RtB section 10 – Cemetery

Up to “Round the Bend”.1

Back to Section 9 – The Nene Hag.

In which Lucia visits the cemetery where she is buried, and socializes with a lady assassin.

Significant characters and themes in this section:

  • James Joyce (1882-1941) was an extremely famous writer and Lucia Joyce’s father.
    • The River Liffey is a river in Ireland which, in Finnegans Wake, is referred to many times, and is metaphorically linked to the female protagonist (who is, in some senses, Lucia).

      Violet Gibson
      Violet Gibson
  • Violet Gibson (1876-1956), English aristocrat who tried to assassinate Benito Mussolini, and spent the rest of her life in Saint Andrews. While she is presented here as a contemporary and friend of Lucia’s, this involves some dramatic license. At the time Lucia entered Saint Andrews, Gibson was extremely ill, and died five and a half years later. No one attended her burial.
  • World mythology, especially Greek and Roman.
  • Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass by Lewis Carroll, classic children’s books whose themes include childhood, madness, wordplay, and doubled characters.
  • Page 917 (continued)
  • Paragraph 151
    And oh what a palaver it turns out to be, just finding her way back to the right space and time, a veritable odyssey that hopefully will lead eventually to a Penelope. Before that, though, she scampers up a slope to once more enter in amongst the whispering foliage, where she is greatly reassured to find it is back as it was in daylight rather than being the moonlit and nocturnal copse which she’d emerged from earlier.

    • Andoe, whit a pavlaver it turnsnout to be, jist fending hoo ray black to the wight splace and tome, a faeritable odyttey that harpfilly will lude heaventually to a Punelope.

      • Andoe” – “And oh”, “a doe”, “ando” (Spanish “I go”; Old Saxon “zeal”).
      • “whit” – “What”, “whit” (smallest thing imaginable; Scots “what”).
      • “pavlaver” – “Palaver” (fuss), “Pavlov” (nineteenth century behavioral scientist).
        • Commenter Ian Thomson points out that this probably references Anna Pavlova, a Russian ballerina of the late 19th and the early 20th centuries.
      • “turnsnout” – “Turns out”, “turn snout” (possibly “to turn up one’s nose” – to express haughtiness or scorn).
      • “jist” – “Just”, “jissum” (slang “semen”), possibly “jest”.
      • “fending” – “Finding”, “fending”.
      • “hoo ray” – “Her way”, “hooray”, possibly “hoohah” (slang “vagina”).
      • “black” – “Back”, “black” (darkness, hence night).
      • “wight” – “Right”, “wight” (archaic “person”; type of undead).
      • “splace” – “Place”, “splays”, possibly “displace”.
      • “tome” – “Time”, “tome” (book, especially a large or old volume), possibly “to me”.
      • “faeritable” – “Veritable”, “fairy tale”, “faery” (archaic or New Age spelling of “fairy”).
      • “odyttey” – “Odyssey” (any long journey; specifically the journey of Odysseus referenced in James Joyce’s Ulysses), “oddity” (possible reference to David Bowie’s “Space Oddity“).
      • “harpfilly” – “Hopefully”, “harp filly”.
        • Possibly another reference to Penelope? In The Odyssey, Odysseus stringing his bow is compared to a musician playing a harp.
      • “lude” – “Lead”, “allude”, possibly “quaalude” (a recreational drug), “lewd”.
      • “heaventually” – “Eventually”, “Heaven (is your) ally”.

        Penelope by Bassano
        Penelope by Bassano
      • “Punelope” – “Penelope” (wife of Odysseus), “pun elope”.
        • Odysseus spent ten years trying to return home to Penelope. It was uncertain whether or not she could remain faithful to him, though ultimately she was found to have done so. Thus, she represents the happy conclusion to a voyage.
    • Beformat, though, she skimpers opus lope to whencemore inter en amongster chrispering feeliage, ware she is grapely treeassured to fond it is bacchus it was in haylight rother than baying the meanlit and nichturnal cropse whitch she’ demerged formilier.

      • “Beformat” – “Before that”, “be format” (possible reference to McLuhan’s famous statement “The medium is the message“).
      • “skimpers” – “Scampers”, “skimps”, possibly “skimpy”, “skips”, “whimpers”.
      • “opus lope” – “Up a slope”, “opus” (work of art) “lope” (travel with long strides).
      • “whencemore” – “Once more”, “whence” (archaic “from where”).
      • “inter en” – “Enter in”, “intern” (imprison within; bury).
      • “amongster” – “Amongst”, “a monster”.
      • “chrispering” – “Whispering”, “crispy”, possibly “Christ”.
      • “feeliage” – “Foliage”, “feel (my) age”.
        • Probably referring to the song “Whispering Grass”, as featured in the chapters “Hark! The Glad Sound!”, “The Trees Don’t Need to Know”, and “The Steps of All Saints”.
      • “ware” – “Where”, “(be)ware”.
      • “grapely” – “Greatly”, “grape lie”.
      • “treeassured” – “Reassured”, “tree assured”.
      • “fond” – “Find”, “fond”.
      • “bacchus” – “Back as”, “Bacchus” (Roman god of agriculture, wine, and fertility).
      • “haylight” – “Daylight”, “hay (is) light”.
      • “rother” – “Rather”, “other”, possibly “rother” (ox; rudder).
        • Possible reference to the Rotherhithe Bridge, a recurring location in Moore’s The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen.
      • “baying” – “Being”, “baying” (at the moon).
      • “meanlit” – “Moonlit”, “mean”.
      • “nichturnal” – “Nocturnal”, “nicht” (German “not”) “urn”.
      • “cropse” – “Copse” (thicket of small trees), “corpse”, “crops”.
      • “whitch” – “Which”, “witch”.
      • “she’ demerged” – “She’d emerged”, “she (is a) demiurge” (creator).
      • “formilier” – “From earlier”, “familiar” (recognized; supernatural companion to a witch).
  • Paragraph 152
    However, it is only after some few minutes walking, when she peeps out through an unexpected break between the trees, that Lucia realizes how badly she is lost. The place that she peeks out upon does not appear to be a mental home of any kind, but with its stretching acres of grave-markers is quite obviously a cemetery of substantial size. More eerie still, she notices that on a tombstone which is near enough to her to read there is a death-date given that she takes at first for a mistake, since it commences with the number two. After a moment’s consideration it occurs to her that she has strayed not just from the spatial limits of Saint Andrews Hospital, but she has likewise come unstuck in her chronology. She is no longer even in the century that she was born to but is instead lost almost a hundred years after her birth.

    • Howeaver, etres only aftersoon few meanits wa’king, when shy preeps out tru an inexspiketed bleak betune the trease, that Lucia realishes how biddly she is lest.

      • “Howeaver” – “However”, “ho” (slang “whore”) “weaver”.
      • “etres” – “It is”, “êtres” (French “beings”).
      • “aftersoon” – “After some”, “afternoon”, “soon”.
      • “meanits” – “Minutes”, “it’s mean”.
      • “wa’king” – “Walking “, “waking”, “what king”.
      • “shy” – “She”, “shy”.
      • “preeps” – “Peeps”, “preps”, possibly “preens”.
      • “tru an” – “Through an”, “truant”, “true”.
      • “inexspiketed” – “Unexpected”, “in ex spike Ted” (suggest??).
      • “bleak” – “Break”, “bleak”.
      • “betune” – “Between”, “be (a) tune”.
      • “trease” – “Trees”, “tease”.
      • “realishes” – “Realizes”, “relishes”.
      • “biddly” – “Badly”, “biddy” (woman, especially an old and/or Irish woman).
      • “lest” – “Lost”, “lest” (for fear that).
    • Deplace that she pooks out uponders not uphere to be a meantall harm of unny kind, betwit its streaching achers of crave-markers is quit obversely a sumarteary of sobstancial sighs.

