RtB part 1 – Illusionary Giorgio Joyce

In which Lucia Joyce begins her day with breakfast, then wanders the grounds of St Andrews Infirmary. She recalls her childhood relationships with her family, especially her  incestuous relationship with her brother George, whom she seems to see an image of.

  • James Joyce (1882-1941) was an extremely famous writer and Lucia Joyce’s father.

    The Joyce family, 1924
    The Joyce family, 1924
  • Nora Barnacle (1884-1951) was James Joyce’s wife and Lucia Joyce’s mother.
  • Giorgio Joyce (1905-???) was the son of James and Nora, and Lucia’s older brother. Moore suggests that he may not have been James’ son, but the result of an affair between Nora and a lover. Moore also suggests that an incestuous affair took place between Giorgio and Lucia. This incestuous relationship is a theory of Moore’s, not attested to by the historical record, but not contradicted by it, either.
  • The River Liffey is a river in Ireland which, in Finnegans Wake, is referred to many times, and is metaphorically linked to the female protagonist (who is, in some senses, Lucia)

 

  • Paragraph 1
    Awake, Lucia gets up with the rising of the light. She is a puzzle, sure enough, as all the nurses and doctors would affirm, but never a cross word these days, depending on her medication and on how she is adapting to it. Her rousing from sleep is like a spring, a babbling brook that gurgles up amidst the soils of sleep, flashing and glittering, to meet the morning sun. Confined in this location now she rushes and goes chuckling from her soft and silky bed, pouring her heart out down a hillside and away across the old landscape to a modest breakfast. Ah, what a performance, practiced and worthy of applause. She claps her hands over her ears to drown out all the dreadful wailing and the sorry imprecations of her family. With her bunions all complaining she escapes the distractions and begins her daily pilgrimage towards redemption or towards the Holy See; towards the tranquility of night.

    • Awake, Lucia gets up wi’ the wry sing of de light.

      • At the start of the chapter, still easing into the dense Joycean style, many words primarily mean what they say. But that’s not to say that there aren’t other meanings as well.
      • “Awake” is not just a description of Lucia’s waking state, but is also an command to the reader: “Wake up! You need all your attention here.”
      • “wi'” is an abbreviation of “with”. It may be an attempt to suggest an Italian accent. (Lucia was born in Italy, and Italian was her first language.)
      • “wry sing” – Singing is usually a joyous, not a wry activity. This is indicative of Lucia’s emotional state demonstrated throughout this chapter: aware of her confinement, yet finding joy and freedom where she can.
      • “de light” – Again, Lucia finds “delight” in even the simple act of rising from her bed to greet the dawn.
    • She is a puzzle, shore enearth, as all the Nurzis and the D’actors would afform, but nibber a cross word these days, deepindig on her mendication and on every workin’ grimpill’s progress.

      • “shore enearth” – “shore and earth”, that is, water and earth, two of the classical elements.
      • “shore” – Lucia is like the seashore: you can see a long way over the surface of the ocean, but never know what lies beneath.
      • “enearth” – The medical staff would like to “unearth” Lucia’s secrets, but never will.
        • Alan Moore wrote a biographical piece about his best friend, Steve Moore (no relation), which was titled “Unearthing”.
      • “Nurzis” – The nurses are compared to Nazis, fascists who should not be entrusted with medical care. This brings to mind Nurse Ratched, from One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest.
      • “D’actors” – The doctors act upon their patients. Or are they merely actors portraying doctors? Is “D” for Death?
      • “afform” – The medical staff can affect Lucia’s “form”, her physical body, but they cannot reach her soul.
      • “nibber a cross word” – Lucia (like this chapter) is a crossword puzzle, to be “solved” by interpretation of cryptic clues. But the only writing tool the staff have is a pen (“nib”), so they have no means of correcting mistakes, and are unlikely to reach a correct solution.
      • “deepindig” – Dug in deeply.
      • “mendication” – A mendicant is a beggar, usually a monk who has taken a vow of poverty.
      • “workin’ grimpill’s” – There is perhaps a suggestion here that some of Lucia’s “grim pills” are not working properly. Or perhaps that these pills make her grim.
      • “workin’ […] progress” – James Joyce’s working title for the book which was eventually published as Finnegans Wake was Work in Progress. This title was also used for the first chapter of Jerusalem, and the first of Alma Warren’s paintings.
        • “grimpill’s progress” – This can be phonetically rearranged to form Pilgim’s Progress, a 17th century allegory by John Bunyan (1628-1688). Bunyan is an influential figure throughout Jerusalem, and appears as a character in the chapter “The Steps of All Saints”.
      • “workin’ grimpill’s progress” – This phrase is so overloaded with possible readings that it is difficult to know what to regard as most important. Hence, the unusually non-literal ‘translation’ as “how she is adapting to [the medication]”.
    • Her arouse from drowse is like a Spring, a babboling book that gorgles up amist the soils o’ sleep, flishing and glattering, to mate the mournin’ son.

      • “arouse from drowse” – A fancy (and rhyming) way of saying “awakening”.
      • “a Spring” – The capitalization makes “Spring” a reference to the season, though this would normally be expressed as “the Spring” rather than “a Spring”. The “a” suggests reading this as a “spring” of the coiled wire variety, as in the metaphorical expression “springing out of bed”. Finally, the following phrase suggests “spring” as a natural upwelling of water from the earth.
      • “babboling book” – “babbling brook”, as in a small waterway that makes a pleasant, if meaningless noise. “babbo” is Italian for “daddy”; “ling” suggests lingua, language, and Lucia’s daddy is certainly involved with language. “book” brings to mind Finnegans Wake, and, of course, Jerusalem
      • “gorgles” – This is probably the first allusion to Lucia’s brother, Giorgio.
      • “amist” – Suggests “a mist” rising from the spring, or from morning dew.
      • “soils o’ sleep” – Sleep does not have soil, of course; this extends the metaphor of Lucia’s awakening being like a (water) spring. (Is there another meaning here? Suggest??)
      • “flishing and glattering” – A spoonerism, of which there will be many more in this chapter. Also suggestive of “fishing” (often performed at dawn, and involving water) and “clattering” (another word denoting a meaningless noise).
      • “mate the mournin’ son” – Lucia’s “mating” of Giorgio (her father’s son) is an important thread throughout this chapter. The meaning of “mournin'” is unclear; perhaps Lucia and/or Giorgio mourns the fact of (or the cessation of) their incest?
    • Canfind in this loquation now she gushes and runs chinkling from her silt and softy bed, pooring her harp out down an illside and aweigh cross the old manscape to a modhouse brookfast.

      • “Canfind” – Though Lucia’s physical form is confined to the asylum, she “can find” a significant amount of joy and freedom here, as demonstrated in this chapter as a whole.
      • “loquation” – Suggests “loquacious”, using lots of words, with the implication that fewer would suffice, or even be preferable. The language in this chapter is almost the opposite of loquacious; each word serves in place of a great number of words, all of whose meanings one “can find” within them.
      • “gushes” – Can mean “speaks quickly and happily”. Can also mean “flows quickly (as of water)”, which reinforces the imagery of Lucia as a river.
      • “gushes and runs” – Seems to suggest a spoonerism, except that “runs” makes sense in context, and “guns” doesn’t…
      • “chinkling” – Suggests “chuckling” and “twinkling”, both of which are words that may also be applied to a brook. “Chink” is also slang for vagina, which may connect with “silt” (anagrammed to “slit”).
      • “silt and softy” – Approximately a spoonerism for “soft and silky”, a common phrase describing a nice bed. “Silt” is fine sand deposited at the bottom of flowing water, reinforcing the river imagery.
      • “pooring her harp out” – “Pouring [one’s] heart out is an English phrase meaning to express all of one’s feelings (or secrets).
      • “pooring” – The Joyce family was often poor (lacking in money). This might also refer to Lucia’s “poor” (unfortunate) situation of incarceration here.
      • “harp” – Lucia’s emotions (her “heart”) are also her means of expressing art, her instrument (“harp”).
      • “an illside” – A hillside that is located on the grounds of a hospital, a place (“side”) for the “ill”.
      • “aweigh” – As in “Anchors aweigh!” a phrase shouted on a ship to announce that the anchor is now clear of the bottom, at the start (or resumption) of a journey. Another nautical metaphor, though more commonly associated with oceans than rivers.
      • “cross” – Possibly a reference to a “cross” mood underlying Lucia’s surface-level joy. Possibly a reference to a metaphorical “cross” she bears (as in Christ), and which “weigh”s heavily upon her.
      • “old manscape” – “Old man” is slang for “penis”. “Manscape” suggests that this landscape is a place where one can escape from the attentions of men. Or, oppositely, that this is a landscape constructed and dominated by men.
      • “modhouse brookfast” – A “modest breakfast” is an early meal that is neither excessively large nor small.
      • “modhouse” – This madhouse is also a “mod” house, “modern” and fashionable (or at least it will be in the 1970s when Dusty Springfield is here, see section xxx).
      • “brookfast” – “Brook” continues the river metaphors, and much of the language suggests that this river is “fast” rather than slow.
    • Ah, what a performance, practised and applausible.

      • Lucia is “performing” at breakfast; playing the part of a calm, ordinary patient, the better to avoid trouble.
      • “applausible” can be read as both “plausible” (likely to be believed) and “applause-able” (worthy of being applauded).
    • She claps her hands, over her ears, to drone out all the deadful wile-ing and the sorey implecations of whor farmlay.

      • “claps her hands, over her ears,” – The comma after “hands” would not in standard English usage be correct; it suggests that we read “claps her hands” as a phrase by itself, suggesting applause and happiness. This has a very different (almost opposite) emotional load to the phrase “claps her hands over her ears”, which suggests attempting to stop hearing something extremely unpleasant or traumatic.
      • “drone” is a steady humming noise, such as might be used to “drown out” other noises.
      • “deadful” – Not merely “dreadful”, but “full” of “dead”; Lucia’s family is largely (entirely?) dead by now.
      • “wile-ing” – The “wailing” contains “wile”s (cunning plans).
      • “sorey implecations” – “sorry imprecations” means “sad curses”.
      • “sorey” – They make Lucia “sore” (angry).
      • “implecations” – The curses (“imprecations”) are not straightforward, but only by “implication”.
      • “whor farmlay” – Lucia (“her”) is identified as a “whore”, by herself, by her “family”, or both. A farm is a lower-class setting, in which (stereotypically) incest (family members “lay”ing one another) is more common.
    • With her bunyans all complainin’ she escapes the Settee o’ Destraction and beguines her evrydaily Millgrimage towar’s ridemption or towords the Wholly Sea; to wards, the tranquilisity of night.

