RtB section 1 – Breakfast

Up to “Round the Bend”.

In which Lucia Joyce begins her day with breakfast, then wanders the grounds of St Andrews Infirmary. She recalls her life in its broad outlines.

Significant characters and themes in this section:

  • James Joyce (1882-1941) was an extremely famous writer and Lucia Joyce’s father.
    • The Joyce family, 1924
      The Joyce family, 1924

      The River Liffey is a river in Ireland which, in Finnegans Wake, is referred to many times, and is metaphorically linked to the female protagonist (who is, in some senses, Lucia).

  • Nora Barnacle (1884-1951) was James Joyce’s wife and Lucia Joyce’s mother.
  • Giorgio Joyce (1905-1976) was the son of James and Nora, and Lucia’s older brother. Moore suggests that he may not have been James’ son, but the result of an affair between Nora and a lover. Moore also suggests that an incestuous affair took place between Giorgio and Lucia. This incestuous relationship is a theory of Moore’s, not attested to by the historical record, but not contradicted by it, either.
  • World mythology, especially Greek, Roman, and Norse.
  • Arthurian legend.
  • The Pilgrim’s Progress, by John Bunyan.
  • Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass by Lewis Carroll, classic children’s books whose themes include childhood, madness, wordplay, and doubled characters.

 

  • Page 884
  • Paragraph 1
    Awake, Lucia gets up with the rising of the light. She is a puzzle, sure enough, as all the nurses and doctors would affirm, but never a cross word these days, depending on her medication and on how she is adapting to it. Her rousing from sleep is like a spring, a babbling brook that gurgles up amidst the soils of sleep, flashing and glittering, to meet the morning sun. Confined in this location now she rushes and goes chuckling from her soft and silky bed, pouring her heart out down a hillside and away across the old landscape to a modest breakfast. Ah, what a performance, practiced and worthy of applause. She claps her hands over her ears to drown out all the dreadful wailing and the sorry imprecations of her family. With her bunions all complaining she escapes the distractions and begins her daily pilgrimage towards redemption or towards the Holy See; towards the tranquility of night.

    • Awake, Lucia gets up wi’ the wry sing of de light.

      • At the start of the chapter, still easing into the dense Joycean style, many words primarily mean what they say. But that’s not to say that there aren’t other meanings as well.
      • “Awake” is not just a description of Lucia’s waking state, but is also an command to the reader: “Wake up! You need all your attention here.”
      • “wi'” is an abbreviation of “with”. It may be an attempt to suggest an Italian accent. (Lucia was born in Italy, and Italian was her first language.)
      • “wry sing” – Singing is usually a joyous, not a wry activity. This is indicative of Lucia’s emotional state demonstrated throughout this chapter: aware of her confinement, yet finding joy and freedom where she can.
      • “de light” – Again, Lucia finds “delight” in even the simple act of rising from her bed to greet the dawn.
    • She is a puzzle, shore enearth, as all the Nurzis and the D’actors would afform, but nibber a cross word these days, deepindig on her mendication and on every workin’ grimpill’s progress.

      • “shore enearth” – “shore and earth”, that is, water and earth, two of the classical elements.
      • “shore” – Lucia is like the seashore: you can see a long way over the surface of the ocean, but never know what lies beneath.
      • “enearth” – The medical staff would like to “unearth” Lucia’s secrets, but never will.
        • Alan Moore wrote a biographical piece about his best friend, Steve Moore (no relation), which was titled “Unearthing”.
      • “Nurzis” – The nurses are compared to Nazis, fascists who should not be entrusted with medical care. This brings to mind Nurse Ratched, from One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest.
      • “D’actors” – The doctors act upon their patients. Or are they merely actors portraying doctors? Is “D” for Death?
      • “afform” – The medical staff can affect Lucia’s “form”, her physical body, but they cannot reach her soul.
      • “nibber a cross word” – Lucia (like this chapter) is a crossword puzzle, to be “solved” by interpretation of cryptic clues. But the only writing tool the staff have is a pen (“nib”), so they have no means of correcting mistakes, and are unlikely to reach a correct solution.
      • “deepindig” – Dug in deeply.
      • “mendication” – A mendicant is a beggar, usually a monk who has taken a vow of poverty.
      • “workin’ grimpill’s” – There is perhaps a suggestion here that some of Lucia’s “grim pills” are not working properly. Or perhaps that these pills make her grim.
      • “workin’ […] progress” – James Joyce’s working title for the book which was eventually published as Finnegans Wake was Work in Progress. This title was also used for the first chapter of Jerusalem, and the first of Alma Warren’s paintings.
        • “grimpill’s progress” – This can be phonetically rearranged to form Pilgrim’s Progress, a 17th century allegory by John Bunyan (1628-1688). Bunyan is an influential figure throughout Jerusalem, and appears as a character in the chapter “The Steps of All Saints”.
      • “workin’ grimpill’s progress” – This phrase is so overloaded with possible readings that it is difficult to know what to regard as most important. Hence, the unusually non-literal ‘translation’ as “how she is adapting to [the medication]”.
    • Her arouse from drowse is like a Spring, a babboling book that gorgles up amist the soils o’ sleep, flishing and glattering, to mate the mournin’ son.

      • “arouse from drowse” – A fancy (and rhyming) way of saying “awakening”.
      • “a Spring” – The capitalization makes “Spring” a reference to the season, though this would normally be expressed as “the Spring” rather than “a Spring”. The “a” suggests reading this as a “spring” of the coiled wire variety, as in the metaphorical expression “springing out of bed”. Finally, the following phrase suggests “spring” as a natural upwelling of water from the earth.
      • “babboling book” – “babbling brook”, as in a small waterway that makes a pleasant, if meaningless noise. “babbo” is Italian for “daddy”; “ling” suggests lingua, language, and Lucia’s daddy is certainly involved with language. “book” brings to mind Finnegans Wake, and, of course, Jerusalem
      • “gorgles” – This is probably the first allusion to Lucia’s brother, Giorgio.
      • “amist” – Suggests “a mist” rising from the spring, or from morning dew.
      • “soils o’ sleep” – Sleep does not have soil, of course; this extends the metaphor of Lucia’s awakening being like a (water) spring. (Is there another meaning here? Suggest??)
      • “flishing and glattering” – A spoonerism, of which there will be many more in this chapter. Also suggestive of “fishing” (often performed at dawn, and involving water) and “clattering” (another word denoting a meaningless noise).
      • “mate the mournin’ son” – Lucia’s “mating” of Giorgio (her father’s son) is an important thread throughout this chapter. The meaning of “mournin'” is unclear; perhaps Lucia and/or Giorgio mourns the fact of (or the cessation of) their incest?
    • Canfind in this loquation now she gushes and runs chinkling from her silt and softy bed, pooring her harp out down an illside and aweigh cross the old manscape to a modhouse brookfast.

      • “Canfind” – Though Lucia’s physical form is confined to the asylum, she “can find” a significant amount of joy and freedom here, as demonstrated in this chapter as a whole.
      • “loquation” – Suggests “loquacious”, using lots of words, with the implication that fewer would suffice, or even be preferable. The language in this chapter is almost the opposite of loquacious; each word serves in place of a great number of words, all of whose meanings one “can find” within them.
      • “gushes” – Can mean “speaks quickly and happily”. Can also mean “flows quickly (as of water)”, which reinforces the imagery of Lucia as a river.
      • “gushes and runs” – Seems to suggest a spoonerism, except that “runs” makes sense in context, and “guns” doesn’t…
      • “chinkling” – Suggests “chuckling” and “twinkling”, both of which are words that may also be applied to a brook. “Chink” is also slang for vagina, which may connect with “silt” (anagrammed to “slit”).
      • “silt and softy” – Approximately a spoonerism for “soft and silky”, a common phrase describing a nice bed. “Silt” is fine sand deposited at the bottom of flowing water, reinforcing the river imagery.
      • “pooring her harp out” – “Pouring [one’s] heart out is an English phrase meaning to express all of one’s feelings (or secrets).
      • “pooring” – The Joyce family was often poor (lacking in money). This might also refer to Lucia’s “poor” (unfortunate) situation of incarceration here.
      • “harp” – Lucia’s emotions (her “heart”) are also her means of expressing art, her instrument (“harp”).
      • “an illside” – A hillside that is located on the grounds of a hospital, a place (“side”) for the “ill”.
      • “aweigh” – As in “Anchors aweigh!” a phrase shouted on a ship to announce that the anchor is now clear of the bottom, at the start (or resumption) of a journey. Another nautical metaphor, though more commonly associated with oceans than rivers.
      • “cross” – Possibly a reference to a “cross” mood underlying Lucia’s surface-level joy. Possibly a reference to a metaphorical “cross” she bears (as in Christ), and which “weigh”s heavily upon her.
      • “old manscape” – “Old man” is slang for “penis”. “Manscape” suggests that this landscape is a place where one can escape from the attentions of men. Or, oppositely, that this is a landscape constructed and dominated by men.
      • “modhouse brookfast” – A “modest breakfast” is an early meal that is neither excessively large nor small.
      • “modhouse” – This madhouse is also a “mod” house, “modern” and fashionable (or at least it will be in the 1970s when Dusty Springfield is here, see section xxx).
      • “brookfast” – “Brook” continues the river metaphors, and much of the language suggests that this river is “fast” rather than slow.
    • Ah, what a performance, practised and applausible.

      • Lucia is “performing” at breakfast; playing the part of a calm, ordinary patient, the better to avoid trouble.
      • “applausible” can be read as both “plausible” (likely to be believed) and “applause-able” (worthy of being applauded).
    • She claps her hands, over her ears, to drone out all the deadful wile-ing and the sorey implecations of whor farmlay.

      • “claps her hands, over her ears,” – The comma after “hands” would not in standard English usage be correct; it suggests that we read “claps her hands” as a phrase by itself, suggesting applause and happiness. This has a very different (almost opposite) emotional load to the phrase “claps her hands over her ears”, which suggests attempting to stop hearing something extremely unpleasant or traumatic.
      • “drone” is a steady humming noise, such as might be used to “drown out” other noises.
      • “deadful” – Not merely “dreadful”, but “full” of “dead”; Lucia’s family is largely (entirely?) dead by the present time of this chapter.
      • “wile-ing” – The “wailing” contains “wile”s (cunning plans).
      • “sorey implecations” – “sorry imprecations” means “sad curses”.
      • “sorey” – They make Lucia “sore” (angry).
      • “implecations” – The curses (“imprecations”) are not straightforward, but only by “implication”.
      • “whor farmlay” – Lucia (“her”) is identified as a “whore”, by herself, by her “family”, or both. A farm is a lower-class setting, in which (stereotypically) incest (family members “lay”ing one another) is more common.
    • With her bunyans all complainin’ she escapes the Settee o’ Destraction and beguines her evrydaily Millgrimage towar’s ridemption or towords the Wholly Sea; to wards, the tranquilisity of night.

      • A “bunion” is a painful toe deformity; for John “Bunyan”, see notes above.
      • “complainin'” – If there is a secondary meaning beyond “complaining”, it is unclear. Suggest??
      • “Settee of Destraction” – A “settee” is an upholstered bench, such as Lucia and her fellow inmates might sit upon at breakfast; Lucia views their company as a “distraction”. In Bunyan’s The Pilgrim’s Progress, the “City of Destruction” is the starting location, an allegory for the mortal world of sin.
      • “beguines” – The beguine was a dance popular in the 1930s, as in the song “Begin the Beguine”. Also suggests “beguiling”.
      • “evrydaily” – “everyday”, “daily”. The cadence suggests the phrase “upsy-daisy”, typically said to a child being lifted up. (“Evry” is the name of several locations in France, but there doesn’t seem to be any Joyce connection.)
      • “Millgrimage” – “Pilgrimage”, of course, ties in with Pilgrim’s Progress. The capitalization suggests a reference to someone named “Mill”, but who that could be is unclear. (John Stuart Mill the utilitarian philosopher is probably the most famous “Mill”, but there is no obvious connection. Also possible, but with no obvious connection, is experimental psychologist Stanley Milgram.). Subtracting “Mill” leaves us with “grimage”, suggesting a grim age, or possibly a grim visage or a grimace.
      • “towar’s ridemption” – Lucia “rides” “towards” a state of “redemption”, where she may be free from conflict (“rid” of “war”).
      • “towords” – “to words”, arguably the destination of Jerusalem as a whole.
      • “Wholly Sea” – The “Holy See” is a way of referring to the seat of the Catholic Church. It can stand, allegorically, for the destination of a Pilgrim (such as Lucia). If Lucia is, allegorically, a river, then it is her eventual destiny to flow into the ocean and become “wholly sea”.
      • “to wards” – “Ward” has many potentially relevant meanings: a section of a hospital; a political subdivision; a fortification of a castle; a magical spell of protection.
      • “tranquilisity” – At night, the hospital patients enter the “tranquility” of sleep after being given “tranquilisers” (British spelling of “tranquilizers”).
      • Wherever Lucia goes, her journey inevitably concludes back in her hospital room, reflecting the theme of Eternalism. Or, as a more Bunyan-esque interpretation, we must all Progress from worldly sin towards a hope of salvation, before the sleep of death overtakes us.
  • Paragraph 2
    Spooning the scrambled egg into her tousled head she dwells, as always now, on the past. Sadly born in Trieste in July, 1907, born to the stench and clamor of a pauper’s ward, she was denied the mother’s breast. Not a dribble nor a drop was she allowed. The milk was all sucked dry by Giorgio, who went from one mother to another all of his twisted life. Even the garden of her girlhood he had taken from her, even then, with him the dirty apple of their mother’s eye and always causing trouble, which Lucia had resisted for as long as she could. He’d been fourteen, she was only ten, to put it plainly. Wrestling under silky and translucent sheets in a succession of cramped, claustrophobic rented rooms, the dad off somewhere with all his writing and the mother rural, pagan in her unconcern, forever standing pisspots on the parlor table where they left their rings on the varnish. Giorgio’s dragon would rear up, out from the skimpy undergrowth and urgently demanding her attentions while their mother only smiled, indulgently, and let her brother press ahead with his adventure,  up into the little light, the little depth.

    • Spoonin’ the tousled egg into her scrambled head she wells, as iffer, on the past now.

      • “Spoonin'” – Suggests “spoonerism”.
      • “tousled […] scrambled” – Normally, tousled only applies to hair. By swapping it with “scrambled”, Moore suggests that Lucia has “scrambled brains”, not just untidy hair.
      • “wells” – “dwells”, but also with a suggestion of water (tears, or Lucia’s whole self as a metaphorical river) or memories “welling up”. Wells have depths, from which life-giving water may be drawn.
      • “as iffer” – “as ever”, “as if her”. Also suggests the name of the River Liffey (see above).
      • “past now” – Normal English grammar would place the “now” earlier in the sentence, probably just after “ever”. By placing the two words together, Moore suggests that “past” and “now” are not so distant as commonly believed, something which is demonstrated throughout Jerusalem. To quote William Faulkner, “The past is never dead. It isn’t even past.”
    • Sadly hatched in Triste at seven past the century and seven past the year, born to the clench and stamour of a paupoise warld, she was denied the mummer’s teatre.

      • “hatched” – Suggests “booby hatch”, slang for “mental hospital”. In this slang, “booby”, means “idiot”, but the word is also slang for “breast”, which is about to become a dominant theme of this paragraph.
      • “Triste” – The city of Trieste, in northeastern Italy, where Lucia was born. “Triste” mans “sad” or “sadness” in several European languages. Also suggestive of “tryst”, a love affair (often an illicit one). Possible allusion to the tragic love affair of Tristan and Iseult (see paragraph 14).
      • “seven […] year” – Lucia was born July 26, 1907, seven years and seven months past the start of the century. (Assuming you count the century as starting in 1901, which is, strictly speaking, correct, though common culture often counts starting at 1900.)
      • “clench and stamour” – Spoonerism of “stench and clamour”. “Clench” suggests a tense nervousness. “Stamour” suggests an uncertain stammering speech.
      • “paupoise warld” – “Pauper’s ward” is a hospital wing devoted to people who are too poor to pay for treatment. “Paupoise” suggests “pause”, “poise”, “purpose”, and “porpoise”. “Warld” suggests “world” and “whirled”. What purpose does a poor child like Lucia fill `within our world? Pause a moment, and you will see the poise and whirling of her dancing, graceful as a dolphin.
      • “mummer’s teatre” – “Mother’s teat”, that is, Lucia was not breast-fed. “Mummer” is an archaic word for “actor”, and “teatre” evokes “theatre”. Lucia’s mother denies her not only her breast, but any recognition of agency, giving her no stage to act upon.
    • Not a dripple Nora drop was she aloud.

      • “dripple” – Portmanteau of “drip” and “dribble”. Possibly also “ripple”.
      • Lucia’s mother’s first name was Nora.
      • “aloud” – “Allowed”, but also “aloud”; Lucia is not listened to.
    • The molcow was sucked dry, by George, who went from one mamm to an udder all of his serpenitentine life.

      • “molcow” – “Milk all”, but also with a suggestion of “mother”. This is also an allusion to James Joyce’s Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, which uses the word “moocow” several times in its first sentence. (“Moo” is the English word for the sound a cow traditionally makes.) (Thanks to obiwanspicoli for the James Joyce reference). Possibly also “mercow” (manatee).
      • “sucked dry, by George” – “sucked dry by Giorgio”. The addition of the comma draws attention to the use of the common English exclamation “By George!”
      • “one mamm to an udder” – “One mother to another”. “Mamm” suggests “mammary” which, like “udder”, is a word for “breast”.
      • “serpenitentine” – Portmanteau of “serpentine” (snakelike, twisted) and “penitent” (seeking forgiveness). “Serpent” begins the Garden of Eden imagery which pervades the following sentence.
    • Eve’n the girden of her garlhood he had snaken from her, eden then, with him the dirty apple of their Mermaw’s eye and allwas raising cain, which Lucia had resistered for as long as she was abel.

      • “Eve’n the girden” – “Even the garden”, “Eve in the Garden (of Eden)”. “Girden” also suggests “gird in” (protect) and “guerdon” (reward).
      • “girden […] garlhood” – Spoonerism for “garden of her girlhood”.
      • “snaken” – Suggests “taken” in a snake-like (or sneaky) manner.
      • “eden” – “even”, “Eden”.
      • “dirty apple” – There exists a cocktail recipe called a “Dirty Apple”, though it is not clear if Moore intends the reference. (Also some uses from urbandictionary.com, but they seem even less relevant.) The “dirty” may refer to Giorgio’s hygiene and/or his carnal nature.
      • “apple of […] eye” – To be “the apple of [someone’s] eye” is to be the most cherished person or object to that someone.
      • “Mermaw” – “Meemaw” is British dialect for mouthing words so as to be heard over loud noises; in the Southern US, it can mean “grandmother”. “Mermaw” also suggests “mermaid”. The capitalization suggests that there must be an allusion to some proper noun – suggest??
      • “allwas” “Always”, “all was”.
      • “raising cain” – An English phrase meaning “causing trouble”. It derives from the story of Cain and Abel, in Genesis: Cain became the first murderer by slaying his brother, Abel. The relationship between Giorgio and Lucia will involve him shedding the blood of her maidenhead.
      • “resistered” – Portmanteau of “resisted” and “sister”; sibling-hood is problematic. (Possibly also suggesting “resistor”?)
      • “abel” – “Able”, but also “Abel”, as in Cain’s sibling.
    • He’d been furteen, shy was only ten, to pet it baldly.

      • “furteen” – “Fourteen”, “furtive”. Giorgio proceeds furtively, because he knows that making sexual advances on his sister is wrong.
      • “shy”- “She”, “shy”. Ten-year-old Lucia is shy due to sexual inexperience.
      • “pet it baldly” – “Put it baldly” is an English phrase meaning “say plainly”. “Pet it baldly” suggests that Giorgio is petting (sexually touching) her bald (pre-pubescent) vagina.
      • As obiwanspicoli points out, these ages don’t work: Giorgio was born June 27, 1905, so is only two years and a bit older than Lucia. If he was fourteen, she would be twelve; if she was ten, he would be twelve. The error may be Moore’s or Lucia’s.
        • It seems likely that Moore wants their ages to be fourteen and ten in order to parallel the ages he had already established for his fictionalized John Clare and Mary Joyce in Voice of the Fire, “The Sun Looks Pale Upon the Wall”. See also Clare’s appearances later on in this chapter, and in the chapter “The Steps of All Saints”.
    • Wristling under milky and transluciant sheets in a suck-session of clamped, crusterphobic rended rooms, the da off summerwhere with all his righting and the mudder rural, pagan in her unconcern, forever standing pisspots on the parlour table where they lifft their venerable beaded halos on the varnish.