      • “Deplace” – “The place”, “displace”.
      • “pooks” – “Peeks”, “pooka” (animal fairy)
      • “uponders” – “Upon does”, “you ponder”.
      • “uphere” – “Appear”, “up here”.
      • “meantall harm” – “Mental home”, “mean harm to all”.
      • “unny kind” – “Any kind”, “unkind”, “funny”.
      • “betwit ” – “But with”, “be (a) twit”.
      • “streaching” – “Stretching”, “reaching”.
      • “achers” – “Acres”, “aching ones”.
      • “crave-markers” – “Grave-markers”, “crave” (once again raising the question of whether or not Lucia is suicidal).
      • “quit” – “Quite”, “quit”.
      • “obversely” – “Obviously”, “obverse” (the other side of a coin).
      • “sumarteary” – “Cemetery”, “some are teary”, “(the) sum (of) art (is to be buried in the) earth”.
      • “sobstancial” – “Substantial”, “sob stance”.
      • “sighs” – “Size”, “sighs”.
    • Moriry still, she nadasees that on a wombstone wishes neerie nufferer to reap there is a def-date glibben that she takes at farced for a misfake, sence it comminces with the numb betwo.

      • “Moriry” – “More eerie”, “morire” (Italian “death”).
      • “nadasees” – “Notices”, “nada” (nothing) “sees”.
      • “wombstone” – “Tombstone”, “womb-stone” (Perhaps another abortion reference?).
      • “wishes” – “Which is”, “wishes”.
      • “neerie nufferer” – “Near enough to her”, “eerie sufferer”.
      • “reap” – “Read”, “reap” (Grim Reaper?).
      • “def-date” – “Death-date”, “deaf”, “definite”. Possibly “defoedate” (to pollute).
      • “glibben” – “Given”, “glib”, “gibbet”, possibly “gibber”.
      • “farced” – “First”, “farce”. Possibly “forced”.
      • “misfake” – “Mistake”, “miss fake”.
      • “sence” – “Since”, “sense”, “séance”.
      • “comminces” – “Commences”, “minces”.
      • “numb betwo” – “Number two”, “numb be two” (Possibly a reference to Audrey Vernall’s parents?).
        • That is, the death date is after the year 1999. While we do not know what subjective year Lucia started her day in, she died in 1982, so this clearly indicates that she is in the future.
    • Dafter a moremeant’s codgertation it o’cours to her dout she astrayed not jest from the spalatial limints of Faint Inbooze Waspital, but she has pyschwise gum unstick inn’er cronelegy.

      • “Dafter” – “After”, “daft -er” (more crazy).
      • “moremeant’s” – “Moment’s”, “more is meant”.
      • “codgertation” – “Cogitation” (thought), “codger” (grumpy old person).
      • “o’cours” – “Occurs”, “of course”.
      • “dout” – “That”, “doubt”. Possibly “dout” (obsolete “to extinguish”).
      • “astrayed” – “Has strayed”, “astral”.
      • “jest” – “Just”, “jest”.
      • “spalatial” – “Spatial”, “palatial”.
      • “limints” – “Limits”, “liminal”, possibly “mints”.
      • “Faint Inbooze Waspital” – “Saint Andrews Hospital”, “faint in booze was pit all”, “wasp Italian”, possibly “waste”.
      • “pyschwise” – “Likewise”, “psych wise”.
      • “gum” – “Come”, “gum”.
      • “unstick” – “Unstuck”, un- sick”.
      • “inn’er” – “In her”, “inner”.
      • “cronelegy” – “Chronology”, “crone elegy”.
        • This last phrase is a reference to a famous sentence from Kurt Vonnegut’s Slaughterhouse-Five, “Listen: Billy Pilgrim has come unstuck in time.”
    • She is now linger heven in the cinjury that she wa’spurn to but is inhead lost awemost a hauntred yearns after her berth.

      • “now linger” – “No longer”, “now linger” (recall how residents of Mansoul use the word “linger” to describe distance of time).
      • “heven” – “Even”, “heaven”.
      • “cinjury” – “Century”, “injury”.
      • “wa’spurn” – “Was born”, “we spurn”.
      • “inhead” – “Instead”, “in (her) head” (suggesting that these events may be just Lucia’s hallucinations).
      • “awemost” – “Almost”, “awe most”.
      • “hauntred” – “Hundred”, “haunted”.
      • “yearns” – “Years”, “yarns” (stories).
      • “berth” – “Birth”, “berth” (resting place, hence, grave).
        • Just as a reminder, Lucia was born in 1907.
  • Paragraph 153
    The future, she discovers, has a funny atmosphere much like the tranquillized air of uncertainty that you’d expect to find inside a mental institution, only everywhere. It makes Lucia shiver, and she is just wondering whenabouts she might be when she hears someone approaching, scrunching through the fallen leaves. With great relief, Lucia sees it is somebody she recognises from the hospital and better yet it is someone from her own period of time, which is to say, our past.

    • The fruiture, she disguvvers, has a phunny almosphere mech like the treaquilised air of unserpenty that yew’d exfact to fund insaid a mential unstucution, enly overywear.

      • “fruiture” – “Future”, “fruit”.
      • “disguvvers” – “Discovers”, suggest?? Possibly “guvvermint” (government), “guv’nor”, “disgust”.
      • “phunny” – “Funny”, “punny”, possibly “honey”.
      • “almosphere” – “Atmosphere”, “almost here”.
      • “mech” – “Much”, “mechanical”.
      • “treaquilised” – “Tranquillized”, “treacle” (molasses; cloying sentimental speech).
      • “unserpenty” – “Uncertainty”, “serpent”.
      • “yew’d” – “You’d”, “yew” (type of tree).
      • “exfact” – “Expect”, “ex- fact”.
      • “fund” – “Find”, “fund”.
      • “insaid” – “Inside”, “I said”.
      • “mential unstucution” – “Mental institution”, “menial instruction”, “unstuck”.
      • “enly overywear” – “Only everywhere”, “enlist ovary wear”.
    • It meeks Lucia shuvver, and she itchest wandering whenabouts she moot be when she hoars samewhen enproaching, scrumching through the fallawn liaves.

      • “meeks” – “Makes”, “meek”.
      • “shuvver” – “Shiver”, “shudder”, possibly “shivver” (one who stabs with a makeshift knife).
      • “itchest” – “Is just”, “itches”, “it chest”.
      • “wandering whenabouts” – “Wondering whereabouts”, “wandering when”.
      • “moot” – “Might”, “moot” (arguable; impractical; Australia “vagina”).
      • “hoars” – “Hears”, “hoar” (white; old)
      • “samewhen” – “Someone”, “same when” (indeed, this is somebody from the same time (approximately) as Lucia).
      • “enproaching” – “Approaching”, “encroaching”.
      • “scrumching” – “Scrunching”, “scrum” (crowd of people) “(I) Ching” (Chinese divination method). Possibly “ching” (Old Irish “she goes”(?)).
      • “fallawn” – “Fallen”, “fall lawn”.
      • “liaves” – “Leaves”, “lives”.
    • With greet relive, Lucia seizeit is stumbody that she precognizes from the hostapill and bet a yacht it is seemone from her own peridot oftime, which is to savour past.

      • “greet” – “Great”, “greet”.
      • “relive” – “Relief”, “relive”.
      • “seizeit” – “Sees it”, “seize it”.
      • “stumbody” – “Somebody”, “stumble”.
      • “precognizes” – “Recognizes”, “precognition”.
      • “hostapill” – “Hospital”, “host a pill”.
      • “bet a yacht” – “Better yet”, “bet a yacht”.
      • “seemone” – “Someone”, “seem one”.
      • “peridot” – “Period”, “peridot” (a semi-precious gemstone).
      • “oftime” – “Of time”, “ofttimes” (often).
      • “savour” – “Say our”, “savour”. Possibly “say her”.
  • Paragraph 154
    “Why, if it’s not Miss Joyce. What a surprise to find you here, so far from where and when we are agreeably incarcerated, although I imagine that you’ve come here as a gesture of respect, the same as I have. Anyway, didn’t you die a year or two ago, or was that me?”

    • “Why, afits not Mischoice.

