, “per lapse”, “prolapse” (to move out of place).
      • “crowmaterium” – “Crematorium”, “crow material” (corpses).
      • “Jim’ny” – “Chimney”, “Jiminy (Cricket)” (euphemism for Jesus Christ).
      • “realing” – “Rising”, “becoming real”.
      • “abud” – “Above”, “a bud”.
      • “de sperse” – “The sparse”, “disperse”, possibly “desperate”.
      • “greyn” – “Green”, “grey”.
      • “canoply” – “Canopy”, “panoply” (splendid display).
    • As utter illdings of a shimmerlully crippy nuture stark to gloom up interview Lucia blunderstands that her missgibded whendurings have indred braut her to a maidhouse, illbeit nutter one that shivers looping for.

      • “utter” – “Other”, “utter”.
      • “illdings” – “Buildings”, “ill” “dings” (small dents).
      • “shimmerlully” – “Similarly”, “shimmer” “lully” (archaic “lullaby”).
      • “crippy” – “Creepy”, “crippled”, “crappy”.
      • “nuture” – “Nature”, “nurture”.
      • “stark” – “Start”, “stark” (severe).
      • “gloom” – “Loom”, “gloom”.
      • “interview” – “Into view”, “interview”.
      • “blunderstands” – “Understands”, “(her) blunder stands”.
      • “missgibded” – “Misguided”, “(by) dead Miss Gibson”.
      • “whendurings” – “Wanderings”, “when during” (suggestive of the temporal aspect of these wanderings).
      • “indred” – “Indeed”, “in dread”.
      • “braut her” – “Brought her”, “brother”. Possibly “braut” (German “brew!”; Norwegian “path”; Old Welsh “judgment”).
      • “maidhouse” – “Madhouse”, “maid house”.
        • Audrey Vernall is a “maid” in the sense of “unmarried woman”, but not in the sense of “virgin”.
      • “illbeit” – “Albeit”, “ill bait”.
      • “nutter” – “Not the”, “nutter” (slang “crazy person”).
      • “shivers” – “She was”, “shivers”.
      • “looping” – “Hoping”, “loopy” (slang “crazy”).
    • Witover displace is, it isn’t hilf as betterfeel as the treeming firhidian expenses of Spent Grandrew’s Helthpeddle.

      • “Witover” – “Whatever”, “wit over”.
      • “displace” – “This place”, “displace”.
      • “hilf” – “Half”, “hilf” (German “help!”).
      • “betterfeel” – “Beautiful”, “fell better”.
      • “treeming” – “Teeming”, “tree” “ming” (mixture; foul-smelling; to speak).
      • “firhidian” – “Viridian” (bluish-green), “fir (tree) hiding”. Possibly “hideous”.
      • “expenses” – “Expanses”, “expensive”.
      • “Spent Grandrew’s Helthpeddle” – “Saint Andrew’s Hospital”, “Spent (a) grand (to) peddle (mental) health”.
    • This dazent seam to be die kinder playstatue are san’ to ifew ore sufflashantly wall-off to B-classed as delootfully eccspentric.

      • “dazent” – “Doesn’t”, “dazed nut”.
      • “seam” – “Seem”, “seam”.
      • “die kinder” – “The kind of”, “die kinder” (German “the children”).
      • “playstatue” – “Place that you”, “play statute” (stay still, be unthreatening).
      • “san’” – “Sent”, “sane”.
      • “ifew” – “If you”, “a few”.
      • “ore” – “Are”, “ore” (suggestive of precious metals, riches).
      • “sufflashantly” – “Sufficiently”, “flash” (Britain “having lots of money”), suggest??
      • “wall-off” – “Well-off”, “wall(ed) off”.
      • “B-classed” – “Be classed”, “B-class” (substandard).
      • “delootfully” – “Delightfully”, “the loot fully”.
      • “eccspentric” – “Eccentric”, “spent rich”.
    • Ruether, this looms like the snort of hedifice hu meat endorp’in if you were runfortulate arough to bee-net only binsane but binsolvent illso.

      • “Ruether” – “Rather”, “rue”.
      • “looms” – “Looks “, “looms”.
      • “snort” – “Sort”, “snort” (expression of derision).
      • “hedifice” – “Edifice”, “head”.
      • “hu meat” – “You might”, “human meat”.
      • “endorp’in” – “End up in”, “endorphin” (brain chemicals that cause joy).
      • “runfortulate” – “Unfortunate”, “run far too late”.
      • “arough” – “Enough”, “a rough”.

        Butterfly net pursuing mental patient
        Butterfly net pursuing mental patient
      • “bee-net” – “Be not”, “bee-net” (aka “butterfly net”, stereotypically used by orderlies to catch escaped mental patients).
      • “binsane” – “Insane”, “(loony) bin”.
      • “binsolvent” – “Insolvent” (poor).
      • “illso” – “Also”, “so ill” (unhealthy because of being unwealthy).
  • Paragraph 167
    As if to confirm Lucia’s suspicions, the stern, solemn female voice that issues from behind her has the unmistakable inflection of the English working classes.

    • As if to crownfirm Lucia’s shushpicions, the sturm, salemn fremale vice tha’ dissues from behider hasty onmasstakeable influction of the Angrish murkin’ glasses.

      • “crownfirm” – “Confirm”, “crown firm”.
      • “shushpicions” – “Suspicions”, “shush”.
      • “sturm” – “Stern”, “sturm” (German “storm”).
      • “salemn” – “Solemn”, “Salem”.
        • Salem is a Massachusetts town famous for its 17th century witch trials. It features in Moore’s Neonomicon and Providence.
      • “fremale” – “Female”, “free (from?) male”. Possibly “fretale” (Latin “frying pan”).
      • “vice” – “Voice”, “vice”.
      • “dissues” – “Issues”, “disuse”, “disses” (slang “disrespects”), possibly “dishes”.
      • “behider” – “Behind her”, “be one who hides”.
      • “hasty” – “Has the”, “hasty”.
      • “onmasstakeable” – “Unmistakable”, “on mass take able”.
      • “influction” – “Inflection”, “fluxion” (the act of flowing).
      • “Angrish” – “English”, “anguish”, “angry”.
      • “murkin’ glasses” – “Working classes”, “looking glasses” (as in Alice), “murk in glasses” (beer?).
  • Paragraph 168
    “You look lost, my duck. From how you’re dressed I’d guess you’re used to somewhere a far sight better than this place.”

    • As noted above, Audrey Vernall’s speech is, in addition to the usual Joycean multiple layers, of a notably lower-class dialect. Moore renders this phonetically. I translate to more standardized English without further comment.
    • “Yer luck lorst, mid uck.

      • “luck” – “Look”, “luck”.
      • “lorst” – “Lost”, “lore”.
      • “mid uck” – “My duck” (term of affection), “mid (y)uck”.
    • Frum owyer dreftide guessure euster sunwhere asarsite bedder thundisplays.”

      • “Frum” – “From”, “frum” (Jewish “pious”; Irish “along with me”).
      • “owyer” – “How you’re”, “ower” (one who owes), possibly “bowyer”.
      • “dreftide” – “Dressed I’d”, “drift tide”.
      • “guessure” – “Guess you’re”, “guest sure”. Possibly “gressure” (Latin “O man who will come!”?), “erasure”, “gue” (kind of fiddle; obsolete “rogue”).
      • “euster” – “Used to”, “Easter“. Possibly “Euterpe” (Greek Muse of music and lyric poetry).
      • “sunwhere” – “Somewhere”, “where (there is) sun”.
      • “asarsite” – “A far sight” (much), “asar” (long narrow ridge) “site”, suggest??
      • “bedder” – “Better”, “bed”.
      • “thundisplays” – “Than this place”, “thunder”, “displays”.
  • Paragraph 169
    Lucia turns about to find a strong-boned, handsome woman with a great untidy mass of hair, dressed in a plain hospital gown and seated on a peeling institution bench between the gray and chilly-looking trees. In her appearance she has something of the nature of a seagull, and she pats the fraying timber of the bench beside her as an indication that Lucia should sit down, an invitation that is somewhat nervously accepted.

    • Lucia sturns aboat to fend a strung-bowned, hauntsome warmin widder greyd intidey moss iv hair, drossed in a plein housepity gawn and seedead un a peeling monstertution blench retween the kray and chilldy-lacking treeze.

      • “sturns aboat” – “Turns about”, “stern (of) a boat”.
      • “fend” – “Find”, “fend (off?)”.
      • “strung-bowned” – “Strong-boned”, “strung bow” (possible reference to Odysseus, who proved his identity by stringing a bow).
      • “hauntsome” – “Handsome”, “haunt some”.
      • “warmin widder” – “woman with her”, “warming widow” (possible reference to the classic advice that, for a young man seeking a lover, widows are the best choice).
      • “greyd” – “Great”, “greyed”.
      • “intidey” – “Untidy”, “tide (is) in”.
      • “moss” – “Mess”, “moss”.
      • “iv hair” – “Of hair”, “ever”, suggest??. Possibly “iv” (Middle English “yew” (tree)).
      • “drossed” – “Dressed”, “dross” (trash).
      • “plein” – “Plain”, “plein” (French “plenty”). Possibly “lein” (Estonian “sorrow”).
      • “housepity gawn” – “Hospital gown”, “house (from which) pity (is) gone”.
      • “seedead” – “Seated”, “see dead” (possible reference to The Sixth Sense, and its tagline “I see dead people”). Possibly “seed head”.
      • “un a peeling” – “On a peeling”, “unappealing”.
      • “monstertution” – “Institution”, “monster tuition”.
      • “blench” – “Bench”, “blench” (to draw back from; to become white).
      • “retween” – “Between”, suggest?? Possibly “return”.
      • “kray” – “Gray”, Kray” (surname of twin British gangsters in the 1950s and 1960s, whom Moore has written about in multiple places, perhaps most notably the performance piece “The Moon and Serpent Grand Egyptian Theatre of Marvels“). Possibly “Krazy Kat” (surrealist American comic strip of the early 20th century).
      • “chilldy-lacking” – “Chilly-looking”, “child-lacking”, “lacking (the) chill (of those who) die”.
      • “treeze” – “Trees”, “Henry Treece” (British apocalyptic poet, mentioned in chapter “A Cold and Frosty Morning”), possibly “trapeze”.
    • Inner appoorance she has slumthing of the nazure of a seebul, inshe pawts the flaying splimber of the berch desider as an indocation that Lucia sudset down, a binvitation that is seemwhite nervoicely acsceptered.

      • “Inner” – “In her”, “inner”.
      • “appoorance” – “Appearance”, “a poor dance”.
      • “slumthing” – “Something”, “slum thing”.
      • “nazure” – “Nature”, “azure” (blue). Possibly “Nazarene” (typically a reference to Jesus Christ), “manure”.
      • “seebul” – “Seagull”, “see bull(shit)”.
      • “inshe” – “And she”, “inch”, “insh” (Manx “island”).
      • “pawts ” – “Pats”, “paws”, possibly “parts”.
      • “flaying” – “Fraying”, “flaying”.
      • “splimber” – “Timber”, “splinter”, “limber”.
      • “berch” – “Bench”, “birch” (tree).
      • “desider” – “Beside her”, “decider”.
      • “indocation” – “Indication”, “indoctrination”.
      • “sudset” – “Should sit”, “sunset”, “suds”.
      • “binvitation” – “Invitation”, “(loony) bin”.
      • “seemwhite” – “Somewhat”, “seem white”.
      • “nervoicely” – “Nervously”, “her voice lie”.
      • “acsceptered” – “Accepted”, “scepter”.
  • Paragraph 170
    “Thank you very much for your concern. I am Lucia Joyce, a resident of Saint Andrew’s Hospital along Billing Road. What might your name be, if you don’t mind me asking, and what kind of place is this in which I find myself?”

    • “Think you vary mach far your constern.

      • “Think” – “Thank”, “think”.
      • “vary” – “Very”, “vary”.
      • “mach far” – “Much for”, “Mach four” (a very fast speed), “mach” (German “make!”) “far”.
      • “constern” – “Concern”, “consternation”.
    • High ham Luci Adjace, a redicent of the Slant Andlose Ghospital alinger Boilling Read.

