J1.08 Atlantis

Annotations for Jerusalem by Alan Moore

Book 1 – The Boroughs
Atlantis

Page 207 – titled Atlantis

paragraph 1

 

Page 208

paragraph 1

Page 209

paragraph 1

Page 210

paragraph 1

Page 211

paragraph 1

Page 212

paragraph 1

Page 213

paragraph 1

Page 214

paragraph 1

Page 215

paragraph 1

Page 216

paragraph 1

Page 217

paragraph 1

Page 218

paragraph 1

Page 219

paragraph 1

Page 220

paragraph 1

Page 221

paragraph 1

Page 222

paragraph 1

Page 223

paragraph 1

Page 224

paragraph 1

Page 225

paragraph 1

Page 226

paragraph 1

Page 227

paragraph 1

Page 228

paragraph 1

Page 229

paragraph 1

Page 230

paragraph 1

Page 231

paragraph 1

Page 232

paragraph 1

Page 233

paragraph 1

Page 234

paragraph 1

Page 235

paragraph 1

Page 236

paragraph 1

Page 237

paragraph 1

Page 238

paragraph 1

Page 239

paragraph 1

Page 240

paragraph 1

Page 241

paragraph 1

Page 242

paragraph 1

Page 243

paragraph 1

Page 244

paragraph 1

Page 245

paragraph 1

Page 246

paragraph 1

Page 247

paragraph 1

 

 

 

 

 

7 thoughts on “J1.08 Atlantis”

  1. I have been informed that in emails I use the word “haha” too often (and I know I’ve been doing that here too). Ben’s use of “Ah ha ha ha” in this chapter has made me really self conscious about that…haha(?).

    DATE = MAY 26, 2006

    • This is the same day as Ch3.

    P.O.V. CHARACTER = BENEDICT “BEN” PERRIT.

    • 52 years old, lives on Tower Street (formerly Scarletwell Street), and grew up on Freeschool Street.

    • His sister, Alison, died in a motorcycle “bike smash” over forty years ago.

    • He lives with his mother, Eileen.

    • His father, Jem, has passed away. (Is Jem the same guy who, in Ch4, his horse would carry home as he slept?)

    • He is noted to be attending Alma’s art show on the last page of Ch1.

    OBSERVATIONS AND QUESTIONS:

    • Page 211, par 4: This is Kenny, the dealer guy from Ch3 whom Marla kind of knows (he also shows up on page 245, par 2).

    • Page 212, par 3: Ben thinks his grandfather, Bill “the Sheriff” Perrit may have been one of the Mayorhold mock mayors.

    • Page 213, par 2: Roman Thompson appearance. This also mentions that politician James Cockie was on the Bedford Housing Board. Is this a real guy? And is he the dreamer in his underpants in Ch4?

    • Page 220, par 2, powerful line: “Rather than try to stop the rot, the council had allowed the town’s main veins to atrophy and wither.”

    • Page 220, par 3: “…the murder of hoodies flocked on Abington’s further edge…” A group of crows is called a “murder.”

    • Page 226, par 4: Is “Androgyne” an analog for Moore’s (I think) 1970s underground magazine “Embryo?”

    • Page 227, par 2: “Clare, who’d hobbled eighty miles from Essex back home to Northamptonshire, would probably have laughed at him.” Moore appeared in a film called By Ourselves that is about Clare taking this hobble. Here’s Moore talking about Clare and the film (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hZELY_l6mFs).

    • Page 230, par 4: Ben finds himself “just down from what had once been the Boy’s Grammar School.” I live in the same small town I grew up in, and have many times walked across the parking lot that was once my and my sister’s preschool (there was a building there at the time, of course). I’ve been on board with Moore’s “psychogeography” concept since reading From Hell and interviews in which he has discussed the concept in the late 1990s (I believe the idea is inspired by or at least concurrent with Ian Sinclair’s ideas). It looks like Jerusalem will take this idea exponentially further (I know that’s not exactly a secret or anything, it’s just this quick line really got me!).

    • Page 232, par 1: David Daniels, noted here as being a childhood friend of Alma’s and Ben’s, a grade above them. He is noted at the end of Ch1 as attending Alma’s art show.

    • Page 235, last par: The stone brought to Northampton by the monk in Ch5 is mentioned.

