J1.11 Hark! The Glad Sound!

Annotations for Jerusalem by Alan Moore

Book 1 – The Boroughs
Hark! The Glad Sound!

Page 304 – titled Hark! The Glad Sound!

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3 thoughts on “J1.11 Hark! The Glad Sound!”

  1. DATE = NOVEMBER 17, 1953 (I think – I found it difficult to calculate the date with this chapter)

    P.O.V. CHARACTER = TOMMY WARREN (Jr.)

    • 36 years old.

    • He is May and Tom Warren (Sr.)’s third child, born 1917, works at Phipp’s brewery at Earl’s Barton, and fought in World War II.

    • His wife is Doreen Warren, who in this chapter is giving birth to their first child at St. Edmund’s Hospital (which was formerly a workhouse).

    • His great-grandfather is Ernest “Ginger” Vernall (POV from Ch2), his grandfather is John “Snowy” Vernall (POV from Ch9), and his mother is May Warren (POV from Ch10).

    • He has an older sister, Lou, and three younger brothers: Walt, Frank, and Jack (but Jack died in World War II).

    OBSERVATIONS AND QUESTIONS:

    • Page 310 par 3: Snowy is teaching Tommy multiplication tables and geometry, and basically passing on the knowledge taught to him by his father, Ernest, who had the angel experience in Ch2.

    That’s a really neat trick with the multiplication! I knew about the multiples of 9 pattern, but not how the other single-digits had mirrored patterns like that! I drew out a rough sketch of what I thought Snowy’s diagram would look like (described on p313). It does put the numbers that have the corresponding inverse patterns on either side of each other…drawn on a TORUS, of course! I love this line describing that moment:

    “Neither Tom nor his grandfather had the first idea what their discovery might mean, or could conceive of any useful application for it. Indeed, it was so blindingly obvious once you’d first seen it that they’d both assumed that someone, or more likely a great many people, had stumbled across the notion previously.”

    After contemplating this memory, Tom blows an “unintended smoke-ring” (which could be a quick visual representation of a torus).

    • Page 319, par 3: “Lou’s voice, low and chuckling, had a lovely croak to it…. She could always be relied upon to set you straight and have a laugh while she were doing it.”

    That relationship between Tommy and his older sister Lou reminds me of that between Mick and his older sister Alma in Ch1.

    • Page 323, par 1: “And anyway, after the A-bomb what the Yanks had dropped onto Hiroshima, didn’t they say that if there was a third world war, then it would all be over in about five minutes?”

    That reminds me of this powerful Einstein quote: “I know not with what weapons World War III will be fought, but World War IV will be fought with sticks and stones.”

    • Page 326: Tommy wonders about the weird Doddridge Church door, notes that Doddridge came to Northampton in 1729 on Christmas Eve, and supposes that was because it had a “long tradition as a haven for religious firebrands, insurrectionists and the plain mad.”

    Tommy’s favorite hymn by Doddridge is “Hark! The Glad Sound!” and considers him to be Northampton’s “most heroic son” and its “soul.”

    • Page 327: I was having trouble keeping in mind as to whether Tommy was actually running into people he knew at the Black Lion, or if he just went there and had memories of hanging out with people there, or both. I’m pretty sure the following stuff is memory:

    Tommy mentions lots of his family members on the Vernall side, as well as Jem Perrit, father of Ben (POV from Ch8); Freddy (POV from Ch4); and Mary Jane “the brawler,” Freddy’s friend.

    Tommy hangs out with his uncle Johnny and aunt Celia and asks about his cousin Audrey (who, like Thursa, plays accordion, but in a band), but they mention she’s going through teenage female mood swings or whatnot (paraphrased). Later, walking home past their house, Tommy sees Johnny and Celia run out into the street in horror, but convinces himself to stay out of their business because it doesn’t seem like they’re looking for help. We later find out that Audrey had locked Johnny and Celia out of the house and ignored their knocking, played the piano and shouted. She was soon diagnosed as delusional, taken to St. Crispin’s mental home, and “her name was only mentioned rarely now.”

    • Page 334, par 2-3: Tommy sees Thursa with her accordion out of nowhere, who “pressed just four notes from the squeeze-box slung on its worn leather strap around her stringy neck, four grave and trudging tones that Tom had recognized with a mild tingle of alarm as the beginning of ‘The Funeral March.’”