      • “High ham” – “I am”, “high ham”.
        • Lucia may here be attempting a Cockney accent, perhaps to fit in with the lower-class surroundings.
      • “Luci Adjace” – “Lucia Joyce”, “Lucy adjacent”.
      • “redicent” – “Resident”, “red cent”.
      • “Slant Andlose Ghospital” – “Saint Andrew’s Hospital”, “slant and lose ghost pal”.
      • “alinger” – “Along the”, “a linger” (both in the sense “remain”, and in the Jerusalem-specific meaning of “duration-distance”).
      • “Boilling Read” – “Billing Road”, “boiling read” (potboiler?).
    • Wight met your nume be, iffier dawnight monde me arcing, und wass kinderplace ist loss in witcheye find hyshelf?”

      • “Wight” – “What”, “wight” (person; undead spirit).
      • “met” – “Might”, “met”.
      • “nume” – “Name”, “numinous”. Possibly “nume” (Italian “god”).
      • “iffier” – “If you”, “iffier” (more uncertain).
      • “dawnight” – “Don’t mind”, “dawn (ends) night”.
      • “monde” – “Mind”, “monde” (French “world”).
      • “arcing” – “Asking”, “arcing”.
      • “und” – “And”, “und” (German “and”), possibly “under”.
      • “wass” – “What”, “wasser” (German “water”).
      • “kinderplace” – “Kind of place”, “kinder” (German “children”), “place (to be) kinder (to one another)”.
      • “ist loss” – “Is this”, “ist los” (German “is going on”), “loss”.
      • “witcheye” – “Which I”, “witch eye”.
      • “hyshelf” – “Myself”, “high shelf”.
        • Possibly referring to “top-shelf”, which can mean “high quality”, but can also refer to pornography. Top Shelf is also an American publisher of some of Moore’s work, including the high quality pornography Lost Girls.
  • Paragraph 171
    The other woman pats Lucia’s hand and smiles.

    • The ohthere wombin peats Lucia-sand and swhiles.

      • “ohthere” – “Other”, “oh there”.
      • “wombin” – “Woman”, “possessing a womb”.
      • “peats” – “Pats”, “peat”.
      • “Lucia-sand” – “Lucia’s hand”, “sand”.
      • “swhiles” – “Smiles”, “whiles”.
  • Paragraph 172
    “My name is Audrey Vernall and you’re in Saint Crispin’s Hospital, along the Berrywood Turn, just round the bend from the Main Road in Duston. You’re a good few miles from home, if I can be so bold, but I dare say you’ve come here through these belaboring trees. Do you know, some of them are so high once I have taken the mathematics of the thing into consideration that they poke up through the floorboards into Mansoul? Mansoul is the town that’s over, after, and before Northampton, incidentally.”

    • “Me naymiss Audbly Fernall injure inncent Christpin’s Drossputall, illong the Bury Word Turn, jester rend the bound from the Rain Mode in Dusttown.

      • “Me naymiss” – “My name is”, “me nay miss” (that is, I am no virgin). Possibly “nemesis”.
      • “Audbly Fernall” – “Audrey Vernall”, “audibly” (able to be heard, something that was notably both present and absent during Audrey’s teenage years) “all fern”.
      • “injure” – “And you’re”, “injure”.
      • “inncent Christpin’s Drossputall” – “In Saint Crispin’s Hospital”, “innocent Christ pins” (crucifix nails?) “put all dross”.
      • “illong” – “Along”, “ill long”.
      • “Bury Word Turn” – “Berry Wood turn”, “bury word”
      • “jester” – “Just”, “jester”.
      • “rend the bound” – “Round the bend” (also the title of this chapter), “rend the bound” (break out of boundaries).
      • “Rain Mode” – “Main Road”, “rain mode”.
      • “Dusttown” – “Duston” (suburb of Northampton), “dust town”.
    • Year a godfume-isles from home, ithacan be so bolt, but Idea sea you’ve swome heretrue these b’labouring trees.

      • “Year” – “You’re”, “year”.
      • “godfume-isles” – “Good few miles”, “god fume isles”.
      • “ithacan” – “If I can”, “inhabitant of Ithica” (Ulysses was the king of Ithaca; “Ithaca” is the title of the penultimate chapter of James Joyce’s Ulysses).
      • “bolt” – “Bold”, “bolt” (of inspiration?).
      • “Idea sea” – “Dare say”, “idea sea” (another way of referring to Moore’s conception of Ideaspace?).
      • “swome” – “Come”, “swum”.
      • “heretrue” – “Here through”, “her true”.
      • “b’labouring” – “Belaboring” (suggest??), “blabbing”.
    • Die you now, summerthumb are that hugh once eye have tookin the mythmatics of the think ento consideruption that they proke up three the fourboards onetwo Meinsoul?

      • “Die you now” – “Did you know”, “now you die”.
      • “summerthumb” – “Some of them”, “summer thumb” (possibly meaning “green thumb”, someone who is a skilled gardener).
      • “hugh” – “High”, “huge”. Possibly “Hugh” (referring to suggest??).
      • “eye” – “I”, “eye”.
      • “tookin” – “Taken”, “took in” (understood).
      • “mythmatics” – “Mathematics”, “myth”.
      • “think” – “Thing”, “think”.
      • “ento” – “Into”, suggest??
      • “consideruption” – “Consideration”, “eruption”.
      • “proke up” – “Poke up”, “broke up”, possibly “woke up”.
      • “three the fourboards” – “Through the floorboards”, “three (dimensions become) four”.
      • “onetwo” – “Into”, “one two”.
      • “Meinsoul” – “Mansoul”, “mein” (German “my”) “soul”.
    • Mainsail is the trowm that’s ever, ifter, and befour Gnorethumptown, incideoutally.”

      • “Mainsail” – “Mansoul”, “mainsail”.
      • “trowm” – “Town”, “trow” (archaic “believe”), suggest??. Possibly “row”, “trauma”.
      • “ever, ifter, and befour” – “Over, after, and before”, “ever after” “be four (dimensional)”.
      • “Gnorethumptown” – “Northampton”, “ignore thump town”. Possibly “gnome”.
        • Northampton is both a town whose stoic inhabitants try to ignore thumps, and a town which has been thumped and ignored.
      • “incideoutally” – “Incidentally”, “inside-out ally”.
  • Paragraph 173
    Lucia blinks in surprise.

    • Lucia blanks in surpraise.

      • “blanks” – “Blinks”, “(mind goes) blank”.
      • “surpraise” – “Surprise”, “sur” (French “above”) “praise”.
  • Paragraph 174
    “Well, I must say, you seem to know an awful lot about the workings of the higher realm for seeing that you are an inmate of this dreadful-looking place.”

    • “Wheel, I missay, nyou ‘steem to noah lawful wot about the lurkings of the highhear drealm fourseeing, that you are, an inmeet of this drudgeful-locking pleas.”

      • “Wheel” – “Well”, “wheel”.
      • “missay, nyou” – “Must say, you”, “me sane you”, “miss anyhow”.
      • “‘steem” – “Seem”, “esteem”, possibly “steam”.
      • “noah lawful wot” – “Know an awful lot”, “Noah” (Biblical patriarch) “lawful” “wot” (archaic “to know”).
      • “lurkings” – “Workings”, “lurking”.
      • “highhear” – “Higher”, “high hear”.
      • “drealm” – “Realm”, “dream”.
      • “fourseeing, that you are,” – “Seeing that you are”, “four (dimensional) seeing”, “foreseeing”.
      • “inmeet” – “Inmate”, “meet in”.
      • “drudgeful-locking” – “Dreadful-looking”, “drudge locking”.
      • “pleas” – “Place”, “pleas”.
  • Paragraph 175
    Her new friend, who looks to be in her forties or her fifties, throws back her wild mane of hair and laughs.

    • Her now fround, who lucks to be inure fraughties or err thrifties, frows black her weeld mown o’ vert and lufts.

      • “now fround” – “New friend”, “now frond”, “new-found”.
      • “lucks” – “Looks”, “luck”.
      • “inure” – “In her”, “inure” (to habituate).
      • “fraughties” – “Forties”, “fraught (family) ties”.
      • “or err” – “Or her”, “err”. Possibly “orrery” (clockwork model of a solar system).
      • “thrifties” – “Thirties”, “thrifty”.
        • Audrey was born c.1930, so if this age estimate is correct, the current scene is in the 1970s or 1980s.
      • frows” – “Throws”, “frowns”, “frowsy” (having a neglected appearance).
      • “black” – “Back”, “black”.
      • “weeld” – “Wild”, “weed”. Possibly “we’d”, “whee!”.
      • “mown” – “Mane”, “mown (grass)”.
      • “o’ vert” – “Of hair”, “overt”, “vert” (green).
        • “vert” for “hair” is a bit of a stretch, but this is probably to continue the theme built up over the last few words of suggesting that Audrey’s hair is like an un-mown lawn.
      • “lufts” – “Laughs”, “luft” (German “air”).
  • Page 921
  • Paragraph 176
    “Oh well, you see now, it’s because I know the workings of little things that I’ve been put out here. That is, I’m what they call a Vernal in these parts. We are to oversee the boundaries between the different territories, and at our eventual inquest we define the tricky corner between one world and the next. That’s why I can see the rough sleepers, all the ghosts, and see the funny little fairy-fruits they eat. That’s why I have the foresight, with the threesight, twosight, and onesight all into the bargain. As for why I’m here, that is because I locked my mom and dad out of our house and wouldn’t let them in. I sat there playing Whispering Grass all night until they came next day and they just took me to the madhouse. No one really asked me why I had been doing it, or else I should have told them that it was because I could no longer bear the weight of incest.”

    • “Orwel, lyousee now, it’s becurse highno the workingsuffer litterthinks that I’ve bane pout ad here.

      • “Orwel” – “Oh well”, “Orwell”.
        • George Orwell (1903-1950) was an English writer, best known for 1984.
      • “lyousee” – “You see”, suggest??
      • “becurse” – “Because”, “be curse”.
      • “highno” – “I know”, “high no”.
      • “workingsuffer” – “workings of the”, “working suffer” (the working class suffers; the suffering of Work in Progress)
      • “litterthinks” – “Little things” (possibly a dig at Johnny’s penis size?), “litter thinks” (the thoughts of (people who are) trash?).
      • “bane” – “Been”, “bane”.
      • “pout” – “Put”, “pout”.
      • “ad here” – “Out here”, “adhere” (stick to).
    • Babyrth, I’m werticall a Vernal in disports.

      • “Babyrth” – “That is”, suggest?? Possibly “Babylon”, “bara brith” (type of Welsh bread), “baby earth”, “labyrinth”. Possible-but-unlikely “barbelith” (significant word from Grant Morrison’s The Invisibles.
      • “werticall” – “What they call”, “vertical”.
      • “disports” – “These parts”, “disport” (amusement).
    • Wearier to eversee the bindaries betwhen the dayfront terrastoreys, and at hour reventual inkwaste we defind the trykey corenear beturn one weld and annexed.

      • “Wearier” – “We are”, “wearier”.
      • “eversee” – “Oversee”, “ever see”.
      • “bindaries” – “Boundaries”, “bind”, possibly “(book-)bindery”, “Aries” (Zodiac sign).
      • “betwhen” – “Between”, “bet when”, possibly “be twin”.
      • “dayfront” – “Different”, “day front”.
      • “terrastoreys” – “Territories”, “terra” (Earth) “storeys” (levels of a house; compare the notion of Mansoul as “Upstairs”).
      • “hour” – “Our”, “hour”.
      • “reventual” – “Eventual”, “reventus” (Latin “having come back”(?)), possibly “revenant” (undead).
      • “inkwaste” – “Inquest”, “waste (of) ink” (hopefully not the actual judgment of history upon Jerusalem!).
      • “defind” – “Define”, “defend”, possibly “de- find” (make hidden?).
      • “trykey” – “Tricky”, “try key”.
      • “corenear” – “Corner”, “near (the) core”.
      • “beturn” – “Between”, “be turn”.
      • “weld” – “World”, “weld” (type of herb; to bind together; Welsh “to see”).
      • “annexed” – “The next”, “annexed” (attached; taken over).
    • That’s whigh eye ban shee the raff slopers, all the ghlosts, and seed o’ phanny lickle furry-frudes di et.