    • Page 237, par 2: Tragic and thematic line: “That half-a-square mile continent had sunk under a deluge of bad social policy. First there had been a mounting Santorini awareness rumble of awareness that the Boroughs’ land would be more valuable without its people, then came bulldozers in a McAlpine tidal wave.”

    • Page 242, par 3: “This was where the traitors’ skulls were placed on spikes like trolls on pencils, as a decoration.” Heads on spikes are noticed by the monk in Ch5. Also, if this is a reference to the little troll doll heads that kids would put over their pencil erasers back in the day (or maybe that was just a U.S. thing, and probably not Ben’s generation), then that’s really funny.

    “EINSTEINIAN BLOCK UNIVERSE” MOMENT:

    • Page 224, par 4, at the end of Ben and Marla’s chat: “By mutual consent they seemed to both be disengaging from the conversation, starting to move slowly off, him uphill, Alma down. It was if they’d come to the predestined end of their encounter and must both now walk away, whether they’d finished talking yet or not. They had to hurry if they wanted to remain on schedule, occupying all the empty spaces in their futures they had yet to fill, all the proper predetermined times.”

    FUNNY ALMA WARREN DESCRIPTIONS:

    • Page 220, par 4: “Even back then, you’d never have confused her with a girl. Or with a boy, for that matter. She was too big, too single minded, too alarming to be anything but Alma, in a gender of her own.”

    • Page 221, par 1, Alma had: “…more rings underneath her eyes than on her ostentatiously embellished fingers.”

    • Page 222, par 4: “Alma’s voice wasn’t just deep brown, it was infra-brown.”

    THESE LINE MADE ME LAUGH:

    • Page 207, par 1: “…mermaids mermering…”

    • Page 231, par 2: “Anyone applying for their son to be accepted had to first compose a modest essay stating why, precisely, at the most profound ideological and moral level, they believed their child would benefit from being tutored in an atmosphere of strict gender apartheid.”

    • Page 232, par 2: “There’d be established foetal standards soon, so that you could feel pressurized and backwards if your fingers hadn’t separated fully by the third trimester. Academic stress-related pre-birth suicides would become commonplace, the depressed embryos hanging themselves with their umbilical chords, farewell notes scratched on to the placentia.”

    Like

  2. I’ll put my dramatis personae and index lists here.
    NOTES:
    Page referrers are for 3 volume paperback edition by Knockabout.
    Dramatis personae-characters in brackets are only mentioned but not in scene.

    Dramatis Personae
    • Benedict Perrit, *1953, POV, drunkard, unemployed poet with writers block
    • (Alison, Benedicts sister, died 40 years ago in motorcycle accident)
    • (Old Jam, Benedicts father)
    • (Lily, Bens wife, left him and took boys—how many—with her)
    • Eileen, Benedicts mother
    • Fat Kenny
    • (Bill Perrit ›The Sheriff‹, Benedicts paternal grandfather)
    • (Roman Thompson)
    • (James Cookie, former Labour councillor)
    • (Botteril, news agent)
    • (Butcher)
    • (Phyllis Malin, barber)
    • (Georgie Bumble)
    • barman of Bear pub
    • (Dave Turvey, Bendeicts friend with whom he can talk about literature)
    • (Pete Corr, ›Piet de Snapp‹, photographer who took Bens portrait, moved to Canada)
    • Alma Warren
    • (Miss Corrier, teacher at Spring Lane School)
    • (Pitt-Draffen, dance school owner)
    • (Tattooed couple, Benedicts neighbors after Lily left him)
    • (child, injured by young Benedicts attempt to fish)
    • (Davis Daniels)
    • (racist math teacher in grammar school)
    • (legendary monk who brought stone cross from Golgotha to St. Gregory Church = Peter from X Marks the Spot)
    • Marla (see chapter ASBOS Of Desire)
    • four or five drunk girls, boys
    • tow truck men at crash site
    • cherub like police officer at crash site
    • some bloke in late 30, driver of crashed car
    • (wife of accident driver)
    • (girl at St. Andrews Road who got raped and beaten = Marla?)
    • (boyfriend of Alison, died with her in accident)