      • “Wristling” – Portmanteau of “wrist” and “wrestling”. Did Giorgio hold Lucia down by the wrists? Or was this a more playful “wrestling”, where wrists and fingers played beneath each other’s waists?
      • “milky” – “Silky”, but also continuing the “milk” theme from earlier in the paragraph.
      • “transluciant” – “Translucent” means that light can pass through. inserting “lucia” suggests that Giorgio is passing through (or at least into) Lucia.
      • “suck-session” – “succession”, or a session of sucking, suggestive of oral sex.
      • “clamped and crusterphobic rended” – Not quite a spoonerism for “cramped and claustrophobic”. “Clamped” suggests restraints, or Giorgio’s hands clamped around Lucia’s wrists, holding her down. “Crusterphobic” suggests a fear of “crust” “her”; suggesting a crust of dried sperm, or perhaps reading “crust” as a maidenhead about to be “rended”.
      • “da” – Abbreviation for “dad”.
      • “summerwhere” – Somewhere summery.
      • “righting” – Writing which makes the world right.
      • “mudder” – “Mother”, with a suggestion that she spends her time in the mud, or is otherwise “dirty”.
      • “pisspots” – Chamberpots, indicative of lower-class, rural life.
      • “lifft” – “Left”, but with a suggestion of the River Liffey.
      • “venerable beaded halos” – An extremely ornate way of describing old round stains. Possibly some other meaning here – suggest??
    • Giorgio’s dragon would rear up, out from the scampy wondergrowth and orgiantly demanding her at-ten shuns while their Moider only smirled, ingently dull, and let her borther press a head with his idventure, up into the little light, the little depth.

      • “dragon” – Lucia sees Giorgio’s penis (for the first time?) as a sort of fabulous monster.
      • “scampy” – “Scanty”, “scamp-like” (mischievous).
      • “wondergrowth” – “Undergrowth” or pubic hair. Little Lucia wonders what it is, and/or finds it wonderful.
      • “orgiantly” – Portmanteau of “orgiastic” and “urgently”. Also contains “giant”, which resonates with the earlier “dragon”; Lucia is in a strange sort of fairy tale. Almost contains “Giorgio”.
      • “at-ten shuns” – Lucia, at age ten, shuns sexual attentions — or should, by general opinion.
      • “Moider” – “Mother”. Phonetically, “murder”, which reminds us of Cain and Abel, and hence the maidenhead bloodshed that Giorgio is about to commit. In Irish English, “moider” can mean to confuse, or to babble deliriously. The capitalization suggests that there must be an allusion to some proper noun – suggest??
      • “smirled” – Portmanteau of “smiled” and “smirked”.
      • “ingently dull” – “Indulgently”. “Ingently” suggests “un gently”, and also the notion that a “gent” (Giorgio) will soon be “in” Lucia and “lying” upon her. “Dull”, in this context, suggests Nora’s lack of intelligence, and/or attention to her daughter’s predicament.
      • “borther” – A brother who bothers, and who may soon berth (or birth) with her.
      • “press a head” – “Press ahead” means to continue with a project. “Press a head”, in this context, suggests pressing the head of his penis into Lucia’s vagina, or possibly pressing upon her maidenhead.
      • “idventure” – Portmanteau of “id” and “adventure”. In Freudian psychology, the “id” is the bestial, instinctive part of the mind, including the sexual impulse. “Kid” is perhaps also suggested, as they are still both children.
      • “the little light” – “Lucia” means “light”, and she is still quite little.
      • “the little depth” – Presumably, Lucia’s vagina is not yet fully developed, and thus not very deep. Obiwanspicoli points out that there may also be an allusion to “the little death”, a French way of describing sexual orgasm.
  • Paragraph 3
    Not that she hadn’t welcomed his advances, painful at first, back then when she still believed that he loved her, back there in their paradise when she was in the early bloom of her youth. Sitting in the day-room now she chews over her toast, and wonders if he ever really and truly was her brother. Hadn’t there once been a letter from their father in the land of Eire? He’d met with Vincent Cosgrave who had confessed to having sex with Nora Barnacle in 1904, the year Giorgio was first conceived. “Is this not my son?” her distressed dad had cried in his mental anguish, to which the crying mother dared not reply. The matter had been left unsettled. Wouldn’t that explain a lot, now, about mother and her Giorgio? How the pair of them were always close, unhealthily so in her estimation, from the cradle to the grave? She muddily recalls her mother warming up the young master’s thing inside her mouth on chilly afternoons, or thinks she does. Of course, it would make plain for all to see why they two had insisted she be silenced within sanatoriums, for Lucia was her father’s seed, his sparkle evident in all she said or did, the way she always spoke her will, whereas in Giorgio was not a whit of the same substance to be seen. Old Nora had decided then and there that her firstborn should carry on the dynasty, no matter that he may have been another man’s. As for her little girl, the father’s real daughter, shut her up in a lunatic asylum, like at Frankenstein’s, or finally here in Saint Andrew’s hospital.

    • Not that she hoydent wellcomed his hardvances, penfull at forst, back then when she still beliffied that he loved her, back there in their papadise when she was tigrish in the milibloom of her youth-ray tease.

      • “hoydent” – Portmamteau of “hoyden” (a sexually loose woman) and “hadn’t”.
      • “wellcomed” – Lucia welcomed his advances, and the two of them “came” (reached orgasm) “well”.
      • “hardvances” – Portmanteau of “hard” (as in erect penis) and “advances”.
      • “penfull” – Lucia found it painful when she firat became “full” of his “pen” (penis). “Pen” in this context also suggests a connetion between language and sex, which will be a continuing theme in this chapter.
      • “forst” – Lucia’s memories seem ambiguous about whether she consented or had to be “forced”.
      • “beliffied” – Another reference to the River Liffey.
      • “papadise” – For Lucia, the idea of paradise is inextricably linked to her “papa”.
      • “tigrish” – “Tigerish”, like a tiger. This is an unusual adjective in context, suggesting fierceness and danger. A more typical word for a spirited child would be “coltish” (like a young horse).
      • “tigrish […] youth-ray-tease” – An allusion to the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers in Mesopotamia. Some believe the area to be the location of the Garden of Eden, connecting to the idea of paradise earlier in the sentence, and the varied Genesis imagery from last paragraph.
      • “milibloom” – Reference to Molly Bloom, a character from James Joyce’s Ulysses (thanks to obiwanspicoli for the reference).
      • “milibloom of her youth-ray-tease” – The phrase “bloom of youth” means the best period of childhood.
      • “youth-ray-tease” – In addition to the Euphrates reference (see above), this suggests that Lucia’s youthful appearance (as conveyed by “rays” of light) constitutes a “tease” (a sexual invitation) that she is responsible for and which Giorgio cannot resist. (Please note that I am suggesting no such thing, but that the patriarchal culture in which Giorgio and Lucia are embedded may lead them to believe this.)
    • Setting in the die-room now she chews over her toast, raised two old tines, and wanders if he ova reilly and tooralee was her brooder.

      • “Setting” – “Sitting”, but also “setting” as in concrete, becoming hard through prolonged inactivity. (Though this interpretation is more true of a typical asylum resident than it is of Lucia.)
      • “die-room” – A “day-room” is a room in a hospital where patients who are able to leave their own rooms can mingle, talk, play games, etc. For despairing patients, it may be considered the place where they wait to “die”.
      • “toast, raised two old tines,” – Can be read as “a piece of toasted bread lifted on an old fork with only two tines” or as “raising a toast (as in a celebratory drink in honor of something) to old times”.
      • “wanders” – “Wonders”, but with a sughestion that Lucia’s mind “wanders”.
      • “ova” – “Ever”, but also “ova” (egg, female sex cell). The ova that became Giorgio definitely came from Nora, but there is some question with regard to the sperm’s origin (see below).
      • “reilly” – “Really”, but also the name “Reilly” (or possibly O’Reilly). Book one of Finnegans Wake contains a song titled “The Ballad of Persse O’Reilly” which concerns rumors of “sexual trespass”.
      • “tooralee” – A common nonsense word found in the chorus of old folksongs.
      • “brooder” – Lucia now broods upon the breeding (ancestry) of her (half?) brother.
  • Page 885
    • Hidn’t there once been a scarlet letter, a dismissive from their Further in the Land of Ire?

      • “hidn’t” – Portmanteau of ‘”hidden” and “hadn’t”.
      • “scarlet letter” – Reference to Nathanial Hawthorne’s novel The Scarlet Letter, which dealt with the theme of adultery. (Although Nora Barnacle and James Joyce didn’t actually marry until 1913, years after the birth of their children.)
      • “dismissive” – A missive that was dismissed (or at least “left unsettled”, see below).
      • “Further” – A father who is further of than Lucia wishes. Also possibly suggestive of Führer, title of Adolf Hitler.
      • “Land of Ire” – Ireland, often called “Eire”. Also referring to the “ire” (anger) which James Joyce was experiencing.
    • He’d met with Cowsgrope the Invincible who had confleshed to scraping the odd barnacle in nineteen nundread-for, the year that Orgy-porgy-puttin-pie was farst consceptered.

      • “Cowsgrope the Invincible” – Obiwanspicoli writes “Vincent Cosgrave was a friend of Joyce’s who falsely claimed to have slept with Nora after her relationship with Joyce was underway. No one seems to take it seriously. He was a shitty friend to Joyce. He appears as Lynch in Portrait and Ulysses.”
      • “Cowsgrope” – Vincent claims to have “groped” Nora, who was characterized in paragraph 2 as a source of milk, hence metaphorically a “cow”. “Cow” is also a derogatory word for a woman, usually implying ugliness.
      • “Invincible” – Obiwanspicoli points out that this may be a reference to the “Irish National Invincibles, an offshoot of Irish Republican Brotherhood. I can find no mention of Cosgrave being one and they were not active by 1904.”
      • “confleshed” – “Confessed”. “Con” is Latin for “with”; Cosgrave confessed to putting his flesh with Nora’s.
      • “scraping the odd barnacle” – A euphemistic way of saying he had sex with Nora Barnacle.
      • “nundread-for” – “Hundred four”, but also suggesting (having) “no dread for”; Cosgrave wasn’t afraid of the consequences. Possibly this could also be read as “nun dread for”, expressing Nora’s fear of monogamous.commitment (“nun”-like).
      • “Orgy-porgy-puttin-pie” – A 19th century English folk song begins (in its most common version) “Georgie Porgie, pudding and pie“. Significantly, the second line is “Kissed the girls and made them cry”. “Orgy” is unrestrained sexual activity. A “porgy” is a type of fish, though the relevance, if any, is unclear. “Puttin-pie” suggests how Giorgio will be “putting” his penis “in” Lucia’s “pie” (vagina).
      • “farst” – Giorgio may have “first” been conceived by someone “far” from James Joyce, which is rather a “farce”.
      • “consceptered” – Conceived with (“con”) someone’s “scepter” (penis). “Scepter” is also a symbol of royal authority; royalty being even more concerned than most people over the thought of offspring from adultery.
    • Is Dis Nod my sun, her darkglassed da had cried in his tormental angruish, to witch the briny mare durst not deply.

      • “Dis” – In Dante’s Divine Comedy, Dis is the city that encompasses circles six through nine of Hell. As an English prefix, “dis-” usually indicates breaking apart or destruction.
      • “Nod” – In Genesis, after Cain (previously identified with Giorgio) was cursed by God, he settled in the land of Nod. “Nod” is also what someone does when they are about to fall asleep; in the expression “Even Homer nods”, it indicates that even a very wise person commits the occasional error.
        • Alan Moore mentioned Nod in an interview in 1997:

          I once heard an anecdote about a contemporary magician who decided to put this principle to the test by adopting a belief so strange that nobody could possibly mistake it for reality and then seeing what happened. The belief he decided to go with was that Noddy, the little toy-car driving and belled-hat wearing protagonist of Enid Blyton’s children’s books, was in fact the absolute creator of the Universe and the God of all Gods. Within a couple of weeks he abandoned the experiment in alarm, finding himself upon the brink of conclusively proving that Noddy was the Supreme Being. He’d come across magazine articles showing freshly discovered cave-drawings of an obviously sacred figure wearing what appeared to be a tall pointed hat with a little bell on the top. He’d read an interview with Enid Blyton herself in which she described a strange vision that had come to her while under the influence of gas at the dentist; in which she had been whisked across the Universe at the speed of light to meet God himself, although he couldn’t describe the details of their conversation. This, along with a whole mess of other stuff and previously hidden meanings in Bible passages (Cain is banished to the Land of Nod in Genesis, for example), seemed to indicate that Nod was God and Enid Blyton His prophetess.

      • “sun” – Giorgio is not James’ “sun”, the source of his light’ his light is “Lucia”.
      • “darkglassed” – “Distressed” or “wearing dark glasses”, as James Joyce often did.
      • “tormental” – Portmanteau of “torment” and “mental”. Possibly also “tor”, mountain.
      • “angruish” – Portmanteau of “angry” and “anguish”.
      • “witch” – “Which” or “witch”.
      • “briny mare” – “Briny” means salty, like seawater (in which barnacles are found); “salty” is also a term for filthy language, or someone who uses such language. A “mare” is a female horse, so this is also “mother”. There may be other meanings here – suggest??
      • “durst” – Archaic form of “dared”. Possibly also suggesting the “worst” which she dares not say.
      • “deply” – “Reply”, “deeply”, “deploy”. “de-ply” (unfold).
    • The mater had been left unseddled.

      • “mater” – Latin for “mother” (who was, presumably, unsettled).
      • “unseddled” – “Unsettled”, “unsaid”. Possibly “unsaddled”?
    • Woden that expain a Lot, now, about Morma and her Gorgo?

      • “Woden” – An Anglo-Saxon storm and father god, equivalent to the Norse Odin. Like most “Allfather” gods, he frequently committed adultery.
      • Lot” – A character from Genesis. After his wife died, his two daughters committed incest with him.
      • “Morma […] Gorgo” – “Mormo” and “Gorgo” are two of the many names associated with Hecate, the Greek goddess of witchcraft, connecting with the use of “witch” two sentences back.
    • How the peer of hum were all-ways clost, unhearthily so in her cestimation, from the grendle to the crave?

      • “peer of hum” – “Pair of them”. “Peer” can mean “look”, suggestive of voyeurism. “Peer” can also mean “equal”, something which mother and son usually aren’t; adding “hum” to peer suggests the notion of harmony. “Hum peer” could also be read as “hump her”.
      • “all-ways” – “Always”, “in all ways” (including inappropriate ones).
      • “clost” – “Close”, “closed”, “closet” (as in, “in the closet”, hiding forbidden sexual tastes), “lost”, possibly “cluster”, “clothes”.
      • “unhearthily” – “Unhealthily”, with a “heart” or “hearth” (as in “hearth and home”) inside it. Possible suggestion of “heartily”.
      • “cestimation” – “Estimation” of “incest”.
      • “grendle” – Allusion to the Anglo-Saxon epic Beowulf, which featured a monster named Grendel and its equally monstrous mother.
      • “from the grendle to the crave” – “From the cradle to the grave,” that is, for his entire life.
      • “crave” – “Grave”, “crave” (desire), “cave” (metaphor for vagina; also the home of monsters such as Grendel and his mother).
    • She maddily recalls her fishermum warmin’ up the jung mastur’s bait incide her muth on chillywilly ofterrnoons, or thinkshe-thinkshe does.

      • “maddily” – “Muddily” (imperfectly), “madly”. Possibly also suggests “madder” and “mother”.
      • “fishermum” – “Fisherman”, “mother”. Obiwanspicoli suggests that “fisher” is another “Barnacle” reference, “also her mother was fishy in the sense that she may have acted odd or behaved suspiciously.”
      • “jung” – Carl Jung (1875-1961) was a highly influential psychiatrist and psychoanalyst who treated Lucia Joyce for a time, starting in 1934.
      • “jung mastur” – “Young master”, a common English form of address for a young nobleman from a servant; the suggestion that it was used between mother and son is unusual.
      • “mastur’s bait” – “Masturbation”, with “bait” continuing the “fisherman” imagery. “Bait” for fish is often worms, which can be thought of as resembling a (limp) penis.
      • “incide” – “Inside”, “incest”.
      • “muth” – “Mouth”, “mother”. Possibly also “mutt” (suggesting bestial acts and a non-pedigreed ancestry) or “month”.
      • “chillywilly” – “Willy” is childish slang for “penis”.
      • “ofterrnoons” – “Afternoons”, “oft” (often), perhaps “of terror” or “offed her”.
      • “thinkshe-thinkshe” – “Thinks she”, or possibly the even less certain “thinks that she thinks that she”. (Is this doubled phrase a specific James Joyce allusion? – Suggest??)
      • The sense here seems to be that Lucia observed Nora performing oral sex on Giorgio when she was very young (and he not much older).
    • Of curse, it wurd make plaint for alter see why they t’woo had insested she be liplocked with insanatoriums, fear Luci-lippi was heir poppy’s seed, his sperkle efferdent in all she set or dit, they way she allwise spoke her wheel, whoreas in Dirgeo was not a wit o’ the same subsdance to be scene.

      • “Of curse” – “Of course” this could be the source “of” Lucia’s “curse” (misfortunes).
      • “wurd” – “Would”, “word”.
      • “plaint” – “Plain”, “plaint” (complaint, woeful cry). Possibly “pain”, “paint”, “plant”, “plane”.
      • “alter” – “All to”, “alter” (in the sense of “other”, or in the sense of “change”). Also “altar” a place of worship and/or sacrifice.
      • “t’woo” – “Two” people who have decided “to woo” one another.
      • “insested” – “Insisted” and, yet again, “incest”. Also possibly “insect”, “infested”.
      • “liplocked” – Lucia’s lips will be locked (metaphorically) to silence her; non-metaphorically, her entire body will be locked away. “Liplock” is also a crude way of describing a kiss.
      • “insanitoriums” – “In sanitoriums”, “insanity”.
      • “fear” – “For”, but also suggesting the fear that Nora and Giorgio have about their incest being discovered.
      • “Luci-lippi” – “Lucia”, with suggestions of “Lucy Lips” (as discussed throughout part two of Jerusalem) and possibly the River Liffey again. An annotated edition of James Joyce’s Dubliners makes mention of the Renaissance Italian painter Fra Filippo Lippi, known for his sexual rapaciousness.
      • “heir” – “Her”, but with the added weight that Lucia is her father’s true “heir”.
      • “poppy’s seed” – “Father’s child”. Poppy seeds are very small, and are often placed on buns, or sometimes ground into a paste. Poppy also suggests opium.
      • “sperkle” – “Sparkle”, “sperm” (Giorgio’s sperm having apparently not come from James Joyce).
      • “efferdent” – “Evident”, “effervescent” (sparkling).
      • “set” – “Said”, “set” (sitting, or set down on paper).
      • “dit, they” – “Did, the”, “ditty” (song).
      • “allwise” – “Always”, “wise in all things”.
      • “spoke her wheel” – “Spoke her will” (spoke her mind). “Wheels” often have “spokes”, but a “spoke” can also be something thrust into a wheel, to break it.
      • “whoreas” – “Whereas”, “as a whore”.
      • “in Dirgeo” – “In Giorgio”, “indigent” (poor), “dirge” (song about death).
      • “wit” – “Whit” (small amount), “wit” (cleverness).
      • “subsdance” – “Substance”, “subs” (belonging to that which is below, or submissive), “dance” (the primary medium through which Lucia displayed her own wit and art), “subsidence”.
      • “scene” – “Seen”, “scene” (display, acting, performance).
    • Old Gnawer had deicided then and there that her firstbore should carryon the dinnersty, no mutter that he mite halve been an utter mance.