      • “whigh” – “Why”, “high”, “wight” (archaic “person”; type of undead).
      • “eye” – “I”, “eye”.
      • “ban shee” – “Can see”, “banshee” (Celtic death spirit).
      • “raff slopers” – “Rough sleepers”, “raff” (riffraff; Welsh “rope; graph”) “sloper” (something which slopes; obsolete “a member of the peerage who has fallen from wealth but maintains social contacts”).
      • “ghlosts” – “Ghosts”, “lost”, “glows”.
      • “seed o’ phanny” – “See the funny”, “seed orphan”, “fanny” (slang “vagina”), possibly “epiphany”, “dauphin” (title of the Prince of France).
      • “lickle” – “Little”, “lick”, “lickle” (dialect “little”).
      • “furry-frudes” – “Fairy-fruits”, “furry dudes”. Possibly “(Brian) Froud“, a notable illustrator of fairies.
      • “di et” – “They eat”, “diet”.
        • Audrey may be exaggerating slightly here. In the chapter “Rough Sleepers”, she detedted the likely presence of a Puck’s Hat as “something moving from the corner of my eye”, but couldn’t directly see it in the way that actual ghosts do.
    • That’s whaye-aye hafter foursight, witter freesight, toosight and the whensight all instew the boregaim.

      • “whaye-aye” – “Why I”, “aye-aye” (term used by sailors to acknowledge a command; type of lemur).
      • “hafter” – “Have the”, “after”. Possibly “halter”.
      • “foursight” – “Foresight” (ability to see the future, sometimes supernatural), “four-sight” (ability to see in four dimensions).
      • “witter” – “With the”, “witter” (to speak at length on trivial topics; obsolete “wise”; Scots “water”).
      • “freesight” – “Three-sight”, “free sight”.
      • “toosight” – “Two-sight”, “see also”.
      • “whensight” – “One-sight”, “when-sight” (the ability to see through time).
      • “instew” – “Into”, “in stew”.
      • “boregaim” – “Bargain”, “bore (Neil) Gaiman.
    • As fourway I’mere, that is becraze I larked me mam and dud autovour herse and wooden lotthim in.

      • “fourway” – “For why”, “four-way” (again, four dimensions).
      • “I’mere” – “I’m here”, “I (am a) mere” (I’m unimportant; I’m a mirror).
      • “becraze” – “Because”, “be crazy”.
      • “larked” – “Locked”, “lark” (to prank).
      • “mam” – “Mom”, “mammary”.
      • “dud” – “Dad”, “dud”.
      • “autovour” – “Out of our”, “auto- (de)vour” (To consume oneself – or perhaps one’s child?).
      • “herse” – “House”, “hearse”, possibly “herself”.
      • “wooden” – “Wouldn’t”, “wooden” (possible allusion to the Trojan Horse, an idea come up with by Ulysses).
      • “lotthim” – “Let them”, “Lot him” (In the Bible, Lot is a notable occurrence of father-daughter incest, which is blamed upon the daughters). Possibly “lottery”, or “King Lot” (Arthurian figure).
    • I sad there ploying Whimpering Class hellnight ontil day clame noxt they unday misstook me to the mudhose.

      • “sad” – “Sat”, “sad”.
      • “ploying” – “Playing”, “(as a) ploy”.
      • Whimpering Class” – “Whispering Grass“, “whimpering class”.
        • Obiwanspicoli notes “It is standard for songs to be in quotes and albums italicized but I left it as it was.  This must be an editing error as every other instance “Whispering Grass” is in quotes.”
      • “hellnight” – “All night”, “hell”.
      • “ontil” – “Until”, suggest?? Possibly “ontic” (ontological).
      • “day clame noxt they” – “They came next day”, “day claim” “Nox” (Latin “night, darkness, dream, death”; a goddess of these qualities).
      • “unday” – “And they”, “Sunday”, possibly “undine” (water spirit).
      • “misstook” – “Just took”, “mistook”, “took miss”.
      • “mudhose” – “Madhouse”, “mud”.
    • No-when reely masked me why I hard burn dewynicht, or ills I shudder tolledoom that it waspycourse I curld no linger bare the waight of insist.”

      • “No-when” – “No-one”, “no-when” (at no time).
      • “reely” – “Really”, “reeling”.
      • “masked” – “Asked”, “masked” (hidden).
      • “hard” – “Had”, “hard”.
      • “burn” – “Been”, “burn”.
      • “dewynicht” – “Doing it”, “dewy” (covered in dew) “nicht” (German “no”).
      • “ills” – “Else”, “ills”.
      • “shudder” – “Should have”, “shudder”.
      • “tolledoom” – “Told them”, “tolled doom” (this resonates strongly with the bell motif in the chapter “The Steps of All Saints”).
      • “waspycourse” – “Was because”, “waspy” (waspish, spiteful) “course”.
      • “curld” – “Could”, “curled” (in a fetal position?).
      • “linger” – “Longer”, “linger” (to die slowly; in Jerusalem, a measure of duration).
      • “bare” – “Bear”, “bare”.
      • “waight” – “Weight”, “wait”, possibly “wight” (see above).
      • “insist” – “Incest”, “insist”.
  • Paragraph 177
    In both sympathy and shock Lucia raises one hand to her lips.

    • In boat samepathy and shrock Lookhere roses wan haund to ellipse.

      • “In boat samepathy” – “In both sympathy”, “in the same boat”, “empathy”.
      • “shrock” – “Shock”, “rock”. Possibly “(Max) Schreck” (German actor famous for Nosferatu).
      • “Lookhere” – “Lucia”, “look here”.
      • “roses” – “Raises”, “roses” (flowers of many symbolic meanings).
      • “wan” – “One”, “wan” (pale, sickly).
      • “haund” – “Hand”, “hound” (possibly referring back to Lucia’s traumatic experience with a dog, as discussed in section 5, J. K. Stephen).
      • “ellipse” – “Her lips”, “ellipse” (oval).
  • Paragraph 178
    “Why, how dreadful! You poor girl. Would it have been an older brother that was taking liberties with you, as it was in my own case?”

    • “Woh, how deadfeel!

      • “Woh” – “Why”, “woe”, “woh” (Middle English “wrong, evil, bent”).
      • “deadfeel” – “Dreadful”, “(I) feel dead”.
    • You paw grrl.

      • “paw” – “Poor” (meaning both unlucky and not wealthy), “paw” (hand or foot of a beast; to touch sexually without consent).
      • “grrl” – “Girl”, “grr” (sound a threatening beast makes). Possibly “(riot) grrrls” (1990s punk feminist subculture).
    • Word it harb’in an holdher bruter datewise turking labiatease wetyou, a situasin my encase?”

      • “Word” – “Would”, “word”.
      • “harb’in” – “Have been”, “harbinger”, “in harbor”, “harboring”.
      • “holdher bruter” – “Older Brother”, “hold her, brute”.
      • “datewise” – “That was”, “date-wise” (in respect to time), “date wise(ly)” (be careful whom you express affection for).
      • “turking” – “Taking”, “Turk -ing”.
        • “Turk” is used here in a now unfashionable sense of “exotic, sexually-depraved Other” (as in the 1828 erotic novel The Lustful Turk).
      • “labiatease” – “Liberties”, “labia tease”.
      • “wetyou” – “With you”, “(making) you wet” (either through Audrey’s own sexual excitement, or from having her assailant’s semen spilled on/in her).
      • “situasin” – “It was in”, “situation”. Possibly “(in) situ” (in its original place) “was sin”, suggestive of the doctrine of Original Sin (something Moore is opposed to).
      • “encase” – “Own case”, “encase”.
  • Paragraph 179
    Here, the other of the two madwomen shakes her thick dark tresses.

    • Eer the ether odder too madwi’men shnakes hair thick doctresses.

      • “Eer” – “Here”, “eerie”.
      • “ether” – “Other”, “ether” (early anaesthetic), “ethereal”.
      • “odder too” – “Of the two”, “also more odd”.
      • “madwi’men” – “Madwomen”, “mad with men” (fed up with men; driven insane by men).
      • “shnakes hair” – “Shakes her”, “snakes (for) hair” (suggesting that Audrey Vernall is Medusa?).
      • “doctresses” – “Dark tresses”, “doctress” (archaic “female doctor”).
  • Paragraph 180
    “No, I never had a brother, nor vice-versa. I was interfered with by my father, Johnny Vernall in his loud plaid jacket. What it was, you see, I had a talent. I’d learned how to play the piano-accordion by studying my Great-Aunt Thursa, who was not an ordinary woman. She would walk the blackout streets and serenade the German bombers overhead with her deranged improvisations. Anyway, my dad suggested that I join a little show-band made of chaps he knew, where he would be the manager. This was after the war, when I was sixteen, seventeen, something like that. He doted on me, did my father. Said that I’d be on the radio and have my pictures in the magazines. Then, after one of our performances, it was the middle of the night, he came and got in bed with me and fucked me. What I should have done, I think now, looking back, I should have screamed and woken someone, but that isn’t what I did. I never made a sound, and I tried not to move, to make out that I was asleep and didn’t know that it was happening, as if that way I wouldn’t really be a part of it. It was the same on all of the occasions after that, with me just lying there and trying not to make noise while I was weeping. Even so, my mom, she must’ve known. He did it once or twice a fortnight until I did my solo performance that night, playing Whispering Grass, letting him know that I was going to tell the trees about him and his naughty little prick, where it had been, what he’d been doing with it.”

    • “Kno, E nuffer hard a brothler, gnaw vice-worser

      • “Kno, E nuffer” – “No, I never”, “know enough”.
      • “hard” – “Had” (possessed; had sex with), “hard” (erect).
      • “brothler” – “Brother”, “brothel”.
      • “gnaw” – “Nor”, “gnaw”.
      • “vice-worser” – “Vice-versa”, “vice (makes things) worse”.
    • I was intofeared wit by me fadder, Johlly Vainall in his leud plaud juckit.

      • “intofeared” – “Interfered”, “(led) into fear”.
      • “wit” – “With”, “wit”.
      • “fadder” – “Father”, “fadder” (one who follows fads).
      • “Johlly Vainall” – “Johnny Vernall”, “all jolly (and) vain”.
      • “leud” – “Loud”, “lewd”.
      • “plaud” – “Plaid”, “applaud”.
      • “juckit” – “Jacket”, “fuck it”.
    • Wah tit was, usey, I head e toilent.

      • “Wah tit” – “What it”, “wah” (crying sound), “tit”.
      • “usey” – “You see”, “use -y” (available for use?).
      • “head e” – “Had a”, “heady” (intoxicating).
      • “toilent” – “Talent”, “toilet”.
    • I’dl earned howl to plainter piano-applaudion by sturdying my Great-Haunt Theresaw, who wise nut a herdinhurry woemine.

      • “I’dl earned” – “I’d learned”, “idle earned” (possibly suggesting that her talent is more due to heredity than practice?).
      • “howl” – “How”, “howl”.
      • “plainter” – “Play the”, “plaintive”.
      • “piano-applaudion” – “Piano-accordion”, “applaud”.
      • “sturdying” – “Studyings”, “sturdy”.
      • “Great-Haunt” – “Great-Aunt”, “great(ly) haunt(ed)”.
      • “Theresaw” – “Thursa”, “Theresa”, “there saw”.
      • “wise” – “Was”, “wise”.
      • “nut” – “Not”, “nut” (eccentric person).
      • “herdinhurry” – “Ordinary”, “her in (a) hurry”, “herd”, possibly “hereditary”.
      • “woemine” – “Woman”, “woe (is) mine”.
    • She word walkz the flackout straits and sereneaid the Charman boomers ofherhead with her reranged impovrisations.

      • “word” – “Would”, “word”.
      • “walkz” – “Walk”, “waltz”.
      • “flackout” – “Blackout”, “flack” (anti-aircraft guns).
      • “straits” – “Streets”, “straits” (circumstances).
      • “sereneaid” – “Serenade”, “serene aid”.
      • “Charman” – “German”, “char” (type of fish; woman who does housework).
        • This is the first of several words over the next few sentences referring to menial female labor. Perhaps this is something Audrey Vernall objected to, and saw her musical talent as an escape from?
      • “boomers” – “Bombers”, “boomers” (makers of loud sounds).
      • “ofherhead” – “Overhead”, “off her head” (crazed).
      • “reranged” – “Deranged”, “rearranged”.
      • “impovrisations” – “Improvisations”, “impoverished”.
    • Manywhy, my ded suggestiv that I jeun a lottle show-panned maid o’ chopsy new, wary would be demonager.