    Index
    • ›Foul fanthoms five his farter lies, and office bones are cobbles made‹, play on ›Full fathom five thy father lies; of his bones are coral made‹, Ariel`s Song from The Tempest by William Shakespeare: 205
    • Dylan Thomas (1914-1953), Welsh poet: 206, 224
    • H. E. Bates (1905-1974), English writer and author: 206
    • John Clare (1793-1864), English poet: 206, 213, 223, 225, 227, 230, 232, 241
    • Thomas Hardy (1840-1928), English novelist and poet: 206
    • Old Spice, brand name for after shave: 207
    The Clitheroe Kid, BBC comedy radio show (1957-1972): 207
    • Benson & Hedges, cigarette brand: 208
    • Carlsberg, beer brand: 208
    A Northamptonshire Garland, anthology (1989) by Trevor Hold: 208, 213, 224
    • Trevor Hold (1939-2004), English composer and writer: 208
    Fortean Times, british monthly magazine about strange phenomena: 209
    • Calpol, pharma product for infants and children: 209
    • Brooke Bond, tea brand name: 209
    I`m Not In Love, song by 10CC (1975): 209
    • Lego: 209
    • Henry Lee ???: 209
    • Richard the Second (1367-1400), also theatre play by William Shakespeare: 209
    • Titchbourne Claimant, legal identity case in Victorian England concerning missing heir to Tichborne baronetcy: 210
    The Great Pretender, song by The Platters (1955), covered by Freddie Mercury (1992): 210
    • Lambert Simnel (1477-1525), pretender to the throne of England: 210
    • Perkin Warbeck (1474-1499), pretender to the throne of English: 210
    • ›Ford Transit Gloria Mundi‹, play on ›Sic transit gloria mundi‹ (Thus passes the glory of the world): 212
    The force that through the green fuse drives, poem (1933) by Dylan Thomas 212
    The Archers, BBC radio soap (1951-present): 212
    • Walter Gabriel, character in The Archers, performed by Robert Mawdesley and Chris Gittins 212
    • John Smith (money): 213
    • Darwin (money): 213, 235
    • Elizthe Fry (money): 213, 215, 235, 236
    • John Lennon (money): 213
    • Dads For Justice = ??? Fathers 4 Justice ???, fathers rights organization founded in 2002: 213
    • Thomas Grimshaw (1836-1893), English painter: 213, 214
    • Humpty Dumpty, character in Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll: 214
    • ›no one there to put him back together‹, see Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll: 214
    Stars In Their Eyes, British talent TV show: 214
    • Matthew {Kelly}, presenter of Stars in Their Eyes from 1993-2004: 214
    • Aubrey Beardsley (1872-1898), English illustrator and author: 214
    • Hank Janson, fictional thriller character & pseudonym of English pulp fiction author Stephen Daniel Frances (1917-1989): 214
    • Dennis Wheatley (1897-1977), English thriller and occult novel author: 214
    • {Georges} Simenon (1903-1989), Belgian writer, most famous for his Detective Maigret novels: 214
    • Alistair MacLean (1922-1987), Scottish novelist of thriller and adventure stories: 214
    Clock-a-Clay, poem John Clare: 214
    I Am, poem John Clare: 215
    • Olivia Newton John, English-Australian singer, songwriter and actress: 216
    • Tom Hall (1936), US country music songwriter, singer, novelist and short story writer: 216, 228, 230
    • Mars Bar: 216
    • Lothario, seducer of women in Don Quixote (1605-1615) by Miguel de Cervantes: 218
    Clearance Area, poem by Benedict: 218, 225
    The Independent, British newspaper: 219
    • Edward Elgar (money): 221, 224
    The Dream of Gerontius, work for voices and orchestra (1900) by Edward Elgar: 221
    Emmerdale, British TV soap (1972-present): 221
    • Charles Bradlaugh (1833-1891), English political activist and atheist: 221
    • {Otto Adolf} Eichmann (1906-1962): German Nazi SS-Lieutenant Colonel; major organizer of Holocaust: 222
    Androgyne, (fictional?) student art magazine: 222
    • Andy Warhol (1928-1987), American pop art artist: 223
    • Bridget Reily (1931), English Op art artist: 223
    Northampton Chronicle & Echo: 223
    • Sir Malcolm Arnold (1921-2006), English composer: 223, 228, 241
    Colonel Bogey March (1914) by F. J. Ricketts: 224