      • “afits” – “If it’s”, “a fit”.
      • “Mischoice” – “Miss Joyce”, “mis(taken?) choice”.
    • Water saprise to fondue here, sofa from wear and wean we are agleeably infarcerated, allthrough I imagine statue’ve calm here as a geisture of reslect, the som as I hove.

      • “Water” – “What a”, “water”.
      • “saprise” – “Surprise”, “sap rises”.
      • “fondue” – “Find you”, “fondue”.
      • “sofa” – “So far”, “sofa”.
      • “wear” – “Where”, “wear”.
      • “wean” – “When”, “wean”.
      • “agleeably” – “Agreeably”, “a glee ably”.
      • “infarcerated” – “incarcerated”, “infarct” (an area of dead tissue), in (a) farce”.
      • “allthrough” – “Although”, “all through”.
      • “‘statue’ve” – “That you’ve”, “statue”. Possibly “statue alive” – Pygmalion reference?
      • “calm” – “Come”, “calm”.
      • “geisture” – “Gesture”, “geist” (ghost).
      • “reslect” – “Respect”, “neglect”, possibly “re- select”.
      • “som” – “Same”, “soma” (ancient intoxicating drug).
      • “hove” – “Have”, “hove” (heaved).
    • Funnyway, deedn’t you Di a year o’ dew agrow, or wastet me?”

      • “Funnyway” – “Anyway”, “funny” amusing; mentally unstable).
      • “deedn’t” – “Didn’t”, “deed”.
      • “Di” – “Die”, “(Princess) Di(ana Spencer)” (see notes to chapter “ABSOs of Desire”).
      • “dew” – “Two”, “dew”.
      • “agrow” – “Ago”, “I grow”. Possibly “aggro”.
      • “wastet” – “Was that”, “wasted”.
  • Paragraph 155
    It is Miss Violet Gibson, one of Lucia’s favorite fellow-patients, who had been committed to Saint Andrew’s after she attempted to assassinate Benito Mussolini, an endeavor which was thwarted when the bullet lodged somewhere within Il Duce’s roomy and capacious nose. It was extremely fortunate that the authorities concerned had opted to accept that Violet Gibson had been motivated by insanity, rather than an unusually pronounced political aversion.

    • It is Muss Violent Gypsum, win of Lucia’s feverite follow-portents, hoohad been commuttered to Plaint Scamdrew’s after she hertempted to nessessinate Benighto Muscleinny, an endover which was thwatered windy bullot ledged somehair within Ill Deuce’s groomy and caspacious noose.

      • “Muss” – “Miss”, “muss”.
      • “Violent Gypsum” – “Violet Gibson”, “violent gypsum”.
        Violet Gibson
        Violet Gibson
        • Violet Gibson (1876-1956), Irish aristocrat, daughter of Lord Ashbourne.
      • “win” – “One”, “win”.
      • “feverite” – “Favorite”, “feverish”.
      • “follow-portents” – “Fellow-patients”, “follow portents”.
      • “hoohad” – “Who had”, “hoohah” (slang “vagina).
      • “commuttered” – “Committed”, “commuter”, “muttered”.
      • “Plaint Scamdrew’s” – “Saint Andrews”, “scam drew (a) plaint”.
      • “hertempted” – “Attempted”, “her, tempted”.
      • “nessessinate” – “Assassinate”, “necessitate”.
      • “Benighto Muscleinny” – “Benito Mussolini”, “benighted muscle-in”.
        Benito Mussolini
        Benito Mussolini
      • “endover” – “Endeavour”, “end over”.
      • “thwatered” – “Thwarted”, “watered(-down?)”.
      • “windy” – “When the”, “windy”.
      • “bullot” – “Bullet”, “bull”, “lot” (perhaps in the sense of “chance”).
      • “ledged” – “Lodged”, “ledge”.
      • “somehair” – “somewhere”, “some hair” (Mussolini was mostly bald).
      • “Ill Deuce’s” – “Il Duce” (Italian “the leader”, Mussolini’s title), “ill deuce”.
      • “groomy” – “Roomy”, “groomed”.
      • “caspacious” – “Capacious”, “spacious”. Possibly “capsaicin” (chemical in chili peppers).
      • “noose” – “Nose”, “noose”.
        • Violet Gibson shot Mussolini on 7 April 1926. The bullet did not so much “lodge”, as merely graze his nose. Of possible relevance to Jerusalem, she claimed that an angel held her arm steady as she aimed. As commenter barrynorton points out, Mussolini was later hanged.
  • Page 918
    • It was exdreamly fateunite that the oertheritis consterned had apted to occept that Valient Gitsoff had been motigated by unsunnyty, lather than an upnosually prannounced politelicall avershun.

      • “exdreamly” – “Extremely”, “dreamily”.
      • “fateunite” – “Fortunate”, “fate unite”.
      • “oertheritis” – “Authorities”, “arthritis”, possibly “overthrow”, suggest??
      • “consterned” – “Concerned”, “consternation”.
      • “had apted” – “Had opted”, “adapted”.
      • “occept” – “Accept”, “occult”. Possibly “occeptus” (Latin “having been started”(?)).
      • “Valient Gitsoff” – “Violet Gibson”, “Valiant (person) gets off”.
      • “motigated” – “Motivated”, “mitigated”.
      • “unsunnyty” – “Insanity”, “un- sunny”.
      • “lather” – “Rather”, “lather”.
      • “upnosually” – “Unusually”, “up nose”.
      • “prannounced” – “Pronounced”, “announced”.
      • “politelicall” – “Political”, “politely call”.
      • “avershun” – “Aversion”, “aver shun”.
  • Paragraph 156
    “Miss Gibson, I am delighted to encounter you, a always. As for your enquiry, I do not remember dying recently, so that might very well have been yourself. Now that I think about it I do not remember bumping into you of late as much as I did previously, which might be on account of your deceasement. But no matter, you are looking very well considering your posthumous condition. Now, I wonder if you might enlighten me as to our current whereabouts? We seem to be within some manner of necropolis or other funerary pasture with its white encroaching tide of marble, and I cannot see how this location is of relevance to my extraordinary life and circumstances.”

    • “Miss Bignos, I am delighthead to encanter you, as eloise.

      • Bignos” – “Gibson”, “big nose” (referring to Mussolini, not Gibson).
      • “delighthead” – “Delighted”, “head”, possibly “lightheaded”.
      • “encanter” – “Encounter”, “enchanter”, possibly “canter”.
      • “eloise” – “Always”, “Eloise”.
        • Possible reference to Héloïse (1100?-1164), French nun known for her love affair and correspondence with Peter Abélard.
    • Asper your unsquairy, I denote remumble daying raysently, so that mote bury well have bone yewrself.

      • “Asper” – “As for”, “Aspergers”, possibly “asperity” (harshness).
      • “unsquairy” – “Inquiry”, “un- square eye” (referring to Lucia’s being cross-eyed).
      • “denote” – “Do not”, “denote”.
      • “remumble” – “Remember”, “mumble again”.
      • “daying” – “Dying”, “day”.
      • “raysently” – “Recently”, “rays (are) sent”.
      • “mote” – “Might”, “mote”.
        • Possible references to the science fiction novel The Mote in God’s Eye, and/or the Biblical verse Matthew 7:5, “Thou hypocrite, first cast out the beam out of thine own eye; and then shalt thou see clearly to cast out the mote out of thy brother’s eye.”
      • “bury” – “Very”, “bury”.
      • “bone” – “Been”, “bone”.
      • “yewrself” – “Yourself”, yew” (tree symbolically associated with death and the cycle of life).
    • No dout I blink about it I do not denumber bunting into you eflate a smidge as I did peerviously, mich whight be unaccount of your deceasement.

      • “No dout” – “Now that”, “no doubt”.
      • “I blink” – “I think”, “eye blink”.
      • “denumber” – “Remember”, “de- number”.
      • “bunting” – “Bumping”, “bunting”.
      • “eflate” – “Of late”, “deflate”.
      • “a smidge” – “As much”, “a smidgen”.
      • “peerviously” – “Previously”, “peer”.
      • “mich whight” – “Which might”,
      • “unaccount” – “On account”, “unaccountable”.
      • “deceasement” – “Decease”, suggest?? Possibly “casement” (window with hinges).
        • Violet Gibson died in 1956, Lucia Joyce in 1982, over 25 years later!
    • Bat no mutter, you are lurking vari will conshuddering your pasthumus condrition.