      • “Gnawer” – “Nora”, “one who gnaws” (in the sense of destruction of Lucia’s life, and also suggestive of her fellating Giorgio. The initial “G” also recalls the allusion to Grendel three sentences back.
      • “deicided” – “Decided”, “the act of having slain a deity (god)”.
      • “firstbore” – Nora’s firstborn is, first and foremost, a bore.
      • “carryon” – “Carry on” (continue, but also perhaps an allusion to the “Carry On” series of British comedy films), “carrion” (abandoned dead animals which are food for scavengers).
      • “dinnersty” – “Dynasty”, “dinner sty” (continuing the suggestion that Giorgio is not only a beast, but a carrion-eater and/or a pig). Possibly “diversity”.
      • “mutter” – “Matter”, “mutter” (speak softly and unclearly). “Mutter” is also German for “mother”.
      • “mite” – “Might”, “mite” (small insect; by extension, anything very small or insignificant). Possibly “miter” (as in bishop’s miter).
      • “halve” – “Have”, “halve” (split in two, perhaps referring to how the Joyce family is split between Nora/Giorgio and James/Lucia).
      • “an utter mance” – “Another man’s”. “Utter” means complete or final, and is also suggestive of “udder” (the source of milk, which Giorgio kept Lucia from receiving). “Mance” suggests “romance”, and perhaps also “manse” (mansion) and “menace”.
    • As for her lital gill, the da’s reel darter, shutter up in lumatrick asylence, like at Pranginstein’s or finalee herein Saif Handrue’s house-piddle.

      • “lital” – “Little”. “Lital” means “my dew” in Hebrew. Possibly suggestive of “littoral”, “relating to the shore”.
      • “gill” – “Girl”, “gill” (that which allows a fish to breathe; a measure of liquid; a mountain stream).
      • “reel” – “Real”, “reel” (spool, or other winding mechanism, such as on a fishing rod; a type of dance; to stagger).
      • “darter” – “Daughter”, “one who darts” (moves quickly and gracefully), “darter” (type of fish, connecting with “reel” earlier.
      • “shutter” – “Shut her”, “shutter (boards to close a window).
      • “lumatrick asylence” – They will “trick” Lucia (light, “luma”) into “lunatic” “asylums” in order to assure her “silence” (or at least that no one will listen to what she says).
      • “Pranginstein’s” – “Frankenstein’s”, which refers on one level to Mary Shelley’s famous novel and its titular scientist, but also to Doctor François Delmas, who ran a French sanitorium where Lucia spent some time (thanks to obiwanspicoli for pointing this out). “The “Prang” beginning of the name also suggests “prong” (penis), and perhaps Paris (which the hospital was near).
      • “finalee” – “Finally”, “final lee” (“lee” is shelter from wind or current).
      • “herein” – “Here in”, “herein” (in this document).
      • “Saif” – “Saint”, “safe”. “Saif” is also an Arabic name, and means “scimitar”.
      • “Handrue’s” – “Andrew’s”, “that which the hand regrets”. Perhaps also “ruse” (deceit).
      • “house-piddle” – “Hospital”, “house of piss”.
  • Paragraph 4
    Lucia’s ingratiating nurse, fatherly Patricia, sits beside her while she sips her early morning cup of tea and patiently enquires just what the famous writer’s cross-eyed, dotty daughter will be doing with herself today.

    •  Lucia’s nicey-nercy, featherly Patrisia, sips besight her while she bibs her searly monin’ cuppla Tees and mentalpatiently ensquires jest what the flameous rider’s cross-i, dot-t doubter well be druin’ with hersylph toda.

      • “nicey-nercy” – “Nice nurse”. “Nicey-nicey” means “trying to be pleasant, but in a way that suggests artifice or exaggeration”; the nurse is not sincerely “Nercy” is also a name, albeit an uncommon one.
      • “featherly” – “Fatherly”, “feathery” (suggesting a somewhat bird-like appearance or character, she might be “feather-brained”).
      • “Patrisia” – An unusual, but not unheard-of, variant of the name “Patricia”. It is derived from the Latin word “patrician” (noble), which is is turn closelt related to Latin “pater” (father).
      • “sips” – “Sits”, “sips”, “slips”, “spits”.
      • “besight” – “Beside”, “be sight” (suggesting a judgment based on surface appearance).
      • “bibs” – “Sips”, “imbibes” (a fancy way of saying “drinks”), “wears a bib” (like a child which can’t keep itself clean).
      • “searly” – “Early”, “searing” (hot), “surly” (grumpy).
      • “monin'” – “Morning”, “moaning” (in the sense of complaining?). Perhaps “mom in”, “man in”.
      • “cuppla” – “Cup of”, “couple”, cupola”. “Cuppa” is common English slang for “cup of (tea)”.
      • “Tees” – “Tea”, “tease”, possibly “tees” (as in golf). The capitalization suggests reference to a proper noun – suggest?
      • “mentalpatiently” – “Patiently”, with the reminder that Lucia is a patient in a mental hospital.
      • “ensquires” – “Enquires”, “in squires”. “Squire” can refer to an important landowner, or (as a verb) to escort a woman. Possibly “squirrel”?
      • “jest” – “Just”, “jest” (joke, trick).
      • “flameous” – “Famous”, “flame of us” (metaphorically “our inspiration”), “flamenco” (a dance).
      • “rider” – “Writer”, “rider” (one who rides (usually horses); an added condition).
      • “cross-i, dot-t” – Approximately a spoonerism of the expression “dot the ‘i’s and cross the ‘t’s” (ensure all details are properly completed).
      • “cross-i” – Lucia Joyce was cross-eyed. Also suggests “I am cross” (angry), or possibly “I am The Cross” (Christian symbol).
      • “dot-t” – “Dotty” (eccentric). Possibly “doting”?
      • “doubter” – “Daughter”, “one who doubts”, possibly “one who should be doubted”.
      • “well” – “Will”, “well” (good; hole from which water is drawn).
      • “druin'” – “Doing”, “ruin”, “druid”.
      • “hersylph” – “Herself”, “her sylph” (a sylph is a mythological air spirit).
      • “toda” – “Today”, “toad”, “to do”.
  • Paragraph 5
    “Well, I thought I might have a wander on the grounds, now, seeing as it’s such a lovely day and all the flowers are in bloom. I don’t mind being by myself, and I dare say you’ve other fish to fry. Be off, and don’t you worry about me, Pat. I’ll be right as rain.”

    • “Will, I thought I might have a wonder in the ground, now, seeing as it’s such a liffley day and all the flawers are in Bloom.

      • “Will” – “Well”, “will” (an expression of Lucia’s willpower).
      • “wonder” – “Wander”, “wonder”; Lucia’s wandering will reveal wonders.
      • “liffley” – “Lovely”, “River Liffey“.
      • “flawers” – Flowers which are flawed.
      • “Bloom” – A reference to Leopold Bloom, protagonist of James Joyce’s Ulysses.
    • I dent mind bein’ bi myself, and I dar say you’ve auther fish to frey.

      • “dent” – “Don’t”, “den” (cave), “dent” (blemish or damage). Possibly “Ent”, a tree spirit from Tolkien.
      • “bi” – “By”, “bi” (bisexual).
      • “dar say” – “Dare say” (feel confident that). Possibly “Mr. Darcy” from Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice. Possibly a reference to “gaydar” (alleged ability to detect people of a homosexual nature).
      • “auther fish to frey” – “Other fish to fry” (other things to do).
      • “auther” – “Other”, “author”.
      • “frey” – “Fry”, “fray” (a battle), “fray” (to wear down), “Frey” (Norse god of prosperity).
    • Bee off, and don’t you weary about me, Pat.

      • “Bee” – “Be”, “bee” (as in “busy like a bee”).
      • “weary” – “Worry”, “weary”. Seems to suggest that Pat finds Lucia wearying (or vice versa).
    • Isle be writer’s reign.”

      • “Isle” – “I’ll”, “isle” (island, evoking travel and exploration). Possibly “aisle”, a space for traveling between.
      • “writer’s reign” – “Right as rain” means perfectly fine. “Writer’s reign” suggests that writing rules, that the pen is mightier than the sword, and perhaps a fond hope by the author that he will be able to remain in charge of this text.
  • Paragraph 6
    With her companion thus reassured, Lucia blots her lips upon a paper napkin and excuses herself, skipping out and whistling down a freshly disinfected corridor towards glass doorways at its farthest end, light running into light.

    • With her compinion thus-why’s beassured, Lucia blots her nips upon a paper lapkin and excurses herself, skipling out and thistling down a freshly dizzifected carrydor towheres glass D’orways at its fatherst and, light runnin’ inter light.

      • “compinion” – “Companion”, “pinion” (the outer part of a birds wings; to cut off the pinion to prevent flight; to hold someone down), “with yonder pin”.
      • “thus-why’s beassured” – “Thuswise” (in that manner) reassured, “With her questions (“why’s”) answered thusly: be assured”.
      • “blots – Absorbs the moisture, but also suggestive of Rorschach Blots.
      • “nips” – “Lips”, “nips” (small sips), “nipples”.
      • “lapkin” – “Napkin”, “lap” (where “kin” are conceived). Lap-kin, together with the prior mention of nips and moisture, is suggestive of sexual excitement.
      • “excurses” – “Excuses”, “ex curses” (removes herself from her misfortunes), “excursion” (what Lucia is about to embark upon).
      • “skipling” – “Skipping”, “rippling” (like a river). Possibly “tippling” (drinking alcohol) or “sapling” (a young tree).
      • “thistling” – “Whistling”, “thistle” (a prickly plant, and an emblem of Scotland).
      • “dizzifected” – “Disinfected”, “dizzy”.
      • “carrydor” – “Corridor”, “carry door” (a means of exit which is portable). Possibly a reference to Stephen King’s Carrie?
      • “towheres” – “Towards”, “to wheres” (towards places).
      • “D’orways” – “Doorways”, “ways of gold”. Possible reference to Christian Dior, or some other proper noun – suggest?
      • “Fartherst and” – “Furthest end”, “father also”. Lucia’s father was often far from her, but he also represented escape.
      • “light” – “Light” and “Lucia”.
      • “inter” – “Into”, “inter-” (between, among; Lucia will run between times and places), “inter” (to bury).
  • Paragraph 7
    Outside, she stands and takes it in, from the cerulean sky bowl of the firmament above to the sage curtain of the far horizon, or the flowerbeds close at hand with all their petals and flowering sprays of color. Though it’s not ideal she likes this place the best of all she’s been in. She enjoys the handsome doctors with their bedside manners, and then, roughly four o’clock, she often lingers at the gates to watch the jostling schoolboys from the Grammar School that stands adjacent to her psychiatric institution.  Pretty as a picture they go scuffling down the Bulling Road beyond the iron railings, snatching up each other’s battered caps and grabbing at each other’s balls with wild hilarity, oblivious to her spying from the foliage in wistful, private lechery.

    • Outsighed, she stunnds and tics it in, from the cerebrulean skullbowl of the fymirment above to the sage cortin of the fir hereyeson, ur the flarebeds close at hand withal their petalsparks and fleurwork sprays o’ culeur.

      • “Outsighed” – “Outside”, “let out a sigh”.
      • “stunnds” – “Stands”, “is stunned” (by beauty).
      • “tics” – “Takes”, “tics” (compulsive, repetitive movements, usually uncontrolled, sometimes taken as indicative of insanity. Possibly also “ticks” (small insects; sounds made by a clock).
      • “cerebrulean” – “Cerulean” (sky blue), “cerebral” (intellectual; concerning the cerebrum). Possibly also “Ceres” (Roman goddess of agriculture), “creme brulee”, “lean”.
      • “skullbowl of the fymirment” – “Sky bowl of the firmament”. In Norse mythology, Odin and his brothers created the universe from the remains of the giant “Ymir“, whom they slew; they fashioned the “bowl” of the sky from his “skull”.
      • “sage cortin” – “Sage curtain” (a line of the evergreen shrub), “stage curtain”, “courting” (romantically).
      • “fir hereyeson” – “Far horizon”, “fir” (connects with sage, earlier), “her eyes on” (where she is looking).
      • “ur” – “Or”, “Ur” (ancient Sumerian city-state), “ur-” (original, earliest).
      • “flarebeds” – “Flowerbeds”, “flares” (sudden bursts of light, introduction of firework imagery).
      • “withal” – “With all”, “withal” (archaic for “also”, “in addition”).
      • “petalsparks” – “Petals”, “sparks” (connects with building firework imagery).
      • “fleurwork” – “Flowering” (“fleur” is French for “flower”), “firework”.
      • “culeur” – “Color”, “-cule” (suffix indicating something small), “enculer” (French for “sodomize”, also used in Victorian English erotica).
    • Though it’s not ideyll she likes displace the best of all she’s in-bin.

      • “ideyll” – “Ideal”, “idyll” (a happy scene; a verbal description of such a scene).
      • “displace” – Although Lucia likes “this place”, she cannot help but feel “displaced”.
      • “in-bin” – “Been in”, “in the bin” (“loony bin” is a slang term for a mental hospital).
    • She injoys the handson dictors with their bed’s-eye menners, und dien, roughly for o’cock, she aften langours at the gaits to watch the jesslin’ squallboys from the Glammar Scruel that stems adjescent to hier pysche-hattrick instincution.

      • “injoys” – “Enjoys”, “finds joy within”.
      • “handson” – “Handsome”, also recalling the “hands” of “son” Giorgio, which introduced her to sexual desire.
      • “dictors” – “Doctors” who are have “dicks” (penises). Also possibly “dictators”, those who say what is or is not allowed.
      • “bed’s-eye menners” – “Bedside manners” (the ability to speak to patients in a calming manner), “bed’s eye men” (men who have a “bedroom” (lustful) gaze).
      • “und dien” – “And then”, “undine” (a mythological water spirit).
      • “for o’cock” – “Four o’clock”, “for (in favor of) a cock”.
      • “aften” – “Often”, “aft” (behind, suggestive in this context of her bottom).
      • “langours” – “Lingers”, “langour” (pleasant tiredness; in this context, post-coital).
      • “gaits” – “Gates”, “gait” (walking cadence; Lucia is interestes in watching legs).
      • “jesslin'” – “Jostling”, “wrestling”. Also possibly “jess”, a leather strap to restrain a hawk, recalling Lucia’s imprisonment here.
      • “squallboys” – “Schoolboys”, “squalling” (reinforcing the jostling, wrestling language).
      • “Glammar Scruel” – “Grammar School“, “glamour” (spell, attractive appearance), “is cruel” (British schools are notoriously cruel environments). Possibly also “screw” (have sex with).
      • “stems” – “Stands”, “stems” (slang for “legs”).
      • “adjescent” – “Adjacent”, “descent” (into debauchery?), “scent”.
      • “hier” – “Her”, “hierarchy”, “hieros” (Greek for “sacred”).
      • “pysche-hattrick instincution” – “Psychiatric institution”.
      • “pysche-hattrick” – “psyche” (the mind or soul; also a mythological figure, best known from the story of “Cupid and Psyche“), “hat trick” (something achieved three times, possibly referring to the three trials which Venus insists Psyche accomplish).
      • “instincution” – “Institution”, the “execution” of “instinct”.
    • Spitty as a pricksure they go scruffling down the Bulling Roude beyond the iron realings, snurchin’ up each other’s badgered caps an’ grubbin’ at each other’s bawls wit’ wilde hellarity, obliffeyus to her sprying from the foolyage in wishtful, privet larchery.

      • “Spitty as a pricksure” – “Pretty as a picture” (a common English phrase for beauty).
      • “Spitty” – “Pretty”, “spitty” (tending to spit), “spotty” (suffering from acne).
      • “pricksure” – “Picture”, “cocksure” (arrogant, with here an extra emphasis on the male sexual organ).
      • “scruffling” – “Scuffling”, “scruffy”.
      • “Bulling Roude” – “Billing Road“, “rowdy” like “bulls”.
      • “realings” – “Railings” demarcate the boundary between the “real” outside world and Lucia’s interior (in multiple senses) life.
      • “snurchin'” – “Snatching”, “urchin”, possibly “sneaking”.
      • “badgered” – “Battered”, “badgered” (bothered). Possible reference to the Badger Game, a con in which the victim is lured into having sex with a woman and then her ‘husband’ comes home and demands money in order to avoid a beating and/or lawsuit.
      • “grubbin'” – “Grabbing”, “grubby”.
      • “bawls” – “Balls” (in context, could be either toys or testicles), “bawling” (crying).
      • “wit’ wilde” – “With wild”. Oscar “Wilde” was a famous 19th century author, known for his “wit”, and his homosexuality.
      • “hellarity” – “Hilarity”, “Hell”, “hellions.
      • “obliffeyus” – “Oblivious”, “River Liffey“, “O, we (“us”) have a fey life”.
      • “sprying” – “Spying”. Though Lucia is physically rather old, her libido remains “spry”.
      • “foolyage” – Lucia spies from the “foliage”, though this is arguably “fully” “fool”-ish at her “age”. Still, she would like to “fool” around.
      • “wishtful” – “Wistful”, “wishful”.
      • “privet” – “Private”, “privet” (a type of hedge, presumably what she is spying through).
      • “larchery” – “Lechery”, “larch” (a kind of tree), “archery” (as in Cupid).
  • Paragraph 8
    But what she likes the best of all about her current residence is how it alters with the seasons, never quite the same from one day to the next. The where and when of it does not seem so inflexible as some locations that have entertained her presence down across the decades. Here, she can meander readily between her pasts and her futures; between here and there; betwixt one world and the next. Here at Saint Andrews Psychological Infirmary it is entirely possible, in Lucia’s estimation, to slip from the earthly realm into a territory of fairy tale and old mythology, where every utterance is an immediate and eternal truth. Why, sometimes she hardly knows which infirmary she’s in at present, or if ultimately all the nuthouses might not turn out to be the selfsame place, one vast establishment transcending international boundaries and filled with fusty doctors trying to get hold of her soul.

    • Bud wort she likes the bestival apout her current reasidance is how it olders with the saysongs, nava quit the seam firm one die to the nicht.

      • “bud” – “But”, “bud” (flower; slang for brother).
      • “wort” – “What”, “wort” (a class of plant; unfermented beer), “wart”.
      • “bestival” – “Best of all”, “estival” (appearing in the summer), “festival”, “possibly “bestial”.
      • “apout” – “About”. Although Lucia is trying to think positively, her position still sometimes puts “a pout” on her face. “Pout” is also a kind of fish.
      • “reasidance” – A “residence” where Lucia can “readily, easily dance”. Also possibly “reads”.
      • “olders” – “Alters”, “grows older”, “alder” (a type of lowering plant).
      • “saysongs” – “Seasons”, “say songs” (there are many songs which speak of the seasons). Possibly “singsong”, “sarongs”.
      • “nava quit” – “Never quite”, “never quit”.
      • “nava” – “Never”, possibly “navigate”?
      • “quit” – “Quite”, “quit”.
      • “seam” – “Same”, “seam” (a boundary between things: seasons, different chunks of madhouse spacetime).
      • “firm” – “From”, “firm” (constant, unchanging – which is very much not the subjective experience of time, but which Jerusalem argues is the actual state of things), “fir” (tree).
      • “die” – “Day”, “die”. Every day brings us closer to death; every day another roll of the die.
      • “nicht” – “Next”, “nicht” (German for “not”, which is what people seem to become when they die), “night” (opposed to day).
    • The weir and wen of it der knot same so influxable as some lockations that hav intertrained her persence down orcross the docaides.

      • “weir” – “Where”, “weir” (a small dam, used to alter a river’s flow).
      • “wen” – “When”, wen (boil on skin).
      • “der” – “Does”, “der” (German for “the”), “dur” (an expression to comment on a foolish action).
      • “knot” – “Not”, “knot”.
      • “same” – It would “seem” that things are not always the “same” here.
      • “influxable” – “Inflexible”, “influx” (sudden arrival of a large group; inflow of water into a body of water), “flux” (change; archaic term for diarrhea).
      • “lockations” – “Locations” in which she has been “locked”.
      • “hav” – “Have”, “hav” (“sea” in several Scandinavian languages).
      • “intertrained” – “Entertained” (in this context, ironic for “imprisoned”), “inter” (bury), “inter-” (between). “trained” (possibly in the sense of directing plant growth; archaic: entice).
      • “persence” – “Presence”, “person”, “persistence”.
      • “down orcross” – “Down across”, “down or across” (the directions of a crossword puzzle, which this chapter could be likened to). Possibly “horcrux” from Harrry Potter?
      • “docaides” – “Decades”, “doc aides” (nurses or orderlies).
  • Page 886
    • Her, she carn miander reedily betwin her pa’stime and her fewcheers; betorn hear an’ dare; betwhether wan welt under noxt.