    But reflecting on the notes later, “he saw that those four notes could just as well have been ‘Oh Mine Papa,’ or probably a dozen other tunes.”

    Both the “The Funeral March” and “Oh Mine Papa” melodies start with the same note played four times in a row, and to the same rhythm.

    “The Funeral March” plays the first note of the minor scale four times in a row, and “Oh Mine Papa” plays the first note of the major scale four times in a row.

    But since there were no chords accompanying the notes when Thursa played them (to provide a major or minor context), those notes could just as likely be the beginning of either song. So Tommy is correct with both interpretations. Good stuff.

    THIS LINE MADE ME LAUGH:

    • Page 315, par 1, Tommy sitting in the hospital waiting room with the other expectant fathers: “Nothing against the other chaps, it was just that they hadn’t much in common past the fact that nine months earlier they’d had a lucky night.”

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  2. Having finished book two I now understand the meaning of what Thursa plays. I think I’m going to have to reread the whole book after I’m finished and I’m looking forward to it.

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  3. I’ll put my Dramatis Personae and Index lists here.
    NOTES:
    Page referrers are for 3 volume paperback edition by Knockabout.
    Dramatis personae-characters in brackets are only mentioned but not in scene.

    Dramatis Personae
    • Tommy Warren: POV, Doreens husband, Almas father, born 1917
    • (Doreen (Swan) Warren: Tommy’s wife)
    • (›old Tom‹, Tom Warren: Tommy’s father)
    • (›Lou‹, Louise: Tommy’s 6 years older sister; has 2 daughters and 12 year old son)
    • (Albert: husband of Louise)
    • (›Walt‹, Walter: Tommy’s younger brother; has 2 sons)
    • (Frank: Tommy’s youngest living brother)
    • (Uncle Johnny:)
    • (Ron Bayliss: Tommy’s captain at Boy Brigade in the 1930)
    • (Liz Bayliss: Tommy’s crush in the 1930)
    • (Jim: May’s cat)
    • (Jack: Tommy’s youngest brother, died in World War II)
    • (Snowy Vernall: Tommy’s grandfather)
    • (Ernest Vernall: Tommy’s great-grandfather)
    • (Louisa: Tommy’s grandmother; Snowy’s wife)
    two other blokes whose wifes give birth
    • (idiot British officers: on homecoming train after the war)
    • (big Yank GI: on homecoming train after the war)
    • (GI’s complaining about Blackies in Black Lion pub)
    • (manager of Grand Hotel)
    • (Mr. Partridge: neighbor in Green Street)
    • (Clara: Doreen’s mother)
    • (James: Doreen’s oldest brother)
    • (Emma: Doreen’s older sister; wife of Ted; mother of John and Eileen)
    • (Alf: Doreen’s younger brother; husband of Queen; father of baby Jim)
    • (Dr. Grey: Swan family doctor)
    • (landlord and landlady of Blue Anchor pub in 1880: parents of Anne, Tommy’s great-grandmother, wife of Ernest)
    • (work chums of Frank in Blue Anchor pub)
    • (Elsie Sharp: May’s best friend)
    • (Jem Perrit: Black Lion pub regular; father of Benedict Perrit)
    • (The-fingered-Tunk: fishmonger)
    • (Freddy Allen: moocher, tramp)
    • (Celia: Tommy’s aunt; Johnny’s wife; mother of Audrey)
    • (ARP wardens)
    • (Audrey Vernall: Tommy’s cousin)
    • (landlord of Black Lion pub)
    • (Mary Jane: brawler)
    • (Thursa: Tommys’s great-aunt)
    • (doctors taking Audrey to St. Crispin’s)
    • (German sniper, aged 15, dead)