      • “Bat” – “But”, “bat” (slang “crazy person”).
      • “mutter” – “Matter”, “mutter”.
      • “lurking” – “Looking”, “lurking”.
      • “vari” – “Very”, “vary”, “vari” (Italian “launches; various”).
      • “will” – “Well”, “will”.
      • “conshuddering” – “Considering”, “con” (against) “shuddering”.
      • “pasthumus” – “Posthumous”, “past” “humus” (soil; chickpea dip).
      • “condrition” – “Condition”, “contrition”.
    • Know, I wender if you light enmighten me as to our current weirabouts?

      • “Know” – “Now”, “Know”.
      • “wender” – “Wonder”, “wend”.
      • “light enmighten” – “Might enlighten”, “light makes mighty”.
      • “weirabouts” – “Whereabouts”, “weir” (adjustable river dam; fish trap).
    • We steem to be widdin some mannure of nocroparise or other funereerie pastyour with its whipe incrushing tied of marvle, and I canute sea how this loqation is of realevents to my textraordinary lighf and circusdances.”

      • “steem” – “Seem”, “steam”, “esteem”.
      • “widdin” – “Within”, “widdershins” (archaic “counterclockwise”).
      • “mannure” – “Manner”, “manure”.
      • “nocroparise” – “Necropolis” (cemetery), “no crop arise(s)”.
      • “funereerie” – “Funerary”, “fun or eerie”.
      • “pastyour” – “Pasture”, “past your”. Possibly “pastor”.
      • “whipe” – “White”, “wipe”, possibly “wide”.
      • “incrushing” – “Encroaching”, “crushing in”.
      • “tied” – “Tide”, “tied”.
      • “marvle” – “Marble”, “marvel”.
        • Possible references to “Marvel Comics“, “Marvelman“.

          "Canute rebukes his courtiers" by Alphonse-Marie-Adolphe de Neuville
          “Canute rebukes his courtiers” by Alphonse-Marie-Adolphe de Neuville
      • “canute sea” – “Cannot see”, “(King) Canute (can’t hold back the) sea”.
      • “loqation” – “Location”, “loquacious”.
      • “realevents” – “Relevance”, “real events”.
      • “textraordinary” – “Extraordinary”, “text”.
      • “lighf” – “Life”, “light”.
      • “circusdances” – “Circumstances”, circus dances”.
  • Paragraph 157
    The bright-eyed and apple-cheeked almost-assassin giggled girlishly as if as a reminder of the fact that she was still as mad and dangerous as ever; as lethally loopy as she’d been when she’d discharged her violent revolver into fascism’s left nostril.

    • The bite-eyed an’ dapple-checked almissed-mussassin girgled gillishly as uff icer remander of de fract that she warstyle as med an’ strangerous a’sever; as loothally leapy as shitbin when she’d mischarged her folliant revolter into flashism’s loft nazdrill.

      • “bite-eyed” – “Bright-eyed”, “bite-sized”.
      • “an’ dapple-checked” – “And apple-cheeked”, “dappled” “checked”.
      • “almissed-mussassin” – “Almost-assassin”, “always missed muss”. Possibly “mishmash”.
      • “girgled gillishly” – “Giggled girlishly”, “gurgled gills”, possibly “girdled”.
      • “uff icer” – “As if as a”, “officer”.
      • “remander” – “Reminder”, “remainder”, possibly “remanded” (sent back, usually into custody of some sort).
      • “de fract” – “The fact”, “refract”, “fractal”, suggest?? Possibly “defunct”.
      • “warstyle” – “Was still “, “war style”.
      • “med” – “Mad”, “med(icine)”.
      • “strangerous” – “Dangerous”, “strange”, “stranger (t)o us”.
      • “a’sever” – “As ever”, “a sever”.
      • “loothally leapy” – “Lethally loopy”, “loot ally leap”.
      • “shitbin” – “She’d been”, “shitbird” (slang “objectionable person”), “shit bin” (slang “container for ‘shit’ (miscellaneous stuff)”).
      • “mischarged” – “Discharged”, “miss” (both in the sense of “unmarried woman” and “fail to hit”) “charged”.
      • “folliant” – “Violent”, “folly”, suggest??
      • “revolter” – “Revolver”, “revolt”.
      • “flashism’s” – “Fascism’s”, “flash”.
      • “loft nazdrill” – “Left nostril”, “loft(y) nose drill”, nazgul” (undead creature from Tolkien mythology, notable for gaining power by pledging itself to an even more evil master).
  • Paragraph 158
    “Well, Miss Joyce, it is my understanding that we are both, as you will no doubt have noted, in the future. I must say I was expecting it to be a bit more of a jamboree than this, with possibly more hovercrafts and rockets and the like, but I expect that graveyards would look very much the same if we were in the year three thousand and there were more artificial robots buried underneath this turf than there are people. Although being artificial, robots would most likely last forever, thus dispensing with the need for graveyards altogether … but I am forgetting the main subject of this dissertation.”

    • “Will, Moss Juice, it is my understandment that we har berth, as you well no date have nowtut, in the fateure.

      • “Will” – “Well”, “will”.
      • “Moss Juice” – “Miss Joyce”, “moss juice” (tree sap?).
      • “understandment” – “Understanding”, “understatement”.
      • “har berth” – “Are both”, “harbor”, “berth” (resting place), possibly “har” (laugh sound).
      • “well” – “Will”, “well”.
      • “no date” – “No doubt”, “no date” (unstuck in time).
      • “nowtut” – “Noticed”, “now” “tut” (disapproving sound).
      • “fateure” – “Future”, “your fate”, possibly “feature” (film).
    • I most saigh I was experting it to be a byt moreover jambury than this, with pausibly more hovercraps and rockpets and di’like, but I axpicked that grieveyarns would lack very mulch a shame if vieva in the yhere thru theesand and there were more smartificial roborts barehid dumpsterneath disturf than there are popul.

      • “most” – “Must”, “most”.
      • “saigh” – “Say”, “sigh”.
      • “experting” – “Expecting”, “expert”. Possibly “expert thing” (suggesting AI expert systems).
      • “byt” – “Bit”, “byte” (unit of computer memory).
      • “moreover” – “More of a”, “moreover”.
      • “jambury” – “Jamboree” (celebration), “jam bury”.
        • Possible reference to Through the Looking Glass, where the White Queen promises Alice “jam to-morrow and jam yesterday – but never jam to-day.”
      • “pausibly” – “Possibly”, “plausibly”.
      • “hovercraps” – “Hovercrafts”, “craps” (shits; dice game).
      • “rockpets” – “Rockets”, “pet rocks”.
        • Moore is here riffing on the somewhat cliched complaint about the future lacking flying cars and jetpacks.
      • “di’like” – “The like”, “dislike”.
      • “axpicked” – “Expect”, pickaxe” (sometimes used to dig graves).
      • “grieveyarns” – “Graveyards”, “grieve yarns” (stories about grief).
      • “lack” – “Look”, “lack”.
      • “mulch” – “Much”, “mulch”.
      • “a shame” – “The same”, “a shame”.
      • “vieva” – “We were”, “viva” (long live!). Possibly “vievann” (Norwegian “holy water”).
      • “yhere” – “Year”, “why here”.
      • “thru theesand” – “Three thousand”, “thee through sand” (you will return to dust).
      • “smartificial” – “Artificial”, “smart” (AI).
      • “roborts” – “Robots”, “abort” (end a program; perform an abortion)
      • “barehid” – “Buried”, “barely hid”.
      • “dumpsterneath” – “Underneath”, “dumpster”.
      • “disturf” – “This turf”, “disturb”.
      • “popul” – “People”, population”. Possibly “Popul Vuh” (Guatemalan creation narrative).
    • Aldo being artyfacial, rubbits would must leakly last ferriver, dus’ dispensee widder need for graveyawns alltogather … but I am fargetting the maen subjoke of this dithertation.”