      • A “bunion” is a painful toe deformity; for John “Bunyan”, see notes above.
      • “complainin'” – If there is a secondary meaning beyond “complaining”, it is unclear. Suggest??
      • “Settee of Destraction” – A “settee” is an upholstered bench, such as Lucia and her fellow inmates might sit upon at breakfast; Lucia views their company as a “distraction”. In Bunyan’s The Pilgrim’s Progress, the “City of Destruction” is the starting location, an allegory for the mortal world of sin.
      • “beguines” – The beguine was a dance popular in the 1930s, as in the song “Begin the Beguine”. Also suggests “beguiling”.
      • “evrydaily” – “everyday”, “daily”. The cadence suggests the phrase “upsy-daisy”, typically said to a child being lifted up. (“Evry” is the name of several locations in France, but there doesn’t seem to be any Joyce connection.)
      • “Millgrimage” – “Pilgrimage”, of course, ties in with Pilgrim’s Progress. The capitalization suggests a reference to someone named “Mill”, but who that could be is unclear. (John Stuart Mill the utilitarian philosopher is probably the most famous “Mill”, but there is no obvious connection. Also possible, but with no obvious connection, is experimental psychologist Stanley Milgram.). Subtracting “Mill” leaves us with “grimage”, suggesting a grim age, or possibly a grim visage.
      • “towar’s ridemption” – Lucia “rides” “towards” a state of “redemption”, where she may be free from conflict (“rid” of “war”).
      • “towords” – “to words”, arguably the destination of Jerusalem as a whole.
      • “Wholly Sea” – The “Holy See” is a way of referring to the seat of the Catholic Church. It can stand, allegorically, for the destination of a Pilgrim (such as Lucia). If Lucia is, allegorically, a river, then it is her eventual destiny to flow into the ocean and become “wholly sea”.
      • “to wards” – “Ward” has many potentially relevant meanings: a section of a hospital; a political subdivision; a fortification of a castle; a magical spell of protection.
      • “tranquilisity” – At night, the hospital patients enter the “tranquility” of sleep after being given “tranquilisers” (British spelling of “tranquilizers”).
      • Wherever Lucia goes, her journey inevitably concludes back in her hospital room, reflecting the theme of Eternalism. Or, as a more Bunyan-esque interpretation, we must all Progress from worldly sin towards a hope of salvation, before the sleep of death overtakes us.
  • Paragraph 2
    Spooning the scrambled egg into her tousled head she dwells, as always now, on the past. Sadly born in Trieste in July, 1907, born to the stench and clamor of a pauper’s ward, she was denied the mother’s breast. Not a dribble nor a drop was she allowed. The milk was all sucked dry by Giorgio, who went from one mother to another all of his twisted life. Even the garden of her girlhood he had taken from her, even then, with him the dirty apple of their mother’s eye and always causing trouble, which Lucia had resisted for as long as she could. He’d been fourteen, she was only ten, to put it plainly. Wrestling under silky and translucent sheets in a succession of cramped, claustrophobic rented rooms, the dad off somewhere with all his writing and the mother rural, pagan in her unconcern, forever standing pisspots on the parlor table where they left their rings on the varnish. Giorgio’s dragon would rear up, out from the skimpy undergrowth and urgently demanding her attentions while their mother only smiled, indulgently, and and let her brother press ahead with his adventure,  up into the little light, the little depth.

    • Spoonin’ the tousled egg into her scrambled head she wells, as iffer, on the past now.

      • “Spoonin'” – Suggests “spoonerism”.
      • “tousled […] scrambled” – Normally, tousled only applies to hair. By swapping it with “scrambled”, Moore suggests that Lucia has “scrambled brains”, not just untidy hair.
      • “wells” – “dwells”, but also with a suggestion of water (tears, or Lucia’s whole self as a metaphorical river) or memories “welling up”. Wells have depths, from which life-giving water may be drawn.
      • “as iffer” – “as ever”, “as if her”. Also suggests the name of the River Liffey (see above).
      • “past now” – Normal English grammar would place the “now” earlier in the sentence, probably just after “ever”. By placing the two words together, Moore suggests that “past” and “now” are not so distant as commonly believed, something which is demonstrated throughout Jerusalem. To quote William Faulkner, “The past is never dead. It isn’t even past.”
    • Sadly hatched in Triste at seven past the century and seven past the year, born to the clench and stamour of a paupoise warld, she was denied the mummer’s teatre.

      • “hatched” – Suggests “booby hatch”, slang for “mental hospital”. In this slang, “booby”, means “idiot”, but the word is also slang for “breast”, which is about to become a dominant theme of this paragraph.
      • “Triste” – The city of Trieste, in northeastern Italy, where Lucia was born. “Triste” mans “sad” or “sadness” in several European languages. Also suggestive of “tryst”, a love affair (often an illicit one). Possible allusion to the tragic love affair of Tristan and Iseult.
      • “seven […] year” – Lucia was born July 26, 1907, seven years and seven months past the start of the century. (Assuming you count the century as starting in 1901, which is, strictly speaking, correct, though common culture often counts starting at 1900.)
      • “clench and stamour” – Spoonerism of “stench and clamour”. “Clench” suggests a tense nervousness. “Stamour” suggests an uncertain stammering speech.
      • “paupoise warld” – “Pauper’s ward” is a hospital wing devoted to people who are too poor to pay for treatment. “Paupoise” suggests “pause”, “poise”, “purpose”, and “porpoise”. “Warld” suggests “world” and “whirled”. What purpose does a poor child like Lucia fill `within our world? Pause a moment, and you will see the poise and whirling of her dancing, graceful as a dolphin.
      • “mummer’s teatre” – “Mother’s teat”, that is, Lucia was not breast-fed. “Mummer” is an archaic word for “actor”, and “teatre” evokes “theatre”. Lucia’s mother denies her not only her breast, but any recognition of agency, giving her no stage to act upon.
    • Not a dripple Nora drop was she aloud.

      • “dripple” – Portmanteau of “drip” and “dribble”. Possibly also “ripple”.
      • Lucia’s mother’s first name was Nora.
      • “aloud” – “Allowed”, but also “aloud”; Lucia is not listened to.
    • The molcow was sucked dry, by George, who went from one mamm to an udder all of his serpenitentine life.

      • “molcow” – “Milk all”, but also with a suggestion of “mother”. This is also an allusion to James Joyce’s Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, which uses the word “moocow” several times in its first sentence. (“Moo” is the English word for the sound a cow traditionally makes.) (Thanks to obiwanspicoli for the James Joyce reference).
      • “sucked dry, by George” – “sucked dry by Giorgio”. The addition of the comma draws attention to the use of the common English exclamation “By George!”
      • “one mamm to an udder” – “One mother to another”. “Mamm” suggests “mammary” which, like “udder”, is a word for “breast”.
      • “serpenitentine” – Portmanteau of “serpentine” (snakelike, twisted) and “penitent” (seeking forgiveness). “Serpent” begins the Garden of Eden imagery which pervades the following sentence.
    • Eve’n the girden of her garlhood he had snaken from her, eden then, with him the dirty apple of their Mermaw’s eye and allwas raising cain, which Lucia had resistered for as long as she was abel.

      • “Eve’n the girden” – “Even the garden”, “Eve in the Garden (of Eden)”. “Girden” also suggests “gird in” (protect) and “guerdon” (reward).
      • “girden […] garlhood” – Spoonerism for “garden of her girlhood”.
      • “snaken” – Suggests “taken” in a snake-like (or sneaky) manner.
      • “eden” – “even”, “Eden”.
      • “dirty apple” – There exists a cocktail recipe called a “Dirty Apple”, though it is not clear if Moore intends the reference. (Also some uses from urbandictionary.com, but they seem even less relevant.) The “dirty” may refer to Giorgio’s hygiene and/or his carnal nature.
      • “apple of […] eye” – To be “the apple of [someone’s] eye” is to be the most cherished person or object to that someone.
      • “Mermaw” – “Meemaw” is British dialect for mouthing words so as to be heard over loud noises; in the Southern US, it can mean “grandmother”. “Mermaw” also suggests “mermaid”. The capitalization suggests that there must be an allusion to some proper noun – suggest??
      • “allwas” “Always”, “all was”.
      • “raising cain” – An English phrase meaning “causing trouble”. It derives from the story of Cain and Abel, in Genesis: Cain became the first murderer by slaying his brother, Abel. The relationship between Giorgio and Lucia will involve him shedding the blood of her maidenhead.
      • “resistered” – Portmanteau of “resisted” and “sister”; sibling-hood is problematic. (Possibly also suggesting “resistor”?)
      • “abel” – “Able”, but also “Abel”, as in Cain’s sibling.
    • He’d been furteen, shy was only ten, to pet it baldly.

      • “furteen” – “Fourteen”, “furtive”. Giorgio proceeds furtively, because he knows that making sexual advances on his sister is wrong.
      • “shy”- “She”, “shy”. Ten-year-old Lucia is shy due to sexual inexperience.
      • “pet it baldly” – “Put it baldly” is an English phrase meaning “say plainly”. “Pet it baldly” suggests that Giorgio is petting (sexually touching) her bald (pre-pubescent) vagina.
      • As obiwanspicoli points out, these ages don’t work: Giorgio was born June 27, 1905, so is only two years and a bit older than Lucia. If he was fourteen, she would be twelve; if she was ten, he would be twelve. The error may be Moore’s or Lucia’s.
        • It seems likely that Moore wants their ages to be fourteen and ten in order to parallel the ages he had already established for his fictionalized John Clare and Mary Joyce in Voice of the Fire, “The Sun Looks Pale Upon the Wall”. See also Clare’s appearances later on in this chapter, and in the chapter “The Steps of All Saints”.
    • Wristling under milky and transluciant sheets in a suck-session of clamped, crusterphobic rended rooms, the da off summerwhere with all his righting and the mudder rural, pagan in her unconcern, forever standing pisspots on the parlour table where they lifft their venerable beaded halos on the varnish.

      • “Wristling” – Portmanteau of “wrist” and “wrestling”. Did Giorgio hold Lucia down by the wrists? Or was this a more playful “wrestling”, where wrists and fingers played beneath each other’s waists?
      • “milky” – “Silky”, but also continuing the “milk” theme from earlier in the paragraph.
      • “transluciant” – “Translucent” means that light can pass through. inserting “lucia” suggests that Giorgio is passing through (or at least into) Lucia.
      • “suck-session” – “succession”, or a session of sucking, suggestive of oral sex.
      • “clamped and crusterphobic rended” – Not quite a spoonerism for “cramped and claustrophobic”. “Clamped” suggests restraints, or Giorgio’s hands clamped around Lucia’s wrists, holding her down. “Crusterphobic” suggests a fear of “crust” “her”; suggesting a crust of dried sperm, or perhaps reading “crust” as a maidenhead about to be “rended”.
      • “da” – Abbreviation for “dad”.
      • “summerwhere” – Somewhere summery.
      • “righting” – Writing which makes the world right.
      • “mudder” – “Mother”, with a suggestion that she spends her time in the mud, or is otherwise “dirty”.
      • “pisspots” – Chamberpots, indicative of lower-class, rural life.
      • “lifft” – “Left”, but with a suggestion of the river Liffey.
      • “venerable beaded halos” – An extremely ornate way of describing old round stains. Possibly some other meaning here – suggest??
    • Giorgio’s dragon would rear up, out from the scampy wondergrowth and orgiantly demanding her at-ten shuns while their Moider only smirled, ingently dull, and let her borther press a head with his idventure, up into the little light, the little depth.

