J1.04 Rough Sleepers

Annotations for Jerusalem by Alan Moore

Book 1 – The Boroughs
Rough Sleepers

Setting: The Boroughs, Northampton, Friday, May the 26th, 2006 (P91p2; P113p1), with a detour to 1928 (P108p1).

This chapter features many characters drawn from an oral history of Northampton In Living Memory: Life in ‘The Boroughs’. These notes quote that book frequently.

Dramatis Personae:

  • Freddy Allen: Homeless person, ghost, POV character. Based on an actual Freddy Allen, as described in In Living Memory, by a former policeman, George Harding:

    I remember Freddy Allen, that slept out around the Boroughs. He went to court for petty theft, clothes or something and said, “I want to complain Your Honour, Your Worship, or whatever… Mr. Harding thumped me.” And the Magistrate then – who’s now long gone – said, “Take him out of the court. Coming here making insolent remarks like that.” The truth was, of course, I had thumped him. And he was taken out, end of story, you see.

  • Mary Jane – Drunkard, fighter, and also a ghost. Also briefly mentioned in In Living Memory.
  • Georgie Bumble – Another ghost. Mentioned briefly in In Living Memory; described as a “moocher”.
  • Brother Peter – A time-displaced monk. Viewpoint character of chapter X Marks the Spot.
  • The Scarletwell tenant – A friend of Freddy’s
  • Patsy Clarke – A ghost with whom Freddy once had sex.
  • Jem Perrit – Another ghost, loosely based on two people from In Living memory.
  • Phyllis Painter – An eight year old girl in 1928.
  • Three-Fingered Tunk – Former fishmonger, now ghost.
  • Nobby Clark – Former advertiser, now ghost.
  • The Four Master Builders.
    • Mighty Mike – Archangel.

Mentioned:

  • Mick Malone
  • Lizzie Fawkes
  • Jean Dove
  • Joe Ball
  • Two old Sisters
  • The Dead Dead Gang
  • Kaph
  • Charley George

Page 90 – titled Rough Sleepers

  • Rough sleepers” is a British euphemism for homeless people, people who sleep “in the rough”, that is, outdoors. “Rough” has other relevant meanings of course: difficult, crude, violent, coarse. In specifically British slang, “rough” can mean ill, hungover.

paragraph 1

  • “forty years since Freddy Allen left the life” – Suggesting that Freddy died circa 1966.
    • “left the life” – Before the reader knows that Freddy is talking about literally leaving life, this phrase could be taken to refer to a “life” of employment, or normality, or some particular subculture. This is the first of many such coy phrasings.
  • “One day he might go back to it” – This is explained more clearly at Pxxx.
  • “some of the other” – Meaning unclear. The “other” could be “food”, or could be a euphemism for “sex”.

paragraph 2

  • “Twenty-five Thousand Nights” – See notes to Pxxx.

    Spencer Bridge and some of Foot Meadow (Google Maps 2021)
    Spencer Bridge and some of Foot Meadow (Google Maps 2021)
  • “under the arches down Foot Meadow” – The arches in question are the ones under Spencer Bridge, just outside the Boroughs NW corner. See image above.
    • In In Living Memory, a former policeman, George Harding says:

      Another little, famous character – Freddy Allen. He lived in the Boroughs. At least, he didn’t live there, he slept there. These pictures we see, of fellows wrapped up in newspapers under the bridges and arches of London. Freddy used to sleep like that. Until a policeman came along and kicked him out and then he’d go around the corner and sleep somewhere else.

  • “sleeping out” – That is, sleeping outside. Freddy was (and remains) homeless.
  • “another tramp” – This is, of course, not another tramp, but Freddy himself – or at least his dead body.
  • “He’d been moved on” – Again, this is phrased as if it is a territorial displacement, rather than moving from life to death.

paragraph 3

  • “his friend […] who lived in the bottom corner house on Scarletwell Street” – See notes to chapter Go Now See This Cursed Woman, Pxxx. Moore uses the word “friend” (and later “they” pronouns) to avoid giving any firm details as to the person’s gender, age, skin color, state of mortality, or any other details, and will continue to do so until almost the end of the book. Respecting this, I will refer to them as “The Scarletwell tenant”.