      • “Her” – “Here”, “her”.
      • “carn” – “Can”, “carn” (meat), “carnal” (sexual), “cairn” (pile of stomes servimg as a marker).
      • “miander” – “Meander” (wander), “me and her”, “minder”. Possibly “viand” (meat).
      • “reedily” – “Readily”, “like a reed”, “greedily”.
      • “betwin” – “Between”, “be a twin”.
      • “pa’stime” – “Past (time)”, “pastime” (hobby), “father’s time”.
      • “fewcheers” – Lucia anticipates “few cheers” among her “futures”.
      • “betom” – “Between”, “be a tom (tomcat?)”.
      • “hear” – “Here”, “hear”.
      • “dare” – “There”, “dare”.
      • “betwhether” – “Between”, “be T (Tom? True?) whether (whatever) the circumstances are”, “bet whether”.
      • “wan” – “One”, “wan (pale), possibly “won”.
      • “welt” – “World”, “welt” (German: “world”; raised mark on the body caused by a blow).
      • “under” – “And the”, “under” (other worlds are often conceived of as being literal underworlds).
      • “noxt” – “Next”, “Nox” (Roman goddess of night). Possibly “noxious” (revolting, poisonous).
    • Heir at Feint Andruse Cycle-logical Infirmitry it is entimely passible, in Lussye’s questimation, to slep from the birthly whelm intru a terrortree o’ feary-tell and eld mirthology, where every mutterforth is an immadiate and enternal troth.

      • “Heir” – “Here”, “heir” (Lucia is in some senses her father’s heir). Possibly “hair”.
      • “Feint Andruse Cycle-logical Infirmitry” – “Saint Andrews Psychological Infirmary“.
      • “Feint” – “Saint”, “feint”, possibly “faint”.
      • “Andruse” – “Andrews”, “druse” (an aggregation of crystals found in certain plants), possibly “Druze” – a middle-eastern ethnoreligious group founded in the 11th century.
      • “Cycle-logical” – “Psychological”, “cycle” (of the seasons?) “logical” (a quality that the hospital administration would like to think they have, though Lucia might disagree).
      • “Infirmitry” – “Infirmary”, “infirm, I try”.
      • “entimely” – “Entirely”, “in time”, “timely”.
      • “passible” – “Possible”, “passable” (able to be traversed), “plausible”.
      • “Lussye’s” – “Lucia’s”, “Luss” (a village in Scotland) “yes”, “Lussy-sur-Morges” (a municipality in Switzerland), possibly “loose eyes”.
      • “questimation” – “Estimation”, “quest”, “question”.
      • “slep” – “Slip”, “step”, “sleep” (perchance to dream). Possibly “slop”.
      • “birthly whelm” – The “earthly realm” is where our “birth” (“whelp”-ing) took place, something that many find to be “overwhelming”.
      • “intru” – “Into”, “in through”, “in truth”.
      • “terrortree” – “Territory”. “Terror tree” may allude to Yggdrasil, the center of Norse cosmology, and often envisioned as the route between worlds. More facetiously, it might be a reference to The Simpsons’ annual Halloween episode, “Treehouse of Terror”.
      • “feary-tell” – “Fairy-tale”, “That which is frightening to speak of” (connecting with “terror”).
      • “eld” – “Old”, “eld” (literary way of saying “the past”), “elder” (old person; type of shrub).
      • “mirthology” – “Mythology”, “the study of mirth” (standing in contrast to terror and fear).
      • “mutterforth” – An “utterance” is something which you “mutter” (speak) “forth”.
      • “immadiate” – “Immediate”, “made”.
      • “enternal” – “Eternal”, “enter”, possibly “Ent” (Tolkien’s tree-people).
      • “troth” – “Truth”, “troth” (faith or loyalty, often in a context of marriage).
    • Wye, summertimes she hurdly gnos whatch finny-form she’s in at prisent, or if altimately alder not-houses might nut torn out to bye the selfshame plaice, one vurst istabilismend trance-ending innernotional bindaries and filt-wit fausty dactyrs tyin’ to gut hauled ov hert sole.

      • “Wye” – “Why”, “wye” (a Y-shaped support), “Wye” (a major river flowing through England and Wales).
      • “summertimes” – “Sometimes”, “summer times” (connecting with the seasonal theme earlier in this paragraph).
      • “hurdly” – “Hardly”, “hurdle”, possibly “hurdy-gurdy” (a musical instrument). Also “hurds” is a word for coarser parts of flax, removed during processing.
      • “gnos” – “Knows”, “gnosis” (personal knowledge of the spiritual), “gnome” (earth spirit), possibly “gnu” (wildebeest).
      • “whatch” – “Which”, “watch” (to observe; an instrument for telling time), “whatchamacallit” (thingy). Possibly “swatch” (sample of paint or fabric) or “thatch” (roof covering of straw).
      • “finny-form” – “Infirmary”, “form with fins” (suggesting mermaid). Possibly “uniform”, “final form”.
      • “prisent” – “Present”, “prison”. Possibly “prism”, “prize”, “prise” (to pry).
      • “altimately” – “Ultimately”, “all time mates with lies”. Also “altimeter” (device for measuring altitude), timorous (scared).
      • “alder” – “All the”, “alder” (tree; alderman).
      • “not-houses” – “Nuthouses” (slang for asylums) may be “houses” (in that they house inmates), but they are “not” homes.
      • “nut” – “Not”, “nut” (crazy person; tree seed).
      • “torn out” – “Turn out”, “torn out” (pages?).
      • “bye” – “Be”, “bye” (farewell; the advancement of someone to the next round of a tournament without a figjt due to lack of an opponent).
      • “selfshame” – “Selfsame” (identical), “shame of self” (presumably a common issue in asylums).
      • “plaice” – “Place”, “plaice” (a type of fish).
      • “vurst” – “Vast”, “wurst” (sausage), “vürst” (Estonian for “sovereign prince”), “worst”.
      • “istabilismend” – “Establishment”, “I stabilise and mend”, “I stab all lies in the end”.
      • “trance-ending” – “Transcending”, “ending a trance” (awakening).
      • “innemotional” – “International”, “in emotional”, “inn”, “inner”, “motion”, “all”.
      • “bindaries” – “Boundaries” are things which “bind”. Possibly “Aries” (zodiac sign), “Ares” (Greek god of war), “Darius” (famed emperor of Persia).
      • “filt-wit” – “Filled with”, “having a filthy wit”.
      • “fausty” – “Fusty” (old-fashioned), “similar to Faust” (legendary scholar who sold his soul to the devil in return for power and knowledge).
      • “dactyrs” – “Doctors”, “dactyl” (metrical unit of verse), “Dactyls” (mythological race of males who are smiths and healers). Possibly “pterodactyls”, “Týr” (Norse god).
      • “tyin'” – “Trying”, “tying” (restraining). Possibly “Tyin” (a lake in Norway).
      • “gut” – “Get”, “gut” (as in “gut feeling”).
      • “hauled ov” – “Hold of”, “hauled” (dragged involuntarily) “ovum” (egg).
      • “hert” – “Her”, “hurt”, possibly “heart”, “hart” (deer).
      • “sole” – “Soul”, “sole” (singular; bottom of foot or shoe – possibly a reference to John Clare (see section 2), with his shoe damaged from his long walk).
  • Paragraph 9
    The bright green lawns stretch all around her, with the poplars, elms and far off buildings all turning in her planetary orbit, and her standing still at the center like the sun, the very source of light. The source of her, now! With a gay spring in her step, she sets out on her walking progress, on her wake-me-up perambulations, on her expedition, heading off across the dewy grass towards the poetry-line of the spinney waiting in the distance. Off she flounces, as beneficent as old Saint Nicholas himself, an innocent old lady in a wooly cardigan out strolling on the institution lawns.

    • The bride-green yawns strich all orerrnd her, wid the poplores, erlms and faroof bildungs all roturnin’ in her planetree obit, undherstood still art the cindre like the Son, the veri soeurce of lied.

      • “bride-green” – “Bright green”, “bridegroom”, “wide”, “broad” (wide; slang for “woman”). “Green” can also mean “innocent, inexperienced”.
      • “yawns” – “Lawns”, “yawns” (what one does when sleepy; opens wide like an abyss). Possibly “yams”.
      • “strich” – “Stretch”, “ostrich” (bird famed for its alleged ignorance of danger), “strict”, “strich” (screech owl; German: stroke, line, direction of fur; prostitution), “rich”.
      • “orerrnd” – “Around”, “orrery” (mechanical model of the solar system),”or erred”, “ore round”, “or errand”, “o render”, “rend”, “rerun”, “orange”.
      • “wid” – “With”, “wide”, “width”.
      • “poplores” – “Poplars”, “pop lores” (contemporary mythology?), “popular”, “plop ores”.
      • “erlms” – “Elms”, “earl”, “Erlkönig” (Germanic “king of the fairies”, also a famous poem by Goethe).
      • “faroof” – “Far off”, “fa” (musical note) “roof”, “faro” (card game) “of”, “Farooq” (common Arabic name, meaning “one who distinguishes between right and wrong”).
      • “bildungs” – “Buildings”, “bildungsroman” (a coming-of-age story).
      • “roturnin'” – “Rotating”, “row turning”, “rot urn in”, “rot earning”. Possibly “rout”, “nine”.
      • “planetree” – “Planetary”, “plane tree” (a type of tree), “plan three”, “plane” (aeroplane; flat surface; to make a surface flat).
      • “obit” – “Orbit”, “obituary”, “o’ bit”,
      • “undherstood” – “And her standing”, “understood”.
      • “art” – “At”, “art”.
      • “cindre” – “Center”, “cinder” (what the heat of the sun can reduce you to), “cider”, “sin there”, “Cynthia”, “Indra” (Hindu deity).
      • “Son” – “Sun” (center of the solar system), “son” (Giorgio, her mother’s son, and the center of much of her trauma), “Son” (Jesus, the center of Christianity).
      • “veri” – “Very”, “veritable”, “ver” (Latin for “Spring”; French for “worm”; Hungarian for “to pant”; Icelandic for “a man” or “the sea”) “I”.
      • “soeurce” – “Source”, “souer” (French for “sister”).
      • “lied” – “Light”, “lied” (German for “song”; told an untruth).
    • The sauce of her, now!

      • “The sauce of her” – “The source of her”, “the sauciness of her”.
    • With a gae spring in her stoop, she-sex out on her walk in purgress, on her wake-myop parundulations, on her expermission, heeding oft acrux the do-we grass twowords the poertree-line of the spinny wetting in the da’stance.

      • “gae” – “Gay” (happy; homosexual), “Gaelic” (Irish language).
      • “stoop” – “Step”, “stoop” (as in “stooped with age”).
      • “she-sex” – “She sets”, “female gender”.
      • “walk in purgress” – “Walking progress”, “work in progress” (see notes to paragraph 1).
      • “wake-myop” – “Wake-me-up”, “wake” (as in Finnegans) “myopic” (nearsighted, which James Joyce appears to have been).
      • “parundulations” – “Perambulations” (walking about), “par” (parahraph; expected golf score) “undulations” (waving motions, often relating to dance or sex). Also “para-” (beside) and “park”.
      • “expermission” – “expedition”, “without permission”, “experiment”, “sperm emission”. Possibly “expert mission”, “the ions miss through out”.
      • “heeding” – “Heading” (going; direction), “heeding” (paying attention to).
      • “oft” – “Out”, “often”. Possibly “soft”, “loft”.
      • “acrux” – “Across”, “a crux” (central point, crossroads, cross).
      • “do-we” – “Dewy”, “do we” (have sex?).
      • “twowords” – “Towards”, “two words”.
      • “poertree-line” – “Poetry-line”, “property line”, “poor tree-line”. Possibly “Poe” (Edgar Allan), “power”.
      • “spinny” – “Spinney” (small area of trees and bushes), “spinny” (spinning; dizzy).
      • “wetting” – “Waiting”, “becoming wet” (possibly in a sexual sense).
      • “da’stance” – “Distance”, “father’s stance”, “dance”.
    • Iff she flaunces, as veneficent as elled Sent Knickerless hermself, an innerscent ulled lay-die in a wurli cardiagran out strawling on the institrusion lorns.

      • “Iff” – “Off”, “if”, “River Liffey“, possibly “iff” (if and only if).
      • “flaunces” – “Flounces” (moves in an exaggerated or flirtatious manner), “flaunts” (shows off). Possibly alluding to “Fleance” (character from Shakespeare’s Macbeth) or Little Lord “Fauntleroy“.
      • “venificent” – “Benificent” (generous), “venerable” (old), possibly “venal” (corrupt).
      • “elled” – “Old”, possibly “measured” as “ell” is an archaic unit of length.
      • “Sent Knickerless” – “Saint Nicholas” (Santa Claus), “sent knicker-less” (not wearing underwear).
      • “hermself” – “Himself”, “herself”, “herm” (a Greek boundary marker, often notably phallic), “hermaphrodite”, “Hermes”.
      • “innerscent” – “Innocent”, “inner scent” (possibly referring to the scent emerging from inside Lucia’s not-at-all-innocent vagina).
      • “ulled” – “Old”, “Ull” (Germanic god of archery), “ull” (“wool” in several Scandinavian languages), “lulled”, “mulled”, “sullied”.
      • “lay-die” – A “Lady” who is willing to “lay” (have sex) in order to “die” (orgasm).
      • “wurli” – “Wooly”, “whirly”
      • “cardiagran” – “Cardigan” (sweater), “cardiogram”, “gran” (grandmother).
      • “strawling” – “Strolling”, “trawling” (fishing; slang for seeking sexual partners); “straw” (as in “roll in the hay”).
      • “institrusion” – “Institution”, “intrusion”.
      • “lorns” – “Lawns”, “those who are lorn (abandoned or lonely)”.
  • Paragraph 10
    What the observer doesn’t know, however – and there’s always an observer, or at least in Lucia’s experience – is that she’s no old woman. In fact, she’s no age at all: she’s all her selves at once, cradle to grave, one inside the other like a set of Russian dolls. Her daddy’s baby is tucked inside the smallest nook, and then Lucia as a mere toddler, back then when she always was his little girl, his looking-glass. All of her teenage selves, the prima ballerinas and french-kissing nymphomaniacs are inside amidst the nested figurines, all of the made-up bragging about underage and moonlight fornications with a fictional young Latin lover she’d invented by the pseudonym of Sempo, semper fidelis, always faithful, when in actual fact her only sexual explorations had been with her older brother. For all of her other personalities are here as well, the tipsy terpsichorean toast of gay Paris, the fashionable lesbian when cunnilingus was believed to be sophisticated, or the disappointed dancer turning down a prosperous career at the prestigious Elizabeth Duncan School because her master immersed her in his complicated Aryan philosophies and facile racial prejudice. Her infant past, her cemetaried future and her here-and-now, her every living moment all together, all her appertunances present and correct. She’s a collected volume, a Complete Lucia with her whole life gathered into handsome sheepskin bindings, a well-thumbed edition with endpapers marbled and a spine that’s still intact, despite frequent mishandlings.

    • What the upserver dursn’t know, hooever – and there’s all-ways en absurver, err at list in Lucia’s experience – is that she’s nu alld woman.

      • “upserver” – “Observer”, “one who serves up”.
      • “dursn’t” – “Doesn’t”, “dursn’t” (dares not), “dur” (expression of idiocy).
      • “hooever” – “However”, “whoever” (whoever the observer is, or whoever Lucia is).
      • “all-ways” – “Always”, “in all ways” (inescapably).
      • “en” – “An”, “n”, “English”, “en-” (within).
      • “absurver” – “Observer”, “absurd”.
        • “always an observer” – xxx note about Observer Effect.
      • “err” – “Or”, “err” (make a mistake), “er” (expression of uncertainty).
      • “list” – “Least”, “list” (organization method; to lean).
      • “nu” – “No”, “nu” (Yiddish expression of doubt or surprise); slang spelling of “new”; Greek for “n”).
      • “alld woman” – “Old woman”, “all woman” (a sexually attractive woman).
    • En fict, she’s no age atoll: she’s orl her silves at whence, curdle to gravey, won insight the ether like a sat of Rushin’ dirlls.

      • “En fict” – “In fact”, “en” (see above) “fiction”.
      • “atoll” – “At all”, “atoll” (a ring-shaped island of coral).
      • “orl” – “All”, “orl” (British dialect for alder tree).
      • “silves” – “Selves”, “silver”, “sylvan” (pastoral, associated with woods).
      • “whence” – “Once”, “whence” (from which).
      • “curdle to gravey” – “Cradle to grave”, “curdle” (separate into lumps) “gravy”.
      • “won” – “One”, “was victorious”.
      • “insight” – “Inside”, “insight”, “in sight” (visible).
      • “ether” – “Other”, “ether” (now-discredited medium for the transmission of light; anaesthetic gas), “ethereal” (delicate, graceful), “either”.
      • “sat” – “Set”, “sat” (sat down).

        Matryoshka doll
        Matryoshka doll
      • “Rushin’ dirlls” – “Russian dolls” (matryoshka), “rushing drills”, “girls”, “grills”, “dirndl” (traditional Austrian skirt).
    • Her Babbo’s bibby is tocked in the smilest nookst, ind then Luukhere as a mer taddler, boock den winshe alice was his liddel girl, his larking-gloss.

      • “Babbo” – “Daddy” (in Italian).
      • “bibby” – “Baby”, “bibby” (stateroom on a passageway of a ship), “bib”.
      • “tocked” – “Tucked”, “locked”, “tock-ed” (tick-tock, the passing of time).
      • “smilest” – “Smallest”, “smile”.
      • “nookst” – “Nook”, “nest”.
      • “ind” – “And”, “India”, “independent”.
      • “Luukhere” – “Lucia”, “look here”, “Luuk” (Scandinavian name), “lurk”.
      • “mer” – “Mere”, “mer” (French for “sea”).
      • “taddler” – “Toddler”, “tadpole”, “tattler”.
      • “boock” – “Back”, “book”.
      • “den” – “Then”, “den” (animal’s dwelling; private room).
      • “winshe” – “When she”, “wince”, “winsome”, possibly “winch”, “wench”.
      • “alice” – “Always”, “Alice” (In Wonderland, reinforced below).
      • “liddel” – “Little”, Alice “Liddell” (name of the girl for whom Alice in Wonderland was originally told). Possibly “lidded”, “lit dell”.
      • “larking-gloss” – “Looking-glass” (mirror; Through the Looking-Glass), “larking gloss” (“playing with interpretation” – The activity of this whole chapter, for both writer and reader). Possibly “lacking”, “lass”.
    • Allover turnage salves, the preena dolorinas and Fressh-kissen mnymthomaniacs are insat amist the nexted friguleens, alluv the maid-up shagbrag abawd underlit and moon-age formircations with a fuctional yang Letin lovher she’d unvented blyther cleudonym of Sempo, sempo fiddles, allus faithfeel, ween in factual act her lonly senxual explortations hid bone whet’her holdher bluther.