      • “dragon” – Lucia sees Giorgio’s penis (for the first time?) as a sort of fabulous monster.
      • “scampy” – “Scanty”, “scamp-like” (mischievous).
      • “wondergrowth” – “Undergrowth” or pubic hair. Little Lucia wonders what it is, and/or finds it wonderful.
      • “orgiantly” – Portmanteau of “orgiastic” and “urgently”. Also contains “giant”, which resonates with the earlier “dragon”; Lucia is in a strange sort of fairy tale.
      • “at-ten shuns” – Lucia, at age ten, shuns sexual attentions — or should, by general opinion.
      • “Moider” – “Mother”. Phonetically, “murder”, which reminds us of Cain and Abel, and hence the maidenhead bloodshed that Giorgio is about to commit. In Irish English, “moider” can mean to confuse, or to babble deliriously. The capitalization suggests that there must be an allusion to some proper noun – suggest??
      • “smirled” – Portmanteau of “smiled” and “smirked”.
      • “ingently dull” – “Indulgently”. “Ingently” suggests “un gently”, and also the notion that a “gent” (Giorgio) will soon be “in” Lucia and “lying” upon her. “Dull”, in this context, suggests Nora’s lack of intelligence, and/or attention to her daughter’s predicament.
      • “borther” – A brother who bothers, and who may soon berth (or birth) with her.
      • “press a head” – “Press ahead” means to continue with a project. “Press a head”, in this context, suggests pressing the head of his penis into Lucia’s vagina.
      • “idventure” – Portmanteau of “id” and “adventure”. In Freudian psychology, the “id” is the bestial, instinctive part of the mind, including the sexual impulse. “Kid” is perhaps also suggested, as they are still both children.
      • “the little light” – “Lucia” means “light”, and she is still quite little.
      • “the little depth” – Presumably, Lucia’s vagina is not yet fully developed, and thus not very deep. Obiwanspicoli points out that there may also be an allusion to “the little death”, a French way of describing sexual orgasm.
  • Paragraph 3
    Not that she hadn’t welcomed his advances, painful at first, back then when she still believed that he loved her, back there in their paradise when she was in the early bloom of her youth. Sitting in the day-room now she chews over her toast, and wonders if he ever really and truly was her brother. Hadn’t there once been a letter from their father in the land of Eire? He’d met with Vincent Cosgrave who had confessed to having sex with Nora Barnacle in 1904, the year Giorgio was first conceived. “Is this not my son?” her distressed dad had cried in his mental anguish, to which the crying mother dared not reply. The matter had been left unsettled. Wouldn’t that explain a lot, now, about mother and her Giorgio? How the pair of them were always close, unhealthily so in her estimation, from the cradle to the grave? She muddily recalls her mother warming up the young master’s thing inside her mouth on chilly afternoons, or thinks she does. Of course, it would make plain for all to see why they two had insisted she be silenced within sanitoriums, for Lucia was her father’s seed, his sparkle evident in all she said or did, the way she always spoke her will, whereas in Giorgio was not a whit of the same substance to be seen. Old Nora had decided then and there that her firstborn should carry on the dynasty, no matter that he may have been another man’s. As for her little girl, the father’s real daughter, shut her up in a lunatic asylum, like at Frankenstein’s, or finally here in Saint Andrew’s hospital.

    • Not that she hoydent wellcomed his hardvances, penfull at forst, back then when she still beliffied that he loved her, back there in their papadise when she was tigrish in the milibloom of her youth-ray tease.

      • “hoydent” – Portmamteau of “hoyden” (a sexually loose woman) and “hadn’t”.
      • “wellcomed” – Lucia welcomed his advances, and the two of them “came” (reached orgasm) “well”.
      • “hardvances” – Portmanteau of “hard” (as in erect penis) and “advances”.
      • “penfull” – Lucia found it painful when she firat became “full” of his “pen” (penis). “Pen” in this context also suggests a connetion between language and sex, which will be a continuing theme in this chapter.
      • “forst” – Lucia’s memories seem ambiguous about whether she consented or had to be “forced”.
      • “beliffied” – Another reference to the River Liffey.
      • “papadise” – For Lucia, the idea of paradise is inextricably linked to her “papa”.
      • “tigrish” – “Tigerish”, like a tiger. This is an unusual adjective in context, suggesting fierceness and danger. A more typical word for a spirited child would be “coltish” (like a young horse).
      • “tigrish […] youth-ray-tease” – An allusion to the Tigris and Euphrates Rivera in Mesopotamia. Some believe the area to be the location of the Garden of Eden, connecting to the idea of paradise earlier in the sentence, and the varied Genesis imagery from last paragraph.
      • “milibloom” – Reference to Milly Bloom, a character from James Joyce’s Ulysses (thanks to obiwanspicoli for the reference).
      • “milibloom of her youth-ray-tease” – The phrase “bloom of youth” means the best period of childhood.
      • “youth-ray-tease” – In addition to the Euphrates reference (see above), this suggests that Lucia’s youthful appearance (as conveyed by “rays” of light) constitutes a “tease” (a sexual invitation) that she is responsible for and which Giorgio cannot resist. (Please note that I am suggesting no such thing, but that the patriarchal culture in which Giorgio and Lucia are embedded may lead them to believe this.)
    • Setting in the die-room now she chews over her toast, raised two old tines, and wanders if he ova reilly and tooralee was her brooder.

      • “Setting” – “Sitting”, but also “setting” as in concrete, becoming hard through prolonged inactivity. (Though this interpretation is more true of a typical asylum resident than it is of Lucia.)
      • “die-room” – A “day-room” is a room in a hospital where patients who are able to leave their own rooms can mingle, talk, play games, etc. For despairing patients, it may be considered the place where they wait to “die”.
      • “toast, raised two old tines,” – Can be read as “a piece of toasted bread lifted on an old fork with only two tines” or as “raising a toast (as in a celebratory drink in honor of something) to old times”.
      • “wanders” – “Wonders”, but with a sughestion that Lucia’s mind “wanders”.
      • “ova” – “Ever”, but also “ova” (egg, female sex cell). The ova that became Giorgio definitely came from Nora, but there is some question with regard to the sperm’s origin (see below).
      • “reilly” – “Really”, but also the name “Reilly” (or possibly O’Reilly). Book one of Finnegans Wake contains a song titled “The Ballad of Persse O’Reilly” which concerns rumors of “sexual trespass”.
      • “tooralee” – A common nonsense word found in the chorus of old folksongs.
      • “brooder” – Lucia now broods upon the breeding (ancestry) of her (half?) brother.
  • Page 885
    • Hidn’t there once been a scarlet letter, a dismissive from their Further in the Land of Ire?

      • “hidn’t” – Portmanteau of ‘”hidden” and “hadn’t”.
      • “scarlet letter” – Reference to Nathanial Hawthorne’s novel The Scarlet Letter, which dealt with the theme of adultery. (Although Nora Barnacle and James Joyce didn’t actually marry until 1913, years after the birth of their children.)
      • “dismissive” – A missive that was dismissed (or at least “left unsettled”, see below).
      • “Further” – A father who is further of than Lucia wishes. Also possibly suggestive of Führer, title of Adolf Hitler.
      • “Land of Ire” – Ireland, often called “Eire”. Also referring to the “ire” (anger) which James Joyce was experiencing.
    • He’d met with Cowsgrope the Invincible who had confleshed to scraping the odd barnacle in nineteen nundread-for, the year that Orgy-porgy-puttin-pie was farst consceptered.

      • “Cowsgrope the Invincible” – Obiwanspicoli writes “Vincent Cosgrave was a friend of Joyce’s who falsely claimed to have slept with Nora after her relationship with Joyce was underway. No one seems to take it seriously. He was a shitty friend to Joyce. He appears as Lynch in Portrait and Ulysses.”
      • “Cowsgrope” – Vincent claims to have “groped” Nora, who was characterized in paragraph 2 as a source of milk, hence metaphorically a “cow”. “Cow” is also a derogatory word for a woman, usually implying ugliness.
      • “Invincible” – Obiwanspicoli points out that this may be a reference to the “Irish National Invincibles, an offshoot of Irish Republican Brotherhood. I can find no mention of Cosgrave being one and they werennot active by 1904.”
      • “confleshed” – “Confessed”. “Con” is Latin for “with”; Cosgrave confessed to putting his flesh with Nora’s.
      • “scraping the odd barnacle” – A euphemistic way of saying he had sex with Nora Barnacle.
      • “nundread-for” – “Hundred four”, but also suggesting (having) “no dread for”; Cosgrave wasn’t afraid of the consequences. Possibly this could also be read as “nun dread for”, expressing Nora’s fear of monogamous.commitment (“nun”-like).
      • “Orgy-porgy-puttin-pie” – A 19th century English folk song begins (in its most common version) “Georgie Porgie, pudding and pie”. Significantly, the second line is “Kissed the girls and made them cry”. “Orgy” is unrestrained sexual activity. A “porgy” is a type of fish, though the relevance, if any, is unclear. “Puttin-pie” suggests how Giorgio will be “putting” his penis “in” Lucia’s “pie” (vagina).
      • “farst” – Giorgio may have “first” been conceived by someone “far” from James Joyce, which is rather a “farce”.
      • “consceptered” – Conceived with (“con”) someone’s “scepter” (penis). “Scepter” is also a symbol of royal authority; royalty being even more concerned than most people over the thought of offspring from adultery.
    • Is Dis Nod my sun, her darkglassed da had cried in his tormental angruish, to witch the briny mare durst not deply.

      • “Dis” – In Dante’s Divine Comedy, Dis is the city that encompasses circles six through nine of Hell. As an English prefix, “dis-” usually indicates breaking apart or destruction.
      • “Nod” – In Genesis, after Cain (previously identified with Giorgio) was cursed by God, he settled in the land of Nod. “Nod” is also what someone does when they are about to fall asleep; in the expression “Even Homer nods”, it indicates that even a very wise person commits the occasional error.
        • Alan Moore mentioned Nod in an interview in 1997:

          I once heard an anecdote about a contemporary magician who decided to put this principle to the test by adopting a belief so strange that nobody could possibly mistake it for reality and then seeing what happened. The belief he decided to go with was that Noddy, the little toy-car driving and belled-hat wearing protagonist of Enid Blyton’s children’s books, was in fact the absolute creator of the Universe and the God of all Gods. Within a couple of weeks he abandoned the experiment in alarm, finding himself upon the brink of conclusively proving that Noddy was the Supreme Being. He’d come across magazine articles showing freshly discovered cave-drawings of an obviously sacred figure wearing what appeared to be a tall pointed hat with a little bell on the top. He’d read an interview with Enid Blyton herself in which she described a strange vision that had come to her while under the influence of gas at the dentist; in which she had been whisked across the Universe at the speed of light to meet God himself, although he couldn’t describe the details of their conversation. This, along with a whole mess of other stuff and previously hidden meanings in Bible passages (Cain is banished to the Land of Nod in Genesis, for example), seemed to indicate that Nod was God and Enid Blyton His prophetess.

      • “sun” – Giorgio is not James’ “sun”, the source of his light’ his light is “Lucia”.
      • “darkglassed” – “Distressed” or “wearing dark glasses”, as James Joyce often did.
      • “tormental” – Portmanteau of “torment” and “mental”. Possibly also “tor”, mountain.
      • “angruish” – Portmanteau of “angry” and “anguish”.
      • “witch” – “Which” or “witch”.
      • “briny mare” – “Briny” means salty, like seawater (in which barnacles are found); “salty” is also a term for filthy language, or someone who uses such language. A “mare” is a female horse, so this is also “mother”. There may be other meanings here – suggest??
      • “durst” – Archaic form of “dared”. Possibly also suggesting the “worst” which she dares not say.
      • “deply” – “Reply”, “deeply”, “deploy”. “de-ply” (unfold).
    • The mater had been left unseddled.