Page 91

paragraph 1 (continued)

  • “somewhere better” – Meaning either Mansoul, or returning to his life.
  • “Freddy didn’t think they’d understand that, given what their situation was at present” – That is, the living can’t (in Freddy’s opinion) understand the problems of the dead.

paragraph 2

The Black Lion (Google Street View Jun 2018)
The Black Lion (Google Street View Jun 2018)
  • “Black Lion” – This is the Old Black Lion, near the SW corner of the Boroughs. It is allegedly haunted.
  • “the twenty-fives or twenty-sixes […] in the St. Peter’s Annexe ” – One might initially think this was referring to street addresses, but is actually referring to the year 2025 or 2026. Freddy has not moved in space, but rather in time. As will eventually become clear, “St. Peter’s Annexe” is a repurposing or replacement of the Old Black Lion pub, which in the world of Jerusalem happens some time between 2006 and 2025 or 6.
  • “that coloured woman with the bad scar” – For more on her, see the chapter Sleepless Swords, Pxxx.
  • “all the refugees come from the east” – Since Freddy is currently in 2006, one might think he is referring to refugees from the Iraq War. But there’s always some crisis causing refugees, it seems.
  • First appearance of Mary Jane, another ghost. Based on a real Northampton resident, known for fighting.
  • “wishing there was some way they could have a proper drink ” – Implying that they can’t afford to buy a drink, rather than that they physically are incapable of drinking.

paragraph 3

  • “I’ve heard as there’s no pub up there.” – Again, implying that a physical neighborhood is lacking a pub, as opposed to the truth that in 2025, the Black Lion has ceased to exist.

paragraph 4

  • Several more phrases here which could be misread as referring to Mary Jane’s advanced age, rather than her status as a ghost.

paragraph 5

  • “some real good sorts like in the old times” – Moore is perhaps suggesting that periods of crisis or economic deprivation bring out the best in people. In Living Memory frequently talks about how people in the Boroughs in the early twentieth century went to great lengths to support each other, despite desperate poverty. The climate/refugee crises of the 2020s is perhaps having a similar effect.
  • “the gangs of kids” – The Dead Dead Gang, see Book Two.

paragraph 6

  • No notes.

Page 92

paragraph 1 (continued) – 2

  • No notes.

paragraph 3

Mayorhold pubs (detail from map in In Living Memory)
Mayorhold pubs (detail from map in In Living Memory)
  • “chopsing” – British slang, “talking”.

paragraph 4

  • “the Smokers” – The pub The Jolly Smokers. As made clear later, though the pub (and the Mayorhold square it was located on) no longer exists physically in 2006, its ghostly presence remains. See maps. The Jolly Smokers is numbered 58.

    Approximate locations of The Jolly Smokers and The Green Dragon
    Approximate locations of The Jolly Smokers and The Green Dragon

paragraph 5

  • No notes.

paragraph 6

paragraph 7

  • “the Dragon just across the way” – The Green Dragon pub was located just across the Mayorhold from the Jolly Smokers, see maps above (The Green Dragon is numbered 43).
  • “if I’m feeling in the mood” – From this and later context, it appears that Mary Jane is a lesbian, and the Green Dragon was a good place to cruise for partners. See P95p2.

paragraph 8

  • “They just looked through you.” – People do tend to treat the homeless as if they were invisible. Of course, as ghosts, Freddy and Mary Jane are invisible.

paragraph 9

  • No notes.

paragraph 10

  • First mention of Lizzie Fawkes, another lesbian ghost who likes to fight. She (and the fight mentioned here) will appear in the chapter Mental Fights (Pxxx).

Page 93

paragraph 1 (continued)

  • “We went up to the Mayorhold the next morning and we carried on with it a while” – In In Living Memory, one person says of Mary Jane and her fighting habits, “And if she hadn’t finished it Saturday night, she’d be up there Sunday morning to finish it.”

paragraph 2

  • First mention of Georgie Bumble, a real Northampton resident, now a ghost. He appears later in this chapter (Pxxx).
  • Many more phrases that coyly allude to the fact that all these characters are ghosts.

paragraph 3

  • “old affairs” – A double entendre, considering the events of pages xxx.
  • “I’ll perhaps come by the Smokers” – He will, but not just to be sociable; see chapter Forbidden Worlds (Pxxx).

paragraph 4

  • No notes.