      • “Allover” – “All of her”, “all over”.
      • “turnage” – “Teenage”, “the age at which one turns”.
      • “salves” – “Selves”, “salves” (poultices).
      • “preena dolorinas” – “Prima ballerinas”, “preening”, “dolor” (extreme sorrow).
      • “Fressh-kissen” – “French kissing” (kissing with tongues), “fresh” (unspoiled; impudent), “fress” (Yiddish/German for “to devour” ; Icelandic for “tomcat”) “kissen” (German for “cushion”).
      • “mnymthomaniac” – “Nymphomaniac” (sex addict), “mythomaniac” (compulsive liar), “monomaniac” (obsessive).
      • “insat” – “Inside”, “sat in”.
      • “amist” – “Amidst”, “a mist”.
      • “nexted” – “Nested”, “next-ed” (arranged in sequence).
      • “friguleens” – “Figurines”, “frigid” (lacking sexual desire), “frig” (masturbate). Possibly “leen” (Spanish for “they read”), “gul” (ghoul), “lien”.
      • “alluv” -“All of”, “Al love”.
      • “maid-up” – “Made-up”, “maid” (young woman; virgin woman; servant).
      • “shagbrag” – “Bragging”, “shag” (slang for “have sex”) “brag” (boast), “shagrag” or “shab-rag” (a ragged, scruffy, or contemptible person).
      • “abawd” – “About”, “a bawd” (archaic “prostitute”), “bawdy” (funny/sexy).
      • “underlit and moon-age” – “Underage and moonlit”, “dim and month-old”.
      • “formircations” – “Fornications”, “former”, “for murk”, possibly “formic” (relating to ants), “altercations” (fights).
      • “fuctional” – “Fictional”, “functional”, “fuck-tional” (able to be fucked).
      • “yang” – “Young”, “yang” (in Chinese philosophy, the male half of the universe).
      • “Letin” – “Latin” (South American, with connotations of exotic and romantic), “let in”.
      • “lovher” – “Lover”, “love her”.
      • “unvented” – “Invented”, “un vented” (let the wind out of?).
      • “blyther” – “By the”, “blithe-r” (more happy), “Blythe” (female name), “blither” (talk without substance).
      • “cleudonym” – “Pseudonym” (alias), “clue”, “Cluedo” (mystery board game, known as “Clue” in North America).
      • “Sempo” – obiwanspicoli notes:

        From Lucia Joyce: To Dance in the Wake quoting Lucia: “When we sent to Locarno I met a young man from the South of America. I think he spoke Spanish. I fell in love with him but he had tuberculosis. We went in the park by moonlight. It was rather romantic.” Twenty years later, chatting with hwr friend, Lucia remembered him by the name of Sempo.

      • “sempo fiddles” – “Semper fidelis” (Latin for “always faithful”; also the motto of the US Marine Corps), “fiddles” (slang for “touches the sexual parts”; recalls Nero fiddling as Rome burned).
      • “allus” – “Always”, “all us”.
      • “faithfeel” – “Faithful”, “Take it on faith that he feels her up”.
      • “ween” – “When”, “ween” (archaic “think”), possibly “wean”.
      • “factual act” – “Actual fact”, “a factual act”.
      • “lonly” – “Only”, “lonely”, “lone”.
      • “senxual” – “Sexual”, “sensual”.
      • “explortations” – “Explorations”, “exploitations”.
      • “hid bone” – “Had been”, “hid bone” (Giorgio played “hide the bone” by inserting his boner into Lucia).
      • “whet’her” – “With her”, “whether” (or not), “whet” (sharpen) her”, “make her wet”.
      • “holder” – “Older”, “hold her”.
      • “bluther” – “Brother”, “bluster” (aggressive speech), “blither” or “blather” (long-winded speech of little substance).
    • F’all here olter passonalities are her aswill, the topsy-turpsichorean tosst of Gapery, the fancianable lispian when cunninglingloss was belegged to be saphosticated, or the dis-appointed dawncer tearnin’ down a prosterous careern at the prestageous Lastbet Druncan Shulethe becurse herr meister ’Merzed her in his kamflicated airy unphilosophies and fascile rachel pressurdice.

      • “F’all” – “For all”, “Fall” (autumn), “fall” (of Lucifer or of Adam).
      • “here” – “Her”, “here”.
      • “olter” – “Other”, “alter”, possibly “otter”, “altar”.
      • “passonalities” – “Personalities”, “passion”, “pass, son”, “pass on”, possibly “nationalities”.
      • “aswill” – “As well”, “as will”, possibly “swill”.
      • “topsy-turpsichorean” – “Tipsy” (slightly drunk) “terpsichorean” (relating to dance), “topsy-turvy” (in great disorder or confusion), “Topsy” (character from Uncle Tom’s Cabin who, proverbially, “just growed”), “turpitude” (depravity).
      • “tosst” – “Toast” (celebrated person), “tossed” (as in tempest-tossed?).
      • “Gapery” – “Gay Paris” (a common way of referring to the capital of France), “gaping” (in amazement), “drapery” (clothing).
      • “fancianable” – “Fashionable”, “able” to “fancy” (desire, often sexually) “Ann” (Woman’s name, possibly a specific person – Suggest??).
      • “lispian” – “Lesbian”, “one who lisps” (a stereotypical trait of (male) homosexuals).
      • “cunninglingloss” – “Cunnilingus”, “cunning”, “ling” (tongue; language), “loss”.
      • “belegged” – “Believed”, be-legged” (possessing legs).
      • “saphosticated” – “Sophisticated”, “Sappho” (Famous lesbian poet of Classical Greece).
      • “dis-appointed” – “Disappointed”, “removed from her position”.
      • “dawncer” – A “dancer” in the “dawn” of her career.
      • “teamin’ down” – “Turning down”, “teaming” (often occurring in the phrase “teaming up”), “teeming” (full or swarming with).
      • “prosterous” – “Prosperous”, “preposterous” (ridiculous), possibly “prostrate” (prone).
      • “careern” – “Career”, “careen” (mobe in a fast and uncontrolled fashion).
      • “prestageous” – “Prestigious” – “pre-stage” (prior to a performance) “o’ us”.
      • “Lastbet Druncan Shulethe” – “Elizabeth Duncan School” – Elizabeth Duncan (1871-1948) was sister to the famous dancer Isadora Duncan. Elizabeth ran a school of dance at various locations starting in 1904.
        • “Lastbet” – “Elizabeth”, “final chance”.
        • “Druncan” – “Duncan”, “drunken”.
        • Shulethe” – “School”, “schule” (German for “school”), “shul” (Yiddish for “synagogue”), “Lethe” (Greek mythological river in Hades which induced forgetfulness).
      • “becurse” – “Because”, “be curse”.
      • “herr” – “Her”, “herr” (German for “Mr.”).
      • “meister” – “Master”, “meister” (German for “master”).
      • “‘Merzed” – “Immersed”, “Max Merz” (Elizabeth Duncan’s husband, known for his antisemitism).
      • “kamflicated” – “Complicated”, “Mein Kampf” (1925 book by Adolf Hitler detailing his life so far, his politics, and his antisemitism). Possibly “flic” (French slang for “policeman”).
      • “airy unphilosophies” – “Aryan philosophies” (Hitler’s idea that the Herman people were genetically superior), with a suggestion that they are negative (“un-“) and/or inconsequential (“airy”).
      • “fascile” – “Facile” (appearing straightforward by ignoring complexity), “fascist” (as Nazi Germany became).
      • “rachel” – “Racial”, “Rachel” (A common Jewish female name – Jews were oppressed and killed under Hitler).
      • “pressurdice” – “Prejudice”, “pressure dice” (the emotional pressure of the vicissitudes of Fate?).
    • Her inphant pass’d, her semi-terra’d feuture and here her-and-know, her iffrey liffing mement altergather, all her hypertenses prescent and currect.

      • “inphant” – “Infant”, “in phantasies”, possibly “elephant”.
      • “pass’d” – “Past”, “passed”.
      • “semi-terra’d” – “Cemeteried” (that is, “buried”, “dead”), “partially of (or in) the earth”.
      • “feuture” – “Future”, “feu” (French for “fire” or “deceased”; in Scottish law, “land held in feidal tenure”). Possibly “feature” (part of face; movie; “featured performer”), “futile”.
      • “her-and-know” – “Here-and-now” (the present), “her and know”.
      • “iffrey liffing” – “Every living”, “River Liffey” (twice).
      • “mement” – “Moment”, “I meant”. Possibly “meme” (idea).
      • “altergather” – “All together”, “alter gather”.
      • “hypertenses” – “Appurtenances” (items associated with a particular style of living), “hypertenses” (possibly a word which describes the grammatical tenses which go beyond the normal conceptions of time). Possibly also “hypertension” (high blood pressure).
      • “prescent” – “Present” (here), “prescient” (having foresight).
      • “currect” – “Correct”, “current”.
    • She’s a collacted valiume, a Compleat Lucia with her whorle lighf gethered into hadsome crepeskin bendings, a well-thrumbed uddition with eyndpeepers marvled and a speen that’s still integt, tespite freakwend miss-handlings.

      • This sentence is rife with metaphors from the book business, comparing Lucia to a valuable used book.
      • “collacted” – “Collected”, “collated” (sorted, often in reference to pages).
      • “valiume” – “Volume”, “valium” (antidepressant drug).
      • “Compleat” – Archaic spelling of “Complete”. Possibly also “with fold”.
      • “whorle” – “Whole”, “whorl” (spiral), possibly “whore”.
      • “lighf” – “Life”, “light”.
      • “gethered” – “Gathered”, “get her -ed”.
      • “hadsome” – “Handsome”, “had some” (sex?).
      • “crepeskin” – “Sheepskin” (binding material for expensive books), “crepe” (thin, wrinkled fabric (sometimes used for lingerie); thin pancake).
      • “bendings” – “Bindings”, “bendings” (yieldings, in this context probanly sexual ones).
      • “thrumbed” – “Thumbed” (method of turning pages; method of stimulating genitals), “thrusted”, “thrum” (vibration) “bed”.
      • “uddition” – “Edition”, (in this context, an individual book), “udder” (vulgar term for female breast).

        Marbled paper
        Marbled paper
      • “eyndpeepers marvled” – “Endpapers marbled” (see picture), “eyes and peepers marveled” (suggesting voyeurism).
      • “speen” – “Spine”, “peen” (slang for penis).
      • “integt” – “Intact” (unbroken), “in tight” (in context, suggestive of strong vaginal muscles despite lots of sex).
      • “tespite” – “Despite”, “testicle pit”.
      • “freakwend” – “Frequent”, “freak wend” (to “go” (have sex) in unusual ways).
      • “miss-handlings” – “Mishandlings”, “(sexual) handlings of the miss (unmarried woman)”.
  • Paragraph 11
    She saunters on over the viridian expanse, a thousand blades of grass beneath her regulation-issue slippers. Idly, the notices that the surrounding surface of grass is fractured into mismatched jagged shapes, much like a chessboard or a patchwork quilt, in which the quality of the light and, moreover, the variety of grass itself appears entirely different, as if the world about her were comprised after the fashion of a grand collage, sloppily constructed with its ragged interstices plainly visible. It’s just the nature of this place, Lucia reasons, and continues with her most agreeable excursion, anti-clockwise round the madhouse’s extensive grounds.

    • She santas on aver the virdiant ex-pants, a toe’send bleeds o’ glass benearth hor rugulasian-isshu sleppers.

      • “santas” – “Saunters”, “Santa Claus”.
      • “aver” – “Over”, “aver” (state as fact).
      • “virdiant” – “Viridian” (a blue-green pigment), “verdant” (green with grass), “radiant” (glowing). Possibly “vir” (Latin for “man”).
      • “ex-pants” – “Expanse”, “having removed one’s underwear” (“pants” is British dialect for American “underwear”).
      • “toe’send” – “Thousand”, “at the end of her toes”.
      • “bleeds” – “Blades”, “bleeds” (“shedding blood”; “colors mixing”; “image reaching to the edge of a page”).
      • “glass” – “Grass”, “glass” (broken glass in a park might well cause one’s toes to bleed; also “looking-glass”, foreshadowing the Alice references in the next sentence).
      • “benearth” – “Beneath”, “be in the earth”. Possibly also “Unearthing“, a work Alan Moore wrote about his friend Steve Moore.
      • “hor” – “Her”, “whore”, “horticulture”. Possibly “horror”, “horizon”, “horizontal”, “horology” (the study of the measurement of time).
      • “rugulasian-isshu” – “Regulation-issue”, “Asian rug” (a thing to walk upon) “is sure”. Possibly “tissue”, “achoo!” (sneezing sound), “Ruggles” (“of Red Gap”, comic novel and film).
      • “sleppers” – “Slippers”, “sleepers”. Possibly “lepers”.
    • Eyedully, she nowt’sees that the surgrounding surf o’ turf is fragtured into messmutched jagsore sharpes, march like a chasebird alce a botchwork qualt, inwitch the quallatee of deelight and, marova, the veriety of griss intself apeers entimely daffyrant, oz if the whirld abouter wher compised aft’her the fushion of a graund collageon, slappily kenstracted with its rawgged interstpaices painly vrisible.

      • This sentence contains many references to Carroll’s Alice books and Baum’s Oz.
      • “eyedully” – “Idly”, “with dull eyes”.
      • “nowt’sees” – “Notices”, “sees nowt” (nothing).
      • “surgrounding” – “Surrounding”, “above the ground”. Possibly “groundling” (audience members in the “cheap seats” (or even standing)).
      • “surf o’ turf” – “Surface of grass”, “surf and turf” (meal involving both seafood and red meat).
      • “fragtured” – “Fractured”, “fragmented”.
      • “messmutched” – “Mismatched”, “mess” (disarray; place for meals) “mutch” (a close-fitting cap, such as worn by a few characters in John Tenniel’s illustrations for Alice in Wonderland: the sheep and the baby).

        Sheep wearing a mutch cap
        Sheep wearing a mutch cap
      • “jagsore sharpes” – “Jagged shapes”, “jags or sharps”, “sore”.
      • “march” – “Much”, “march” (walk briskly), “March” (month; “March Hare”).
      • “chasebird” – “Chessboard” (recalling Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There), “chase a bird”.
      • “alce” – “Else”, “Alice”.
      • “botchwork” – “Patchwork”, “work which has been botched”. Also The Patchwork Girl of Oz.
      • “qualt” – “Quilt”, “quality”.
      • “inwitch” – “In which”, “in a witch”.
      • “quallatee” – “Quality”, “squall” “tee”. Possibly “squalor”, “quall” (archaic “equal”).
      • “deelight” – “The light”, “delight”. Possibly “Dee” (John Dee, the alchemist), “Delight“, character in Sandman).
      • “marova” – “Moreover”, “ma” “r” “ova” (a mother has an egg).
      • “veriety” – “Variety”, “veritable” (truthful), “very”. Possibly “Verity” (woman’s name).
      • “griss” – “Grass”, “gristle” (cartilage).
      • “intself” – “Itself”, “in its self”, “hints elf”. Possibly “integral” (complete, whole).
      • “apeers” – “Appears”, “peer” (look; social equal; knight), “ape ears”, “apples and pears” (rhyming slang for “stairs”).
      • “entimely” – “Entirely”, “embodied in time”.
      • “daffyrant” – “Different”, “daffy” (insane; silly) “rant”.
      • “oz” – “As”, “Oz” (famous fantasy country from The Wizard of Oz, et al).
      • “whirld” – “World”, “whirled” (spun), “whirlwind” (like the cyclone from The Wizard of Oz).
      • “abouter” – “About her”, “a bouter” (one who engages in fights).
      • “wher” – “Were”, “where”, “her”.
      • “compised” – “Comprised” (made up of), “composed”. Possibly “compassed” (surrounded by).
      • “aft’her” – “After”, “Aft of” (behind) “her”.
      • “fushion” – “Fashion”, “fusion” (combination).
      • “graund” – “Grand”, “ground” (dirt; basis; reduced to particles).
      • “collageon” – “Collage” (artwork formed by combining disparate pre-existing images), “collagen” (structural protein in connective tissues), “college”.
      • “slappily” – “Sloppily”, “slap”, possibly “slap-happy”.
      • “kenstracted” – “Constructed”, “ken” (knowledge) “distracted”.
      • “rawgged” – “Ragged”, “raw”. Possibly “Armageddon”?
      • “interstpaices” – “Interstices” (spaces between), “interstellar spaces”, “interest paces”.
      • “painly” – “Plainly” (clearly), “in a painful manner”.
      • “vrisible” – “Visible”, “risible” (laughable). Possibly “Vril”, a fictional race of beings that were referenced in The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen.
  • Page 887
    • Et’s jest the noture of displace, Lucia raysuns, and cuntinuse widder moist egreable excushion, auntie-cockwise raund the midhearse’s extpensive grands.

      • “Et’s” – “It’s”, “et” (Latin for “and”; dialect “eaten”).
      • “jest” – “Just” (only), “jest” (joke).
      • “noture” – “Nature”, “notion”, “not your”.
      • “displace” – “This place”, “displace”.
      • “raysuns” – “Reasons”, “rays of sunlight”.
      • “cuntinuse” – “Continues”, “cunt (vulgar “vagina”) in use”.
      • “widder” – “With her”, “widdershins” (counterclockwise), “widder” (dialect “widow”).
      • “moist” – “Most”, “moist” (probably in reference to her sexual excitement).
      • “egreable” – “Agreeable”, “egregious” (shocking).
      • “excushion” – “Excursion”, “from a cushion”, possibly “excuses”.
      • “auntie-cockwise” – “Anti-clockwise” (British for “counterclockwise”), “auntie (aunt; old woman) who is wise in the ways of cock (penis; maleness in general)”.
      • “raund” – “Round”, “raunchy” (sexually explicit).
      • “midhearse’s” – “Madhouse’s”, “meadows”, “between/among hearses” (metaphorically can be read as either “in life” or “in the presence of death”; see also “In the midst of life we are in death,” a common part of funeral ceremonies).
      • “extpensive” – “Extensive” (large), “expensive” (a posh hospital like this is not cheap to stay in).
      • “grands” – “Grounds”, “grand”.
  • Paragraph 12
    In her distracted meanderings she has arrived at the woodland’s edge, its mysteries all looming up before her. Just like some knight of antiquity or some pure Christian she has persevered and reached the edge of the enchanted forest. Even at the moment she has come to the boundaries of the safe and secure primordial Eden of her childhood, with only the dark wilderness beyond. She’s alone out here, a wandering Goldilocks, or else is wrapped in her Little Red Riding Hood and is hesitating on the brink of the impenetrable thicket, where there is a wolf. She is a fallen angel in her own eye, a Miltonic Lucifer cast out into the outer darkness where there is a wailing and a gnashing of teeth. Hail, heroes, hail! Bravely, now, she steps over the dividing line in her behavior and enters in amongst the undergrowth, just like Liddell for Lewis Carroll, the ones that pose for dirty photographs in nothing but their stripy tights or stockings and their Alice-bands. She is quite shameless in penetrating the forbidden territory, a prepubescent maiden posturing for an obscene Victorian photographer, projecting always through the looking glass from underneath the blackout cover masturbating his tripod and his optical equipment. Quicker than a shadow she slips into the concealing vegetation and is gone from mortal sight, dancing a minuet amidst the drifting waterweeds, Ophelia sinking into the obscure green depths.

    • In her distructed minderings she haz arrivered adder wouldlance hedge, its mystitrees all looning up befear her.

      • “distructed” – “Distracted”, “destructed”.
      • “minderings” – “Meanderings”, “minder” (a guardian), “mind” (what Lucia has arguably lost) “rings”. Possibly “derring-do” (bravery).
      • “haz” – “Has”, “haze”, possibly “hazard”.
      • “arrivered” – “Arrived”, “a red river”.
      • “adder” – “At the”, “adder” (snake, which has been known to meander).
      • “wouldlance” – “Woodland’s”, “would lance” (desires to pierce), “wooden lance” (medieval jousting weapon).
      • “hedge” – “Edge”, “hedge”.
      • “mystitrees” – “Mysteries”, “misty trees”.
      • “looning” – “Looming”, “loon” (type of aquatic bird; slang for insane person).
      • “befear” – “Before”, “causing fear”.
    • Joust like some night of intiquity ur same puur Chretian she has Percivered end riched the ’odge of dee encharted forege.