      • “mater” – Latin for “mother” (who was, presumably, unsettled).
      • “unseddled” – “Unsettled”, “unsaid”. Possibly “unsaddled”?
    • Woden that expain a Lot, now, about Morma and her Gorgo?

      • “Woden” – An Anglo-Saxon storm and father god, equivalent to the Norse Odin. Like most “Allfather” gods, he frequently committed adultery.
      • “Lot” – A character from Genesis. After his wife died, his two daughters committed incest with him.
      • “Morma […] Gorgo” – “Mormo” and “Gorgo” are two of the many names associated with Hecate, the Greek goddess of witchcraft, connecting with the use of “witch” two sentences back.
    • How the peer of hum were all-ways clost, unhearthily so in her cestimation, from the grendle to the crave?

      • “peer of hum” – “Pair of them”. “Peer” can mean “look”, suggestive of voyeurism. “Peer” can also mean “equal”, something which mother and son usually aren’t; adding “hum” to peer suggests the notion of harmony. “Hum peer” could also be read as “hump her”.
      • “all-ways” – “Always”, “in all ways” (including inappropriate ones).
      • “clost” – “Close”, “closed”, “closet” (as in, “in the closet”, hiding forbidden sexual tastes), “lost”, possibly “cluster”, “clothes”.
      • “unhearthily” – “Unhealthily”, with a “heart” or “hearth” (as in “hearth and home”) inside it. Possible suggestion of “heartily”.
      • “cestimation” – “Estimation” of “incest”.
      • “grendle” – Allusion to the Anglo-Saxon epic Beowulf, which featured a monster named Grendel and its equally monstrous mother.
      • “from the grendle to the crave” – “From the cradle to the grave,” that is, for his entire life.
      • “crave” – “Grave”, “crave” (desire), “cave” (metaphor for vagina; also the home of monsters such as Grendel and his mother).
    • She maddily recalls her fishermum warmin’ up the jung mastur’s bait incide her muth on chillywilly ofterrnoons, or thinkshe-thinkshe does.

      • “maddily” – “Muddily” (imperfectly), “madly”. Possibly also suggests “madder” and “mother”.
      • “fishermum” – “Fisherman”, “mother”. Obiwanspicoli suggests that “fisher” is another “Barnacle” reference, “also her mother was fishy in the sense that she may have acted odd or behaved suspiciously.”
      • “jung” – Carl Jung (1875-1961) was a highly influential psychiatrist and psychoanalyst who treated Lucia Joyce for a time, starting in 1934.
      • “jung mastur” – “Young master”, a common English form of address for a young nobleman from a servant; the suggestion that it was used between mother and son is unusual.
      • “mastur’s bait” – “Masturbation”, with “bait” continuing the “fisherman” imagery. “Bait” for fish is often worms, which can be thought of as resembling a (limp) penis.
      • “incide” – “Inside”, “incest”.
      • “muth” – “Mouth”, “mother”. Possibly also “mutt” (suggesting bestial acts and a non-pedigreed ancestry) or “month”.
      • “chillywilly” – “Willy” is childish slang for “penis”.
      • “ofterrnoons” – “Afternoons”, “oft” (often), perhaps “of terror” or “offed her”.
      • “thinkshe-thinkshe” – “Thinks she”, or possibly the even less certain “thinks that she thinks that she”. (Is this doubled phrase a specific James Joyce allusion? – Suggest??)
      • The sense here seems to be that Lucia observed Nora performing oral sex on Giorgio when she was very young (and he not much older).
    • Of curse, it wurd make plaint for alter see why they t’woo had insested she be liplocked with insanatoriums, fear Luci-lippi was heir poppy’s seed, his sperkle efferdent in all she set or dit, they way she allwise spoke her wheel, whoreas in Dirgeo was not a wit o’ the same subsdance to be scene.

      • “Of curse” – “Of course” this could be the source “of” Lucia’s “curse” (misfortunes).
      • “wurd” – “Would”, “word”.
      • “plaint” – “Plain”, “plaint” (complaint, woeful cry). Possibly “pain”, “paint”, “plant”, “plane”.
      • “alter” – “All to”, “alter” (in the sense of “other”, or in the sense of “change”). Also “altar” a place of worship and/or sacrifice.
      • “t’woo” – “Two” people who have decided “to woo” one another.
      • “insested” – “Insisted” and, yetbagain, “incest”. Also possibly “insect”, “infested”.
      • “liplocked” – Lucia’s lips will be locked (metaphorically) to silence her; non-metaphorically, her entire body will be locked away. “Liplock” is also a crude way of describing a kiss.
      • “insanitoriums” – “In sanitoriums”, “insanity”.
      • “fear” – “For”, but also suggesting the fear that Nora and Giorgio have about their incest being discovered.
      • “Luci-lippi” – “Lucia”, with suggestions of “Lucy Lips” (as discussed throughout part two of Jerusalem) and possibly the River Liffey again. An annotated edition of James Joyce’s Dubliners makes mention of the Renaissance Italian painter Fra Filippo Lippi, known for his sexual rapaciousness.
      • “heir” – “Her”, but with the added weight that Lucia is her father’s true “heir”.
      • “poppy’s seed” – “Father’s child”. Poppy seeds are very small, and are often placed on buns, or sometimes ground into a paste. Poppy also suggests opium.
      • “sperkle” – “Sparkle”, “sperm” (Giorgio’s sperm having apparently not come from James Joyce).
      • “efferdent” – “Evident”, “effervescent” (sparkling).
      • “set” – “Said”, “set” (sitting, or set down on paper).
      • “dit, they” – “Did, the”, “ditty” (song).
      • “allwise” – “Always”, “wise in all things”.
      • “spoke her wheel” – “Spoke her will” (spoke her mind). “Wheels” often have “spokes”, but a “spoke” can also be something thrust into a wheel, to break it.
      • “whoreas” – “Whereas”, “as a whore”.
      • “in Dirgeo” – “In Giorgio”, “indigent” (poor), “dirge” (song about death).
      • “wit” – “Whit” (small amount), “wit” (cleverness).
      • “subsdance” – “Substance”, “subs” (belonging to that which is below, or submissive), “dance” (the primary medium through which Lucia displayed her own wit and art).
      • “scene” – “Seen”, “scene” (display, acting, performance).
    • Old Gnawer had deicided then and there that her firstbore should carryon the dinnersty, no mutter that he mite halve been an utter mance.

      • “Gnawer” – “Nora”, “one who gnaws” (in the sense of destruction of Lucia’s life, and also suggestive of her fellating Giorgio. The initial “G” also recalls the allusion to Grendel three sentences back.
      • “deicided” – “Decided”, “the act of having slain a deity (god)”.
      • “firstbore” – Nora’s firstborn is, first and foremost, a bore.
      • “carryon” – “Carry on” (continue, but also perhaps an allusion to the “Carry On” series of British comedy films), “carrion” (abandoned dead animals which are food for scavengers).
      • “dinnersty” – “Dynasty”, “dinner sty” (continuing the suggestion that Giorgio is not only a beast, but a carrion-eater and/or a pig). Possibly “diversity”.
      • “mutter” – “Matter”, “mutter” (speak softly and unclearly). “Mutter” is also German for “mother”.
      • “mite” – “Might”, “mite” (small insect; by extension, anything very small or insignificant). Possibly “miter” (as in bishop’s miter).
      • “halve” – “Have”, “halve” (split in two, perhaps referring to how the Joyce family is split between Nora/Giorgio and James/Lucia).
      • “an utter mance” – “Another man’s”. “Utter” means complete or final, and is also suggestive of “udder” (the source of milk, which Giorgio kept Lucia from receiving). “Mance” suggests “romance”, and perhaps also “manse” (mansion) and “menace”.
    • As for her lital gill, the da’s reel darter, shutter up in lumatrick asylence, like at Pranginstein’s or finalee herein Saif Handrue’s house-piddle.

      • “lital” – “Little”. “Lital” means “my dew” in Hebrew. Possibly suggestive of “littoral”, “relating to the shore”.
      • “gill” – “Girl”, “gill” (that which allows a fish to breathe; a measure of liquid; a mountain stream).
      • “reel” – “Real”, “reel” (spool, or other winding mechanism, such as on a fishing rod; a type of dance; to stagger).
      • “darter” – “Daughter”, “one who darts” (moves quickly and gracefully), “darter” (type of fish, connecting with “reel” earlier.
      • “shutter” – “Shut her”, “shutter (boards to close a window).
      • “lumatrick asylence” – They will “trick” Lucia (light, “luma”) into “lunatic” “asylums” in order to assure her “silence” (or at least that no one will listen to what she says).
      • ” Pranginstein’s” – “Frankenstein’s”, which refers on one level to Mary Shelley’s famous novel and its titular scientist, but also to Doctor François Delmas, who ran a French sanitorium where Lucia spent some time (thanks to obiwanspicoli for pointing this out). “The “Prang” beginning of the name also suggests “prong” (penis), and perhaps Paris (which the hospital was near).
      • “finalee” – “Finally”, “final lee” (“lee” is shelter from wind or current).
      • “herein” – “Here in”, “herein” (in this document).
      • “Saif” – “Saint”, “safe”. “Saif” is also an Arabic name, and means “scimitar”.
      • “Handrue’s” – “Andrew’s”, “that which the hand regrets”. Perhaps also “ruse” (deceit).
      • “house-piddle” – “Hospital”, “house of piss”.
  • Paragraph 4
    Lucia’s ingratiating nurse, fatherly Patricia, sits beside her while she sips her early morning cup of tea and patiently enquires just what the famous writer’s cross-eyed, dotty daughter will be doing with herself today.

    •  Lucia’s nicey-nercy, featherly Patrisia, sips besight her while she bibs her searly monin’ cuppla Tees and mentalpatiently ensquires jest what the flameous rider’s cross-i, dot-t doubter well be druin’ with hersylph toda.

      • “nicey-nercy” – “Nice nurse”. “Nicey-nicey” means “trying to be pleasant, but in a way that suggests artifice or exaggeration”; the nurse is not sincerely “Nercy” is also a name, albeit an uncommon one.
      • “featherly” – “Fatherly”, “feathery” (suggesting a somewhat bird-like appearance or character, she might be “feather-brained”).
      • “Patrisia” – An unusual, but not unheard-of, variant of the name “Patricia”. It is derived from the Latin word “patrician” (noble), which is is turn closelt related to Latin “pater” (father).
      • “sips” – “Sits”, “sips”, “slips”, “spits”.
      • “besight” – “Beside”, “be sight” (suggesting a judgment based on surface appearance).
      • “bibs” – “Sips”, “imbibes” (a fancy way of saying “drinks”), “wears a bib” (like a child which can’t keep itself clean).
      • “searly” – “Early”, “searing” (hot), “surly” (grumpy).
      • “monin'” – “Morning”, “moaning” (in the sense of complaining?). Perhaps “mom in”, “man in”.
      • “cuppla” – “Cup of”, “couple”, cupola”. “Cuppa” is common English slang for “cup of (tea)”.
      • “Tees” – “Tea”, “tease”, possibly “tees” (as in golf). The capitalization suggests reference to a proper noun – suggest?
      • “mentalpatiently” – “Patiently”, with the reminder that Lucia is a patient in a mental hospital.
      • “ensquires” – “Enquires”, “in squires”. “Squire” can refer to an important landowner, or (as a verb) to escort a woman. Possibly “squirrel”?
      • “jest” – “Just”, “jest” (joke, trick).
      • “flameous” – “Famous”, “flame of us” (metaphorically “our inspiration”), “flamenco” (a dance).
      • “rider” – “Writer”, “rider” (one who rides (usually horses); an added condition).
      • “cross-i, dot-t” – Approximately a spoonerism of the expression “dot the ‘i’s and cross the ‘t’s” (ensure all details are properly completed).
      • “cross-i” – Lucia Joyce was cross-eyed. Also suggests “I am cross” (angry), or possibly “I am The Cross” (Christian symbol).
      • “dot-t” – “Dotty” (eccentric). Possibly “doting”?
      • “doubter” – “Daughter”, “one who doubts”, possibly “one who should be doubted”.
      • “well” – “Will”, “well” (good; hole from which water is drawn).
      • “druin'” – “Doing”, “ruin”, “druid”.
      • “hersylph” – “Herself”, “her sylph” (a sylph is a mythological air spirit).
      • “toda” – “Today”, “toad”, “to do”.
  • Paragraph 5
    “Well, I thought I might have a wander on the grounds, now, seeing as it’s such a lovely day and all the flowers are in bloom. I don’t mind being by myself, and I dare say you’ve other fish to fry. Be off, and don’t yoy worry about me, Pat. I’ll be right as rain.”