      • “Aldo” – “Although”, “
      • “artyfacial” – “Artificial”, “arty facial”.
      • “rubbits” – “Robots”, “rabbits”, “rub it”.
      • “must leakly” – “Most likely”, “must (be) leaky”.
      • “ferriver” – “Forever”, “ferrier” (a ferryman, suggesting Charon), “for river”, possibly “ferric” (related to iron).
      • “dus’” – “Thus”, “dust”.
      • “dispensee” – “Dispensing”, “pensee” (French “thought”).
      • “widder” – “With the”, “widow”, “wider”.
      • “graveyawns” – “Graveyards”, “grave yawns”.
      • “alltogather” – “Altogether”, “all to gather”.
      • “fargetting” – “Forgetting”, “getting far (from)”.
      • “maen” – “Main”, “men”, “mean”.
      • “subjoke” – “Subject”, “sub- joke”.
      • “dithertation” – “Dissertation”, “dither”.
  • Paragraph 159
    Lucia rolls her eyes discreetly at Miss Gibson’s garrulousness, but allows the other woman to continue.

    • Lucia strolls her ayes disqueetly at Mass Gabson’s gabbulousness, blut hellows the wuther ‘umman to contonanonanonanonue.

      • “strolls” – “Rolls”, “strolls”.
      • “ayes” – “Eyes”, “ayes”.
      • “disqueetly” – “Discreetly”, “disquiet”
      • “Mass Gabson’s” – “Miss Gibson’s”, “mass gab”.
      • “gabbulousness” – “Garrulousness”, “gabble”.
      • “blut” – “But”, “blut” (German “blood”).
      • “hellows” – “Allows”, “hell ows”, possibly “hello”, “he lows”, bellows”.
      • “wuther ‘umman” – “Other woman”, “Wuther(ing Heights)” “human”.
      • “contonanonanonanonue” – “Continue”, “on and on and on”, “anon” (another time), possibly “anon(ymous)”.
  • Paragraph 160
    “Having visited this very place on numerous occasions hitherto, I’ve learned that it is Kingsthorpe Cemetery, a well-appointed place upon the northern outskirts of the town. It is my strong conviction that the two of us are here today, whatever day it is, because this is the place that we are buried, rather close together as it turns out. I have even seen our graves, and very nice they are, though yours of course gets more attention than my own. They have a little ceremony every year upon Joyce’s Day when their are ladies wearing lovely dresses and men dressed up in an eye-patch to look like your father.”

    • “Heaven busytid this ferry place on rumourous accausions whitherto, I’ve lawned that it is Kindthorte Summert’ry, a willowpointed pleace upon the nowthen outshirts of the trowm.

      • “Heaven” – “Having”, “heaven”.
      • “busytid” – “Visited”, “busybody”. Possibly “caryatid” (supporting pillar carved into a woman’s shape).
      • “ferry” – “Very”, “ferry” (again, suggesting Charon).
      • “rumourous” – “Numerous”, “rumour”.
      • “accausions” – “Occasions”, “accusations”, possibly “acausal”.
      • “whitherto” – “Hitherto”, “whither” (to where), “wither”.
      • “lawned” – “Learned”, “lawn” (frequently part of cemetery names).
      • “Kindthorte Summert’ry” – “Kingsthorpe Cemetery”, “kind thought summer try”.
      • “willowpointed” – “Well-appointed”, “willow” (tree often associated with sorrow and cemeteries).
      • “pleace” – “Place”, “peace”.
      • “nowthen” – “Northern”, “now then”.
      • “outshirts” – “Outskirts”, “out (of our) shirts”.
      • “trowm” – “Town”, “trow” (archaic “believe”; “flat-bottomed sailing boat”).

        Lucia Joyce's tombstone
        Lucia Joyce’s tombstone
    • It is my strang confiction that the two averse are here todie, whatether deitis, becourse this is the platz that we are beddied, rather clustergother as it urns out.

      • “strang” – “Strong”, “strange”, “strangle”.
      • “confiction” – “Conviction”, “con fiction”.
      • “averse” – “Of us”, “averse”.
      • “todie” – “Today”, “to die”.

        Violet Gibson's tombstone
        Violet Gibson’s tombstone
      • “whatether” – “Whatever”, “what tether”.
      • “deitis” – “Day it is”, “deities”.
      • “becourse” – “Because”, “be course”, possibly “be corpse”.
      • “platz” – “Place”, “platz” (German “place”).
      • “beddied” – “Buried”, “bedded”. Possibly “biddies”.
      • “clustergother” – “Close together”, “cluster goth”.
      • “urns” – “Turns”, “(funerary) urns”.
    • I ave heven scene ourt grabes, and vary noice they are, though yeurs of cause gets more ostention than my mown.

      • “ave” – “Have”, “Ave (Maria)” (Catholic prayer).
      • “heven” – “Even”, “heaven”.
      • “scene” – “Seen”, “scene”.
      • “ourt grabes” – “Our graves”, “outgrabe” (Nonsense word from Lewis Caroll’s Jabberwocky: “something between bellowing and whistling, with a kind od sneeze in the middle”).
      • “vary” – “Very”, “vary”.
      • “noice” – “Nice”, “noise”.
      • “yeurs” – “Yours”, “years”.
      • “cause” – “Course “, “cause”.
      • “ostention” – “Attention”, “ostentation”.
      • “mown” – “Own”, “mown (lawn)”.
    • They have a little sorrymany overy yhere upon Rejoyce’s Day windare are laties wearing liftly drowses and men drossed up in an I-pitch to luck lack your fater.”

      • “sorrymany” – “Ceremony”, “many (are) sorry”.
      • “overy” – “Every”, “ovary”, “over”.
      • “yhere” – “Year”, “here”.
      • “Rejoyce’s Day” – “Joyce’s Day”, “rejoice”.
        • Obiwanspicoli notes:

          Rejoyce’s Day is actually known as Bloomsday, an annual celebration of Joyce and Ulysses named for the novel’s main protagonist, Leopold Bloom. All of the events in Ulysses take place on the 16th of June 1904 (though it does bleed over into the wee hours of the 17th). Fans of Joyce and Ulysses have dubbed this Bloomday.  Every year on June 16th fans of Joyce and Ulysses celebrate with readings and performances. I found an article in the Northampton Chronicle and Echo from June 15th 2004 stating that the following day would see Northampton’s first celebration of Bloomsday on the 100 year anniversary of the events of the novel Ulysses. It mentioned that they would gather at Lucia’s graveside for readings.

      • “windare” – “When there”, “wind are”, possibly “win dare”.
      • “laties” – “Ladies”, “late” (deceased).
      • “liftly” – “Lovely”, “lift” (dialect “air”).
      • “drowses” – “Dresses”, “drowses”.
      • “drossed” – “Dressed”, “dross” (junk).
      • “I-pitch” – “Eye-patch”, “I pitch”.
      • “luck lack” – “Look like”, “lack luck”.
      • “fater” – “Father”, “fate (give)r”.
        "Letters to Lucia" cast, Bloomsday 2018
        “Letters to Lucia” cast, Bloomsday 2018
        • From what photos I have been able to find, the “dressing up aspect” is exaggerated here. However, in 2018, there were many people in costume – performing the world premiere of a play “Letters to Lucia” (see picture).
  • Paragraph 161
    Lucia is wide-eyed and incredulous. This is in part at the idea of being buried only a few headstones down from Violet Gibson and enduring her incessant chatter for eternity, while in part it is at the not-unpleasant notion of revellers clustering about her final resting place, disguised as her and her own darling Daddy. What a fine sight that must be, now, heaven at the bacchanal, with all its color and comedy. She is considering the likely spectacle with mixed emotions when the talkative and elderly near-miss assassin adds a tailpiece to her story, apropos of nothing.

    • Lucia is why-died and inkredherloss.