      • “Joust” – “Just”, “joust” (activity of medieval knight).
      • “night” – “Knight”, “night”.
      • “intiquity” – “Antiquity” (the ancient past), “iniquity” (immoral behavior).
      • “ur” – “Or”, “ur-” (primitive, original), “Ur” (ancient Sumerian city-state).
      • “same” – “Some”, “same”.
      • “puur” – “Pure”, “poor”. Possibly “puer” (Latin for “boy”).
      • “Chretian” – “Christian” (worshipper of Christ; protagonist of Pilgrim’s Progress), “Chrétien” (de Troyes, 12th-century French poet known for Arthurian work).
      • “Percivered” – “Persevered” (maintained steadfast), “Percival” (Arthurian knight who finds the Grail, written of by Chrétien de Troyes).
      • “end riched” – “And reached”, “end riches”, “enriched”.
      • “‘odge” – “Edge”, “lodge”, possibly “hodgepodge”.
      • “dee” – “The”, “Dee” (Johm Dee, famous alchemist).
      • “encharted” – “Enchanted”, “uncharted”.
      • “forege” – “Forest”, “forage”, “edge”.
    • Evenadamant she has cum-to the bannederies of the sayfensecure premerdial Heden offer childhug, with ownlay the dirk bewildernicht bayond.

      • “Evenadamant” – “Even at the moment”, “Adam and Eve”, “adamant” (firm; diamond).
      • “cum-to” – “Come to”, “cum too” (also orgasmed).
      • “bannederies” – “Boundaries”, “banned derrières”. Possibly “bande desinée” (French for “comics”), “bandoliers”, “eros”.
      • “sayfensecure” – “Safe and secure”, “say fens (bogs) cure”.
      • “premerdial” – “Primordial”, “premarital”, possibly “pre murder” (Eden coming before Cain and Abel).
      • “Heden” – “Eden”, “hedonistic” (devoted to pleasure). Possibly “hidden”.
      • “offer” – “Of her”, “offer”.
      • “childhug” – “Childhood”, “hug a child”.
      • “ownlay” – “Only”, “laying one’s own” (that is, incest).
      • “dirk” – “Dark”, “dirk” (dagger; metaphorically penis).
      • “bewildernicht” – “Wilderness”, “bewildering”, “nicht” (German for “night”).
      • “bayond” – “Beyond”, “baying” (like a hound). Possibly “yonder Ba” (a part of the ancient Egyptian concept of the soul).
    • She’s alene-out-yere-wandowt Goldinlocks, or alse is rapt in her Little-Read Writinghood indus stirred hisitratin undi brink o’ day inperitrouble thincket, where there beawolf.

      • “alene-out-yere-wandowt” – “Alone out here, a wandering”, “lean out your window” (as a prostitute might do to solicit business).
      • “Goldinlocks” – “Goldilocks” (famous fairy tale heroine), “golden locks” (strands of hair; security devices).
      • “alse” – “Else”, “Alice” (in Wonderland). Possibly “Alsace”(-Lorraine)?
      • “rapt” – “Wrapped”, “rapt” (fascinated).
      • “Little-Read Writinghood” – “Little Red Riding Hood” (another famous fairy tale heroine), “quality of having (or being) infrequently read writing”.
      • “indus” – “And thus”, “Indus” (Asian River which was the site of one of the earliest civilizations).
      • “stirred” – “Stood”, “stirred” (emotionally moved).
      • “hisitratin” – “Hesitating”, “his i (eye) treating”.
      • “undi” – “On the”, “undine” (water spirit). Possibly “undies” (informal “underwear”).
      • “brink o’ day” – “Brink of the”, “break of day”.
      • “inperitrouble” – “Impenetrable”, “in peril and trouble”.
      • “thincket” – “Thicket”, “think it”.
      • “beawolf” – “Is a wolf”, “Beowulf” (hero of Old English epic).
    • She est a fayllin angle inner roam eye, a maletonic Luciafer cast eyt unto the uuder dugnerss waa there riz a waiflin’ onder gnorashing of the teets.

      • “est” – “Is”, “est” (Latin for “is”), “east”.
      • “fayllin” – “Fallen” (from Grace), “fay” (fairy; homosexual; person at the mercy of fate), “Lin” (as in Tam Lin, popular ballad about a man who encounters the Fairy Queen).
      • “angle” – “Angel”, “angle”. (The mixing of the two terms is, of course, seen throughout Jerusalem, not only in this chapter.)
      • “inner” – “In her” own “inner” eye.
      • “roam” – “Own”, “roaming” (lascivious).
      • “maletonic” – “Miltonic” (in the manner of John Milton‘s Paradise Lost), “male” “tonic” (invigorating medicine), “mal-” (bad, evil).
      • “Luciafer” – “Lucifer”, “Lucia”, “fur” (pubic hair), “fer” (French for “iron”).
      • “eyt” – “Out”, “eye”, “yet”.
      • “uuder” – “Outer”, “udder” (teat).
      • “dugnerss” – “Darkness”, “dug” (teat) “nurse”.
      • “waa” – “Where”, “waa” (sound of a crying baby).
      • “riz” – “Is”, “riz” (dialect “rolling papers” (as in Rizla); dialect “risen”; French for “rice”).
      • “waiflin’” – “Wailing”, “waif” (helpless child) “Lin” (see above).
      • “onder” – “And a”, “under”, “endure”.
      • “gnorashing” – “Gnashing”, “nourishing”, “Nora”, possibly “rash”.
      • “teets” – “Teeth”, “teats”.
      • Oniwanspicoli points out that this paraphrases Matthew 13:42 “And shall cast them into a furnace of the fire: there shall be wailing and gnashing of teeth.”
    • Hell, herroers, heil!

      • “Hell” – “Hail” (acclaim), “Hell”.
      • “herroers” – “Heroes”, “horrors”. Possibly “her rowers”?
      • “heil” – “Hail”, “heil” (German equivalent of “hail”, especially as used by Nazis in World War Two).
      • The line “Hail, heroes, hail!” appears in a number of early twentieth century sources, usually in reference to the end of World War One. There may be an ur-source – suggest?? The overall sense here would seem to be of a surface celebration of heroism, with a lurking awareness of the horrors of actual warfare.
    • Pravely, now, she stairps hover the defydin lion in her beehiveour and intersin amurkst the wundergrowpe, juts like widdel dir lewdist garrols, the wains that paws fa dardy phaedographs in gnawthin’ bott theer stripley tytts er stalkings awnd thair alas-bonds.

      • “Pravely” – “Bravely”, “pray”, “pravda” (Russian for “truth”). Possibly “pavement”.
      • “stairps” – “Steps”, “stairs”.
      • “hover” – “Over”, “hover”.
      • “defydin lion” – “Dividing line”, “defy din lion”, possibly “daffodil”, “dandelion”.
      • “beehiveour” – “Behavior”, “beehive our”.
      • “intersin” – “Enters in”, “sin among”.
      • “amurkst” – “Amongst”, “murk” (darkness).
      • “wundergrowpe” – “Undergrowth”, “wonder” (Land) “grope”.
      • “juts” – “Just”, “juts” (protrudes).
      • “widdel” – “Liddell” (Alice Liddell, child friend of Lewis Carroll, and the original Alice), “widdle” (childish slang for “urinate”).
      • “dir” – “For”, possibly “did”, dire”?
      • “lewdist garrols” – “Lewis Carroll“, “practioner of lewdness” “garrulous” (talkative).
      • “wains” – “Ones”, “wains” (wagons; Scottish for “children”), “waifs” (helpless children).
      • “paws” – “Pose”, “paws” (handles in a rough, sexual manner).
      • “fa” – “For”, “fa” (musical note).
      • “dardy” – “Dirty”, “dard” (French for “cock”).
      • “phaedographs” – “Photographs”, “paedophile” (someone sexually attracted to children).
      • “gnawthin’” – “Nothing”, “gnaw”.
      • “bott” – “But”, “bottom”, “butt”.
      • “theer” – “Their”, “sheer” (as in lingerie), possibly “leer”.
      • “stripley tytts” – “Stripey tights”, “strip lay tits”.
      • “er” – “Or”, “er” (sound of uncertainty), “err”.
      • “stalkings” – “Stockings”, “stalker”.
      • “awnd” – “And”, “owned”, possibly “awed”.
      • “thair” – “There”, “hair”.
      • “alas-bonds” – “Alice-band” (a type of headband, so called because of its frequent appearance in illustrations of Alice), “alas” (expression of misfortune) “bonds” (restraints).
      • Lewis Carroll was an amateur photographer who enjoyed taking photographs of prepubescent girls in states of undress. The mainstream society of his time did not consider this in any way sexual, though Lucia obviously does.
    • Shy is queert shamalice impenetratin’ the forbeddin torrit’ry, a prypubascent maidel pasturinfer an ubseen Victimian phornotographer, projeculating a-lust tru ther lurkin’ glass from wanderneath the blacault cover’t mask-abating his trypoderastyc uptickle equimpent.

      • “Shy” – “She”, “shy”.
      • “queert” – “Quite”, “queer”.
      • “shamalice” – “Shameless”, “sham” (fake) “Alice” (Note that Lucia is almost an anagram of Alice).
      • “impenetratin’” – “In penetrating”, “impenetrable”.
      • “forbeddin” – “Forbidden”, “for bedding”, possibly “foreboding”.
      • “torrit’ry” – “Territory”, “torrid” (hot).
      • “prypubascent” – “Prepubescent”, “pry pub ascent”, “pry pubic scent”.
      • “maidel” – “Maiden”, “model”.
      • “pasturinfer” – “Posturing for”, “pasture infer”, “past urine fur”.
      • “ubseen” – “Obscene”, “unseen”.
      • “Victimian” – “Victorian”, “victim”.
      • “phornotographer” – “Photographer”, “pornographer”.
      • “projeculating” – “Projecting” (in the sense of projecting light; in the sense of their rear end projecting out from under the cloth; perhaps in the sense of loudly projecting voice), “ejaculating” (orgasming; speaking).
      • “a-lust” – “Always”, “lustfully”.
      • “tru” – “Through”, “true”.
      • “ther” – “Their”, “her”.
      • “lurkin’ glass” – “Looking-glass” (metaphor for camera lens; mirror; Through the Looking-Glass); “lurking”.
      • “wanderneath” – “Underneath”, “wander” (as in wandering hands that sneak beneath a lady’s clothes).
      • “blacault” – “Blackout” (preventing light leakage), “caul” (as in Moore’s performance piece The Birth Caul).
      • “cover’t” – “Cover”, “covert” (hidden; hiding place for a hunter).
      • “mask-abating” – “Masturbating” (Lucia extends the notion of “fiddling with” to a more explicit metaphor), “mask abating”.
      • “trypoderastyc” – “Tripod and his”, “try pederasty”.
      • “uptickle” – “Optical”, “tickle up” (perhaps between a girl’s legs).
      • “equimpent” – “Equipment”, “quim” (slang for “vagina”) “pent” (confined).
    • Quirker then a shuddow she slaps entoe the cuncealing vagitation undies gonne fram mertail slight, dans-in a minnowette anipst the driftin waiterwades, Ophailure synching intow the abskewer gruen dipths.

      • “Quirker” – “Quicker”, “quirkier”.
      • “then” – “Than”, “then”.
      • “shuddow” – “Shadow”, “shudder”.
      • “slaps” – “Slips”, “slaps”.
      • “entoe” – “Into”, “entering toe”.
      • “cuncealing” – “Concealing”, “cunny” (cunt; rabbit).
      • “vagitation” – “Vegetation”, “vagina”, “agitation”.
      • “undies” – “And is”, “undies” (informal “underwear”), possibly “undines”.
      • “gonne” – “Gone”, “gonne” (archaic form of “gun”).
      • “fram” – “From”, “pram” (baby carriage).
      • “mertail” – “Mortal”, “mermaid tail”.
      • “slight” – “Sight”, “slight” (small; insult).
      • “dans-in” – “Dancing”, “dans” (French for “inside”, “during”).
      • “minnowette” – “Minuet”, “minnow” “-ette” (small female).
      • “anipst” – “Amidst” – “nips” (nipples; small drinks; pinches).
      • “driftin” – “Drifting”, “drift in”.
      • “waiterwades” – “Waterweeds”, “waiter wades”.
      • “Ophailure” – “Ophelia” (Hamlet‘s sweetheart, who went mad and later drowned among picturesque water weeds), “O failure”.
      • “synching” – “Sinking”, “synchronizing”.
      • “intow” – “Into”, “in the undertow”.
      • “abskewer” – “Obscure” (dim; unknown), “ab-” (from) “skewer” (possibly with sexual connotation?).
      • “gruen” – “Green”, “gruen” (German for “green”), “grue” (gore).
      • “dipths” – “Depths”, “dip” (immerse in water; dance move).
  • Paragraph 13
    At the frayed margins of the copse she trips amongst the buttercups and daisies, pirouetting, harlequinading upon a fine Arcadian carpet made from pine needles, strewn fir cones that resemble hand grenades and everywhere an effervescent froth of dandelion puffballs. Broken shards of light descend upon her from above in stained-glass patches, dappling her cheek and speckling her virile shoulders as she prances in a bright old shower of blossom.

    • At the frayd marchins awf the cupse she treps amokst the betterclaps and dayzes, pierroetting, harliquinderin upawn a feyn Arcabian corpet mead firm pines and neddles, strewen flircones that resymbol land-greenaids amd aviriwhere an everfessent frath o’ dendrilion perfbells.

      • “frayd” – “Frayed”, “afraid”. Possibly “Frey” (Norse god of prosperity).
      • “marchins” – “Margins”, “march in”.
      • “awf” – “of”, “awful” (frightening; inspiring awe).
      • “cupse” – “Copse” (small group of trees), “cup” (drinking vessel; mystical symbol for the element of water; device to protect the genitals during sports).
      • “treps” – “trips” (walk, run, or dance with quick light steps), “trepidatious” (fearful).
      • “amokst” – “Amongst”, “amok” (behave uncontrollably and disruptively).
      • “betterclaps” – “Buttercups”, “better” “claps” (applauds; restrains (“clap in irons”); instances of gonorrhea).
      • “dayzes” – “Daisies”, “days”, “dazes”.
      • “pierroetting” – “Pirouetting” (spinning, sometimes as a specific dance move), “Pierrot” (a stock character in French pantomime, with clown makeup, a white costume, and a pointed hat).
      • “harliquinderin” – “Harlequinading” (moving in a silly manner, derived from “harlequinade”, the section of the pantomime in which the clown Harlequin performs), “her liquid wandering”.
      • “upawn” – “Upon”, “you pawn” (evoking Alice playing the part of a chess pawn in Through the Looking-Glass).
      • “feyn” – “Fine”, “fey” (of or related to fairies; resigned to fate), possibly “feign” (dissemble).
      • “Arcabian” – “Arcadian” (relating to Arcadia, an ideal rustic paradise), “Arabian” (from Araby, a region noted for fine carpets).
      • “corpet” – “Carpet”, “corpse”, “cor” (expression of surprise; French for “horn”; Irish for “reel” (dance type); Latin for “heart”) “pet” (animal companion; to stroke).
      • “mead” – “Made”, “mead” (poetic “meadow”; alcoholic drink made from fermented honey).
      • “firm” – “From”, “firm”.
      • “pines and neddles” – “Pine needles”, “pins and needles”, “neddle” (suggest??), possibly “nettle”.
      • “strewen” – “Strewn” (scattered), “trews” (trousers). Possibly “stew” (food; anxiety; archaic “brothel”), “wen” (boil, cyst).
      • “flircones” – “Fir cones”, “flirt”.
      • “resymbol” – “Resemble”, “re-” (again) “symbol”.
      • “land-greenaids” – “Hand-grenades”, “that which aids the land to become green”.
      • “amd” – “And”, “am”, “a MD” (doctor of medicine).
      • “aviriwhere” – “Everywhere”, “a virile where”.
      • “everfessent” – “Effervescent” (sparkling), “ever” “fess” (confess) “sent”. Possibly “fastened”?
      • “frath” – “Froth”, “wrath”. Possibly “frat” (fraternity)?
      • “dendrilion” – “Dandelion”, “dendri-” (relating to “tree”) “lion”.
      • “perfbells” – “Puffballs”, “perfect bells”. Possibly “perforated”.
    • Braken shurds a’light descediment apun her form above in staint-glasp patures, dabblin’ her chik ornd spackoleeng her fairisle shulders arse she prancess in a brightol’ showher o’ blissom.

      • “Braken” – “Broken”, “bracken” (ferny undergrowth), possibly “brake” (archaic “thicket”).
      • “shurds” – “Shards”, “hurts”, possibly “herds”, “hurdle”, “sure”.
      • “a’light” – “Of light”, “alight” (to land upon; on fire).
      • “descediment” – “Descend”, “sediment”.
      • “apun” – “Upon”, “a pun”. Possibly “ape on”.
      • “form” – “From”, “form”.
      • “staint-glasp” – “Stained-glass”, “saint”, “stain”, “taint”, “stint”, “clasp”, “gasp”, “gaps”.
      • “patures” – “Patches”, “pastures”, “pictures”.
      • “dabblin'” – “Dappling” (putting spots on), “dabbling” (dipping feet in water; doing casually).
      • “chik” – “Cheek” (side of face; arrogance), “chick” (slang for “female”; baby bird).
      • “ornd” – “And”, “and/or”, possibly “ornate”, “ordinary”?
      • “spackoleeng” – “speckling”, “spackling” (repair with plaster), “pack of lies”, suggest??.
      • “fairisle” – “Virile” (manly; strong), “fair isle” (Ireland).
      • “shulders” – “Shoulders”, “shudders”, possibly “hulders” (seductive female creature in Scandinavian folklore).
      • “arse” – “As”, “arse” (British dialect “ass”).
      • “prancess” – “Prances”, “princess”.
      • “brightol’” – “Bright old”, possibly “Brighton”, suggest?
      • “showher” – “Shower”, “show her”.
      • “blissom” – “Blossom”, “bliss”, “lissome” (graceful).
  • Paragraph 14
    She’s aware the very world beneath her feet, the landscape that she walks and wends upon, is made of jothing but her sleeping father’s body, of his merciful remains while he himself dreams underground. She can recall her happy girlhood, when she was his inspiration, dancing through the string of miniature apartments that they were forever suffering eviction from, and papa sitting at his desk and writing his morbid masterpiece while she skipped merrily; while she performed her capers. They had a private language, even then, one that they spoke between the pair of them, while Nora and Giorgio sat by all unsuspecting, too involved in their own secretive and oedipal relationship, locked in forbidden union, to pay attention to what little Lucia and her nonsensical papa were prattling about. She was Jim’s choice. They understood each other. All alone amongst the family she was the only one to read his books. He wrote them for and about her. She was Nausicaa, whose adolescent charms kept Ulysses bound to her fragrant island. She was Anna Livia Plurabelle, likewise Iseult, little Milly Bloom and also dirty, flirty Gertie whom the altar boys slaver over, Miss MacDowell whence they were digging up the dirt for their obscenity investigations. That had been a time, now! All four of them cooped up together in their little flats, living in each other’s pockets, and in all the papers was discussions of the dad’s supposed pederasty, his implied desire for their little girl. Of course, it hadn’t ever been that way with bold Lucia and her dad … all her father-fucking had been on a purely literary level … but her mother had begun regarding her suspiciously from that point onwards.

    • Schez awhere the viri wald bemyth her feat, the lenscake thot she walx and whends apen, isth mud o’ knowthing bit her slippin’ further’s bawdy, Offhas merciaful remainds wile hea hcelf drealms indergrind.