    • “Will, I thought I might have a wonder in the ground, now, seeing as it’s such a liffley day and all the flawers are in Bloom.

      • “Will” – “Well”, “will” (an expression of Lucia’s willpower).
      • “wonder” – “Wander”, “wonder”; Lucia’s wandering will reveal wonders.
      • “liffley” – “Lovely”, “River Liffey”.
      • “flawers” – Flowers which are flawed.
      • “Bloom” – A reference to Leopold Bloom, protagonist of James Joyce’s Ulysses.
    • I dent mind bein’ bi myself, and I dar say you’ve auther fish to frey.

      • “dent” – “Don’t”, “den” (cave), “dent” (blemish or damage). Possibly “Ent”, a tree spirit from Tolkien.
      • “bi” – “By”, “bi” (bisexual).
      • “dar say” – “Dare say” (feel confident that). Possibly “Mr. Darcy” from Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice. Possibly a reference to “gaydar” (alleged ability to detect people of a homosexual nature).
      • “auther fish to frey” – “Other fish to fry” (other things to do).
      • “auther” – “Other”, “author”.
      • “frey” – “Fry”, “fray” (a battle), “fray” (to wear down), “Frey” (Norse god of prosperity).
    • Bee off, and don’t you weary about me, Pat.

      • “Bee” – “Be”, “bee” (as in “busy like a bee”).
      • “weary” – “Worry”, “weary”. Seems to suggest that Pat finds Lucia wearying (or vice versa).
    • Isle be writer’s reign.”

      • “Isle” – “I’ll”, “isle” (island, evoking travel and exploration). Possibly “aisle”, a space for traveling between.
      • “writer’s reign” – “Right as rain” means perfectly fine. “Writer’s reign” suggests that writing rules, that the pen is mightier than the sword, and perhaps a fond hope by the author that he will be able to remain in charge of this text.
  • Paragraph 6
    With her companion thus reassured, Lucia blots her lips upon a paper napkin and excuses herself, skipping out and whistling down a freshly disinfected corridor towards glass doorways at its farthest end, light running into light.

    • With her compinion thus-why’s beassured, Lucia blots her nips upon a paper lapkin and excurses herself, skipling out and thistling down a freshly dizzifected carrydor towheres glass D’orways at its fatherst and, light runnin’ inter light.

      • “compinion” – “Companion”, “pinion” (the outer part of a birds wings; to cut off the pinion to prevent flight; to hold someone down), “with yonder pin”.
      • “thus-why’s beassured” – “Thuswise” (in that manner) reassured, “With her questions (“why’s”) answered thusly: be assured”.
      • “blots – Absorbs the moisture, but also suggestive of Rorschach Blots.
      • “nips” – “Lips”, “nips” (small sips), “nipples”.
      • “lapkin” – “Napkin”, “lap” (where “kin” are conceived). Lap-kin, together with the prior mention of nips and moisture, is suggestive of sexual excitement.
      • “excurses” – “Excuses”, “ex curses” (removes herself from her misfortunes), “excursion” (what Lucia is about to embark upon).
      • “skipling” – “Skipping”, “rippling” (like a river). Possibly “tippling” (drinking alcohol) or “sapling” (a young tree).
      • “thistling” – “Whistling”, “thistle” (a prickly plant, and an emblem of Scotland).
      • “dizzifected” – “Disinfected”, “dizzy”.
      • “carrydor” – “Corridor”, “carry door” (a means of exit which is portable). Possibly a reference to Stephen King’s Carrie?
      • “towheres” – “Towards”, “to wheres” (towards places).
      • “D’orways” – “Doorways”, “ways of gold”. Possible reference to Christian Dior, or some other proper noun – suggest?
      • “Fartherst and” – “Furthest end”, “father also”. Lucia’s father was often far from her, but he also represented escape.
      • “light” – “Light” and “Lucia”.
      • “inter” – “Into”, “inter-” (between, among; Lucia will run between times and places), “inter” (to bury).
  • Paragraph 7
    Outside, she stands and takes it in, from the cerulean sky bowl of the firmament above to the sage curtain of the far horizon, or the flowerbeds close at hand with all their petals and flowering sprays of color. Though it’s not ideal she likes this place the best of all she’s been in. She enjoys the handsome doctors with their bedside manners, and then, roughly four o’clock, she often lingers at the gates to watch the jostling schoolboys from the Grammar School that stands adjacent to her psychiatric institution.  Pretty as a picture they go scuffling down the Bulling Road beyond the iron railings, snatching up each other’s battered caps and grabbing at each other’s balls with wild hilarity, oblivious to her spying from the foliage in wistful, private lechery.

    • Outsighed, she stunnds and tics it in, from the cerebrulean skullbowl of the fymirment above to the sage cortin of the fir hereyeson, ur the flarebeds close at hand withal their petalsparks and fleurwork sprays o’ culeur.

      • “Outsighed” – “Outside”, “let out a sigh”.
      • “stunnds” – “Stands”, “is stunned” (by beauty).
      • “tics” – “Takes”, “tics” (compulsive, repetitive movements, usually uncontrolled, sometimes taken as indicative of insanity. Possibly also “ticks” (small insects; sounds made by a clock).
      • “cerebrulean” – “Cerulean” (sky blue), “cerebral” (intellectual; concerning the cerebrum). Possibly also “Ceres” (Roman goddess of agriculture), “creme brulee”, “lean”.
      • “skullbowl of the fymirment” – “Sky bowl of the firmament”. In Norse mythology, Odin and his brothers created the universe from the remains of the giant “Ymir”, whom they slew; they fashioned the “bowl” of the sky from his “skull”.
      • “sage cortin” – “Sage curtain” (a line of the evergreen shrub), “stage curtain”, “courting” (romantically).
      • “fir hereyeson” – “Far horizon”, “fir” (connects with sage, earlier), “her eyes on” (where she is looking).
      • “ur” – “Or”, “Ur” (ancient Sumerian city-state), “ur-” (original, earliest).
      • “flarebeds” – “Flowerbeds”, “flares” (sudden bursts of light, introduction of firework imagery).
      • “withal” – “With all”, “withal” (archaic for “also”, “in addition”).
      • “petalsparks” – “Petals”, “sparks” (connects with building firework imagery).
      • “fleurwork” – “Flowering” (“fleur” is French for “flower”), “firework”.
      • “culeur” – “Color”, “-cule” (suffix indicating something small), “enculer” (French for “sodomize”, also used in Victorian English erotica).
    • Though it’s not ideyll she likes displace the best of all she’s in-bin.

      • “ideyll” – “Ideal”, “idyll” (a happy scene; a verbal description of such a scene).
      • “displace” – Although Lucia likes “this place”, she cannot help but feel “displaced”.
      • “in-bin” – “Been in”, “in the bin” (“loony bin” is a slang term for a mental hospital).
    • She injoys the handson dictors with their bed’s-eye menners, und dien, roughly for o’cock, she aften langours at the gaits to watch the jesslin’ squallboys from the Glammar Scruel that stems adjescent to hier pysche-hattrick instincution.

      • “injoys” – “Enjoys”, “finds joy within”.
      • “handson” – “Handsome”, also recalling the “hands” of “son” Giorgio, which introduced her to sexual desire.
      • “dictors” – “Doctors” who are have “dicks” (penises). Also possibly “dictators”, those who say what is or is not allowed.
      • “bed’s-eye menners” – “Bedside manners” (the ability to speak to patients in a calming manner), “bed’s eye men” (men who have a “bedroom” (lustful) gaze).
      • “und dien” – “And then”, “undine” (a mythological water spirit).
      • “for o’cock” – “Four o’clock”, “for (in favor of) a cock”.
      • “aften” – “Often”, “aft” (behind, suggestive in this context of her bottom).
      • “langours” – “Lingers”, “langour” (pleasant tiredness; in this context, post-coital).
      • “gaits” – “Gates”, “gait” (walking cadence; Lucia is interestes in watching legs).
      • “jesslin'” – “Jostling”, “wrestling”. Also possibly “jess”, a leather strap to restrain a hawk, recalling Lucia’s imprisonment here.
      • “squallboys” – “Schoolboys”, “squalling” (reinforcing the jostling, wrestling language).
      • “Glammar Scruel” – “Grammar School”, “glamour” (spell, attractive appearance), “is cruel” (British schools are notoriously cruel environments). Possibly also “screw” (have sex with).
      • “stems” – “Stands”, “stems” (slang for “legs”).
      • “adjescent” – “Adjacent”, “descent” (into debauchery?), “scent”.
      • “hier” – “Her”, “hierarchy”, “hieros” (Greek for “sacred”).
      • “pysche-hattrick instincution” – “Psychiatric institution”.
      • “pysche-hattrick” – “psyche” (the mind or soul; also a mythological figure, best known from the story of “Cupid and Psyche”), “hat trick” (something achieved three times, possibly referring to the three trials which Venus insists Psyche accomplish).
      • “instincution” – “Institution”, the “execution” of “instinct”.
    • Spitty as a pricksure they go scruffling down the Bulling Roude beyond the iron realings, snurchin’ up each other’s badgered caps an’ grubbin’ at each other’s bawls wit’ wilde hellarity, obliffeyus to her sprying from the foolyage in wishtful, privet larchery.