Page 94

paragraph 1

  • No notes.

paragraph 2

  • “It was hopeless, Freddy knew that” – Again, the implication is that the waitress won’t flirt with him because he’s old and homeless, whereas she actually literally can’t see him.
  • “he went through the door” – Without needing to open it!

paragraph 3

Looking SE at St. Peter's Church (visitchurches.org.uk)
Looking SE at St. Peter’s Church (visitchurches.org.uk)
  • “underneath the portico” – See image for an approximation of Freddie’s view.
  • pie-eyed” – Slang for drunk, which seems redundant. Possibly in the local dialect it means “drugged”?
  • “He weren’t like that anymore.” – This has a mildly sinister undertone, suggesting that Freddy formerly was a molester and/or criminal. While he was a petty thief, this is actually more of a comment on how he isn’t physically able to do such things as a ghost.

    Freddy's walk, part 1 (Google Maps 2021)
    Freddy’s walk, part 1 (Google Maps 2021)

paragraph 4

  • “From Marefair, Freddy drifted up Horsemarket.” – See map.
  • “the sisters” – These unnamed sisters appear briefly in A Work in Progress (P38p2) and Chain of Office (Pxxx). They play a major role in the chapter Malignant, Refractory Spirits. Referring to them as “dragons” is (probably) metaphorical, but not as much as one might think. Their association with flammable detritus is not accidental.
  • “all the way from here to Derngate” – Derngate is a street (and neighborhood?) about 2,000 feet to the east.

paragraph 5

  • “a scroungey-looking dog” – This is the same dog that tomorrow lays the turd (ASBOs of Desire, P76p1).

Page 95

paragraph 1 (continued)

  • “passed on, not for the first time he reflected” – That is, he has passed this street in the sense of physically traveling before, but also that he has “passed on” in the sense of “died”.

paragraph 2

  • “Justice above the streets.” – See the chapter Mental Fights for more discussion.

paragraph 3

  • “that area’s clergymen” – There are a number of stories about ghostly monks in Northamptonshire.
  • “a stout chap looking hot under his robes” – This is Brother Peter, the viewpoint character for the following chapter, X Marks the Spot. This scene is repeated there, from his point of view, P141p3ff.
  • “an old sack […] it looked that heavy.” – Freddy’s guesses about the sack’s contents are incorrect; it contains a heavy stone cross.

    stars-reunited-z-cars-episode-fancy-smith
    “Fancy” Smith (cultbox.co.uk)

paragraph 4

  • “Fancy Smith in Z-Cars” – Z-Cars was a popular British TV cop show from 1962-1978. “Fancy” Smith was a regular character played by a young Brian Blessed. See image.

    MCDASYO EC013
    Brian Blessed in As You Like It, 2006 (c)PictureHouse
  • “only older, how he’d look if he were in his fifties or his sixties, with a beard and all grey hair” – See image.
  • “Their paths met […] – See map, below.
  • Friar Tuck” – A well-known character from the legend of Robin Hood. He is usually portrayed wearing brown robes and a rope belt.
  • “an accent Freddy couldn’t place. It sounded a bit backwards” – It’s more than a bit backwards, as Brother Peter is in the year 810 AD, over 1100 years before Freddy’s lifetime!
  • Towcester is a market town about 8 miles SW of Northampton.

    Freddy's walk, part 2 (Google Maps 2021)
    Freddy’s walk, part 2 (Google Maps 2021)

paragraph 5

  • No notes.

paragraph 6

  • “nicking all the loaves and pints of milk” – In In Living Memory, a former policeman, George Harding, says of Freddy: “He was another likeable villain, petty thief. Would pinch milk off the doorsteps, pinch the loaves of bread off the bread van and that’s how he existed and lived for many years.”
  • took the mickey out of” – British slang “ridiculed”.