      • “Schez” – “She’s”, “Scheherazade” (famous storyteller of The Arabian Nights), “schizophrenic”.
      • “awhere” – “Aware”, “a where”.
      • “viri” – “Very”, “virile”.
      • “wald” – “World”, “wald” (German for “forest”), possibly “wold” (a piece of high, open, uncultivated land).
      • “bemyth” – “Beneath”, “become a myth”.
      • “feat” – “Feet”, “feat” (accomplishment).
      • “lenscake” – “Landscape”, “lens” (recalling Carroll’s photography) “cake” (such as Alice eats).
      • “thot” – “That”, “thought”.
      • “walx” – “Walks”, “wax” (to grow larger).
      • “whends” – “Wends” (travels, often in an indirect route), “when -ds” (suggestive of traveling through time), “wanes” (grows smaller).
      • “apen” – “Upon”, “a pen”. Possibly “upend”, “Apep” (Egyptian god of chaos), “ape”, “aping” (imitating).
      • “isth” – “Is”, “isthmus” (narrow piece of land connecting two larger pieces of land otherwise separated by water).
      • “mud” – “Made”, “mud”.
      • “knowthing” – “Nothing”, “a thing which knows”, “a thing which is known”.
      • “bit” – “But”, “bit”.
      • “slippin'” – “Sleeping”, “slipping” (becoming less stable).
      • “further’s” – “Father’s”, “furthers” (helps along). Possibly “führer”.
      • “bawdy” – “Body”, “bawdy” (lewd).
        • Lucia seems to imagine James Joyce as a primordial mythological being, from whom the universe was physically constructed. Compare Ymir in Norse mythology (referenced above in paragraph 7).
      • “Offhas” – “Of his”, “off” “has”, “Orpheus” (mythological character who journeyed to the underworld). Possibly “off with his head” (quote from Alice in Wonderland).
      • “merciaful” – “Merciful” (possibly ‘merciful’, because without them, nothing else could survive?), “Mercia” (An Anglo-Saxon kingdom in England from the sixth through tenth centuries).
      • “remainds” – “Remains”, “reminds”, possibly “re:” (regarding) “maids” (virgins).
      • “wile” – “While”, “wile” (cunningness).
      • “hea” – “He”, “heat”, suggest??
      • “hcelf” – “Himself”, possibly “elf”. Obiwanspicoli notes “hcelf contains HCE or Humphrey Chimpsen Earwicker, the protagonist in Finnegans Wake“.
      • “drealms” – “Dreams”, “realms”.
      • “indergrind” – “Underground”, “in der (the) grind”.
    • She ken recurl her hoppy girlhoot, winn she whiz his esperation, dinsing thrue the strang of minochore apertmince dirt dey worr farover shuffering invection fam, end papper satin et his dusk hand writhin his morbidic mastapause whale shea skiffed merilee; weil shiperfoamed her caperet.

      • “ken” – “Can”, “ken” (knowledge; to know).
      • “recurl” – “Recall”, “curl again” (recalling her pirouettes, above).
      • “hoppy” – “Happy”, “hoppy” (in a hopping manner; tasting significantly of hops).
      • “girlhoot” – “Girlhood”, “hoot” (noise an owl makes).
      • “winn” – “When”, “win”, possibly “winsome” (attractive).
      • “whiz” – “Was”, “whiz” (to move quickly; to urinate; wizard, expert).
      • “esperation” – “Inspiration”, “ESP” (extra-sensory perception), possibly “aspiration” (desired goal; breathing).
      • “dinsing” – “Dancing”, “din” (loud noise) “sing”.
      • “thrue” – “Through”, “true”.
      • “strang” – “String” (sequence), “strange”. Possibly “stranger”, “strangle”.
      • “minochore” – “Miniature”, “min” (less; archaic “memory”) “chore” (required annoying task). Possibly “minotaur” (mythical bull-headed man).
      • “apertmince” – “Apartments”, “a pert mince” (an attractive (or cheeky) walk). Possibly “mice”, as would be found in such apartments.
      • “dirt” – “That”, “dirt” (these cheap apartments would have been dirty).
      • “dey” – “They”, “dey” (dialect “dairymaid”; title of the Regent of Algiers).
      • “worr” – “Were”, “worry”.
      • “farover” – “Forever”, “far over”.
      • “shuffering” – “Suffering”, “shuffling”.
      • “invection” – “Eviction”, “invective” (swearing). Possibly “infection”.
      • “fam” – “From”, “family”.
      • “end” – “And”, “end”.
      • “papper” – “Papa”, “paper”. Possibly “pepper”.
      • “satin” – “Sat in”, “satin” (a material that the poor family would rarely have seen).
      • “et” – “At”, “et” (dialect “ate”; Latin for “and”).
      • “dusk” – “Desk”, “dusk”.
      • “hand writhin” – “And writing”, “handwriting” (James Joyce wrote his manuscripts longhand), “writhing”.
      • “morbidic” – Suggest??, “morbid”.
      • “mastapause” – “Masterpiece”, “mast a pause”, “masta” (dialect “master”), “masturbate”, “menopause”.
        • The masterpiece in question is Finnegans Wake, which Joyce worked on between roughly 1922 and 1939. Lucia would have been about 15 when he started, and was about 32 when it was published.
      • “whale” – “While”, “whale” (possibly an allusion to another author’s masterpiece, Moby Dick).
      • “shea” – “She”, “Shea” (possibly referring to Milo O’Shea, who played Leopold Bloom in the 1967 film adaptation of Ulysses).
      • “skiffed” – “Skipped”, “traveled in a skiff” (small boat).
      • “merilee” – “Merrily”, Suggest?? Possibly “mermaid”?
      • “weil” – “Well”, “Weill” (Kurt Weill (1900-1950), composer whose work The Threepenny Opera was one of Moore’s sources for The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen: Century 1910).
      • “shiperfoamed” – “She performed”, “ship across the foam”.
      • “caperet” – “Capers” (dances; complex crimes), “carpet”, “caperet” (Latin “she would capture”).
    • Dahab a pirvarte lungwish, haven den, won dad dayspook betwin the purr of om, woil Gnor and Gorge sat bayeurl insispectin, two envalved in dare raw’n secretif eirnd iddypull relaidsonsip, lact in forbodin yernion, to play atension towhit litrel Llusia haund her nonesincical papyr wor prittiling abeaut.

      • “Dahab” – “They had”, “Dahab” (Muslim name meaning “Gold”; a popular spot for divers off the Sinai Peninsula).
      • “pirvarte” – “Private”, “pervert”, possibly “pirate”.
      • “lungwish” – “Language”, “lung” (organ involved in speech) “wish”.
      • “haven” – “Even”, “haven” (place of safety), possibly “heaven”.
      • “den” – “Then”, “den” (home of an animal).
      • “won” – “One”, “won”.
      • “dad” – “That”, “dad”.
      • “dayspook” – “They spoke”, “day spook” (although ghosts traditionally appear at night).
      • “betwin” – “Between”, “become a twin”.
      • “purr” – “Pair”, “purr” (sound of a satisfied cat).
      • “om” – “Them”, “Om” (a sacred sound in various eastern religions).
      • “woil” – “While”, “woild” (dialect “world”), possibly “oil”.
      • “Gnor” – “Nora”, “ignore”. Possibly “gnu”.
      • “Gorge” – “Giorgio”, “gorge” (to eat greedily; a narrow, steep valley).
      • “bayeurl” – “By, all”, “Bayeux” (Tapestry), “bay” “earl”.
      • “insispectin” – “Unsuspecting”, “insisting”, “inspecting”, “in sis pecker”. Possibly “pectin” (plant substance used in making jam).
      • “two” – “Too”, “two” (people).
      • “envalved” – “Involved”, “inside the valves” (of each other’s hearts).
      • “dare” – “Their”, “dare” (be bold).
      • “raw’n” – “Own”, “raw and”.
      • “secretif” – “Secretive”, “secret if” (suggesting the uncertainty of whether they were actually lovers, or merely psychologically entangled). Possibly “If” (Château d’If, famous French prison).
      • “eirnd”, “And”, “Eire” (Ireland), possibly “earned”.
      • “iddypull” – “Oedipal” (like Oedipus, a mythological character who married his own mother), “like an id” (the psychological seat of unconscious urges) “pull”.
      • “relaidsonsip” – “Relationship”, “re-” (again) “laid” (had sex with), “son” “sip”.
      • “lact” – “Locked”, “lactate” (produce milk).
      • “forbodin” – “Forbidden”, “foreboding”. Possibly “for Odin”.
      • “yernion” – “Union”, “Yearn” (desire greatly).
      • “play” – “Pay”, “play”.
      • “atension” – “Attention”, “a tension”.
      • “towhit” – “To what”, “to wit” (that is to say), “whit” (very small amount).
      • “litrel” – “Little”, “literal” (using words in their plain sense; British printing term “a misprint of a letter”).
      • “Llusia” – “Lucia”, “illusion”.
      • “haund” – “And”, “haunt”, “hound”. Possibly “haunch” (buttock and thigh).
      • “nonesincical” – “Nonsensical”, “none sin”, “since”, possibly “sickle”.
      • “papyr” – “Papa”, “papyrus” (early form of paper), “pauper” (poor person).
      • “wor” – “Were”, “work”, “world”, “worry”, “worm”.
      • “prittiling” – “Prattling” (talking foolishly), “prettily”. Possibly “pry tiling”?
      • “abeaut” – “About”, “a beaut” (informal “beautiful thing”), possibly “beau” (sweetheart).
  • Page 888
    • She was Jim’s choyce.

      • “Jim’s choyce” – “Jim’s choice”, “James Joyce”.
    • They interstud ych auther.

      • “interstud” – “Understood”, “inter stud” (a stud going inside someone?).
      • “ych” – “Each”, “ych” (Welsh for “cow”, “bull”, “ox”), “wych” (a type of elm tree).
      • “auther” – “Other”, “author”.
    • Ullulone aminxt the famely she wise the undly wanter reed his brooks.

      • “Ullulone” – “All alone”, “ululate” (to howl or wail).
      • “aminxt” – “Amongst”, “minx” (an impudent or flirtatious young woman).
      • “famely” – “Family”, “famously”.
      • “wise” – “Was”, “wise”.
      • “undly” – “Only”, “undulate”, “undine” (water spirit).
      • “wanter” – “One to”, “want-er”, “water”, “wander”.
      • “reed” – “Read”, “reed”.
      • “brooks” – “Books”, “brooks”
    • He rit thame furor and abaughter.

      • “rit” – “Wrote”, “writ” (archaic “wrote”; legal document), “rit” (dialect “to tear”; music “to slow down”).
      • “thame” – “Them”, “fame”, “athame” (ritual magic dagger), “Thames” (river that flows through London), “Thame” (town in Oxfordshire).
      • “furor” – “For her”, “furor” (collective excitement).
      • “abaughter” – “About her”, “a daughter”, “bought”.
    • She woos Nautycaa, who’s idyllescent chairms capt Droolysses bownned to her fraglant eyelend.

      • “woos” – “Was”, “woos” (tries to gain the love of).
      • “Nautycaa” – “Nausicaa” (beautiful female character who appears in Homer’s Odyssey; she did not keep Ulysses captive – Lucia (or Moore) is probably confusing her with Calypso, who did), “naughty” “caca” (childish “feces”).
        • Obiwanspicoli notes that “Nausicaa” is also the name of an episode in James Joyce’s Ulysses, where Gerty MacDowell appears (see below).
      • “who’s” – “Whose”, “who is”.
      • “idyllescent” – “Adolescent” (which Nausicaa may have been), “idyll” (extremely happy time) “scent”.
      • “chairms” – “Charms” (attractive qualities; magic spells), “chair”, “hair”, “air”, “arms”, “harms”.
      • “capt” – “Kept”, “captive”, “captain”.
      • “Droolysses” – “Ulysses”, “drooly” (suggesting mental enfeeblement).
      • “bownned” – “Bound”, “bow down”, “owned”.
      • “fraglant” – “Fragrant” (Calypso’s island is described so), “flagrant” (bold).
      • “eyelend” – “Island”, “eye land”.
    • Shim wash Inner Livea Pealobells, lakewise Isobbe, luttle Melliblum ar elso derti, flerti Girty whomb the altboys sliva effer, Muss MuckTrowell whench thy wah dirgin ub the dourt fur ther upsinetty invicestigmations.

      • “Shim” – “She”, “shimmer”, “shimmy”.
      • “wash” – “Was”, “wash”.
      • “Inner Livea Pealobells” – “Anna Livia Plurabelle” (Character in Finnegans Wake), “Inner” “a live”, “peal (sound of multiple bells) of bells” (Lucia’s inner life is joyous).
      • “lakewise” – “Likewise”, “relatimg to a lake”.
      • “Isobbe” – “Iseult” (Heroine of 12th century tale referenced in Finnegans Wake), “I sob” (Iseult’s story is a tragic one).
        • Obiwanspicoli notes that in Ulysses, “Issy” is the daughter of HCE and ALP. He also suggests a possible allusion to the Biblical “Esau“.
      • “luttle” – “Little”, suggest??
      • “Melliblum” – “Molly Bloom” (character in Ulysses), “mellifluous” (pleasant-sounding), “Blum” (possibly René, French ballet producer?).
      • “ar” – “And”, “or”, “are”.
      • “elso” – “Also”, “Elsa” (woman’s name), suggest??
      • “derti, flerti Girty” – “Dirty, flirty Gertie” (Obiwanspicoli notes that, in Ulysses, Gertie MacDowell “entices Bloom by lifting her skirts and showing her legs. It’s heavily implied that Bloom masturbates and this episode resulted in the famous obscenity trial surrounding the book.”), “ert” (British dialect “urge on”), “girt” (archaic “wearing”).
      • “whomb” – “Whom”, “womb”.
      • “altboys” – “Altar boys”, “all the boys”.
      • “sliva” – “Slaver” (to drool), “saliva”.
      • “effer” – “Over”, “F (semi-polite “fuck”) her”.
      • “Muss” – “Miss”, “muss” (to make dirty or disheveled).
      • “MuckTrowell” – “McDowell” (Gertie, see above), “muck” (filth) “trowel” (small handheld tool, which might be used to dig in the muck).
      • “whench” – “Whence” (from where), “wench” (archaic “prostitute”).
      • “thy” – “They”, “thy” (archaic “your”).
      • “wah” – “Were”, “wah” (sound of a baby crying).
      • “dirgin ub” – “Digging up” (finding), “dirge” (sad or funereal music), “ub” – suggest??
      • “dourt” – “Dirt” (scandalous material), “dour” (gloomy).
      • “fur” – “For”, “fur” (pubic hair?).
      • “ther” – “Their”, “the”, “there”.
      • “upsinetty” – “Obscenity”, “up sin Etty”, “upsy-daisy”.
      • “invicestigmations” – “Investigations”, “in vice, stigma”.
    • That hed bane a trime, now!

      • “hed” – “Had”, “head”, possibly “he’d”.
      • “bane” – “Been”, “bane” (archaic “something which causes death”).
      • “trime” – “Time”, “trim” (in good shape), “try me”.
    • All fier ovem carped up illtogather in Leurlittle flatus, lavin in itch athers puckets, undin awl the paypers vas descursions of the da’s simposaid pardarresty, hes implite defire fa ther litola ’gel.

      • “fier” – “Four”, “fire”, possibly “five”.
      • “ovem” – “Of them”, “ovum” (egg), “oven”.
      • “carped” – “Cooped” (crowded), “carp” (to complain), “cramped”.
      • “illtogather” – “All together”, “ill to gather”.
      • “Leurlittle” – “Their little”, “Leur” (suggest??), “fleur” (French “flower”).
      • “flatus” – “Flats” (apartments), “flatus” (flatulence).
      • “lavin in itch athers puckets” – “Living in each other’s pockets” (spend too much time together).
      • “lavin” – “Living”, “laving” (washing).
      • “itch” – “Each”, “itch”.
      • “athers” – “Other’s”, “athers” (suggest??).
      • “puckets” – “Pockets”, “Puck” (fairy character in A Midsummer Night’s Dream).
      • “undin” – “And then”, “undine” (water spirit), possibly “un- din” (become quiet?).
      • “awl” – “All”, “awl” (tool for making holes), “aw” (sound of dismay).
      • “paypers” – “Papers”, “pay purse”, “paupers”.
      • “vas” – “With”, “vas” (vessel or duct, as in “vas deferens”, a part of the penis), possibly “vast”.
      • “descursions” – “Discussions”, “these curses”. Possibly “descant” (talk tediously), “cursive” (handwriting form).
      • “simposaid” – “Supposed”, “symposium” (conference), “simper” (smile coyly) “said”, “Sempo” (Lucia’s imagined lover, see paragraph 10).
      • “pardarresty” – “Pederasty” (sexual activity involving children), “pard” (leopard; dialect “partner”) “arrest”.
      • “hes” – “His”, “he is”.
      • “implite” – “Implied”, “impolite”. Possibly “in a plight”.
      • “defire” – “Desire”, “the fire” (of lust).
      • “fa ther” – “For the”, “father”.
      • “litola” – “Little”, “Lolita” (underage girl in Nabokov’s Lolita, whom the narrator becomes sexually involved with).
      • “‘gel” – “Girl”, “gel” (dialect “girl”), “angel”.
    • A’ curse, it hardent aver ban dirt waywid bold Lucenssyus andor Daddo … alt hier featherforking hid behn onour purly laterearly lovall … bud her mitherhood begon regradin’ whor sispiteously form that peint onwars.

      • “A’ curse” – “Of course”, “a curse”.
      • “hardent” – “Hadn’t”, “harden” (like a penis?), “hard dent”.
      • “aver” – “Ever”, “aver” (to assert, often in a legal sense).
      • “ban” – “Been”, “ban” (prohibit; archaic “curse”), “banns” (announcement of marriage engagement), “Bann” (name of two separate rivers in Ireland).
      • “dirt” – “That”, “dirt” (especially in the sense of “scandal”).
      • “waywid” – “Way with”, “wayward” (uncontrollable, unpredictable).
      • “Lucenssyus” – “Lucia”, “licentious” (lustful), “Odysseus”.
      • “andor” – “And her”, “and/or”, “andro-” (Greek prefix meaning man, male, or masculine).
      • “Daddo” – “Daddy”, “dildo”.
      • “alt” – “All”, “alternative”.
      • “hier” – “Her”, “hierarchy”, “hier” (French “yesterday”), “hieros gamos” (Greek “holy marriage”, sometimes symbolic).
      • “featherforking” – “Father-fucking”, “feather” (fanciful term for pubic hair) “fork” (between two legs).
      • “hid” – “Had”, “hid”.
      • “behn” – “Been”, “Behn” (Apra Behn (1640-1689), female playwright).
      • “onour” – “On a”, “on our” (possibly referring to On Our Backs, title of both the first women-run erotica magazine, and a book by Rosita Sweetman examining sexual attitudes in 1980s Ireland).
      • “purly” – “Purely”, “purl” (knitting term; (of a stream or river) to flow with a swirling motion and babbling sound).
      • “laterearly” – “Literary”, “late or early”, “laterally”.
      • “lovall” – “Level”, “love all”.
      • “bud” – “But”, “bud” (flower bud; metaphorically, a woman’s sexual parts).
      • “mitherhood begon” – “Mother had begun”, “motherhood begone”, “mither” (to pester).
      • “regradin’” – “Regarding”, “re-” “grade” (assess; make level).
      • “whor” – “Her”, “whore”.
      • “sispiteously” – “Suspiciously”, “sis piteously”.
      • “form” – “From”, “form” (body).
      • “peint” – “Point”, “penis”. Possibly “paint” (makeup).
      • “onwars” – “Onwards”, “at war”.
  • Paragraph 15
    It was so unfair! It wasn’t like her dad was doing any more than flirting with her, after all. He wasn’t fucking her: that would have been her older sibling. Daddy was the only one who cared about her, just as she cared about him with all his drinking and his pain-filled eyes, like winter ponds, or it is another problem with his work in progress that affects him. She’d stood by him through it all, back when she called her father “L’Esclamadore”, just like she called his good friend Mister Pound “Signor Sterlina”. Oh, what grand and frightful times they’d been!

    • It wish so unfrere!

      • “wish” – “Was”, “wish”.
      • “unfrere” – “Unfair”, “un-” “frère” (French “brother”).
    • It worsent like her Ded whis dowin inny mar then fliterin’ wather, ifft’rawl.

      • “worsent” – “Wasn’t”, “worsen”, “war sent”.
      • “Ded” – “Dad”, “dead”, “deed”.
      • “whis” – “Was”, “his”, “wizz” (vulgar “urinate”), “whiskers”.
      • “dowin” – “Doing”, “do win”. Possibly “dower” (to endow with a marriage price).
      • “inny” – “Any”, “inner”, “in knee”, “innie” (concave belly button).
      • “mar” – “More”, “mar” (damage).
      • “then” – “Than”, “then”.
      • “fliterin’” – “Flirting”, “flittering” (moving like a butterfly).
      • “wather” – “With her”, “water”.
      • “ifft’rawl” – “After all”, “River Liffey” “trawl” (to fish with a net).
    • He ousent ficcing her: thirt wad haf born her ulter sobling.