      • “Spitty as a pricksure” – “Pretty as a picture” (a common English phrase for beauty).
      • “Spitty” – “Pretty”, “spitty” (tending to spit), “spotty” (suffering from acne).
      • “pricksure” – “Picture”, “cocksure” (arrogant, with here an extra emphasis on the male sexual organ).
      • “scruffling” – “Scuffling”, “scruffy”.
      • “Bulling Roude” – “Bulling Road”, “rowdy” like “bulls”.
      • “realings” – “Railings” demarcate the boundary between the “real” outside world and Lucia’s interior (in multiple senses) life.
      • “snurchin'” – “Snatching”, “urchin”, possibly “sneaking”.
      • “badgered” – “Battered”, “badgered” (bothered). Possible reference to the Badger Game, a con in which the victim is lured into having sex with a woman and then her ‘husband’ comes home and demands money in order to avoid a beating and/or lawsuit.
      • “grubbin'” – “Grabbing”, “grubby”.
      • “bawls” – “Balls” (in context, could be either toys or testicles), “bawling” (crying).
      • “wit’ wilde” – “With wild”. Oscar “Wilde” was a famous 19th century author, known for his “wit”, and his homosexuality.
      • “hellarity” – “Hilarity”, “Hell”, “hellions.”obliffeyus” – “Oblivious”, “River Liffey”, “O, we (“us”) have a fey life”.
      • “sprying” – “Spying”. Though Lucia is physically rather old, her libido remains “spry”.
      • “foolyage” – Lucia spies from the “foliage”, though this is arguably “fully” “fool”-ish at her “age”. Still, she would like to “fool” around.
      • “wishtful” – “Wistful”, “wishful”.
      • “privet” – “Private”, “privet” (a type of hedge, presumably what she is spying through).
      • “larchery” – “Lechery”, “larch” (a kind of tree), “archery” (as in Cupid).
  • Paragraph 8
    But what she likes the best of all about her current residence is how it alters with the seasons, never quite the same from one day to the next. The where and when of it does not seem so inflexible as some locations that have entertained her presence down across the decades. Here, she can meander readily between her pasts and her futures.; between here and there; betwixt one world and the next. Here at Saint Andrews Psychological Infirmary it is entirely possible, in Lucia’s estimation, to slip from the earthly realm into a territory of fairy tale and old mythology, where every utterance is an immediate and eternal truth. Why, sometimes she hardly knows which infirmary she’s in at present, or if ultimately all the nuthouses might not turn out to be the selfsame place, one vast establishment transcending international boundaries and filled with fusty doctors trying to get hold of her soul.

    • Bud wort she likes the bestival apout her current reasidance is how it olders with the saysongs, nava quit the seam firm one die to the nicht.

      • “bud” – “But”, “bud” (flower; slang for brother).
      • “wort” – “What”, “wort” (a class of plant; unfermented beer), “wart”.
      • “bestival” – “Best of all”, “estival” (appearing in the summer), “festival”, “possibly “bestial”.
      • “apout” – “About”. Although Lucia is trying to think positively, her position still sometimes puts “a pout” on her face. “Pout” is also a kind of fish.
      • “reasidance” – A “residence” where Lucia can “readily, easily dance”. Also possibly “reads”.
      • “olders” – “Alters”, “grows older”, “alder” (a type of lowering plant).
      • “saysongs” – “Seasons”, “say songs” (there are many songs which speak of the seasons). Possibly “singsong”, “sarongs”.
      • “nava quit” – “Never quite”, “never quit”.
      • “nava” – “Never”, possibly “navigate”?
      • “quit” – “Quite”, “quit”.
      • “seam” – “Same”, “seam” (a boundary between things: seasons, different chunks of madhouse spacetime).
      • “firm” – “From”, “firm” (constant, unchanging – which is very much not the subjective experience of time, but which Jerusalem argues is the actual state of things), “fir” (tree).
      • “die” – “Day”, “die”. Every day brings us closer to death; every day another roll of the die.
      • “nicht” – “Next”, “nicht” (German for “not”, which is what people seem to become when they die), “night” (opposed to day).
    • The weir and wen of it der knot same so influxable as some lockations that hav intertrained her persence down orcross the docaides.

      • “weir” – “Where”, “weir” (a small dam, used to alter a river’s flow).
      • “wen” – “When”, wen (boil on skin).
      • “der” – “Does”, “der” (German for “the”), “dur” (an expression to comment on a foolish action).
      • “knot” – “Not”, “knot”.
      • “same” – It would “seem” that things are not always the “same” here.
      • “influxable” – “Inflexible”, “influx” (sudden arrival of a large group; inflow of water into a body of water), “flux” (change; archaic term for diarrhea).
      • “lockations” – “Locations” in which she has been “locked”.
      • “hav” – “Have”, “hav” (“sea” in several Scandinavian languages).
      • “intertrained” – “Entertained” (in this context, ironic for “imprisoned”), “inter” (bury), “inter-” (between). “trained” (possibly in the sense of directing plant growth; archaic: entice).
      • “persence” – “Presence”, “person”, “persistence”.
      • “down orcross” – “Down across”, “down or across” (the directions of a crossword puzzle, which this chapter could be likened to). Possibly “horcrux” from Harrry Potter?
      • “docaides” – “Decades”, “doc aides” (nurses or orderlies).
  • Page 886
    • Her, she carn miander reedily betwin her pa’stime and her fewcheers; betorn hear an’ dare; betwhether wan welt under noxt.

      • “Her” – “Here”, “her”.
      • “carn” – “Can”, “carn” (meat), “carnal” (sexual), “cairn” (pile of stomes servimg as a marker).
      • “miander” – “Meander” (wander), “me and her”, “minder”. Possibly “viand” (meat).
      • “reedily” – “Readily”, “like a reed”, “greedily”.
      • “betwin” – “Between”, “be a twin”.
      • “pa’stime” – “Past (time)”, “pastime” (hobby), “father’s time”.
      • “fewcheers” – Lucia anticipates “few cheers” among her “futures”.
      • “betom” – “Between”, “be a tom (tomcat?)”.
      • “hear” – “Here”, “hear”.
      • “dare” – “There”, “dare”.
      • “betwhether” – “Between”, “be T (Tom? True?) whether (whatever) the circumstances are”, “bet whether”.
      • “wan” – “One”, “wan (pale), possibly “won”.
      • “welt” – “World”, “welt” (German: “world”; raised mark on the body caused by a blow).
      • “under” – “And the”, “under” (other worlds are often conceived of as being literal underworlds).
      • “noxt” – “Next”, “Nox” (Roman goddess of night). Possibly “noxious” (revolting, poisonous).
    • Heir at Feint Andruse Cycle-logical Infirmitry it is entimely passible, in Lussye’s questimation, to slep from the birthly whelm intru a terrortree o’ feary-tell and eld mirthology, where every mutterforth is an immadiate and enternal troth.

      • “Heir” – “Here”, “heir” (Lucia is in some senses her father’s heir). Possibly “hair”.
      • “Feint Andruse Cycle-logical Infirmitry” – “Saint Andrews Psychological Infirmary”.
      • “Feint” – “Saint”, “feint”, possibly “faint”.
      • “Andruse” – “Andrews”, “druse” (an aggregation of crystals found in certain plants), possibly “Druze” – a middle-eastern ethnoreligious group founded in the 11th century.
      • “Cycle-logical” – “Psychological”, “cycle” (of the seasons?) “logical” (a quality that the hospital administration would like to think they have, though Lucia might disagree).
      • “Infirmitry” – “Infirmary”, “infirm, I try”.
      • “entimely” – “Entirely”, “in time”, “timely”.
      • “passible” – “Possible”, “passable” (able to be traversed), “plausible”.
      • “Lussye’s” – “Lucia’s”, “Luss” (a village in Scotland) “yes”, “Lussy-sur-Morges” (a municipality in Switzerland), possibly “loose eyes”.
      • “questimation” – “Estimation”, “quest”, “question”.
      • “slep” – “Slip”, “step”, “sleep” (perchance to dream). Possibly “slop”.
      • “birthly whelm” – The “earthly realm” is where our “birth” (“whelp”-ing) took place, something that many find to be “overwhelming”.
      • “intru” – “Into”, “in through”, “in truth”.
      • “terrortree” – “Territory”. “Terror tree” may allude to Yggdrasil, the center of Norse cosmology, and often envisioned as the route between worlds. More facetiously, it might be a reference to The Simpsons’ annual Halloween episode, “Treehouse of Terror”.
      • “feary-tell” – “Fairy-tale”, “That which is frightening to speak of” (connecting with “terror”).
      • “eld” – “Old”, “eld” (literary way of saying “the past”), “elder” (old person; type of shrub).
      • “mirthology” – “Mythology”, “the study of mirth” (standing in contrast to terror and fear).
      • “mutterforth” – An “utterance” is something which you “mutter” (speak) “forth”.
      • “immadiate” – “Immediate”, “made”.
      • “enternal” – “Eternal”, “enter”, possibly “Ent” (Tolkien’s tree-people).
      • “troth” – “Truth”, “troth” (faith or loyalty, often in a context of marriage).
    • Wye, summertimes she hurdly gnos whatch finny-form she’s in at prisent, or if altimately alder not-houses might nut torn out to bye the selfshame plaice, one vurst istabilismend trance-ending innernotional bindaries and filt-wit fausty dactyrs tyin’ to gut hauled ov hert sole.

      • “Wye” – “Why”, “wye” (a Y-shaped support), “Wye” (a major river flowing through England and Wales).
      • “summertimes” – “Sometimes”, “summer times” (connecting with the seasonal theme earlier in this paragraph).
      • “hurdly” – “Hardly”, “hurdle”, possibly “hurdy-gurdy” (a musical instrument). Also “hurds” is a word for coarser parts of flax, removed during processing.
      • “gnos” – “Knows”, “gnosis” (personal knowledge of the spiritual), “gnome” (earth spirit), possibly “gnu” (wildebeest).
      • “whatch” – “Which”, “watch” (to observe; an instrument for telling time), “whatchamacallit” (thingy). Possibly “swatch” (sample of paint or fabric) or “thatch” (roof covering of straw).
      • “finny-form” – “Infirmary”, “form with fins” (suggesting mermaid). Possibly “uniform”, “final form”.
      • “prisent” – “Present”, “prison”. Possibly “prism”, “prize”, “prise” (to pry).
      • “altimately” – “Ultimately”, “all time mates with lies”. Also “altimeter” (device for measuring altitude), timorous (scared).
      • “alder” – “All the”, “alder” (tree; alderman).
      • “not-houses” – “Nuthouses” (slang for asylums) may be “houses” (in that they house inmates), but they are “not” homes.
      • “nut” – “Not”, “nut” (crazy person; tree seed).
      • “torn out” – “Turn out”, “torn out” (pages?).
      • “bye” – “Be”, “bye” (farewell; the advancement of someone to the next round of a tournament without a figjt due to lack of an opponent).
      • “selfshame” – “Selfsame” (identical), “shame of self” (presumably a common issue in asylums).
      • “plaice” – “Place”, “plaice” (a type of fish).
      • “vurst” – “Vast”, “wurst” (sausage), “vürst” (Estonian for “sovereign prince”), “worst”.
      • “istabilismend” – “Establishment”, “I stabilise and mend”, “I stab all lies in the end”.
      • “trance-ending” – “Transcending”, “ending a trance” (awakening).
      • “innemotional” – “International”, “in emotional”, “inn”, “inner”, “motion”, “all”.
      • “bindaries” – “Boundaries” are things which “bind”. Possibly “Aries” (zodiac sign), “Ares” (Greek god of war), “Darius” (famed emperor of Persia).
      • “filt-wit” – “Filled with”, “having a filthy wit”.
      • “fausty” – “Fusty” (old-fashioned), “similar to Faust” (legendary scholar who sold his soul to the debil in return for power and knowledge).
      • “dactyrs” – “Doctors”, “dactyl” (metrical unit of verse), “Dactyls” (mythological race of males who are smiths and healers). Possibly “pterodactyls”, “Týr” (Norse god).
      • “tyin'” – “Trying”, “tying” (restraining). Possibly “Tyin” (a lake in Norway).
      • “gut” – “Get”, “gut” (as in “gut feeling”).
      • “hauled ov” – “Hold of”, “hauled” (dragged involuntarily) “ovum” (egg).
      • “hert” – “Her”, “hurt”, possibly “heart”, “hart” (deer).
      • “sole” – “Soul”, “sole” (singular; bottom of foot or shoe – possibly a reference to John Clare (see section 2), with his shoe damaged from his long walk).
  • Paragraph 9
    The bright green lawns stretch all around her, with the poplars, elms and far off buildings all turning in her planetary orbit, and her standing still at the center like the sun, the very source of light. The source of her, now! With a gay spring in her step, she sets out on her walking progress, on her wake-me-up perambulations, on her expedition, heading off across the dewy grass towards the poetry-line of the spinney waiting in the distance. Off she flounces, as beneficent as old Saint Nicholas himself, an innocent old lady in a wooly cardigan out strolling on the institution lawns.