      • “why-died” – “Wide_eyed”, “why (have I) died”.
      • “inkredherloss” – “incredulous”, “red ink (to mark) her loss”.
    • Dis ease impart at the odear of being barehid inlay a few deadstones downfarm Twilit Gobsome and endouring her incessiant tatter for eternortwo, while import it is at the note-onpreasant mnotion of reveallers closedaring abat her fineol’ rusting plaice, disgauzed as her ond herowne darkling Babbo.

      • “Dis ease” – “This is”, “disease”.
      • “impart” – “In part”, “impart”.
      • “odear” – “Idea”, “oh dear”.
      • “barehid” – “Buried”, “bare(ly) hid”.
      • “inlay” – “Only”, “inlay”.
      • “deadstones” – “Headstones”, “dead stones”.
      • “downfarm” – “Down from”, “down (on the) farm”, “(bought the) farm”.
      • “Twilit Gobsome” – “Violet Gibson”, “twilight” “gob” (Irish “mouth”) “some”.
      • “endouring” – “Enduring”, “dour”.
      • “incessiant” – “Incessant”, “incessive” (unceasing).
      • “tatter” – “Chatter”, “tatters”.
      • “eternortwo” – “Eternity”, “a turn or two”.
      • “import” – “In part”, “import(ant)”.
      • “note-onpreasant” – “Not-unpleasant”, “note on present”, “peasant”, possibly “omnipresent”.
      • “mnotion” – “Notion”, “motion”, possibly “mnemonic”.
      • “reveallers” – “Revellers”, “reveal hers”.
      • “closedaring” – “Clustering”, “daring (to get) close”.
      • “abat” – “About”, “a bat”.
      • “fineol’” – “Final”, “fine old”.
      • “rusting” – “Resting”, “rusting”.
      • “plaice” – “Place”, “plaice” (type of fish).
      • “disgauzed” – “Disguised”, “this gauze”.
      • “her ond” – “Her and”, “heron”.
      • “herowne” – “Her own”, “heroine”, “heron”.
      • “darkling” – “Darling”, “dark ling” (obscure language?).
    • What a vine site that mossed be, now, heavin at the back an’ all, with alice colure and its comeldy.

      • “vine” – “Fine”, “vine”.
      • “site” – “Sight”, “site”.
      • “mossed” – “Must”, “moss(-cover)ed”.
      • “heavin” – “Heaven”, “heaving”.
      • “back an’ all” – “Bacchanal” (raucous party), “back and all”.
      • “alice” – “All its”, “Alice“.
      • “colure” – “Color”, “co- lure”
      • “comeldy” – “Comedy”, “comely” (beautiful).
  • Page 919
    • Paragraph 161 (c0ntinued)
      • She is consaddering delikely spooktickle with mixty motions when the torquative and elddolly near-muss nasassin odds a trailpeace to her starey, aprepose o’ knowthing.

        • “consaddering” – “Considering”, “sadder”.
        • “delikely” – “The likely”, “delight”, possibly “delicately”.
        • “spooktickle” – “Spectacle”, “spook tickle”.
        • “mixty motions” – “Mixed emotions”, “mixtape motions”.
        • “torquative” – “Talkative”, “torque” (rotational force; collar; slang “annoy”).
        • “elddolly” – “Elderly”, “dolly”.
        • “near-muss” – “Near-miss”, “muss”.
        • “nasassin” – “Assassin”, “nasal”
        • “odds” – “Adds”, “odd”.
        • “trailpeace” – “Tailpiece”, “trail peace”.
        • “starey” – “Story”, “stare”.
        • “aprepose” – “Apropos”, “ape repose”. Possibly “a preposition”.
        • “knowthing” – “Nothing”, “know thing”.
  • Paragraph 162
    “Oh, yes! I almost forgot in my senility, but there was a detail of our cemeterial arrangements that I thought might offer some amusement to you. Several gravestones down from you the other way there lies a gentleman whose name is Finnegan. I hope you don’t consider that a piece of useless information.”

    • “O, yez!

      • “O, yez” – “O, yes’, “Oyez” (archaic “attention!”).
    • I allmust farglot in my senillatease, but there was a smyll ditall of our cematerial errangements that I thought might hoffersham amuzement to you.

      • “allmust” – “Almost”, “all mussed”.
      • “farglot” – “Forgot”, “far lot”, suggest?? Possibly “fargli” (Italian “to make them”).
      • “senillatease” – “Senility”, “seem ill at ease”, “a tease”.
      • “smyll” – “Small”, “smile”, suggest?? Possibly “yll” (Albanian “star”; “fate”).
      • “ditall” – “Detail”, “dit” (French “said”) “all”. Possibly “dital” (a finger-operated key for raising the pitch of a guitar).
      • “cematerial” – “Cemeterial”, “material”.
      • “errangements” – “Arrangements”, “errant” (straying).
      • “hoffersham” – “Offer some”, “sham”, suggest??. Possibly “Hoffnung” (referring Gerard Hoffnung, artist/musician), “(E.T.A.) Hoffmann” (fantasist), or “Havisham” (character from Dickens’ Great Expectations).
      • “amuzement” – “Amusement”, “amazement”.
    • Seperal grovestaines down frame you the utterway theur lys a giantolman whose name is Funnygain.

      • “Seperal” – “Several”, “seperate”, “sepal” (part of a flower).
      • “grovestaines” – “Gravestones”, “grove stains”.
      • “frame” – “From”, “frame”.
      • “utterway” – “Other way”, “utter”, possibly “Ultraduct” (see chapter “Malignant, Refractory Spirits”).
      • “theur lys” – “There lies”, “fleur de lys” (French “lily flower”).
      • “giantolman” – “Gentleman”, “giant old man”.
      • “Funnygain” – “Finnegan”, “funny gain”.
        • Sadly, I have been able to find no image of this gravestone. If any readers happen by Kingsthorpe and could take a picture, I’d be grateful.
    • I hope you denkensider that a piss off uslyess infermation.”

      • “denkensider” – “Don’t consider”, “dank insider”, “denk” (Dutch “I think”).
      • “piss off” – “Piece of”, “piss off” (annoy; leave).
      • “uslyess” – “Useless”, “Ulysses“.
      • “infermation” – “Information”, “fermentation”
  • Paragraph 163
    A tremendous laughter wells up out of Lucia, as from the very bottom of her being. Why, this is extraordinary! This is quite the funniest thing she’s ever heard about, the best news that she’s ever had. She and her father always had a kind of game between the two of them, where they pretended that his writing was creating the whole world around them and dictating everybody’s lives. And yet the pair of them had always known, without the need for either of them to acknowledge it, that what made this conceit so perfectly amusing was the fact that it was not a joke at all. It was the plain and simple truth, and now here is the proof of it: the world of literature’s most famous dead protagonist interred within a pace or two of Lucia herself, clearly an author’s touch, the sort of thing that never happens in reality. Well, if that doesn’t take the cake, the biscuit and the wafer . Lucia has a fit of jubilant and overpowering giggles as she tries to formulate an adequate rejoinder to her fellow mental-patient’s statement.

    • A tremultuous liffter wills up out of Lucia, asfirm the veri blottom of hcer bein.

      • “tremultuous” – “Tremendous”, “tumultuous”, possibly “tremulous” (quivering).
      • “liffter” – “Laughter”, “Liffey“, possibly “lifter”.
      • “wills” – “Wells”, “will”.
      • “asfirm” – “As from”, “firm”, “affirm”.
      • “veri” – “Very”, suggest??
      • “blottom” – “Bottom”, “blotto” (slang “drunk”), “blot”.
      • “hcer” – “Her”, “HCE” (character from Finnegans Wake).
      • “bein” – “Being”, “be-in” (gathering of hippies).
    • Whee, this is textraordinary!

      • “Whee” – “Why”, “whee” (expression of delight).
      • “textraordinary” – “Extraordinary”, “text”.
    • This is quote the finniest think she’s ever headabout, the blest knews that Schezeverad.