      • “Manywhy” – “Anyway”, “many (times I asked) why”.
      • “ded” – “Dad”, “dead”.
      • “suggestiv” – “Suggested”, “(sexually) suggestive”.
      • “jeun” – “Join”, “jeune” (French “young person”).
      • “lottle” – “Little”, “Lot” (see note at paragraph 176).
      • “show-panned” – “Show-band”, “show (was) panned”. Possibly “Chopin” (Polish composer).
      • “maid” – “Made”, “maid” (young woman; household servant).
      • “chopsy new” – “Chaps he”, suggest??
      • “wary” – “Where he”, “wary”.
      • “demonager” – “The manager”, “demon”. Possibly “onager” (wild ass).
    • Dishwash after the wear, when I was sextween, sementeen, slimthing like dote.

      • “Dishwash” – “This was”, “wash dishes”.
      • “wear” – “War” (World War II), “wear”.
      • “sextween” – “Sixteen”, “sex between”.
      • “sementeen” – “Seventeen”, “semen teen”.
      • “slimthing” – “Something”, “slim thing”.
      • “dote” – “That”, “dote” (adore).
    • He dated on me, dad me fader.

      • “dated” – “Doted”, “dated” (had a romantic relationship with).
      • “dad” – “Did”, “dad”.
      • “fader” – “Father”, “fader” (one who fades – which would seem to apply more to Audrey than her father).
    • Sed the tide bouy on derideo and have me fictures in the mugazines.

      • “Sed” – “Said”, “sed” (Latin “but”; Spanish “thirsty”).
      • “the tide” – “That I’d”, “the tide”.
      • “bouy” – “Be”, “buoy” (nautical flotation device; to uplift).
      • “derideo” – “The radio”, “deride”.
      • “fictures” – “Pictures”, “fictions”.
      • “mugazines” – “Magazines”, “mug (shots)” (pictures taken by police).
    • Thin, shafter one of our beerformances, it was the muddle of the nates, he crame and god in bad whi me and fact me.

      • “Thin, shafter” – “Then, after”, “thin shaft” (a comment on Johnny’s penis?).
      • “beerformances” – “Performances”, “beer for man”.
      • “muddle” – “Middle”, “muddled” (Audrey’s confused state of mind).
      • “nates” – “Night”, “nates” (buttocks). Possibly “natal” (relating to birth).
      • “crame” – “Came”, “cram” (force into).
      • “god” – “Got”, “god”.
        • Possible reference to Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, I i, where Theseus says: “Be advised, fair maid: To you your father should be as a god”.
      • “bad” – “Bed”, “bad”.
      • “whi” – “With”, “Why?” (the first of several phrases over the next few sentences that seem to contain Audrey’s (possibly unvoiced, or after-the-fact) protests to her father).
      • “fact” – “Fucked”, “fact”.
    • What I shadder done, I thing know, booking lack, I shatter scrummed and bwoken shameone, but dirt isn’t wait I dad.

      • “shadder” – “Should have”, “shudder”. Possibly “shad” (type of fish).
      • “thing know” – “Think now”, “thing (I) know” (what I understand; penis I have had sex with).
      • “booking lack” – “Looking back”, “lack of bookings” (a problem for a band manager).
      • “shatter” – “Should have”, “shatter”, possibly “took a shit”.
      • “scrummed” – “Screamed”, “scrum” (tightly packed crowd).
      • “bwoken” – “Woken”, “broken”.
      • “shameone” – “Someone”, “shame”.
      • “dirt” – “That”, “dirt”.
      • “wait I dad” – “What I did”, “wait, dad, I…”.
    • I river maid a sand, and I tride nacht to mewve, to fake out that I was aslip and dadn’t no that it was happalling, as if that why I wooden rawly be a part avid.

      • “river maid a sand” – “Never made a sound”, “river made of sand”, “river maid” (undine, nymph).
        • Nymph is also a word used to describe sexually active women, especially those who are very young, or over-sexed.
      • “tride” – “Tried”, “trident”.
        • The trident is symbolically associated with Poseidon, a sea god, and thus in some sense a father figure to nymphs. He is also an enemy of Ulysses.
      • “nacht” – “Not”, “nacht” (German “night”).
      • “mewve” – “Move”, “mew” (cat-like small sound of distress).
      • “fake out” – “Make out” (pretend), “fake out”.
      • “aslip” – “Asleep”, “a slip” (a mistake; a ladies undergarment).
      • “dadn’t no” – “Didn’t know”, “Daddy, no!”.
      • “happalling” – “Happening”, “”appalling”.
      • “why” – “Way”, “Why?”.
      • “wooden” – “Wouldn’t”, “wooden”.
        • In an inverse of Pinocchio, Audrey wishes to not be real, to be only made of wood.
      • “rawly” – “Really”, “in a raw manner”.
      • “avid” – “Of it”, “avid” (desirous).
    • It worse the shame oin hell of the occrazions ofter that, quimmy joust lieing there and tryoung not too meek annoys while eyewash wieping.

      • “worse” – “Was”, “worse”.
      • “shame” – “Same”, “shame”.
      • “oin hell” – “On all”, “in hell”. Possibly “From Hell“.
      • “occrazions” – “occasions”, “crazy”.
      • “ofter” – “After”, “often”.
        • This may be a stretch, but I am reminded of the joke in The Pirates of Penzance, where there is frequent confusion between the words “often” and “orphan”. Audrey has, as a result of her parents’ actions, effectively become an orphan.
      • “quimmy” – “With me”, “quim” (archaic “cunt”).
      • “joust” – “Just”, “joust” (possibly a metaphor for sex?).
      • “lieing” – “Lying” (in a prone position; telling untruths).
      • “tryoung” – “Trying”, “too young”.
      • “too meek” – “To make”, “to meek (to resist)”.
      • “annoys” – “A noise”, “annoy”.
      • “eyewash wieping” – “I was weeping”, “wiping eyes (which are) washed (with tears)”.
    • Evil so, me mem, she musty norn.

      • “Evil” – “Even”, “evil”.
      • “me mem” – “My mom”, “remember”.
      • “musty” – “Must’ve”, “musty”.
      • “norn” – “Known”, Norn” (Norse semi-divine being concerned with Fate).
    • He dared it wince or tweeze a fightnaught ontil I did me solow befirmonce that nicht, pleaing Dispering Crass, letching ham no dout I was croing to toll the twees abate him and his daughty liddel preek, whore it had burn, what hi’d ban dewing wadjet.”

      • “dared” – “Did”, “dared”.
      • “wince or tweeze” – “Once or twice”, “tweezing (leads to) wincing”.
      • “fightnaught” – “Fortnight” (two week period), “fight naught” (no resistance).
      • “ontil” – “Until”, “onto”. Possibly “ontic” (ontological).
      • “solow” – “Solo”, “so low”.
      • “befirmonce” – “Performance”, “be firm (for) once”.
      • “nicht” – “Night”, “nicht” (German “no, not”).
      • “pleaing” – “Playing”, “making pleas”.
      • “Dispering Crass” – “Whispering Grass“, “dispersing crass”, possibly “disappearing”.
      • “letching” – “Letting”, “letching” (having lust for).
      • “ham” – “Him”, “ham” (an actor who overacts).
      • “no dout” – “Know that”, “No doubt”.
      • “croing” – “Going”, “crowing”.
      • “toll” – “Tell”, “toll” (bell sound; price).
      • “twees” – “Trees”, suggest?? Possibly “twee” (overly cute).
      • “abate” – “About”, “abate” (relieve).
      • “daughty” – “Naughty”, “daughter”, possibly “dainty”.

        Alice Liddell, age 7, photographed by Carroll
        Alice Liddell, age 7, photographed by Carroll
      • “liddel” – “Little”, “Liddell”.
        • Alice Liddell was the real girl whom Lewis Carroll based his Alice character upon. It has been alleged that Carroll was sexually interested in little girls.
      • “preek” – “Prick” (penis), “peek”.
      • “whore” – “Where”, “whore”.
      • “burn” – “Been”, “burn” (cause pain).
      • “hi’d” – “He’d”, “hid” (suggestive of the euphemism “hide the sausage”).
      • “ban” – “Been”, “ban” (forbid).
      • “dewing” – “Doing”, “dew -ing” (spilling semen upon).
      • “wadjet” – “With it”, “wad(s of semen) jet (out)”. Possibly “Wadjet” (Egyptian goddess).
  • Paragraph 181
    Gravely, Lucia nods her head.

    • Grievely, Lucia nots her heed.

      • “Grievely” – “Gravely”, “grieve lie”.
      • “nots her heed” – “Nods her head”, “heeds her not”.
        • The subtext here is that Lucia doesn’t really understand what Audrey Vernall has been through, a theme more explicitly developed in Audrey’s next speech.
  • Paragraph 182
    “My father may have crushed me underneath the weight of all his well-intended hopes and aspirations for me, but not underneath the weight of his great, sweaty body. You poor thing. It must have been unspeakable. Despite our differences, however, it occurs to me that we’ve a lot in common. Both of us were ladies of ability who loved our rhythm and the color with which we expressed ourselves. The pair of us had fathers who would dominate us, albeit in their disparate fashions, and we were both stuck into mental homes when it was feared we’d raise a fuss about the family member who’d been making us familiar with his member.”

    • “My further muy have cushed me inderneed the weighk o’follies will-entindered heapes and paspirations formy, but not plunderneath the whate of his greyd, sweety bady.

      • “further” – “Father”, “further”.
      • “muy” – “May”, “muy” (slang “much”).
      • “cushed” – “Crushed”, “cushed” (possibly “bounced off the cushion of a pool table”, as eventually happened to Michael Warren).
      • “inderneed” – “Underneath”, “in the need”.
      • “weighk” – “Weight”, “wake”, “(Finnegans) Wake“.
      • “o’follies” – “Of all his”, “O, follies”.
      • “will-entindered” – “Well-intended”, “will en-tindered” (fire created by his will?; will which catches fire?).
      • “heapes” – “Hopes”, “heaps”.
      • “paspirations” – “Aspirations” (desired; acts of breathing), “pa” (father), “past”.
      • “formy” – “For me”, “form -y” (similar to shape?). Possibly “formy” (heraldic term applied to crosses).
      • “plunderneath” – “Underneath”, “plunder”.
      • “whate” – “Weight”, “whale”, “what he”.
      • “greyd” – “Great”, “greyed”.
      • “sweety” – “Sweaty”, “sweety” (term of endearment).
      • “bady” – “Body”, “baby”, “baddy” (bad person).
    • You poor think.

      • “poor” – “Poor” (again, in both the sense of unlucky and un-wealthy).
      • “think” – “Thing”, “think”.
    • Hid moster been unsneakable.

      • “Hid” – “It”, “hid”.
      • “moster” – “Must have”, “monster”.
      • “unsneakable” – “Unspeakable”, “un- sneak -able” (Johnny Vernall was able to get away with sneaking into Audrey’s bed for a while, but not forever).
        • Now, Audrey Vernall can speak of it, but at the time, she was unable to do so. She was, eventually, able to sing about it.
    • Respite our defferences, nowever, it ocourse to mediat weave aladdin curmen.

      • “Respite” – “Despite”, “respite” (Lucia needs a respite from Audrey’s horror?).
      • “defferences” – “Differences”, “deference” (suggestive of Lucia’s superior social class).
      • “nowever” – “However”, “now (is) ever”, possibly “never”.
      • “ocourse” – “Occurs”, “of course”.
      • “mediat” – “Me that”, “mediate”.
      • “weave” – “We’ve”, “weave” (suggestive of the Fates?).
      • “aladdin” – “A lot in”, “Aladdin” (Arabian Nights character – relevance suggest??).
      • “curmen” – “Common”, “men (are) cur(s)”.
    • Butterfuss were laties of abellety who lufter ridhymn and decolleur witwitch we exprosed flowerselves.