    • The bride-green yawns strich all orerrnd her, wid the poplores, erlms and faroof bildungs all roturnin’ in her planetree obit, undherstood still art the cindre like the Son, the veri soeurce of lied.

      • “bride-green” – “Bright green”, “bridegroom”, “wide”, “broad” (wide; slang for “woman”). “Green” can also mean “innocent, inexperienced”.
      • “yawns” – “Lawns”, “yawns” (what one does when sleepy; opens wide like an abyss). Possibly “yams”.
      • “strich” – “Stretch”, “ostrich” (bird famed for its alleged ignorance of danger), “strict”, “strich” (screech owl; German: stroke, line, direction of fur; prostitution), “rich”.
      • “orerrnd” – “Around”, “or erred”, “ore round”, “or errand”, “o render”, “rend”, “rerun”, “orange”.
      • “wid” – “With”, “wide”, “width”.
      • “poplores” – “Poplars”, “pop lores” (contemporary mythology?), “popular”, “plop ores”.
      • “erlms” – “Elms”, “earl”, “Erlkönig” (Germanic “king of the fairies”, also a famous poem by Goethe).
      • “faroof” – “Far off”, “fa” (musical note) “roof”, “faro” (card game) “of”, “Farooq” (common Arabic name, meaning “one who distinguishes between right and wrong”).
      • “bildungs” – “Buildings”, “bildungsroman” (a coming-of-age story).
      • “roturnin'” – “Rotating”, “row turning”, “rot urn in”, “rot earning”. Possibly “rout”, “nine”.
      • “planetree” – “Planetary”, “plane tree” (a type of tree), “plan three”, “plane” (aeroplane; flat surface; to make a surface flat).
      • “obit” – “Orbit”, “obituary”, “o’ bit”,
      • “undherstood” – “And her standing”, “understood”.
      • “art” – “At”, “art”.
      • “cindre” – “Center”, “cinder” (what the heat of the sun can reduce you to), “cider”, “sin there”, “Cynthia”, “Indra” (Hindu deity).
      • “Son” – “Sun” (center of the solar system), “son” (Giorgio, her mother’s son, and the center of much of her trauma), “Son” (Jesus, the center of Christianity).
      • “veri” – “Very”, “veritable”, “ver” (Latin for “Spring”; French for “worm”; Hungarian for “to pant”; Icelandic for “a man” or “the sea”) “I”.
      • “soeurce” – “Source”, “souer” (French for “sister”).
      • “lied” – “Light”, “lied” (German for “song”; told an untruth).
    • The sauce of her, now!

      • “The sauce of her” – “The source of her”, “the sauciness of her”.
    • With a gae spring in her stoop, she-sex out on her walk in purgress, on her wake-myop parundulations, on her expermission, heeding oft acrux the do-we grass twowords the poertree-line of the spinny wetting in the da’stance.

      • “gae” – “Gay” (happy; homosexual), “Gaelic” (Irish language).
      • “stoop” – “Step”, “stoop” (as in “stooped with age”).
      • “she-sex” – “She sets”, “female gender”.
      • “walk in purgress” – “Walking progress”, “work in progress” (see notes to paragraph 1).
      • “wake-myop” – “Wake-me-up”, “wake” (as in Finnegans) “myopic” (nearsighted, which James Joyce appears to have been).
      • “parundulations” – “Perambulations” (walking about), “par” (parahraph; expected golf score) “undulations” (waving motions, often relating to dance or sex). Also “para-” (beside) and “park”.
      • “expermission” – “expedition”, “without permission”, “experiment”, “sperm emission”. Possibly “expert mission”, “the ions miss through out”.
      • “heeding” – “Heading” (going; direction), “heeding” (paying attention to).
      • “oft” – “Out”, “often”. Possibly “soft”, “loft”.
      • “acrux” – “Across”, “a crux” (central point, crossroads, cross).
      • “do-we” – “Dewy”, “do we” (have sex?).
      • “twowords” – “Towards”, “two words”.
      • “poertree-line” – “Poetry-line”, “property line”, “poor tree-line”. Possibly “Poe” (Edgar Allan), “power”.
      • “spinny” – “Spinney” (small area of trees and bushes), “spinny” (spinning; dizzy).
      • “wetting” – “Waiting”, “becoming wet” (possibly in a sexual sense).
      • “da’stance” – “Distance”, “father’s stance”, “dance”.
    • Iff she flaunces, as veneficent as elled Sent Knickerless hermself, an innerscent ulled lay-die in a wurli cardiagran out strawling on the institrusion lorns.

      • “Iff” – “Off”, “if”, “River Liffey”, possibly “iff” (if and only if).
      • “flaunces” – “Flounces” (moves in an exaggerated or flirtatious manner), “flaunts” (shows off). Possibly alluding to “Fleance” (character from Shakespeare’s Henry V) or Little Lord “Fauntleroy”.
      • “venificent” – “Benificent” (generous), “venerable” (old), possibly “venal” (corrupt).
      • “elled” – “Old”, possibly “measured” as “ell” is an archaic unit of length.
      • “Sent Knickerless” – “Saint Nicholas” (Santa Claus), “sent knicker-less” (not wearing underwear).
      • “hermself” – “Himself”, “herself”, “herm” (a Greek boundary marker, often notably phallic), “hermaphrodite”, “Hermes”.
      • “innerscent” – “Innocent”, “inner scent” (possibly referring to the scent emerging from inside Lucia’s not-at-all-innocent vagina).
      • “ulled” – “Old”, “Ull” (Germanic god of archery), “ull” (“wool” in several Scandinavian languages), “lulled”, “mulled”, “sullied”.
      • “lay-die” – A “Lady” who is willing to “lay” (have sex) in order to “die” (orgasm).
      • “wurli” – “Wooly”, “whirly”
      • “cardiagran” – “Cardigan” (sweater), “cardiogram”, “gran” (grandmother).
      • “strawling” – “Strolling”, “trawling” (fishing; slang for seeking sexual partners); “straw” (as in “roll in the hay”).
      • “institrusion” – “Institution”, “intrusion”.
      • “lorns” – “Lawns”, “those who are lorn (abandoned or lonely)”.
  • Paragraph 10
    What the observer doesn’t know, however – and there’s always an observer, or at least in Lucia’s experience – is that she’s no old woman. In fact, she’s no age at all: she’s all her selves at once, cradle to grave, one inside the other like a set of Russian dolls. Her daddy’s baby is tucked inside the smallest nook, and then Lucia as a mere toddler, back then when she always was his little girl, his looking-glass. All of het teenage selves, the prima ballerinas and french-kissing nymphomaniacs are inside amidst the nested figurines, all of the made-up bragging about underage and moonlight fornications with a fictional young Latin lover she’d invented by the pseudonym of Sempo, semper fidelis, always faithful, when in actual fact her only sexual explorations had been with her older brother. For all of her other personalities are here as well, the tipsy terpsichorean toast of gay Paris, the fashionable lesbian when cunnilingus was believed to be sophisticated, or the disappointed dancer turning down a prosperous career at the prestigious Elizabeth Duncan School because her master immersed her in his complicated aryan philosophies and facile racial prejudice. Her infant past, her cemetaried future and her here-and-now, her every living moment all together, all her appertunances present and correct. She’s a collected volume, a Complete Lucia with her whole life gathered into handsome sheepskin bindings, a well-thumbed edition with endpapers marbled and a spine that’s still intact, despite frequent mishandlings.

    • What the upserver dursn’t know, hooever – and there’s all-ways en absurver, err at list in Lucia’s experience – is that she’s nu alld woman.

      • “upserver” – “Observer”, “one who serves up”.
      • “dursn’t” – “Doesn’t”, “dursn’t” (dares not), “dur” (expression of idiocy).
      • “hooever” – “However”, “whoever” (whoever the observer is, or whoever Lucia is).
      • “all-ways” – “Always”, “in all ways” (inescapably).
      • “en” – “An”, “n”, “English”, “en-” (within).
      • “absurver” – “Observer”, “absurd”.
      • “err” – “Or”, “err” (make a mistake), “er” (expression of uncertainty).
      • “list” – “Least”, “list” (organization method; to lean).
      • “nu” – “No”, “nu” (Yiddish expression of doubt or surprise); slang spelling of “new”; Greek for “n”).
      • “alld woman” – “Old woman”, “all woman” (a sexually attractive woman).
    • En fict, she’s no age atoll: she’s orl her silves at whence, curdle to gravey, won insight the ether like a sat of Rushin’ dirlls.

      • “En fict” – “In fact”, “en” (see above) “fiction”.
      • “atoll” – “At all”, “atoll” (a ring-shaped island of coral).
      • “orl” – “All”, “orl” (British dialect for alder tree).
      • “silves” – “Selves”, “silver”, “sylvan” (pastoral, associated with woods).
      • “whence” – “Once”, “whence” (from which).
      • “curdle to gravey” – “Cradle to grave”, “curdle” (separate into lumps) “gravy”.
      • “won” – “One”, “was victorious”.
      • “insight” – “Inside”, “insight”, “in sight” (visible).
      • “ether” – “Other”, “ether” (now-discredited medium for the transmission of light; anaesthetic gas), “ethereal” (delicate, graceful), “either”.
      • “sat” – “Set”, “sat” (sat down).
      • “Rushin’ dirlls” – “Russian dolls” (matryoshka xxx link/pic), “rushing drills”, “girls”, “grills”, “dirndl” (traditional Austrian skirt).
    • Her Babbo’s bibby is tocked in the smilest nookst, ind then Luukhere as a mer taddler, boock den winshe alice was his liddel girl, his larking-gloss.

      • “Babbo” – “Daddy” (in Italian).
      • “bibby” – “Baby”, “bibby” (stateroom on a passageway of a ship), “bib”.
      • “tocked” – “Tucked”, “locked”, “tock-ed” (tick-tock, the passing of time).
      • “smilest” – “Smallest”, “smile”.
      • “nookst” – “Nook”, “nest”.
      • “ind” – “And”, “India”, “independent”.
      • “Luukhere” – “Lucia”, “look here”, “Luuk” (Scandinavian name), “lurk”.
      • “mer” – “Mere”, “mer” (French for “sea”).
      • “taddler” – “Toddler”, “tadpole”, “tattler”.
      • “boock” – “Back”, “book”.
      • “den” – “Then”, “den” (animal’s dwelling; private room).
      • “winshe” – “When she”, “wince”, “winsome”, possibly “winch”, “wench”.
      • “alice” – “Always”, “Alice” (In Wonderland, reinforced below).
      • “liddel” – “Little”, Alice “Liddell” (name of the girl for whom Alice in Wonderland was originally told). Possibly “lidded”, “lit dell”.
      • “larking-gloss” – “Looking-glass” (mirror; Through the Looking-Glass), “larking gloss” (“playing with interpretation” – The activity of this whole chapter, for both writer and reader). Possibly “lacking”, “lass”.
    • Allover turnage salves, the preena dolorinas and Fressh-kissen mnymthomaniacs are insat amist the nexted friguleens, alluv the maid-up shagbrag abawd underlit and moon-age formircations with a fuctional yang Letin lovher she’d unvented blyther cleudonym of Sempo, sempo fiddles, allus faithfeel, ween in factual act her lonly senxual explortations hid bone whet’her holdher bluther.