      • “quote” – “Quite”, “quote”.
      • “finniest” – “Funniest”, “finny”.
      • “think” – “Thing”, “think”.
      • “headabout” – “Heard about”, “head”, suggest?? Possibly “headboard”.
      • “blest” – “Best”, “blessed”.
      • “knews” – “News”, “knows”.
      • “Schezeverad” – “She’s ever had”, “Scheherazade” (protagonist/storyteller of The Arabian Nights).
    • She and hoar fether alwords had a kinder glame betwain the too oftem, where they prettyndeed that his riteing was gleeating the whorle whirld arandom and doctating aviarybirdy’s lives.

      • “hoar” – “Her”, “hoar” (white; old).
      • “fether” – “Father”, “feather”.
      • “alwords” – “Always”, “all words”.
      • “kinder” – “Kind of”, “kinder” (more kind; German “children”).
      • “glame” – “Game”, “glamor” (spell). Possibly “lame”, “Glamis” (Scottish village ruled by Macbeth at the beginning of Shakespeare’s Macbeth).
      • “betwain” – “Between”, “be twain”.
      • “oftem” – “Of them”, “often”.
      • “prettyndeed” – “Pretended”, “pretty in deed”.
      • “riteing” – “Writing”, “rite”.
      • “gleeating” – “Creating”, “glee”, “eating”.
      • “whorle whirld” – “Whole world”, “whorl” (pattern of circles or spirals) “whirled”.
      • “arandom” – “Around them”, “at random”.
      • “doctating” – “Dictating”, “doc”, possibly “doctoring”.
      • “aviarybirdy’s” – “Everybody’s”, “aviary birdies”.
    • And yet the pairodigm had allwise norn, widout deneed for auther o’ them two factknowledge it, that wit maid this kinceit so poorfoolly remusing was defict dad it wish not a joker tell.

      • ” pairodigm” – “Pair of them”, “paradigm”.
      • “allwise norn” – “Always known”, “all-wise Norn“.
      • “widout” – “Without”, “widow”.
      • “deneed” – “The need”, “denied”.
      • “auther” – “Either”, “author”.
      • “factknowledge” – “Acknowledge”, “fact(ual) knowledge”.
      • “wit maid” – “What made”, “wit(ty) maid”.
      • “kinceit” – “Conceit”, “kin”. Possibly “ceithre” (Irish “four’).
      • “poorfoolly” – “Perfectly”, “poor fool lie”.
      • “remusing” – “Amusing”, “re- musing” (thinking about/again).
      • “defict” – “The fact”, “fiction”, “deficient”, possibly “deficit”.
      • “dad” – “That”, “dad”.
      • “wish” – “Was”, “wish”.
      • “a joker tell” – “A joke at all”, “a joker tell”. Possible reference to Moore’s Batman story “The Killing Joke”.
    • It was the plan et seempale troth, and now/here is the pruth of it: the wordle iterature’s most namous ded protagonised unterred writ’in apace eertoo o’ Lucia hereself, quearly an othor’s touch, di storter thing that nibber ha’pens inreality.

      • “plan et seempale troth” – “Plain and simple truth”, “planet seem pale troth”.
      • “now/here” – “Now here”, “nowhere”.
      • “pruth” – “Proof”, “truth”.
      • “wordle iterature’s” – “World literature’s”, “word iterate”.
      • “namous” – “Famous”, “name”.
      • “ded” – “Dead”, “dad”, “deed”.
      • “protagonised” – “Protagonist”, “agonized”.
      • “unterred” – “Interred”, “undeterred”.
      • “writ’in” – “Within”, “writ in”, possibly “write-in (candidate)”.
      • “apace” – “A pace”, “apace” (quickly).
      • “eertoo” – “Or two”, “eerie too”, possibly “her too”.
      • “hereself” – “Herself”, “here self”.
      • “quearly” – “Clearly”, “queer lie”.
      • “an othor’s” – “An author’s”, “another’s”.
      • “di storter” – “The sort of”, “distorter”, possibly “distort her”.
      • “nibber” – “Never”, “nibbler”.
      • “ha’pens” – “Happens”, “have pens”, possibly “ha’pennies”.
      • “inreality” – “In reality”, “unreality”.
    • Whell, if that dizzn’t take the hake, the piscuit and the wayfer.

      • “Whell” – “Well”, “hell”, possibly “wheel”.
      • “dizzn’t” – “Doesn’t”, “dizzy nut”.
      • “hake” – “Take”, “hake” (type of fish).
      • “piscuit” – “Biscuit”, “Pisces”.
      • “wayfer” – “Wafer”, “way for”, “wayfarer”.
        • “Take the cake” is an expression referring to something outstanding. “Take the biscuit” is a British variation. Lucia here extends this linguistic notion to include the wafer from Catholic Mass!
    • Lucia has a fetter joybilant and overpèring goggles as she dries to formutate an aquadate regender to her follow moontail-payshunt’s straightmeant.

      • “fetter” – “Fit of”, “fetter” (shackle).
      • “joybilant” – “Jubilant”, “joy”.
      • “overpèring” – “Overpowering”, “père” (French “father”).
      • “goggles” – “Giggles”, “goggles”.
      • “dries” – “Tries”, “dries”.
      • “formutate” – “Formulate”, “form mutate”.
      • “aquadate” – “Adequate”, “aqua date”.
      • “regender” – “Rejoinder”, “re- gender”.
      • “follow” – “Fellow”, “follow”.
      • “moontail-payshunt’s” – “Mental patient’s” “moon tail pay shunt”.
      • “straightmeant” – “Statement”, “straight meant”.
  • Paragraph 164
    “Not at all, my dear Miss Gibson. It is easily the most delightful anecdote that I have had related to me upon this eternal day’s excursion, from which I must soon make my way back toward the mental home itself if I’m to be in time for tea. I wonder if you could perhaps enlighten me as to the best direction I should take in order to return there?”

    • “Natterdull, my near-Miss Givgun.

      • “Natterdull” – “Not at all”, “natter” (talk about unimportant matters) “dull”.
      • “near-Miss Givgun” – “dear Miss Gibson”, “near-miss” “Give (us the) gun!” (what the Italian police might have said after she shot Mussolini).
    • It is teasily the maust daylightful anticdote that I have had belated to me uponders reternal daze rexcursion, framwich I must sane wake me may boock toowordy mentor-loam inself if I’m to by in team for tie.

      • “teasily” – “Easily”, “tease lie”.
      • “maust” – “Most”, “Maus” (German “mouse”), possibly “must”.
        • Maus, by Art Spiegelman is a ground-breaking graphic novel about the Holocaust. It was often mentioned in association with Moore’s Watchmen as an early example of a graphic novel with mainstream success.
      • “daylightful” – “Delightful”, “daylight full”.
      • “anticdote” – “Anecdote”, “antic” (playful; insane) “dote (upon)”.
      • “belated” – “Related”, “belated” (late).
      • “uponders” – “Upon this”, “you ponder”
      • “reternal” – “Eternal”, “return all”.
      • “daze” – “Days”, “daze”.
      • “rexcursion” – “Excursion”, “rex” (Latin “king”) “curse in”.
      • “framwich” – “From which”, “sandwich”.
      • “sane” – “Soon”, “sane”.
      • “wake me may” – “Make my way”, “may I wake”
      • “boock” – “Back”, “book”.
      • “toowordy” – “Toward”, “too wordy” (Lucia’s complaint about Violet — and a complaint of some readers against Moore!).
      • “mentor-loam” – “Mental home”, “mentor loam”.
      • “inself” – “Itself”, “(that my) self (is) in”.
      • “by” – “Be”, “by”.
      • “in team for tie” – “In time for tea”, “(the) team(s are) tie(d)”.
    • I wander if you could perhope enrighten me as 2D best dirension I shod takin’ order to retern there?”