    Index
    • ›Mad Marie‹ = Marie Ashton, no dates found. Achieved female marathon piano record in 1958. http://www.britishpathe.com/video/marathon-pianist : 293, 296, 310, 322
    Roll Out The Barrel also known as Beer Barrel Polka (1927) by Jaromir Vejvoda, song: 293
    Men Of The North, Rejoice, may be correctly Hills Of the North, Rejoice, hymn (1870) by Charles E Oakley (words) and John Darwall (music): 293
    We’ll Gather Lilacs, song (1945) from musical Perchance to Dream by Ivor Novello: 294
    The British Grenadier, traditional marching song: 294
    • Humber Hawk, four-cylinder car manufactured from 1945-1967 by British-based Humber Limited: 294
    • Brylcreeme, pomade brand: 294
    • ›Winnie Churchill‹ = Winston Churchill (1874-1965), British statesman, two times Prime Minister of United Kingdom, Leader of Conservative Party: 294
    • ›Clem Atlee‹ = Clement Atlee (1883-1967), British politician, Prime Minister of United Kingdom, Leader of Labour Party, served under Churchill as Deputy Prime Minister in coalition government during World War II: 294
    • National Health, founded in 1948: 294, 307
    • National Insurance, introduced in 1911, expanded by Labour government in 1948: 294
    Varsity Rag = possibly Varsity Drag, song (1927) from musical Good News by Ray Henderson (music), Buddy DeSylva & Lew Brown (words): 295
    Old Bull and Bush = possibly Down at the Old Bull and Bush, British music hall version of beer garden song Under the Anheuser Bush (1903) popularized by Florrie Forde: 295
    • ›riot act‹, stock short title for legislation relation to riot: 295
    O Little Town of Burlington, possible a music hall version of O Little Town of Bethlehem, hymn (1868) by Phillips Brooks (words) and Lewis Redner (music): 296
    Bethlehem Bertie, possible music hall song Burlington Bertie (1900) by Harry B. Norris: 296
    • Boy’s Brigade, largest Christian uniformed youth organisation in United Kingdom and Republic Of Ireland, founded in 1883: 296
    • Maxie Miller, stage name of Thomas Henry Sargent (1894-1963), British comedian known as ›The Cheeky Chappie‹: 296
    • war = Second World War, World War II (1939-1945): 297, 298, 303, 305, 315, 322
    • Bible: 298
    • Jesus: 298, 313
    • ›Good Queen Bess‹ = Elizabeth II (*1926), coronated in 1953: 298
    Journey into Space, BBC Radio science fiction programme (1953-1958): 298
    • ›New Elizabethans‹, Quote: »In the years surrounding the Coronation of Elizabeth II, British political and cultural life was suffused with a language that both prophesied and idealized the potential for a new Elizabethan era. The self-styled new Elizabethans identified an innate national character in the accomplishments of a vanished age. This age was apparently manifest in ›Shakespearean‹ music, theatre, and poetry — and characterized by imperial expansion and exploration, a clear sense of social hierarchy, a fierce and heroic spirit of patriotic individualism, and the brave resistance of a mighty little people to larger invading forces«, Source: http://www.ies.sas.ac.uk/events/ies-conferences/NewElizabethans : 298
    • Kensitas, cigarette brand: 299, 302, 310, 313
    • Captain Webb’s, brand name of matches, named after Captain Matthew Webb (1848-1883), first person to swim across English Channel: 299
    • Fry’s Five Boys, nickname for Fry’s Cream, brand name for chocolate cream bar: 299
    • Ronald Coleman (1891-1958), English actor: 303
    • Ford Anglia, various car models manufactured by Ford UK between 1939 to 1967: 303
    • (Statue of) Charles Bradlaugh (1833-1891), English political activist and atheist: 303
    • ›Yanks‹, short for Yankee, outside die USA slang for any American: 303
    • Luftwaffe, aerial warfare branch of the German Wehrmacht during World War II: 304, 314
    • ›RAF‹ = Royal Air Force: 304
    • Hitler = Adolf Hitler (1889-1845), German politician, leader of the Nazi Party, Chancellor of Germany from 1933-1945; as ›Führer‹ of Nazi Germany initiator of World War II: 304
    • Battle of the Bulge (16. Dec. 1944 – 25. Jan. 1945), also known as Ardennes Counteroffensive by Allied Forces, or Operation ›Autumn Mist‹ (Unternehmen ›Herbstnebel‹) and Operation ›Watch on the Rhine‹ (Unternehmen ›Wacht am Rhein‹) by German forces; last major German offensive campaign during World War II: 304
    • ›Herberts‹, London slang for (a) silly, poorly educated possible bastard child; (b) foolish and/or ridiculous man: 304