      • “Butterfuss” – “Both of us”, “butter fuss”, possibly “fussbudget” (complainer).
      • “laties” – “Ladies”, “late”. Possibly “laity” (not clergy).
      • “abellety” – “Ability”, “belle” (pretty young woman).
      • “lufter” – “Loved our”, “lüfter” (German “electric fan”).
      • “ridhymn and decolleur” – “Rhythm and color”, “rid hymn” “décolletage” (low neckline on a woman’s dress). Possibly “colleur” (French “wallpaper hanger”).
        • In the 1920s, Lucia belonged to a dance collective known as “Les Six de rythme et coleur” (The Six of rhythm and color).
      • “witwitch” – “with which”, “wit witch”.
      • “exprosed” – “Expressed”, “exposed”.
      • “flowerselves” – “Ourselves”, “flower selves”.
  • Page 922
  • Paragraph 182 (continued)
    • The père of us had faffers who ward doominate us, illbeit in their disparent fissions, and we verboth stack in argumental homes when it mos phered we’d razor fess adout the fumbly member hid bin snaking us femaleer with his mamba.”

      • “père” – “Pair”, “père” (French “father”).
      • “faffers” – “Fathers”, “faffers” (time wasters).
      • “ward” – “Would”, ” word”.
      • “doominate” – “Dominate”, “doom”.
      • “illbeit” – “Albeit”, “ill be it”.
      • “disparent” – “Disparate” (differing), “dis-” (away from) “parent”.
      • “fissions” – “Fashions”, “fission”.
      • “verboth” – “Were both”, “verboten” (forbidden). Possibly “vermouth”.
      • “stack” – “Stuck”, “stack”.
      • “argumental homes” – “To mental homes”, “argumentative homes”.
      • “mos phered” – “Was feared”, “atmosphere”.
      • “razor” – “Raise a”, “razor”.
      • “fess” – “Fuss”, “‘fess” (confess). Possibly “fess” (heraldry term; “Old Irish “to have been known”(?)).
      • “adout” – “About”, “a doubt”.
      • “fumbly member” – “Family member”, “fumbly member” (clumsily manipulated penis).
      • “hid bin” – “Had been”, “hid (in the loony) bin”.
      • “snaking” – “Making”, “snake” (dishonorable person; slang “penis”).
      • “femaleer” – “Familiar”, “leer (at a) female”.
      • “mamba” – “Member”, “mamba” (type of highly venomous snake).
  • Paragraph 183
    Her companion snorts with derision, although not unkindly.

    • Her comparion snaughts with decrision, alldough not uncandley.

      • “comparion” – “Companion”, “comparison”.
      • “snaughts” – “Snorts”, “naught”.
      • “decrision” – “Derision”, “decision”.
      • “alldough” – “Although”, “all (about the) dough” (dough = money).
      • “uncandley” – “Unkindly”, “candle”.
  • Paragraph 184
    “I’ll admit there may be similarities between us, but the major difference that you’re not mentioning is one of several thousand pounds. As you must surely be aware, a person of the working classes has the greater likelihood, speaking statistically, of being diagnosed as a schizophrenic. It’s amazing how a tidy bank balance contributes to our psychological well-being, isn’t it? It really is a marvel how the better-off are suffering from nervous stress that can be easily cured by an extensive frolic in agreeable surrounds while those in my position are invariably the hopeless victims of a madness that can only be alleviated by injections or electric shocks. That’s why you’re only passing through, upon an idle stroll from your more well-appointed mental institution, while for my part I am stuck here with occasionally brutal orderlies and fellow patients who have had whatever intellects and personalities they once possessed reduced to slurry.”

    • “Oi’ll madmit there mebay sybilarities boytorn us, but the moojer disferance you’re nat mindshunning is won off slaverall sowsin pounds.

      • “Oi’ll” – “I’ll”, “oil”.
      • “madmit” – “Admit”, “madman”.
      • “mebay” – “May be”, “me bay”. Possibly “eBay” (auction site).
      • “sybilarities” – “similarities”, “sybil” (Greek prophetess). Possibly “sibilant”.
      • “boytorn” – “Between”, “be torn”.
      • “moojer” – “Major”, “moocher”.
      • “disferance” – “Difference”, suggest?? Possibly “this” “feran” (Old English “to go”).
      • “nat” – “Not”, suggest?? Possibly “nat” (Danish “night”; Dutch “wet”; Latin “she swims”).
      • “mindshunning” – “Mentioning”, “mind shunning” (avoiding thinking about).
      • “won off” – “One of”, “won off (of the backs of the poor?)”, “one-off”.
      • “slaverall” – “Several”, “slaver” (salivate for; one who enslaves) “all”.
      • “sowsin” – “Thousand”, “sow sin”, possibly “sow’s in” (possibly a reference to the saying “can’t make a silk purse out of a sow’s ear“).
    • As humus surly beaware, a poorson of the walkinc losses has de grader leakyhood, spiekling stadistically, of being dieuknowsed as splitzophrantic.

      • “humus” – “You must”, “humus” (soil).
      • “surly” – “Surely”, “surly”.
      • “beaware” – “Be aware”, “beware”.
      • “poorson” – “Person”, “poor son”.
      • “walkinc losses” – “Working classes”, “walking losses”.
        • There could easily have been a Work in Progress reference here, but there isn’t, perhaps because it would distract from the point Audrey Vernall is making.
      • “de grader” – “The greater”, “degrader”.
      • “leakyhood” – “Likelihood”, “leaky” “hood” (head covering; neighborhood).
      • “spiekling” – “Speaking”, “spiking”, “sparkling”.
      • “stadistically” – “Statistically”, “sadistically”.
      • “dieuknowsed” – “Diagnosed”, “did you know(what they) said?”, “die”, “dieu” (French “god”). Possibly “dowsed”.
      • “splitzophrantic” – “Schizophrenic”, “split so frantic”.
    • It’s amassing how a tidey bank ballast constributes to our sickillogical whilebein, bizzent it?

      • “amassing” – “Amazing”, “amassing (a fortune).
      • “tidey” – “Tidy” (of sufficient magnitude), “tiny” (both a large and a small bank account can affect one’s health, in different ways), “tide -y” (like the tide, going in and out).
      • “ballast” – “Balance”, “ballast” (weight required to make a ship sail smoothly; metaphorically anything that ensures security).
      • “constributes” – “Contributes”, “distributes”, “con’s tributes” (suggesting that rich people get that way dishonestly).
      • “sickillogical” – “Psychological”, “(that poor people are) sick (and) ill (is only) logical”.
      • “whilebein” – “Well-being”, “while be in”.
      • “bizzent” – “Isn’t”, “bizarre”, possibly “business”. Possibly “bizze” (Italian “tantrums”).
    • Itt ruley is a mereveil how the betsar-off are stuffering from newvase stress that candy eentsy-cured by an extpensive freeluc in agleeabelle sirowns while thousin my povrition are unfairiably the rhopeless fictims of a mudness that carn moanly be ableviated by injenctions or selectric shrocks.

      • “Itt ruley” – “It really”, “I truly”, suggest??.
      • “mereveil” – “Marvel”, “mere veil”.
      • “betsar-off” – “Better-off”, “(all) bets are off”.
      • “stuffering” – “Suffering”, “stuff (and nonsense?)”, “stuffing”.
      • “newvase” – “Nervous”, “new vase”.
      • “candy” – “Can be”, “candy” (possibly suggesting recreational drugs?).
      • “eentsy-cured” – “Easily cured”, “insecure”, “eentsy” (very small amount).
      • “extpensive” – “Extensive”, “expensive”, possibly “pensive”.
      • “freeluc” – “Frolic”, “free luck”, “free Lucia”.
      • “agleeabelle” – “Agreeable”, “a gleeful belle”.
      • “sirowns” – “Surrounds” (surroundings), “sir owns”, possibly “sirens” (mermaids).
      • “thousin” – “Those in”, “thousands”, “thou sin”.
      • “povrition” – “Position”, “poverty”.
      • “unfairiably” – “Invariably”, “unfairly”.
      • “rhopeless” – “Hopeless”, “rope less” (suggest??).
      • “fictims” – “Victims”, “fictional”.
      • “mudness” – “Madness”, “mud”.
      • “carn” – “Can”, “carnal”.
      • “moanly” – “Only”, “moan”.
      • “ableviated” – “Alleviated”, “abbreviated”, possibly “able”.
      • “injenctions” – “Injections”, “injunctions”.
      • “selectric shrocks” – “Electric shocks”, “selected rocks”. Possibly “Selectric” (brand of typewriters).
    • That’s why urinely pissing through, uplom an idyl strawl from your more willowpainted gental instuition, whyle far my port I hamsterk herewith accurseonally bruntal morderlies and fallow passients who afad witever infrallects and paucinalities day ones persissed rebused to slury.”

      • “urinely pissing” – “You’re only passing”, “pissing urine”.
      • “uplom” – “Upon”, “aplomb”, “you plum”.
      • “idyl” – “Idle”, “idyllic”.
      • “strawl” – “Stroll”, “sprawl”.
      • “willowpainted” – “Well-appointed”, “willow painted” (possibly referring to willow china?).
      • “gental” – “Mental”, “gentle”, “genital”.
      • “instuition” – “Institution”, “tuition”.
      • “whyle” – “While”, “why”.
      • “far my port” – “For my part”, “far (from) my port”.
      • “hamsterk” – “Am stuck”, “hamster”.
      • “herewith” – “Here with”, “herewith” (in this way).
      • “accurseonally” – “Occasionally”, “accurse”, “I curse an ally” (which sums up Audrey’s reaction to Lucia’s attempt at finding common ground).
      • “bruntal” – “Brutal”, “brunt”.
      • “morderlies” – “Orderlies”, “murder lies”.
      • “fallow” – “Fellow”, “fallow” (unused, barren).
      • “passients” – “Patients”, “passing”.
      • “afad” – “Have had”, “a fad”.
      • “witever” – “Whatever”, “wit ever”.
      • “infrallects” – “Intellects”, “infra-” (beneath, inferior).
      • “paucinalities” – “Personalities”, “paucity” (lack).
      • “day ones” – “They once”, “day one”.
      • “persissed” – “Possessed”, “persist”.
      • “rebused” – “Reduced”, “abused”.
      • “slury” – “Slurry” (waste product), “fury”.
  • Paragraph 185
    Lucia remains expressionless throughout the other woman’s critical appraisal of the socio-economic aspect of insanity, but will allow that much of it is no more than the truth.

    • Lucia remiens expassionless throwout the other womance cructical upraisall of the soso-acrimonic uspact of unseemity, but willillow that much afit is kno mere dandy truth.
      • “remiens” – “Remains”, “mien” (facial expression). Possibly “remiendo (Spanish “patch”).
      • “expassionless” – “expressionless”, “passionless”.
      • “throwout” – “Throughout”, “throw out” (reject).
      • “womance” – “Woman’s”, “romance”.
      • “cructical” – “Critical”, “crucial”.
      • “upraisall” – “appraisal”, “upraise all”.
      • “soso-acrimonic” – “Socio-economic”, “so-so acrimony”.
      • “uspact” – “Aspect”, “a pact (between) us”, possibly “impact”.
      • “unseemity” – “Insanity”, “unseemly”.
      • “willillow” – “Will allow”, “willow”.
      • “afit” – “Of it”, “a fit” (of insanity).
      • “kno” – “No”, “know”.
      • “mere dandy” – “More than the”, “mere dandy”.
  • Paragraph 186
    “Admittedly there is a lot in what you say, although I am of the opinion that some reaches of derangement might afford a kind of leveling; a glorious commonality of the insane. In my demented state, I feel I have transcended or perhaps been barred from ordinary notions of propriety or property or class. Is it not just the same for you, or for the radiant and impoverished William Blake, or poor John Clare, eating grass, his worn soul hanging by a thread? Is not the estate of a visionary lunatic truly a class all of its own?

      • “Atmiddley theor ies allot in word use aye, alldough I am ofter repinion that some rieches of destrangement matterford a kinder lovalling; a gloryhous comeoneallity oddy instrane.