Page 96

paragraph 1 – 3

  • No notes

paragraph 4

  • “the sports and recreation centre” – Otherwise mentioned as “billiard hall” or “pool hall”. See map. While definitely not in the center of Northampton, it might well be the center of England. It is certainly a significant location, as we will see later.

paragraph 5

Trees at the corner of Horse Market (Google Street View Apr 2009)
Trees at the corner of Horse Market (Google Street View Apr 2009)
  • “turn right by that tree” – See image for a view of two trees, either of which might have been the one Freddy indicated, as both are roughly at the corner of Castle Street and Horse Market.

paragraph 6

  • “He must have walked a long way” – An understatement; Peter has walked from Jerusalem! (Although at least a little of that journey was by boat.)
  • “Holy Joe” – British slang for “preacher”.
  • “Patsy Clarke” – See P107ff.
  • pensioner” -Here, possibly used in the sense “old person”, though the Scarletwell tenant is probably living off some sort of pension.
  • “leaving quite a trail behind him” – A doubled meaning here: “trail of evidence” versus “trail of afterimages”. See xxx
  • rozzers” –  British slang for “police”.

paragraph 7

  • “when it came to seeing Freddy” – “Seeing” here is doubled: “visiting”, “perceiving”.

    Bristol Street (detail of 1950 map)
    Bristol Street (detail of 1950 map)
  • “you couldn’t get down Bristol Street without a lot of difficulty these days” – Bristol Street would be a more direct route to his destination — if it still existed. The area was redeveloped some time between 1950 and 2006 (early 1970s?) and Bristol Street no longer exists. The new houses having been in place for ~30 years, they are somewhat solid by ghost standards. (See chapter xxx, Pxxx for more explanation of this.)
Freddy's walk, part 3 (Google Maps 2021)
Freddy’s walk, part 3 (Google Maps 2021)

Page 97

paragraph 1 (continued)

  • No notes.

paragraph 2

  • “where Bath Row had run down to Andrew’s Road once” – See map detail above for the former route of Bath St, and map right for a more modern layout.
  • “the opening to the garages” – Probably the parking area whose entrance is pictured below. At some point between 2015 and 2021, it was replaced with more housing.

    Lower Bath Street parking area (Google Street View 2015)
    Lower Bath Street parking area (Google Street View 2015)
  • “there was something going to happen there” – Freddy is correct; see chapters xxx and Go See Now This Cursed Woman.
  • “the first faint ghost of a shiver” – This is the first time the word “ghost” has been used in this chapter — and it’s not even literal.

    St Andrew's Road jitty (detail from 1901 map)
    St Andrew’s Road jitty (detail from 1901 map)
  • “You could still see some of the cobbles of the jitty mouth, where it had run behind the terrace down on Andrew’s Road” – At right is a detail from a 1901 map, showing the jitty leading north from Scarletwell Street; St Andrew’s Road runs up the west side. Below is an image of the small patch of cobbles that remained in 2006.
    • jitty” – British dialect for “alley”.

      Cobbled patch next to Scarletwell street house (Google Street View Jun 2018)
      Cobbled patch next to Scarletwell street house (Google Street View Jun 2018)
  • “almost everything down here was grey or black or white” – For more discussion of this, see chapter xxx, Pxxx.
  • “in forty-something years” – Suggesting that Freddy died in the mid-1960s. (Probably no earlier than 1962, given his familiarity with Z-Cars, see P95p4.)
  • “just part of his condition” – Suggesting a medical condition, not the condition of being dead.
The house on the corner of Scarletwell Street (Google Street View Apr 2009)
The house on the corner of Scarletwell Street (Google Street View Apr 2009)

paragraph 3

  • “Joe Swan” – Father of Doreen (Swan) Warren, grandfather of Alma Warren.
  • Again, this paragraph has a lot of coy wording concealing the fact that, as a ghost, Freddy is literally walking through the door.

paragraph 4

  • jumping Jack” – Possibly a reference to the old-fashioned toy?
  • “the old man” – A phrase which can mean many things (helping to obscure the tenant’s identity) but most likely in the sense “father”. The tenant’s father does have a great deal to be sorry for…

paragraph 5

  • No notes.