      • “Allover” – “All of her”, “all over”.
      • “turnage” – “Teenage”, “the age at which one turns”.
      • “salves” – “Selves”, “salves” (poultices).
      • “preena dolorinas” – “Prima ballerinas”, “preening”, “dolor” (extreme sorrow).
      • “Fressh-kissen” – “French kissing” (kissing with tongues), “fresh” (unspoiled; impudent), “fress” (Yiddish/Getman for “to devour” ; Icelandic for “tomcat”) “kissen” (German for “cushion”).
      • “mnymthomaniac” – “Nymphomaniac” (sex addict), “mythomaniac” (compulsive liar), “monomaniac” (obsessive).
      • “insat” – “Inside”, “sat in”.
      • “amist” – “Amidst”, “a mist”.
      • “nexted” – “Nested”, “next-ed” (arranged in sequence).
      • “friguleens” – “Figurines”, “frigid” (lacking sexual desire), “frig” (masturbate). Possibly “leen” (Spanish for “they read”), “gul” (ghoul), “lien”.
      • “alluv” -“All of”, “Al love”.
      • “maid-up” – “Made-up”, “maid” (young woman; virgin woman; servant).
      • “shagbrag” – “Bragging”, “shag” (slang for “have sex”) “brag” (boast), “shagrag” or “shab-rag” (a ragged, scruffy, or contemptible person).
      • “abawd” – “About”, “a bawd” (archaic “prostitute”), “bawdy” (funny/sexy).
      • “underlit and moon-age” – “Underage and moonlit”, “dim and month-old”.
      • “formircations” – “Fornications”, “former”, “for murk”, possibly “formic” (relating to ants), “altercations” (fights).
      • “fuctional” – “Fictional”, “functional”, “fuck-tional” (able to be fucked).
      • “yang” – “Young”, “yang” (in Chinese philosophy, the male half of the universe).
      • “Letin” – “Latin” (South American, with connotations of exotic and romantic), “let in”.
      • “lovher” – “Lover”, “love her”.
      • “unvented” – “Invented”, “un vented” (let the wind out of?).
      • “blyther” – “By the”, “blithe-r” (more happy), “Blythe” (female name), “blither” (talk without substance).
      • “cleudonym” – “Pseudonym” (alias), “clue”, “Cluedo” (mystery board game, known as “Clue” in North America).
      • “Sempo” – obiwanspicoli notes:

        From Lucia Joyce: To Dance in the Wake quoting Lucia: “When we sent to Locarno I met a young man from the South of America. I think he spoke Spanish. I fell in love with him but he had tuberculosis. We went in the park by moonlight. It was rather romantic.” Twenty years later, chatting with hwr friend, Lucia remembered him by the name of Sempo.

      • “sempo fiddles” – “Semper fidelis” (Latin for “always faithful”; also the motto of the US Marine Corps), “fiddles” (slang for “touches the sexual parts”; recalls Nero fiddling as Rome burned).
      • “allus” – “Always”, “all us”.
      • “faithfeel” – “Faithful”, “Take it on faith that he feels her up”.
      • “ween” – “When”, “ween” (archaic “think”), possibly “wean”.
      • “factual act” – “Actual fact”, “a factual act”.
      • “lonly” – “Only”, “lonely”, “lone”.
      • “senxual” – “Sexual”, “sensual”.
      • “explortations” – “Explorations”, “exploitations”.
      • “hid bone” – “Had been”, “hid bone” (Giorgio played “hide the bone” by inserting his boner into Lucia).
      • “whet’her” – “With her”, “whether” (or not), “whet” (sharpen) her”, “make her wet”.
      • “holder” – “Older”, “hold her”.
      • “bluther” – “Brother”, “bluster” (aggressive speech), “blither” or “blather” (long-winded speech of little substance).
    • F’all here olter passonalities are her aswill, the topsy-turpsichorean tosst of Gapery, the fancianable lispian when cunninglingloss was belegged to be saphosticated, or the dis-appointed dawncer tearnin’ down a prosterous careern at the prestageous Lastbet Druncan Shulethe becurse herr meister ’Merzed her in his kamflicated airy unphilosophies and fascile rachel pressurdice.

      • “F’all” – “For all”, “Fall” (autumn), “fall” (of Lucifer or of Adam).
      • “here” – “Her”, “here”.
      • “olter” – “Other”, “alter”, possibly “otter”, “altar”.
      • “passonalities” – “Personalities”, “passion”, “pass, son”, “pass on”, possibly “nationalities”.
      • “aswill” – “As well”, “as will”, possibly “swill”.
      • “topsy-turpsichorean” – “Tipsy” (slightly drunk) “terpsichorean” (relating to dance), “topsy-turvy” (in great disorder or confusion), “Topsy” (character from Uncle Tom’s Cabin who, proverbially, “just growed”), “turpitude” (depravity).
      • “tosst” – “Toast” (celebrated person), “tossed” (as in tempest-tossed?).
      • “Gapery” – “Gay Paris” (a common way of referring to the capital of France), “gaping” (in amazement), “drapery” (clothing).
      • “fancianable” – “Fashionable”, “able” to “fancy” (desire, often sexually) “Ann” (Woman’s name, possibly a specific person – Suggest??).
      • “lispian” – “Lesbian”, “one who lisps” (a stereotypical trait of (male) homosexuals).
      • “cunninglingloss” – “Cunnilingus”, “cunning”, “ling” (tongue; language), “loss”.
      • “belegged” – “Believed”, be-legged” (possessing legs).
      • “saphosticated” – “Sophisticated”, “Sappho” (Famous lesbian poet of Classical Greece).
      • “dis-appointed” – “Disappointed”, “removed from her position”.
      • “dawncer” – A “dancer” in the “dawn” of her career.
      • “teamin’ down” – “Turning down”, “teaming” (often occurring in the phrase “teaming up”), “teeming” (full or swarming with).
      • “prosterous” – “Prosperous”, “preposterous” (ridiculous), possibly “prostrate” (prone).
      • “careern” – “Career”, “careen” (mobe in a fast and uncontrolled fashion).
      • “prestageous” – “Prestigious” – “pre-stage” (prior to a performance) “o’ us”.
      • “Lastbet Druncan Shulethe” – “Elizabeth Duncan School” – Elizabeth Duncan (1871-1948) was sister to the famous dancer Isadora Duncan. Elizabeth ran a school of dance at various locations starting in 1904.
        • “Lastbet” – “Elizabeth”, “final chance”.
        • “Druncan” – “Duncan”, “drunken”.
        • Shulethe” – “School”, “schule” (German for “school”), “shul” (Yiddish for “synagogue”), “Lethe” (Greek mythological river in Hades which induced forgetfulness).
      • “becurse” – “Because”, “be curse”.
      • “herr” – “Her”, “herr” (German for “Mr.”).
      • “meister” – “Master”, “meister” (German for “master”).
      • “‘Merzed” – “Immersed”, “Max Merz” (xxx).
      • “kamflicated” – “Complicated”, “Mein Kampf” (1925 book by Adolf Hitler detailing his life so far, his politics, and his antisemitism). Possibly “flic” (French slang for “policeman”).
      • “airy unphilosophies” – “Aryan philosophies” (Hitler’s idea that the Herman people were genetically superior), with a suggestion that they are negative (“un-“) and/or inconsequential (“airy”).
      • “fascile” – “Facile” (appearing straightforward by ignoring complexity), “fascist” (as Nazi Germany became).
      • “rachel” – “Racial”, “Rachel” (A common Jewish female name – Jews were oppressed and killed under Hitler).
      • “pressurdice” – “Prejudice”, “pressure dice” (the emotional pressure of the vicissitudes of Fate?).
    • Her inphant pass’d, her semi-terra’d feuture and here her-and-know, her iffrey liffing mement altergather, all her hypertenses prescent and currect.

      • “inphant” – “Infant”, “in phantasies”, possibly “elephant”.
      • “pass’d” – “Past”, “passed”.
      • “semi-terra’d” – “Cemeteried” (that is, “buried”, “dead”), “partially of (or in) the earth”.
      • “feuture” – “Future”, “feu” (French for “fire” or “deceased”; in Scottish law, “land held in feidal tenure”). Possibly “feature” (part of face; movie; “featured performer”), “futile”.
      • “her-and-know” – “Here-and-now” (the present), “her and know”.
      • “iffrey liffing” – “Every living”, “River Liffey” (twice).
      • “mement” – “Moment”, “I meant”. Possibly “meme” (idea).
      • “altergather” – “All together”, “alter gather”.
      • “hypertenses” – “Appurtenances” (items associated with a particular style of living), “hypertenses” (possibly a word which describes the grammatical tenses which go beyond the normal conceptions of time). Possibly also “hypertension” (high blood pressure).
      • “prescent” – “Present” (here), “prescient” (having foresight).
      • “currect” – “Correct”, “current”.
    • She’s a collacted valiume, a Compleat Lucia with her whorle lighf gethered into hadsome crepeskin bendings, a well-thrumbed uddition with eyndpeepers marvled and a speen that’s still integt, tespite freakwend miss-handlings.

      • This sentence is rife with metaphors from the book business, comparing Lucia to a valuable used book.
      • “collacted” – “Collected”, “collated” (sorted, often in reference to pages).
      • “valiume” – “Volume”, “valium” (antidepressant drug).
      • “Compleat” – Archaic spelling of “Complete”. Possibly also “with fold”.
      • “whorle” – “Whole”, “whorl” (spiral), possibly “whore”.
      • “lighf” – “Life”, “light”.
      • “gethered” – “Gathered”, “get her -ed”.
      • “hadsome” – “Handsome”, “had some” (sex?).
      • “crepeskin” – “Sheepskin” (binding material for expensive books), “crepe” (thin, wrinkled fabric (sometimes used for lingerie); thin pancake).
      • “bendings” – “Bindings”, “bendings” (yieldings, in this context probanly sexual ones).
      • “thrumbed” – “Thumbed” (method of turning pages; method of stimulating genitals), “thrusted”, “thrum” (vibration) “bed”.
      • “uddition” – “Edition”, (in this context, an individual book), “udder” (vulgar term for female breast).
      • “eyndpeepers marvled” – “Endpapers marbled” (xxx pic), “eyes and peepers marveled” (suggesting voyeurism).
      • “speen” – “Spine”, “peen” (slang for penis).
      • “integt” – “Intact” (unbroken), “in tight” (in context, suggestive of strong vaginal muscles despite lots of sex).
      • “tespite” – “Despite”, “testicle pit”.
      • “freakwend” – “Frequent”, “freak wend” (to “go” (have sex) in unusual ways).
      • “miss-handlings” – “Mishandlings”, “(sexual) handlings of the miss (unmarried woman)”.