        • “Atmiddley” – “Admittedly”, “at middle”.
        • “theor ies” – “There is”, “theories”.
        • “allot” – “A lot”, “allot”.
        • “word use aye” – “What you say”, “word use, aye”.
        • “alldough” – “Although”, “all (about) dough”.
        • “ofter” – “Of the”, “ofter” (more often).
        • “repinion” – “Opinion”, “re- pinion” (imprison again), “pinion” (feather, wing).
        • “rieches” – “Reaches”, “riches”.
        • “destrangement” – “Derangement”, “estrangement”.
        • “matterford” – “Might afford”, “matter ford” (provide a passage across physicality?).
        • “kinder” – “Kind of”, “kinder” (more kind; German “children”).
        • “lovalling” – “Leveling”, “love”, suggest??
        • “gloryhous” – “Glorious”, “glory house”.
        • “comeoneallity” – “Commonality”, “come one, (come) all”.
        • “oddy” – “Of the”, “oddity”.
        • “instrane” – “Insane”, “in strain”, possibly “strane” (Italian “strange women”).
      • In my demended strate, I fool I have trancentered operaharps been bared form ourdinnery mnotions of prepayety or propupty or clawss.

        • “demended” – “Demented”, “de- mended” (broken).
        • “strate” – “State”, “strait” (difficulty).
        • “I fool I” – “I feel (that) I”, “I fool myself”.
        • “trancentered” – “Transcended”, “entered a trance”.
        • “operaharps” – “Or perhaps”, “opera harps”.
        • “bared form” – “Barred from”, “bared form”.
        • “ourdinnery” – “Ordinary”, “our dinner”.
        • “mnotions” – “Notions”, “motions”.
        • “prepayety” – “Propriety”, “pre-pay”.
        • “propupty” – “Property”, “prop up”.
        • “clawss” – “Class”, “claws”.
      • Ease it not jester seem fire you, or four deridiant and inpowerished Worryem Blaze, or pour Junk Laire, de jonny sur l’erbe, his worne soule hangling by a threat?

        • “Ease” – “Is”, “ease”.
        • “jester” – “Just the”, “jester”.
        • “seem fire” – “Same for”, “seem (to be) fire” (probable reference to Voice of the Fire).
        • “four deridiant” – “For the radiant”, “4-D”, “derided”.
        • “inpowerished” – “Impoverished”, “in power”. Possibly “enriched”.
        • “Worryem Blaze” – “William Blake”, “Worry them (with a) blaze”.
        • “pour” – “Poor”, “pour”.
        • “Junk Laire” – “John Clare”, “junk lair”.
        • “de jonny sur l’erbe” – “Déjeuner sur l’herbe”, “Johnny”.
          • “Déjeuner sur l’herbe” is French for “luncheon on the grass”. It refers to both a famous 1862 painting by Édouard Manet, and to an episode in John Clare’s long walk where he was reduced to eating grass by the side of the road (see section 3, paragraph 41). Lucia is hardly helping her case by making such a complex multilingual allusion to a woman who probably hasn’t had the education to understand it; the more so as it also includes the name of Audrey’s abusive father.
        • “worne soule” – “Worn soul”, “worn sole”, possibly “borne”.
          • Here, Lucia refers both to the weariness of soul that Clare experienced during his walk, and to the fact that his shoe sole was quite worn (see section 3, paragraph 34)
        • “hangling” – “Hanging”, “dangling”.
        • “threat” – “Thread”, “threat”.
      • Is noddy escate offer fisionary lumatic trilly a c’lossal of id sown?”
        • “noddy” – “Not the”, “Noddy” (children’s character created by Enid Blyton).
          • Moore commented notably upon Noddy in his interview with Dave Sim:

            I once heard an anecdote about a contemporary magician who decided to put this principle to the test by adopting a belief so strange that nobody could possibly mistake it for reality and then seeing what happened. The belief he decided to go with was that Noddy, the little toy-car driving and belled-hat wearing protagonist of Enid Blyton’s children’s books, was in fact the absolute creator of the Universe and the God of all Gods. Within a couple of weeks he abandoned the experiment in alarm, finding himself upon the brink of conclusively proving that Noddy was the Supreme Being. He’d come across magazine articles showing freshly discovered cave-drawings of an obviously sacred figure wearing what appeared to be a tall pointed hat with a little bell on the top. He’d read an interview with Enid Blyton herself in which she described a strange vision that had come to her while under the influence of gas at the dentist; in which she had been whisked across the Universe at the speed of light to meet God himself, although he couldn’t describe the details of their conversation. This, along with a whole mess of other stuff and previously hidden meanings in Bible passages (Cain is banished to the Land of Nod in Genesis, for example), seemed to indicate that Nod was God and Enid Blyton His prophetess.

        • “escate” – “Estate” (condition), “escape”.
        • “offer” – “Of a”, “offer”.
        • “fisionary” – “Visionary”, “fission”.
        • “lumatic” – “Lunatic”, “automatic”.
        • “trilly” – “Truly”, “trilly” (sounding like a bird’s trill).
        • “c’lossal of id sown” – “Class all of its own”, “sown of a colossal id” (perhaps commenting on Lucia’s arrogance?).
  • Paragraph 187
    Here, Audrey Vernall smiles and nods as if to say that Lucia might have a point, encouraging her to continue.

    • Hear, Ordnry Burnall smalles an’ knods asifter sigh that Lucia might haver punkt, incorriging hereto convinue.

      • “Hear” – “Here”, “hear”.
      • “Ordnry Burnall” – “Audrey Vernall”, “ordinary burn all” (possibly suggesting both a furious rage, and an acceptance of the situation).
      • “smalles” – “Smiles”, “smallest”.
      • “an’ knods” – “And nods”, “ankh” (Egyptian symbol of life), “knows”.
      • “asifter” – “As if to”, “a sifter”.
      • “sigh” – “Say”, “sigh”.
      • “haver” – “Have a”, “haver” (Britain “to hem and haw”; Scotland “to talk foolishly”).
      • “punkt” – “Point”, “punk” (worthless person; archaic “prostitute”).
      • “incorriging” – “Encouraging”, “incorrigible”.
      • “hereto” – “Her to”, “heretofore”.
      • “convinue” – “Continue”, “convince”, possibly “convene”.
  • Paragraph 188
    “All the same, I am distressed to hear of the brutality amongst the nursing staff that you allude to. Is it really as unbearable as you imply, and are there no humane and decent people caring for you?”

    • “Ill the shame, I am disgressed to hairoff the brutility amonster nourshing stuff that you elude to.

      • “Ill the shame” – “All the same”, “ill(ness) is a shame”.
      • “disgressed” – “Distressed”, “digressed”.
      • “hairoff” – “Hear of”, “hair off” (bald?).
      • “brutility” – “Brutality”, “futility”, “utility”.
      • “amonster” – “Amongst the”, “a monster”.
      • “nourshing stuff” – “Nursing staff”, “nourishing stuff”.
      • “elude” – “Allude”, “elude”.
    • Ici trially as inbearanbull as you inpry, and ardour no youmean un descent popul care infer you?”

      • “Ici trially” – “Is it really”, “ici” (French “here”) “trial lie”.
      • “inbearanbull” – “Unbearable”, “in bear and bull” (possibly the name of a tavern; possible allusion to stock market terms bear and bull; possible allusion to the “bull” (minotaur) born by Pasiphae).
      • “inpry” – “Imply”, “pry in” (Lucia is prying).
      • “ardour” – “Are there”, “ardor” (affection).
      • “youmean” – “Humane”, “you mean”. Possibly “yeoman” (dependable worker).
      • “un descent” – “And decent”, “indecent”, “descent under”.
      • “popul” – “People”, “population”, “Popul Vuh” (book of Guatemalan mythology).
      • “care infer” – “Caring for”, “care to infer”.
  • Paragraph 189
    Audrey shifts her weight upon the squeaking bench.

      • Audbly shuffs awayter ponder queaking bunch.

        • “Audbly” – “Audrey”, “audibly”.
        • “shuffs” – “Shifts”, “shuffles”.
        • “awayter ponder” – “Her weight upon the”, “a way to ponder”.
        • “queaking” – “Squeaking”, “quaking”.
        • “bunch” – “Bench”, “bunch”.
  • Paragraph 190
    “I wouldn’t say that there was a great deal of cruelty, although what there is can be quite terrible. There have been orderlies who liked to put a couple of the violent patients into a locked room together, just to see them fight and maybe have a bet upon the outcome. The majority of those who tend to us seem by and large indifferent, but there are a few who turn out to be lively, interesting individuals. Do you see that tall young fellow through the trees there, having a sly smoke beyond the buttress of that red brick building? He’s one of my favorites.

    • “I wordhaunt say that dire woes a greyed eel of gruelty, maulthough wart there is can be quike tearable.

      • “wordhaunt” – “Wouldn’t”, “word haunt”.
      • “dire woes” – “There was”, “dire woes”.
      • “greyed eel” – “Great deal”, “greyed” (aged) “eel”.
      • “gruelty” – “Cruelty”, “gruel” (a cheap food, famously associated with cruelty in Dickens’ Oliver Twist).
      • “maulthough” – “Although”, “maul” (a large hammer) “thought”, “through”.
      • “wart” – “What”, “wart”.
      • “quike” – “Quite”, “quick”, possibly “like”.
      • “tearable” – “Terrible”, “tear -able” (able to be torn).
    • Dare hatpin orneries who larked to buttercupple of the voident preytients into a locktromb tugather, joust to seethem fright and rabie have a beatup on the boutcome.

      • “Dare” – “There”, “dare”.
      • “hatpin” – “Have been”, “hatpin” (sometimes used as a weapon).
      • “orneries” – “Orderlies”, “ornery” (bad-tempered).
      • “larked” – “Liked”, “larked” (played).
      • “buttercupple” – “Put a couple”, “buttercup”
      • “voident” – “Violent”, “void enter”.
      • “preytients” – “Patients”, “prey”.
      • “locktromb” – “Locked room”, “tomb”, possibly “womb”.
      • “tugather” – “Together”, “tug at her”, “tu” (French “you”) “gather”.
      • “joust” – “Just”, “joust”.
      • “seethem” – “See them”, “seethe”.
      • “fright” – “Fight”, “fright”.
      • “rabie” – “Maybe”, “rabies”.
      • “beatup on” – “Bet upon”, “beat up on”.
      • “boutcome” – “Outcome”, “bout”.
    • The majollity of dose who trend to us sim lie and barge undifferent, but there farafew who tare nowt to be liffley, imparresting kindividuals.

      • “majollity” – “Majority”, “ma jollity”.
      • “dose” – “Those”, “dose”.
      • “trend” – “Tend”, “trend”.
      • “sim” – “Seem”, “simple”, “simulate”.
      • “lie and barge” – “By and large”, “lie and barge”.
      • “undifferent” – “Indifferent”, “un different” (that is, “normal”).
      • “farafew” – “Are a few”, “farfetched”, suggest??
      • “tare nowt” – “Turn out”, “tare” (type of weed; weight of a container; French “defect, flaw”) “nowt” (dialect “nothing”).
      • “liffley” – “Lively”, “River Liffey”.
      • “imparresting” – “Interesting”, “imp arresting”.
      • “kindividuals” – “Individuals”, “kin”.
  • Page 923
  • Paragraph 190 (continued)
    • Juicy that tall yeng foellow fruiter trees dare, havana sly smirke beyonder buttrest of that dedprick bulldung?

      • “Juicy” – “Do you see”, “juicy” (slang “sexually attractive”).
      • “yeng” – “Young”, “yen” (desire).
      • “foellow” – “Fellow”, “follow”.
      • “fruiter” – “Through the”, “fruit”.
      • “dare” – “There”, “dare”.
      • “havana” – “Having”, Havana” (Cuban capital city, noted for its fine cigars).
      • “smirke” – “Smoke”, “smirk”.
      • “beyonder” – “Beyond the”, “be yonder”.
      • “buttrest” – “Buttress”, “butt rest”. Possibly “Rest your eyes on that butt!”
      • “dedprick” – “Red brick”, “dead prick”.
      • “bulldung” – “Building”, “bull dung”.
        • These last two words suggest that, while Audrey is attracted to him, the relationship is not well-omened.
    • He-swan o’ my feverites.”

      • “He-swan” – “He’s one”, “he swan”.
      • “feverites” – “Favorites”, “fever rites”.
  • Paragraph 191
    Peering between the ferns and branches Lucia can see the orderly with the heroic stature that her newfound colleague is referring to. He looks, she thinks, like someone in a film who knows the world about him is a painted set and all of its upheavals merely narrative devices that are commonplace in cinema. Clearly besotted, her companion natters on enthusiastically regarding an infatuation that is obviously undetected and thus unrequited.

    • Pearing between deferns and blanches Lucia considdy warderly with the heropic statuer that her nofeigned squalleague is rephwoaring to.