Page 98

paragraph 1

  • “Johnny” – This would be Johnny Vernall, Alma Warren’s great-uncle. See the chapter The Steps of All Saints.

paragraph 2

  • No notes.

paragraph 3

  • “other matters” – See xxx.

paragraph 4

  • “septuagenarian” – Suggesting a birthdate between 1925-1936. The real-world analog to the tenant was born in 1929, so would be 77 in 2006.

paragraph 5-6

  • No notes.

paragraph 7

  • “my innards in the state they are these days, it goes right through me” – Again, while this is an ordinary metaphor, Freddy means it completely literally.

paragraph 8

  • No notes.

paragraph 9

  • “them bloody kids” – The Dead Dead Gang, see chapter xxx, Pxxx.
  • “some months ago” – xxx

    Spring Lane Terrace (detail from 1901 map)
    Spring Lane Terrace (detail from 1901 map)
  • “Spring Lane Terrace as was up the back there years ago” – Spring Lane Terrace was a small street that used to extend south from Spring Lane. It vanished some time between 1901 and 1950. In the map detail at right, the tenant’s house is approximately in the SW corner.
  • “they know that you can’t touch them” – Another double meaning. Modern children know that adults aren’t allowed to physically punish them as they once used to. The Dead Dead Gang, of course, are intangible.

paragraph 10

  • No notes.

paragraph 11

  • “I saw ’em earlier, when I was up the twenty-fives in Peter’s Annexe.” – See chapter Sleepless Swords, Pxxx.
  • “this darky woman with a scar over her eye” – Kaph, again see chapter Sleepless Swords, Pxxx.
  • “Phyllis Painter” – Leader of the Dead Dead Gang. See Book Two, especially the chapter Rabbits.
  • “the old Black Lion when it was opposite the cherry orchards” – I have been unable to find out anything about these alleged cherry orchards. Given the number of Northamptonshire places named “Cherry Orchard” however, cherries were clearly widely cultivated in the area.
  • “back round there in Doddridge’s rough area” – This might be referring to the physical area near Doddridge’s church (which is just down the street from the Black Lion). Conversely, Freddy might be referring to the temporal vicinity of Doddridge’s life. Doddridge lived in the 1700s, and the Dead Dead Gang entered St. Peter’s Annexe from the year 1645 — but from the viewpoint of 2006, those might be thought of as “near” each other.

paragraph 12

  • “just up the road” – Here, a spatial metaphor is being used to refer to a temporal “distance”.

paragraph 13

  • “flooding” – Presumably due to anthropogenic climate change.
  • “from the east” – Writing of a period that was then 20 years in the future, Moore cagily avoids giving specific detail. Depending on how it is interpreted, “the east” could cover about a quarter of the globe. It seems a safe bet that there will be some region overwhelmed by flooding with refugees winding up in England.

paragraph 14

  • “we all thought as it would be further off” – A reasonable characterization of the mainstream scientific consensus in 2006. Moore, cynically but accurately, predicted that things were getting worse faster than that consensus.

Page 99

paragraph 1 (continued) – 2

  • No notes.

paragraph 3

  • For more on Georgie Bumble and his “office”, see Pxxx, below

paragraph 4-7

  • No notes.

paragraph 8

  • “my great-grand-dad” – Ernest Vernall, who we met in the chapter A Host of Angles.

paragraph 9

  • No notes.

paragraph 10

  • “no trail was left behind […] contrary to what the coppers had once told him” – Again, see chapter xxx, Pxxx for more discussion of these “trails”.