      • “ousent” – “Wasn’t”, “you sent”.
      • “ficcing” – “Fucking”, “making into a fiction”, “fico” (Italian “fig”; archaic “rude gesture”).
      • “thirt” – “That”, “to hurt”. Possibly “shirt”.
      • “wad” – “Would”, “wad” (slang “sperm”).
      • “haf” – “Have”, “half”. Possibly “haft” (shaft of a weapon).
      • “born” – “Been”, “born”, “borne” (the weight of a lover).
      • “ulter” – “Older”, “ulterior” (as in motives).
      • “sobling” – “Sibling”, “sob” “ling” (suggesting “language”, “tongue”).
    • Babbo wesdee earnly ween who clared abitter, joyst as she curd abet hirm weathall his drunkin anders panefull ice, lake wanter pondres, ir it is agnawther probling woth his wakin procress thut affacts hum.

      • Babbo – Italian for “daddy”.
      • “wesdee” – “Was the”, “we see”?, suggest??
      • “earnly” – “Only”, “earn”, “early”.
      • “ween” – “One”, “ween” (archaic “to think”).
      • “clared” – “Cared”, “Clare” (John Clare, see section three; Irish name meaning “bright, clear”).
      • “abitter” – “About her”, “a bitter”.
      • “joyst” – “Just”, “Joyce”, possibly “joust”.
        • Lucia and James are the only true “Joyces”; Nora didn’t marry James until 1931, and Giorgio (according to this narrative) was not James’ son.
      • “curd” – “Cared”, “curd” (coagulated milk), “cured”.
      • “abet” – “About”, “abet” (aid, usually in a crime), “a bet”.
      • “weathall” – “With all”, “weather”, “wheat”, “hall”.
      • “drunkin” – “Drinking”, “drunken”, “drunk in”.
      • “anders” – “And his”, “Anders” (Scandinavian name), suggest?
      • “panefull ice” – “pain-filled eyes”, “pane” (as in window), “painful”, “ice”.
      • “lake” – “Like”, “lake”.
      • “wanter” – “Winter”, “want her”, possibly “wanton”.
      • “pondres” – “Ponds”, “ponders”.
      • “ir it is” – “Or it is”, “irritates”.
      • “agnawther” – “Another”, “a gnaw there”, “author”.
      • “probling” – “Problem”, “probing”, “probe” “ling” (tongue).
      • “woth” – “With”, “wot” (archaic “to know”).
      • “wakin procress” – “Work in progress” (working title of Finnegans Wake), “waking process”, “wacking” (slang “masturbating”) “procreates”, “we kin pro cress (water plant)”.
      • “thut” – “That”, “hut”, “tut” (expression of disapproval).
      • “affacts” – “Affects”, “of facts”.
      • “hum” – “Him”, “hum”.
    • Shade stook bli hom truettall, beck wone she kelled hoarfeyther “L’Esclamadore”, jest lark she galled hez god freund Maestre Pound “Signor Sterlina”.

      • “Shade” – “She’d”, “shade”.
      • “stook” – “Stuck”, “took”, “mistook”. Possibly “stork”.
      • “bli” – “By”, “blithe” (happy and carefree). Possibly “Bligh” (Captain of the HMS Bounty, whose men famously mutinied).
      • “hom” – “Him”, “homme” (French “man”).
      • “truettall” – “Through it all”, “true tale”. Possibly “cruet” (condiment container), “tall”.
      • “beck” – “Back”, “beckon”.
      • “wone” – “When”, “won”, “one”, “woe”.
      • “kelled” – “Called”, “killed”, “Kells” (The Book of Kells, created by Irish monks circa 800 A.D.).
      • “hoarfeyther” – “Her father”, “hoar” (gray-haired with age; frost) “fey” (fairy; resigned to fate) “there”, “how are fate her”.
      • “L’Esclaramonde” – Obiwanspicoli notes “Italian for the Exclaimer. According to Carol Loeb Shloss Lucia always spoke Italian with her father, the language of her birth.”
        • May also refer to Esclaramonde of Foix, a prominent 13th century Catharist; her first name means (in Occitan) “Clarity of the world”.
      • “jest” – “Just”, “jest” (joke).
      • “lark” – “Like”, “lark” (bird; something silly done for fun).
      • “galled” – “Called”, “galled” (annoyed).
      • “hez” – “His”, “fez” (type of hat), “he’s”.
      • “god” – “Good”, “god”.
      • “freund” – “Friend”, “freund” (German “friend”), “Freud” (1856-1939, founder of psychoanalysis and colleague of Carl Jung).
      • “Maestre” – “Mister”, “maestro” (master; Italian “teacher”), possibly “maze tree”.
      • “Pound” – Ezra Pound (1885-1972), poet and friend of James Joyce.
      • “Signor Sterlina” – Italian for “Mister Pound”, with a pun on the money. Ezra Pound, though from America originally, lived in England, where the primary unit of currency was the “Pound Sterling”.
    • Owe, whirt grinnd end flightful temps thade behan!

      • “Owe” – “Oh”, “owe” (be in debt).
      • “whirt” – “What”, possibly “shirt”, suggest??
      • “grinnd” – “Grand”, “grinned”, possibly “grind”.
      • “end” – “And”, “end”.
      • “flightful” – “Frightful”, full of flight”. Possibly “delightful”.
      • “temps” – “Times”, “temps” (French “times”), “temporary things”, “temperatures”.
      • “thade” – “They had”, “Hades” (Hell), possibly “shade”.
      • “behan” – “Been”, “behind, “Behan” (Brendan Behan (1923-1964), Irish poet).
  • Paragraph 16
    Still light of heart she hops and skitters down an incline, thick with blossom, heading deeper into the asylum woodlands, deeper into no-man’s-land. She has resolved that her tale shall not go unspoken, that she shall not be reduced to a mere footnote in her father’s authorized biography. She counts herself a Queen of infinite space, were it not that she usually has bad dreams, and she’ll not stand by idly while her brothers suspect bloodline (like her nephew Stephen) rewrote history by editing Lucia out of it. She will not rest content and see her father’s masterpiece disinherited and falsely redefined, his Camelot unsexed and bowdlerized by hard-faced critics and their misled arts, murdered, that’s all very plain to see, by literary executioners unworthy of a writer of his calibre,  perceiving him as pornographic in his correspondence and unladylike in all his descriptions. Lucia herself would be abandoned, unremembered, left out of the index, Mrs Rochestered away into a psychiatric hospital and cast adrift upon the wide Sargasso Sea. Her memory would only be preserved by accident as if she were a sacrificial victim that had been interred beneath their father, unrequired for the established narrative.

    • Stell leyd of hert she haps en skirtles daanan uncline, thickwit glossom, herdin dipper unter thee assailem wordlanps, dieper entre nermadslant.

      • “Stell” – “Still”, “stellar” (relating to stars), “stell” (archaic “to place”).
      • “leyd” – “Light” – “Leyden jar” (a type of electrical battery, invented in the 18th century), “ley” (fallow field; magical line connecting two points), “eyed”, “lied” (German romantic song).
      • “hert” – “Heart”, “her”, “hurt”, “hart” (archaic “stag”).
      • “haps” – “Hops”, “happens”.
      • “en” – “And”, suggest??
      • “skirtles” – “Skitters” (moves lightly and quickly), “skittles” (moves like a bowling ball?), “skirt”, “kirtle” (archaic “gown”).
      • “daanan” – “Down an”, possibly “Canaan” (Biblical name).
      • “uncline” – “Incline”, “undine” (water spirit), possibly “uncle”.
      • “thickwit” – “Thick with”, “thickwit” (insult).
      • “glossom” – “Blossom”, “glisten” (shine), possibly “gloom”.
      • “herdin” – “Heading”, “herd in”.
      • “dipper” – “Deeper”, “Dipper” (Big and Little, constellations), “someone who dips”).
      • “unter” – “Into”, “under”, “inter”.
      • “thee” – “The”, “thee” (archaic “you”).
      • “assailem” – “Asylum”, “assail them”.
      • “wordlanps” – “Woodlands”, “word lamps”.
      • “dieper” – Dutch for “deeper”, “die person”.
      • “entre” – “Into”, “entre” (French “enter”).
      • “nermadslant” – “No-man’s-land”, “enter mad slant”, “mermaid”.
    • Sche harezolvd that haretail shellnut gho inspoken, that seashal nite bey redust tu a mer fitnot in Ar Fathem’s arthurised iboglyphey.

      • “Sche harezolvd” – “She has resolved”, “Scherazade” (Female storyteller in The Arabian Nights).
      • “haretail” – “Her tale”, “hare’s tail”.
      • “shellnut” – “Shall not”, “shelled nut”.
      • “gho” – “Go”, “ghost”.
      • “inspoken” – “Unspoken”, “put a spoke in” (thwart someone’s plans).
      • “seashal” – “She shall”, “seashell”, “She sells seashells by the seashore” (classic tongue twister).
      • “nite” – “Not”, “night”.
      • “bey” – “Be”, “bay” (inlet; tree), “Bey” (Turkish “chieftain”).
      • “redust” – “Reduced”, “returned to dust” (ashes to ashes…).
      • “tu” – “To”, “tu” (French informal “you”).
      • “mer” – “Mere” (only; pond), “mermaid”.
      • “fitnot” – “Footnote”, “fit not” (Lucia doesn’t fit the narrative).
      • “Ar Fathem’s” – “Her fathers”, “Our Father” (Who Art in Heaven…), “fathoms” (depth measurements; understands).
      • “arthurised” – “Authorized”, “made like Arthur” (presumably King Arthur, legendary British hero).
      • “iboglyphey” – “Biography”, “I bog (informal “bathroom”) lie for a fee”, “River Liffey“, “lifey” (as in Moore-collaborator Eddie Campbell‘s book The Dance of Lifey Death). Possibly “I blog”.
    • She coints hersoph a Queer’n of infanightly spece, wooryt nacht thot shee fusuelli horrs baed drames, ent shayl not stind boy-eyedly whyl her birthers sowspet buldlyin (loke her nepheud Stifen) rerote hyrstery by iditing Hant Lucia errta vit.

      • This sentence begins with a close paraphrase of Hamlet, Act 2, scene 2: “I could be bounded in a nut shell and count myself a king of infinite space, were it not that I have bad dreams.” In this scene Hamlet pretends to be mad – though it would be easy to argue that he is
      • “coints” – “Counts”, “coins”, “coint” (archaic French “pretty”), “quaint” (archaic “cunt”).
      • “hersoph” – “Herself”, “her” “Sophy” (archaic title of ruler of Persia), “-soph” (knowledge).
      • “Queer’n” – “Queen”, “queer one”.
      • “infanightly” – “Infinite”, “infant” “nightly”.
      • “spece” – “Space”, “specie (cash), “species”, “peace”.
      • “wooryt” – “Were it”, “woo right”, “worry”, “worrit” (archaic “worry”).
      • “nacht” – “Not”, “nacht” (German “night”).
      • “thot” – “That”, “thought”.
      • “shee” – “She”, “sheep” (counting sheep to fall asleep?).
      • “fusuelli” – “Usually”, “fuse”, “Henry Fuseli” (1741-1825, Swiss painter known for the nightmarish themes of his work).

        Fuseli - The Nightmare
        Fuseli – The Nightmare
      • “horrs” – “Has”, “horrors”.
      • “baed” – “Bad”, “bed”, “baa-ed” (sheep sound).
      • “drames” – “Dreams”, “drams” (small alcoholic drinks).
      • “ent” – “And”, “sent”, “Ent” (tree spirit).
      • “shayl” – “She’ll”, “shay” (small horse-drawn carriage).
      • “stind” – “Stand”, “stint” (be overly frugal).
      • “boy-eyedly” – “Idly by”, “eyed by boys”.
      • “whyl” – “While”, “why”, “will”.
      • “birthers” – “Brother’s”, “birthers” (ones who share a birth-mother; group that questioned Obama‘s birth certificate).
      • “sowspet” – “Suspect”, “sow’s” (female pig; derogatory term for woman) “pet”.
      • “buldlyin” – “Bloodline” (both in the sense of his dubious parentage, and his regrettable son (see below)), “building”, “bold lying”.
      • “loke” – “Like”, “Loki”, “look”, “lock”.
      • “nepheud” – “Nephew”, “new feud”.
      • “Stifen” – “Stephen”, “stiffen” (a penis).
        • Stephen James Joyce (1932-) is Giorgio’s son and the executor of James Joyce’s estate. According to Wikipedia: “In 1988, he destroyed a collection of Lucia’s letters. In 1989, he forced Brenda Maddox to delete a postscript concerning Lucia from her biography Nora: The Real Life of Molly Bloom.”
      • “rerote” – “Rewrote”, “rote” (repeating something over and over to memorize it).
      • “hyrstery” – “History”, “hysteria” (a fraught diagnosis that has been used to oppress women for centuries).
      • “iditing” – “Editing”, “id” (uncontrolled instinct).
      • “Hant” – “Aunt”, “haunt” (a ghost).
      • “errta vit” – “Out of it”, “errata” (list of mistakes in a text), “err, ta”, “vita” (Latin and Italian “life”, a word often found in the title of biographical works; biography or résumé).
    • Che wilt not rust containt endsay her forber’s misterplace disindhersted aund foolsley readefiled, his Cumalot unsecst and balderised by hod-faced creatics and their misledarts, mordred, iat sallus vurry plaintasy, by littelroary axecutioneers unwordthy ev a wroidar uth hixcalibre, parcivin hym as pnoragrophic in his carryspawndance und anladylac in alles desicryptions.

      • This sentence has a veritable flood of Arthurian allusions, expanding greatly upon the one from two sentences ago. There are also several allusions to the Norse myth of the death of Balder.
      • “Che” – “She”, “Che” (Guevara (1928-1967), Marxist revolutionary).
      • “wilt” – “Will”, “wilt”.
      • “rust” – “Rest”, “rust”.
      • “containt” – “Content”, “con” (Italian “with”) “taint”.
      • “endsay” – “And see”, “end say”.
      • “forber” – “Father”, “forbear” (ancestor), “former”.
      • “misterplace” – “Masterpiece”, “mister place”.
      • “disindhersted” – “Disinherited”, “this in her stead”.
      • “aund” – “And”, “aunt”, possibly “maunder” (talk in a rambling manner).
      • “foolsley” – “Falsely”, “foolishly”.
      • “readefiled” – “Redefined”, “read defiled”.
      • “Cumalot” – “Camelot” (court of the legendary King Arthur; by association, any especially excellent thing), “cum (orgasm) a lot”.
      • “unsecst” – “Unsexed”, “sects” (splinter religions).
      • “balderised” – “Bowdlerized” (censored), “made more bald” (less virile), “Balder” (Norse god of light, slain by his brother Hoder due to a plot by Loki).
      • “hod-faced” – “Hard-faced”, “Hodor” (see note immediately above).
        • Obiwanspicoli notes “Tim Finnegan was a hod carrier”. A hod is a device for carrying bricks.
      • “creatics” – “Critics”, “create ticks” (critics are parasites upon creators).
      • “misledarts” – “Misled arts”, “mistletoe darts” (Balder (see above) was killed with a dart made from mistletoe).
      • “mordred” – “Murdered”, “Mordred” (betrayed King Arthur), “more dread”.
      • “iat sallus” – “That’s all”, “fiat”?, suggest??, “Sallust” (Roman historian, 86-35 B.C.), “Salus” (Roman goddess of safety).
      • “vurry” – “Very”, “worry”.
      • “plaintasy” – “Plain to see”, “plaint (poetic “complaint”), “fantasy”.
      • “littelroary” – “Literary”, “little roaring”.
      • “axecutioneers” – “Executors”, “executioners”, “axe” (tool used by executioners).
      • “unwordthy” – “Unworthy”, “word”.
      • “ev” – “Of”, “ever”.
      • “wroidar” – “Writer”, “radar”?, “android”?, suggest??
      • “uth” – “Of”, “aUTHor”.
      • “hixcalibre” – “His caliber”, “Excalibur” (sword of King Arthur).
      • “parcivin” – “Perceiving”, “Parsival” (one of King Arthur’s knights).
      • “hym” – “Him”, “hymen”?
      • “pnoragrophic” – “Pornographic”, “Nora” (James Joyce wrote many explicit love letters to Nora), “grope”.
      • “carryspawndance” – “Correspondence”, “carry spawn dance” (suggestive of a mating ritual).
      • “und” – “And”, “under” (underwear?).
      • “anladylac” – “Unladylike”, “Lady of the Lake” (important figure in Arthurian legend), “Lancelot du Lac” (one of Arthur’s knights), “anal” (the letters to Nora reveal a fondness on James Joyce’s part for anal play).
      • “alles” – “All his”, “alles” (German “everything”), “allies”.
      • “desicryptions” – “Descriptions”, “desecrations”, “decryptions” (what these notes are attempting!).
    • Lucia hersoul wood be abandoned, unmememerd, liff dout aftey indarx, Messus Rechistered awry entira psycheattic hisspittle ernd cut adraft apen the whide sargacotea.

      • “hersoul” – “Herself”, “her soul”, “sole” (alone).
      • “wood” – “Would”, “wood” (forest).
      • “unmememerd” – “Unremembered”, “meme”, “me mermaid”, “immured” (confined).
      • “liff dout” – “Left out”, “River Liffey“, “lift”, “life”, “doubt”, “dout” (archaic “extinguish”).
      • “aftey” – “Of the”, “aft” (maritime “to the rear”).
      • “indarx” – “Index”, “in the dark”.
      • “Messus Rechistered” – “Mrs. Rochester-ed”, “mess us”, “registered”, “Christ”.
        • Mrs. Rochester is a character in Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre, who, having gone insane, is locked away in an attic and rarely spoken of.
      • “awry” – “Away”, “awry” (wrong, askew).
      • “entira ” – “Into a”, “entire”, “tira” (Italian vulgar “become erect”).
      • “psycheattic” – “Psychiatric”, “psyche” (soul) “attic” (see note about Mrs. Rochester above).
      • “hisspittle” – “Hospital”, “his spittle”, “hiss piddle”.
      • “ernd” – “And”, “earned”.
      • “adraft” – “adrift”, “a draft”.
      • “apen” – “Upon”, “a pen”.
      • “whide sargacotea” – “Wide Sargasso Sea”, “why”, “hide”, “sugar and tea”.
        • The Sargasso Sea is a region of the North Atlantic noted for calm blue water and brown Sargassum
        • Wide Sargasso Sea is the name of a 1966 novel by Jean Rhys which is a femist and postcolonial retelling of Jane Eyre from the point of view of Mrs. Rochester.
    • Eyr murmuree wed onely be priserfed bioxidint asift she wor a suprificial dictim datad bon interrned binearth theeart paetre, unrequirte fathey instonbleshed norative.

      • “Eyr” – “Her”, “Eyre” (Jane, see previous sentence).
      • “murmuree” – “Memory”, “murmur” (to speak softly and indistinctly).
      • “wed” – “Would”, “wed”.
      • “onely” – “Only”, “one”, “lonely”.
      • “priserfed” – “Preserved”, “prisoner fed”.
      • “bioxidint” – “By accident”, “bioxide” (chemical formed with two oxygen atoms), “bi-” (two, doubled), “dint” (mark), possibly “doxy” (archaic “prostitute”).
      • “asift” – “As if”, “a sift”.
      • “wor” – “Were”, “wore”.
      • “suprificial” – “Sacrificial”, “superficial”, “supremely fictional”.
      • “dictim” – “Victim”, “dictum” (formal pronouncement).
      • “datad” – “That had”, “data”, “dad”.
      • “bon” – “Been”, “bon” (French “good”), “bob-bon” (candy).
      • “interrned” – Interred”, “interned”.
      • “binearth” – “Beneath”, “bin earth”.
      • “theart paetre” – “Their father”? (suggest??), “the art”, “heart”, “poetry”.
      • “unrequirte” – “Unrequired”, “unrequited”.
      • “fathey” – “For the”, “father”, “fat hey”.
      • “instonbleshed” – “Established”, “in stone blessed”, “instant blushed”.
      • “norative” – “Narrative”, “Nora” (James’ wife being widely accepted as his muse, instead of Lucia).

Forward to Section 2 – Illusionary Giorgio Joyce.

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