      • “Pearing” – “Peering”, “pear” (type of fruit), possibly “pea ring”.
      • “deferns” – “The ferns”, “defer”, “defense”, possibly “vas deferens” (a duct in male testicles).
      • “blanches” – “Branches”, “blanches” (turns white).
      • “considdy” – “Can see the”, “consider”. Possibly “siddha” (one who has achieved a high degree of enlightenment).
      • “warderly” – “Orderly”, “warder” (jailer) “lie”.
      • “heropic” – “Heroic”, “hero” “pic” (movie).
      • “statuer” – “Stature”, “statue”.
      • “nofeigned” – “Newfound”, “no feigned” (that is, sincere).
      • “squalleague” – “Colleague”, “squall” (storm).
        • “Squall League” could be an allusion to another Moore work started shortly after Jerusalem, The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen: Tempest.
      • “rephwoaring” – “Referring”, “phwoar” (an expression indicating sexual desire).
    • Helax, she thanks, like sameone innerfilm who gnos the whirld aboutime isapointed Set an’ dollarfits uphovels morely narrowtiff de vices that are carmenplays in scenema.

      • “Helax” – “He looks”, “relax”, “he (is) lax”.
      • “thanks” – “Thinks”, “thanks”.
      • “sameone” – “Someone”, “same one”.
      • “innerfilm” – “In a film”, “inner film” (a way of describing subjective experience?).
      • “gnos” – “Knows”, “gnosis” (mystical knowledge).
      • “whirld” – “World”, “whirled”.
      • “aboutime” – “About him”, “about time”.
      • “isapointed” – “Is a painted”, “disappointed”, “is appointed”.
      • “Set” – “Set” (constructed façade for a play or a film), “Set” (Egyptian god of chaos).
      • “an’ dollarfits” – “And all of its”, “dollar fits” (concern about money).
      • “uphovels” – “Upheavals”, “hovels”.
      • “morely” – “Merely”, “more lies”.
      • “narrowtiff” – “Narrative”, “narrow tiff” (an especially petty argument).
      • “de vices” – “Devices”, “the vices”.
      • “carmenplays” – “Commonplace”, “Carmen plays”.
        • Carmen is a popular 1875 opera by Bizet, containing many “upheavals”.
      • “scenema” – “Cinema”, “scene ma”. Possibly “enema”.
    • Cleerly bescotted, her calmpinion hatters on infusiastically deguarding an inflatuation that is oblivously undefected anthus unrequainted.

      • “Cleerly” – “Cleerly”, “leer”.
      • “bescotted” – “Besotted”, “Scots” (see next sentence).
      • “calmpinion” – “Companion”, “calm pinion” (evoking a bird which has adjusted to captivity).
      • “hatters” – “Natters”, “hatter” (as in “mad as a hatter”).
      • “infusiastically” – “Enthusiastically”, “infuse fantastically”.
      • “deguarding” – “Regarding”, “de guarding” (letting her guard down).
      • “inflatuation” – “Infatuation”, “inflated notion”. Possibly “flatulence”.
      • “oblivously” – “Obviously”, “oblivious”.
      • “undefected” – “Undetected”, “un defect-ed” (still perfect?).
      • “anthus” – “And thus”, “anthus” (type of small bird).
      • “unrequainted” – “Unrequited”, “unacquainted”. Possibly “quaint”.
  • Paragraph 192
    He’s a Scots lad come from Corby where they process all the steel, but underneath it all the boy’s an artist. I imagine that’s why he escaped his birthplace, putting all the sparks and smelting works behind him and attending at the Old School here, the one that’s up Saint  George’s Avenue beside the Racecourse, if you know the place at all. His name is Bill, Bill Drummond, and I’ve had a premonition that in years to come he will be known for having burned a million pounds to ash in some kind of unfathomable joke.

    • “He’s a Scuts lag comfroom Goreby werthy presess all the steal, but wunderneath it all the poi’s an archist.
      • “Scuts lag” – “Scots lad”, “scut” (slang “contemptible person”) “slag” (slang “slut”).
      • “comfroom” – “Come from”, “comfy room”
      • “Goreby” – “Corby“, “gore by”
        • Corby is a town to the northeast of Northampton. It has a large Scottish population, mostly descended from migrant workers come to work in the steelworks there.
        • Drummond (see below) actually moved to Corby at the age of 11, having been born in South Africa to Scottish parents.
      • “werthy” – “Where they”, “worthy”.
      • “presess” – “Process”, “presses”, possibly “precess” (having an angle of rotation that varies cyclically).
      • “all the steal” – “All of the steel”, “all they steal” (perhaps a comment on the capitalist exploitation of the steel workers?).
      • “wunderneath” – “Underneath”, “wonder”.
      • “poi’s an archist” – “Boy’s an artist”, “poison anarchist”.
    • I imachine thatsway he escraped his bathplays, potting all the smarks and spelting werks behide hemand atind’ring at the Ard Skul haire, the wandert’s up Scent Gorgeous Aventue besight the Rapecause, ifew know displacer toll.

      • “imachine” – “Imagine”, “I machine”.
      • “thatsway” – “That’s why”, “that sway”.
      • “escraped” – “Escaped”, “he scraped”.
      • “bathplays” – “Birthplace”, “bath plays”.
      • “potting” – “Putting”, “pot” (many meanings).
      • “smarks and spelting” – “Sparks and smelting”, “smirks and pelting” (that is, prejudice). Possibly “smart remarks”, “spelt” (spelled; a type of grain).
      • “werks” – “Works”, suggest??
      • “behide” – “Behind”, “be hide”.
      • “hemand” – “Him and”, “he-man”, “demand”.
      • “atind’ring” – “Attending”, “a-tindering” (setting on fire?).
      • “Ard Skul” – “Art School”, “hard skull”.
        The School of the Arts
        The School of the Arts
      • “haire” – “Here”, “hair”, possibly “hare”.
      • “wandert’s” – “One that’s”, “wander tis”.
      • “Scent Gorgeous Aventue” – “Saint George’s Avenue“, “gorgeous scent” “aventure” (obsolete “adventure”).
      • “besight” – “Beside”, “be sight”.
      • “Rapecause” – “Racecourse”, “rape cause”.
        • The Racecourse is a large park in the north of Northampton. Moore notes in the chapter “A Cold and Frosty Morning”: “…it’s still referred to as “The Rapecourse” by a healthy number of the town’s inhabitants.”
      • “ifew” – “If you”, “I, few”.
      • “displacer toll” – “This place at all”, “displacer” “toll”.
    • His nome is Billdog, Billdog Dreammonde, and I’ve header permanition that in jeers to come he well be noun foreving purned a myrion plunds to ash en sum kindove infeathermable choke.”

      • “nome” – “Name”, “nom de plume”, possibly “gnome” (earth spirit).
      • “Billdog Dreammonde” – “Bill Drummond”, “Bulldog Drummond”, “dream” “monde” (French “world”).
        Bill Drummond
        Bill Drummond
        • Bill Drummond (1953-) was a member of the KLF and the K Foundation, known (as noted below) for filming themselves burning £1,000,000. There was a showing of the resulting film in Alan Moore’s house, as briefly mentioned in the chapters “Burning Gold” and “Chain of Office”. Moore commented on the event at the time. Drummond (see below) actually moved to Corby at the age of 11, having been born in South Africa to Scottish parents. Drummond’s Wikipedia entry mentions one of his early jobs as “nursing assistant”, which may refer to his time at St. Crispin’s (also referenced in “Burning Gold”).
        • Bulldog Drummond was a fictional detective in the 1920s and beyond. He appeared as a supporting character in Moore’s The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen: Black Dossier
      • “header” – “Had a”, “header” (gone head first into something).
      • “permanition” – “Premonition”, “permanent intuition”.
      • “jeers” – “Years”, “jeers” (many people did mock the burning episode).
      • “well” – “Will”, “well”.
      • “noun” – “Known”, “noun”.
      • “foreving” – “For having”, “forever”.
      • “purned” – “Burned”, “spurned”.
      • “myrion” – “Million”, “myriad” (very large number). Possibly “Myron”.
      • “plunds” – “Pounds”, “plunder”. Possibly “puns”.
      • “ash en sum” – “Ash in some”, “ashen sum”.
      • “kindove” – “Kind of”, “kin (to a) dove” (perhaps suggesting that the fire was an act of peace?).
      • “infeathermable” – “Unfathomable”, “in feather”. Possibly “Mabel”.
      • “choke” – “Joke”, “choke”.
  • Paragraph 193
    Lucia turns this over in her mind for several moments before making her reply.

    • Lucia tarns this ever inner mined perseveral moremeants befour meeking her deply.

      • “tarns” – “Turns”, “tarn” (mountain lake).
      • “ever” – “Over”, “ever”.
      • “inner” – “In her”, “inner (self)”.
      • “mined” – “Mind”, “mined” (the ore to make the Corby steel?).
      • “perseveral” – “For several”, “perseverance”.
      • “moremeants” – “Moments”, “more is meant”. Possibly “me (am) more (than) ants”.
      • “befour” – “Before”, “be four(-dimensional)”.
      • “meeking” – “Making”, “meek thing”, possibly “me king”.
      • “deply” – “Reply”, “deeply”.
  • Paragraph 194
    “Well, I can see how that might be an admirable thing to do, although in light of it I cannot help but wonder that you’re the inmate here and not himself. You seem a reasonable woman. Is there no hope of release from your incarceration?”

    • “Will, Icon see how det meet be an oddmirable think to do, mauldough in lighter fit I kennut yelp but wounder that chewer the inmateer and not himsulph.

      • “Will” – “Well”, “will(power)”, possibly “Will (Shakespeare)”.
      • “Icon” – “I can”, “icon” (symbol which is religiously venerated — one might argue that the pound notes Drummond burned were icons).
      • “det” – “That”, “debt”, suggest??
      • “meet” – “Might”, “meet”.
      • “oddmirable” – “Admirable”, “odd miracle”.
      • “think” – “Thing”, “think”.
      • “mauldough” – “Although”, “maul” (damage) “dough” (money).
      • “lighter fit” – “Light of it”, “lighter fit”. Possibly “fit of laughter”.
      • “kennut” – “Cannot”, “ken” (know, understand) “nut” (crazy person).
      • “yelp” – “Help”, “yelp” (make a starled sound).
      • “wounder” – “Wonder”, “wound her”.
      • “chewer” – “You are”, “chewer”.
      • “inmateer” – “Inmate here”, “ma in tears”, “in matter”.
      • “himsulph” – “Himself”, “him sulphur” (suggesting Drummond is the devil?).
    • You seem a raysunable womoon.

      • “raysunable” – “Reasonable”, “ray of sun”.
      • “womoon” – “Woman”, “woe moon”.
    • Esther noho pov releaf frame your inclassoration?”

      • “Esther” – “Is there”, “Esther” (Biblical character).
        • Esther was a member of an oppressed class (Jews) who won the right to slay her enemies.
      • “noho pov” – “No hope of”, “Noho” (slang “Northampton”) “POV” (point of view).
      • “releaf” – “Relief”, “re- leaf” (possibly “turn over a new leaf”?).
      • “frame” – “From”, “frame” (to cause to be falsely accused of a crime — similar to what Audrey’s parents did to her).
      • “inclassoration” – “Incarceration”, “in (a social) class (for the) duration”. Possibly “class(room) in oration”.
  • Paragraph 195
    Audrey shrugs.

    • Augery shrags.

      • “Augery” – “Audrey”, “augury” (divination).
      • “shrags” – “Shrugs”, “sags”, “rags”, “shrag” (a twig cut from a tree).
  • Paragraph 196
    “Oh, I don’t worry about it. Our lives are a sublimely scripted drama even though we like to think we’re improvising, and we’ve run through our performances already, countless times. From what I can remember, in a dozen years or so they close down this asylum for the want of funds and I’m moved into what they will describe without a shred of irony as ‘care in the community’, a little halfway house that’s not far from my former neighborhood, where I shall live out my days in as instructive a capacity as I can manage. But what of yourself? Should you not bw returning to your own mental home before you’re taken for a patient here?”

    • “Owe, I don’t whurry abideat.