    When johnnies come marching home again, hurrah, possible = When Johnny Comes Marching Home, song (1863) of the American Civil War: 305
    • Guinness, Irish dark ale brand name: 305
    • ›ITMA‹, acronym for It’s That Man Again, BBC radio comedy programme (1939-1949) : 308
    • Borax, cleaner brand name: 309
    • ›Jerries‹, slang by the British soldiers for German soldiers since World War I: 309
    • Korea War (1950-1953): 309
    • A-bomb, Hiroshima; dropped by American Forces on 6. Aug. 1945 which led to the surrender of Empire of Japan in World War II: 310
    • D’Artagnan; fictional portrait of Charles Ogier de Batz de Castelmore, Comte d’Artagnan (c. 1611-1673) in d’artagnan Romances by Alexandre Dumas: 311
    • Philip Doddridge (1702-1751), English Nonconformist leader, educator and hymnwriter: 312, 313
    • Queen Anne (1665-1714) of House Stuart, supported Occasional Conformity Bill of 1702 restricting public offices to Anglican conformists: 312
    • Nonconformists, any English subject belonging to a non-Anglican church or non-Christian religion since Act of Uniformity from 1662: 312
    • {English} Dissenters, Christians who separated from the Church of England in 16th, 17th and 18th centuries: 312
    • George the First (1660-1727) of House Hanover: 312
    • Independents, advocates for local congregational control of religious and church matters; particularly prominent in period of English Civil War on the side of the Parliamentary faction: 312
    • Morovian Brethren, belongs to oldest Protestant denominations, originating in Bohemian Reformation in 15th century: 312
    • John Wycliffe (c. 1320-1384), English scholastic philosopher, theologian, Biblical translator, reformer, professor in Oxford; dissident of the Roman Catholic priesthood: 312
    • ›Old Robert Browne‹ = Robert Browne (†1633), founder of Brownists, early Separatists from the Church of England: 313
    • Separatists, see English Dissenters: 313
    • Nation of Saints puritans, ???: 313
    • Ranters, pantheistic nonconformist dissenting Christians, denied authority of church and scripture, emerged around the time of English Commonwealth (1649-1660): 313
    • John Wesley (1703-1791), Anglican cleric and theologian, one of the founders of Mathodism: 313
    • Church of England, originated in King Henry VIII renouncing papal authority in 1534: 313
    • ›TB took him‹, TB = adverbiation for Tuberculosis, a chronic infectious desease: 313
    Hark! The Glad Sound!, hymn (1734) by Thomas Haweis: 313, 323
    • Richard the Lionheart = Richard I of England (1157-1199): 313
    • Oliver Cromwell (1599-1658), English military and political leader, Lord Protector of the Commonwelath of England, Scotland and Ireland: 313
    • Thomas Becket (1119-1170), Catholic saint, Lord Chancellor, Archbishop of Canterbury: 313
    • ›Ninepins‹ = nine-pin billards, also known as Goriziana; https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goriziana : 314
    • Olympus, in Macedonia Greece, home of the twelve Gods in Greek mythology: 314
    • Titans, second generation of divine beings in Greek mythology, preceding the Olympian deities: 314
    • ambrosia, in Greek mythology the food or drink of the gods: 314
    • minotaurs, in Greek mythology a minotaur is a creature with the head of a bull and the body of a man: 314
    • al fresco, ital. ›at the cool‹, outdoors, open to the atmosphere: 314
    • ›ARP wardens‹; ARP = Air Raid Precautions, organisation in United Kingdom set up in 1937 dedicated to the protection of civilians from the danger of air raids: 314
    • Eden, garden of God, Genesis, Bible: 315
    • ›pleased as Punch‹, derived vom hand puppet Mr. Punch: 315
    • Lord Protector, title of Oliver Cromwell: 317
    • ›old Johanna‹ = Cockney slang for piano: 318
    ›Why tell them all your secrets‹, see Whispering Grass: 318
    ›They’re buried under the snow‹, see Whispering Grass: 318
    Whispering Grass, song (1940) by Fred and Doris Fisher: 319, 323
    • grass, slang for informer: 319
    • Walt Disney (1901-1966), American entrepeneur, animator and film producer: 319
    • The Funeral March, many possibilities; Most famous is March funèbre (1837) by Frédéric Chpoin: 320
    Oh Mine Papa, (O mein Papa) song from German musical The Black Pike (Der schwarze Hecht, 1939), instrumental version by trumpeter Eddie Calvert topped UK Singeles Chart in 1954: 320
    ›When the grass is whispering over me, then you’ll remember‹, song, ???: 321

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