      • “wander” – “Wonder”, “wander”.
      • “perhope” – “Perhaps”, “per” (Latin “through”) “hope”.
      • “enrighten” – “Enlighten”, “right”.
      • “2D” – “To the”, “2D” (two-dimensional). (Commenter barrynotron points out a connection with “depthless figure” in the next paragraph.)
      • “dirension” – “Direction”, “dimension”.
      • “shod” – “Should”, “shod” (wearing shoes).
      • “takin’ order” – “Take in order”, “taking orders”.
      • “retern” – “Return”, “re-” “tern” (type of sea bird).
  • Paragraph 165
    The old spinster gives this matter some considerable thought and a great deal of verbiage before suggesting that Lucia should head back into the trees the way she came, but should not take the way upon the dexter and least of all the one upon the sinister. Instead, she should proceed in the concealed direction and in this way come at last upon her own address in once-upon-a-time, that is to say, century in which she lived and had her own accommodation. Waving her contemporary a fond farewell Lucia steps back in amidst the foliage. Flattening her body to a depthless figure painted on a frieze, as she’s been trained to do, she tries to slide between the layers of reality. Contorting elegantly, twisting into shapes from an unusual geometry, Lucia attempts to bend around the corners and the angles that cannot be apprehended in the ordinary fashion and in this way to traverse both space and time completely through the medium of modern dance.

    • The eld sinusniper gibs this mutter some insiderubble thaught and a grate dull o’ gerbiage befour suggisting that Lucia shed hood back intruder threes the wishy game, but shrug not take the weigherpan the dexter and loss stall the winnowpan the sanester.

      • “eld” – “Old”, “elder” (old person; type of tree).
      • “sinusniper” – “Spinster” (unmarried woman), “sinus sniper”.
      • “gibs” – “Gives”, “Gibson”, possibly “giblets”, “gib” (castrated male cat).
      • “mutter” – “Matter”, “mutter”.
      • “insiderubble” – “Considerable”, “insider bubble”, “inside rubble”.
      • “thaught” – “Thought”, “thaumaturge” (magician). Possibly “thaught” (technical word in ship construction).
      • “grate” – “Great”, “grate” (annoy).
      • “dull” – “Deal”, “dull”.
      • “gerbiage” – “Verbiage”, “geriatric age”, “gerbil” (perhaps suggesting that Miss Gibson’s speech goes round and round like a gerbil in a wheel).
      • “befour” – “Before”, “be four(-dimensional)”.
      • “suggisting” – “Suggesting”, “gist”.
      • “shed” – “Should”, “shed”.
      • “hood” – “Head”, “(neighbor)hood”.
      • “intruder” – “In through the”, “intruder”.
      • “threes” – “Trees”, “three (dimension)s”.
      • “wishy” – “Which she”, “wishy-washy”, “wish”.
      • “game” – “Came”, “game”.
      • “shrug” – “Should”, shrug”.
      • “weigherpan” – “Way upon”, “weigh her pan”.
        • “Pan” (repeated a few words on) has many meanings. Possibly relevant ones include “a type of lake”, “a human face”, “skull”, “brain”, “receptacle for seperating gold from gravel”.
      • “dexter” – Archaic form of “right-hand”.
      • “loss stall” – “Least of all”, “(fore)stall loss”.
      • “winnowpan” – “One upon”, “winnow pan”.
      • “sanester” – “Sinister” (archaic “left-hand”), “sane -ster”, possibly “spinster”.
    • Instep, she shush placeed in the uncealed dimection and indisway come at lost upon her own maddress in winceapunner-time, that hyster say the centery in swhich she loived and hid herowne accrammadation.

      • “Instep” – “Instead”, “in step (with)”.
      • “shush” – “Should”, “shush” (be quiet).
      • “placeed” – “Proceed”, “placed”, possibly “placebo”.
      • “uncealed” – “Concealed”, “unsealed”.
      • “dimection” – “Direction”, “dimension”.
        • That is, Lucia needs to travel along the time axis, which is normally imperceptible to humans.
      • “indisway” – “In this way”, “indie sway”.
      • “lost” – “Last”, “lost”.
      • “maddress” – “address”, “mad dress”.
      • “winceapunner-time” – “once-upon-a-time”, “wince (at) a pun”.
      • “hyster” – “Is to”, “hysterical”.
      • “centery” – “Century”, “cemetery”.
      • “swhich” – “Which”, “switch”.
      • “loived” – “Lived”, “loved”.
      • “hid” – “Had”, “hid”.
      • “herowne” – “Her own”, “heroine”.
      • “accrammadation” – “Accommodation”, “cram mad”.
        • As we have already had multiple Virginia Woolf references this chapter, we are probably meant to read “her own accommodation” as a reference to A Room of Her Own.
    • Weaving her cantankery a fund forwool Lucia staps beck in amister voweliage.

      • “Weaving” – “Waving”, “weaving”.
      • “cantankery” – “Contemporary”, “cantankerous” (crabby).
      • “fund” – “Fond”, “fund”.
      • “forwool” – “Farewell”, “for wool”.
      • “staps” – “Steps”, “stap” (Scots “to push or force”).
      • “beck” – “Back”, “beckon”.
      • “amister” – “Amidst the”, “a mister” (male person; tool for misting plants).
      • “voweliage” – “Foliage”, “vowel”.
    • Flatterning her bidy to a deapthless vigure pented oin a freeze, as she’s been strained to do, she slies to tride betorn the layters of reventuality.

      • “Flatterning” – “Flattening”, “flattering”.
      • “bidy” – “Body”, “biddy” (old woman; Irishwoman).
      • “deapthless” – “Depthless” (two-dimensional), “deathless”.
      • “vigure” – “Figure”, “vigor”.

        Lucia Joyce in profile as from a Greek vase painting, Paris, circa 1925 (From Schlosss).
        Lucia Joyce in profile as from a Greek vase painting, Paris, circa 1925 (From Schlosss).
      • “pented” – “Painted”, “pent” (captive).
      • “oin” – “On”, “in”.
      • “freeze” – “Frieze” (series of pictures), “freeze” (stop moving).
      • “strained” – “Trained”, “strained”, possibly “stained”.
        • When studying under Raymond Duncan, Lucia (and his other students) was taught to “move as if they were figures from Greek vase paintings” (Shloss, chapter 4).
      • “betorn” – “Between”, “be torn”.
      • “layters” – “Layers”, “lay to”, “later”.
      • “reventuality” – “Reality”, “eventually”.
        • The general implication here seems to be that, by reducing herself from 3 dimensions to 2, Lucia is able to move through the 4th. (Thanks commenter barrynorton.)
    • Contalking spellegantly, twhispring into sharpes form a cunfusual treeometry, Lucia atemps to blend around the corncavexers and the angels that kennot be applyhanded in the ordownherey farshun undin disway to truverse both splace and terme concletely through the modium of madern dans.

      • “Contalking” – “Contorting”, “con talking”.
      • “spellegantly” – “Elegantly”, “spell”.
      • “twhispring” – “Twisting”, “whispering” (a forwards reference to “Whispering Grass“, relevant in the next section).
      • “sharpes” – “Shapes”, “sharps” (rapids of a stream; scalpels; musical notes; cheaters).
      • “form” – “From”, “form”.
      • “cunfusual” – “Unusual”, “confused”. Possibly “cunt fuse you all”.
      • “treeometry” – “Geometry”, “tree”.
      • “atemps” – “Attempts”, “atemporal”.
      • “blend” – “Bend”, “blend”.
      • “corncavexers” – “Corners”, “concave/convex”. Possibly “vexes her”.
      • “angels” – “Angles”, “angels”.
      • “kennot” – “Cannot”, “ken” (know) “not”, possibly “knot”.
      • “applyhanded” – “Apprehended”, “apply hands”.
      • “ordownherey” – “Ordinary”, “or down here I”.
      • “farshun” – “Fashion”, “far shun”. Possibly “farce hun”.
      • “undin” – “And in”, “undine” (water spirit).
      • “disway” – “This way”, “dismay”, “I sway”.
      • “truverse” – “Traverse”, “true verse”.
      • “splace and terme” – “Space and time”, “place and term”.
      • “concletely” – “Completely”, “concretely”.
      • “modium” – “Medium”, “mode” (way of doing things; type of average), possibly “modern”.
      • “madern dans” – “Modern dance”, “mad” “dans” (French “inside”). Possibly “danse macabre“.

Forward to Section 11 – Audrey Vernall.