      • “Owe” – “Oh”, “owe (money?)”, “ow”.
      • “whurry” – “Worry”, “hurry”.
      • “abideat” – “About it”, “abide at”, “a biddy”. Possibly “a bidet”.
    • Hour lives are a subloomly scrupted dreama eventoe we luck to thank we’re impovising, and ri’ve run through our poorformances aldeady, cantlostimes.

      • “Hour” – “Our”, “hour”.
      • “subloomly” – “Sublimely”, “sub loom lie” (referring to the weaving of the Fates).
      • “scrupted” – “Scripted”, “sculpted”, possibly “scrupulous”.
      • “dreama” – “Drama”, “a dream”.
      • “eventoe ” – “Even though”, “event, oh!”, “even toes”.
      • “luck to thank” – “Like to think”, “thank (your) lucky (stars)”.
      • “impovising” – “Improvising”, “impoverished”, “POV”, “imposing”.
      • “ri’ve” – “We’ve”, “I’ve”, “river”.
      • “poorformances” – “Performances”, “poor form” (in bad taste; in the shape of poverty).
      • “aldeady” – “Already”, “all (are) dead”.
      • “cantlostimes” – “Countless times”, “can’t lose times” (the fundamental message of Eternalism).
    • From vatican remumble, in a dozin’ yeahs ah so they clause down this asighloom for the wont of frunds and I’m maved into witty wol de-scribe widoubt a shreg of byrony as ‘scarin der community’, a lightall hilfway hows that’s note fourform my fromeer neighbourhoody, weary shell lave out my daze in ask unstucktive a capricity as I can moonage.

      • “vatican” – “What I can”, “Vatican“.
      • “remumble” – “Remember”, “re- mumble”.
      • “dozin’” – “Dozen”, “dozing”.
      • “yeahs” – “Years”, “yeah”.
      • “ah so” – “Or so”, “ah so” (stereotyped Chinese exclamation).
      • “clause” – “Close”, “clause”.
        • British governmental decrees are generally divided into clauses. Sometimes, particular clauses necome especially controversial. Moore’s self-published AARGH! was in protest of Clause 28, for example.
      • “asighloom” – “Asylum”, “a sigh looms”.
      • “wont” – “Want” (lack), “wont” (habit).
        • Given the recent appearance of Bill Drummond, one is tempted to read this as “money is just a habit”.
      • “frunds” – “Funds”, “friends”.
      • “maved” – “Moved”, “mave” (Scandinavian languages “stomach”; Old French “seagull”), “maven” (expert).
      • “witty” – “What they”, “witty”.
      • “wol” – “Will”, “wol” (Old English “plague”; Cornish “sail”, “veil”), suggest??
      • “de-scribe” – “Describe”, “de- scribe” (unwrite, erase).
      • “widoubt” – “Without”, “why doubt”, “widow’s debt”.
      • “shreg” – “Shred”, “shrug”.
      • “byrony” – “Irony”, “Byronic”
      • “‘scarin der community’” – “Care in the community”, “scaring the community”.
        • Per obiwanspicoli: “Care in the Community was a British policy of deinstitutionalization, treating and caring for physically and mentally disabled people in their homes rather than in institutions.  The policy followed several scandals about the poor quality of care in some hospitals.” Naturally, a different set of scandals followed, reagrding the poor care people received under the new policies.
      • “lightall” – “Little”, “light all”.
      • “hilfway hows” – “Halfway house”, “hilf” (German “help!”) “how”.
        • A halfway house is a temporary residence designed to be a transitional phase for someone released from an institution (asylum, jail, drug rehab) but not yet fully ready to live on their own.
      • “note” – “Not”, “note”.
      • “fourform” – “Far from”, “four form” (four-dimensional).
      • “fromeer” – “Former”, “from here”.
      • “neighbourhoody” – “Neighborhood”, “hoody” (sweatshirt with hood, associated with the lower classes).
      • “weary shell” – “Where I shall”, “weary shell” (old, tired body).
      • “lave” – “Live”, “lave” (wash).
      • “daze” – “Days”, “daze”.
      • “ask unstucktive” – “As instructive”, “ask unstuck I’ve”, “instinctive”.
      • “capricity” – “Capacity”, “capricious”.
      • “moonage” – “Manage”, “moon age”.
    • Bet wait of yoursalve?

      • “Bet” – “But”, “bet”.
      • “wait” – “What”, “wait”.
      • “yoursalve” – “Yourself”, “your salve”.
    • Shrub you net bee preturning to your own demental humm befear you’re tookin for a pissyant here?”

      • “Shrub” – “Should”, “shrub”.
      • “net” – “Not”, “net”.
        • Stereotypically, an asylum orderly would chase an escaped patient with a large butterfly net. (See paragraph 166.)
      • “bee” – “Be”, “bee”.
      • “preturning” – “Returning”, “pre- turning” (from an Eternalist point of view, the turn happens both before and after).
      • “demental humm” – “The mental home”, “demented hum”.
      • “befear” – “Before”, “be fear”.
      • “tookin” – “Taken”, “took in”.
      • “pissyant” – “Patient”, “pissant” (insignificant person), “pissy” (peevish).
  • Paragraph 197
    Acknowledging that this would be a miserable eventuality, Lucia inquires of her newfound friend as to the quickest route between the non-Euclidean trees that will deliver her back to Saint Andrews Hospital, preferably on the same date when she set out upon her majestic meander so that she’s not left with a time-paradox that needs explaining to the nursing staff. The talented and forthright Miss Vernall cheerily obliges her with comprehensive and concrete directions to her own spot in the continuum of spacetime, a trajectory between shrubs and saplings that involves taking two right turns, then a left,  and next proceeding for about a hundred yards in the concealed direction. Lucia thanks the other female mental-patient warmly, so completely different to herself and yet with such a lot of striking similarities, then waves goodbye and sets out on the indicated route towards her own year, her own madhouse.

    • Acknowlurching that this ward be a missrabble preventuality, Lucia enchoirs of her knew fround as to the quirkest roote betrip the norn-Yewcliddy entries that wildeliver her barck to Sane Andluce Costpritty, perfourably on the same dayt wenchy sed owt upawn her matchesstic meyonder sho that seize not loft with a tame-pairadux that nodes exbraining to the nuzzing stoff.

      • “Acknowlurching” – “Acknowledging”, “Ack! Now lurching (in terror)”.
      • “ward” – “Would”, “(mental) ward”.
      • “missrabble” – “Miserable”, “miss (that is, an upper class woman) (among the) rabble”.
      • “preventuality” – “Eventuality”, “prevent”.
      • “enchoirs” – “Enquires”, “in choirs”.
      • “knew fround” – “New friend”, “knew frond”, “newfound”. Possibly “knew Freud” (Lucia never met him, but she was treated by Jung, who knew Freud).
      • “quirkest” – “Quickest”, “quirky”.
      • “roote” – “Route”, “root”.
      • “betrip” – “Between”, “be (a) trip”.
      • “norn-Yewcliddy entries” – “Non-Euclidean trees”, “Norn” (Norse Fate) “yew” (type of tree), “clitty” “entries”. Possibly “clidomancy” (divination by using a suspended key as a pendulum).
      • “wildeliver” – “Will deliver”, “wild liver” (one who lives a ‘wild’ life). Possibly “(Oscar) Wilde“.
      • “barck” – “Back”, “bark”.
      • “Sane Andluce Costpritty” – “Saint Andrews Hospital”, “Lucia (is) sane” “cost(s a) pretty (penny)” (idiomatic for “is very expensive”).
      • “perfourably” – “Preferably”, “per” (through) “four” (dimensions).
      • “dayt” – “Date”, “day”.
      • “wenchy” – “When she”, “wench”.
      • “sed” – “Set”, “said”, “sed” (Latin “but”).
      • “owt” – “Out”, “ow!”.
      • “upawn” – “Upon”, “you (are a chess) pawn”, “you pawn” (sell to a pawnshop).
      • “matchesstic” – “Majestic”, “matt chess tic”, “matches stick”.
      • “meyonder” – “Meander”, “me yonder”.
      • “sho” – “So”, “sho'” (dialect “sure”).
      • “seize” – “She’s”, “seize”.
      • “loft” – “Left”, “aloft”, “lofty”.
      • “tame-pairadux” – “Time-paradox”, “tame pair of ducks”.
      • “nodes” – “Needs”, “nodes”.
      • “exbraining” – “Explaining”, “ex- braining” (moving an idea out of her brain into theirs).
      • “nuzzing” – “Nursing”, “nuzzling”, “nothing”.
      • “stoff” – “Staff”, “toff” (upper class person).
    • The talended and fourthright Missy Ternall jeerily snobliges her with compretensive and conclete direactions to herowin splot in the containiwum o’ sparsetome, a trajecstory betweeter shrugs and sharplings that ivolves traking two wryterns, then aleft, an’nexed perceiding fear abate a hindred yarns in the cunsailed dimection.

      • “talended” – “Talented”, “tale ended”, possibly “tall and dead”.
      • “fourthright” – “Forthright”, “fourth right” (evoking both 4D and directions).
      • “Missy Ternall” – “Miss Vernall”, “miss eternal”.
      • “jeerily snobliges” – “Cheerily obliges”, “jeering snob”.
      • “compretensive” – “Comprehensive”, “pretense”.
      • “conclete” – “Concrete”, “clete” (Middle English “cleat; burdock”), possibly “conclude”, suggest??
      • “direactions” – “Directions”, “dire actions”.
      • “herowin splot” – “Her own spot”, “heroine’s plot”, “hero win”, “heroin splat”.
      • “containiwum” – “Continuum”, “contain I one” (I, alone, contain everything).
      • “sparsetome” – “Spacetime”, “sparse tome”.
      • “trajecstory” – “Trajectory”, “tragic story”.
      • “betweeter” – “Between the”, “be tweeter” (bird?), “be twee to her”.
      • “shrugs and sharplings” – “Shrubs and saplings”, “shrugs and sharp language”.
      • “ivolves” – “Involves”, “evolves”.
      • “traking” – “Taking”, “tracking”.
      • “wryterns” – “Right turns”, “wry terms”, “writers”. Possibly “wyverns” (type of dragons).
      • “aleft” – “A left”, “aloft”, “aleph” (often used as a sign for infinity).
      • “an’nexed” – “And next”, “annexed”.
      • “perceiding” – “Proceeding”, “perceiving”.
      • “fear abate” – “For about”, “fear abate(s)”.
      • “hindred” – “Hundred”, “hindered”, “kindred”, possibly “(leaving) dread (be)hind”.
      • “yarns” – “Yards”, “yarns”, possibly “years”.
      • “cunsailed” – “Concealed”, “cun” (steer a ship; obsolete “to know”) “sailed”. Possibly “cunt”.
      • “dimection” – “Direction”, “dimension”.
    • Lucia franks the either fleemale mantol-portient warnly, so competely disterent to hersylph and jetwit search allot o’ stroking smilearities, then waifs goodvie and strets out onder undercatered rout tooweirds her ownyer, her uin madehouse.

      • “franks” – “Thanks”, “frankly”.
      • “either” – “Other”, “either” (suggesting an equivalence between the two).
      • “fleemale” – “Female”, “flee male”.
      • “mantol-portient” – “Mental-patient”, “man toll portent”.
      • “warnly” – “Warmly”, “warningly”.
      • “competely” – “Completely”, “compete lie”, possibly “competent”.
      • “disterent” – “Different”, “distant”, “disinterested”.
      • “hersylph” – “Herself”, “her sylph” (water spirit).
      • “jetwit” – “Yet with”, “jet wit” (dark humor?).
      • “search” – “Such”, “search”.
      • “allot” – “A lot”, “allot”.
      • “stroking” – “Striking”, “stroking”.
      • “smilearities” – “Similarities”, “smile rarities”.
      • “waifs” – “Waves”, “waifs”.
      • “goodvie” – “Goodbye”, “good vie” (a fair contest?), “vie” (Italian “routes”).
      • “strets” – “Sets”, “streets”, “struts”.
      • “onder undercatered” – “On the indicated”, “onder” (Norwegian “evils”), “under catered”.
      • “rout” – “Route”, “rout”.
      • “tooweirds” – “Towards”, “too weird”.
      • “ownyer” – “Own year”, “owner”.
      • “her uin” – “Her own”, “he ruin”.
      • “madehouse” – “Madhouse”, “made house”.

Forward to Section 12, Dusty Springfield.