    Tim O`Shanter, nickname for Overture Op. 51a (1955) by Malcolm Arnold, based on poem by Robert Burns: 224
    Under Milkwood (1972), radio drama by Dylan Thomas: 224
    The Angler`s Song: 225
    • William Basse (1583-1653), English poet: 225
    • Phillip Doddridge (1702-1751), English Nonconformist: 225, 226
    Christ`s Message, poem by Doddridge: 225
    • Book of Luke, Bible: 225
    • ›He comes the broken heart to bind‹, poem by Doddridge: 226
    • Mildmay Fane of Apethorpe, 2nd Earl of Westmoreland (1602-1666): 226
    • Julian Henry Charles Fane, 11th Earl of Westnoreland (1827-1870): 226
    • John Betjeman, poet, writer, broadcaster (1906-1984): 226
    • ›The moss-grey mansion of my father stands‹, quote from Julian Fane. A Memoir (1871) by Robert Lytton, : 226
    • Tony Blair, English Prime Minister (1997-2007), Leader of Labour Party (1994-2007): 227
    • Queen Victoria: 228
    • J. K. Stephen (1859-1892), English poet and tutor to Prince Eddy: 228
    • Dusty Springfield (1939-1999), English pop singer and record producer: 228
    • Lucia Joyce (1907-1982), daughter of author James Joyce: 228
    Finnegans Wake (Work in Progress), avantgardist comical novel (1939) by James Joyce: 228
    I Just Don`t Know What To Do With Myself, song (1964) performed by Dusty Springfield; famously covered by Dionne Warwick (1966) and The White Stripes (2003): 228
    • Samuel Beckett (1906-1989), Irish avant-garde novelist, playwright, theatre director and poet: 228, 229
    Wisden`s Almanac (= Wisdens Cricketers’ Almanac), cricket reference book, published annually since 1864: 229
    Duck Soup, movie (1933) starring the Marx Brothers: 229
    • Zeppo Marx (1901-1979), youngest of the five Marx Brothers: 229
    • Harpo Marx (1888-1964), the silent one with the harp: 229
    • John Speed (1552-1629), English cartographer: 229
    • flatland (as expression): 229
    • Elliot O`Donnell (1872-1965), English authority on ghosts and hunted places: 230
    • Archangel Michael (on Guildhall): 230
    • Ivalde, 11th century: 231
    • St. Ragener, anglo saxon saint http://www.fostp.org.uk/uploads/St%20Ragener%20%28M%29%20of%20Northampton.pdf : 231
    • Holy Spirit: 231
    • Atlantis: 232
    • ??? Santorini, small greek island or Italian physician and anatomist Giovanni Demenico Santorini (1681-1737): 232
    The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, long poem (1798) by Samuel Taylor Coleridge: 232
    • Ishmael, protagonist of Moby Dick (1851) by Herman Melville: 232
    • Plato: 232
    • Eden, garden of God, Genesis, Bible: 232
    • Undine, elemental being associated with water (Paracelsus); water nymph: 232
    • Lemuria, fabeld hyothetical continent in Indian Ocean; also: fictional location in Marvel Comics: 233
    • Doctor Marten`s, brand name of English shoes, popular with youth subculture: 233
    • Sheba, kingdom mentioned in Old Testament: 233
    • Maybelline, cosmetic brand: 233
    • Hugh Grant, English actor: 233
    • ??? O`Rourkes, Presleys, nightmare clans: 233
    • Ealing comedy, series of comedy movies produced by London-based Ealing studios between 1947-1957. Most famous may be The Ladykillers: 234
    • Mr. Pickwick, character in The Pickwick Papers (1836) by Charles Dickens: 234
    • John Falstaff, character in several plays by William Shakespeare: 234
    • Thomas Chatterton (1752-1770), English poet: 236
    • ›Whom the bell tolls‹, line by John Donne in Devotions upon Emergent Occasions (1624): 237
    • John Donne (1573-1631), English poet and cleric: 237
    • Lucozade, brand name for energy and sport drinks: 238
    • Stanley Kubrick (1928-1999), US movie director: 239
    • Simon de Senlis (died 1111), norman knight: 239
    • William Blake (1757-1827), English poet, painter, draughtsman and visionary: 240

    Like

  3. Beautiful chapter. I was literally weeping by the end. Very touching.
    In general I’m in awe for Moore’s ability to convey all the different voices and inner worlds of the characters.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s