Page 100

paragraph 1 (continued)

  • No notes.

paragraph 2

  • “Fiery Phil” – Philip Doddridge, who will appear in the chapter Malignant, Refractory Spirits.
  • “There’s only one chap knows all that.” – Presumably God.

    the small bricked-in back yard (Google Street View Apr 2009)
    “the small bricked-in back yard” (Google Street View Apr 2009)

paragraph 3

  • “the small bricked-in back yard” – See image.

paragraph 4

  • “ashbox” – From In Living Memory:
    “John Short: We used to call them ashboxes, not dustboxes because everybody had ashes from the fires in those days.”

paragraph 5

  • “Puck’s Hat” – First mention of these enigmatic fungi. They do not actually exist, despite the large amount of apparent folklore surrounding them that Moore has invented. “Puck” is presumably the folkloric fairy figure most famous for his appearance in A Midsummer Night’s Dream.
    • Moore described Puck’s Hats in detail in The Thackery T. Lambshead Cabinet of Curiosities.

paragraph 6

  • “You’ve got better eyes for it than me.” – Living people can’t see Puck’s Hats, except for brief flashes in their peripheral vision.

paragraph 7

  • No notes.

paragraph 8

  • “faint squeal as he plucked it” – Reminiscent of the folklore of a mandrake root screaming when plucked. In some versions, hearing that scream was fatal, though that obviously isn’t something Freddy has to worry about anymore.

Page 101

paragraph 1

  • As has been alluded to but not yet clearly established, ghosts generally cannot see color or have any sense of smell. Puck’s Hats are exceptional in many ways.

    Puck's Hat front cover
    Puck’s Hat detail from front cover.

paragraph 2

  • Various covers of Jerusalem‘s first edition have featured images of Puck’s Hats. The cover as a whole is credited to Moore, though the Puck’s Hat images look to me like they might be the work of Melinda Gebbie. A Puck’s Hat image was also featured on a signed and numbered bookplate for a limited edition. All these images are largely as described in the text, with the exception of the fairies’ arms

paragraph 3-4

  • No notes.

paragraph 5

  • “you won’t have to worry about boiling a four-minute egg then finding half a day has gone. You know what these can be like when it comes to missing out a lump of time. It’s all because of how they grow.” – xxx

paragraph 6

  • No notes.

Page 102

paragraph 1 (continued)

  • “a whole ring of Puck’s Hats” – Recalling “fairy rings” of mushrooms.

paragraph 2

31d0433e-e215-4ff3-9be8-a9c41669418f-large16x9_Oldphotoalbum1
“snapshots with their small black corner hinges” (source: katu.com)
  • “snapshots with their small black corner hinges” – For the benefit of younger readers, back when a “photo album” was a physical object, some versions of the technology had small corner thingies to hold the photo to the page. See image.

    Saint Crispin's Hospital
    Saint Crispin’s Hospital
  • “a young girl […] buildings in the background like a hospital or school” – This is almost certainly Audrey Vernall at Saint Crispin’s Hospital, a psychiatric institution. See chapter Round the Bend, section 11 for more details.
Freddy's walk, part 4 (Google Maps 2021)
Freddy’s walk, part 4 (Google Maps 2021)

paragraph 3

  • “Jem Perrit’s horse and cart”- Jem Perrit is the father of Benjamin Perrit, the protagonist of chapter Atlantis. He seems to be a conflation of two actual people from the book In Living Memory: Jim Allard (father of Dominic Allard?) and Jim’s father Bill “Sherriff” Allard, who matches most of Jem Perrit’s described characteristics.
    The Sherriff outside the Mayorhold Mission (from In Living Memory)
    “The Sherriff” outside the Mayorhold Mission (from In Living Memory)

    Jim Allard: My father was an old man when I was born. They’d call my father ‘The Sherriff’.
    Richard Foreman: Why?
    JA: Because he was so domineering. Wanted everything doing his way. He used to sit for hours on the Mayorhold, on a handtruck. […] He used to get drunk.
    RF: Did he travel with a horse and cart?
    JA: Yes.

  • “there might be other complications” – See chapter xxx, Pxxx.

    Jem Perrit's route home (Google Maps 2021)
    Jem Perrit’s route home (Google Maps 2021)
  • “home to Freeschool Street” – See map. Given Jem’s current location, it seems likely that he has just left The Jolly Smokers pub, especially as he will be seen there in the later chapters Forbidden Worlds and The Jolly Smokers.
  • Mayorhold vicinity (detail from 1950 map)
    Mayorhold vicinity (detail from 1950 map)

    “where the widened sweep of Silver Street ran down” – The phrasing here is ambiguous, but Silver Street does not exist by 2006. See map, left, for where it used to be.

paragraph 4

  • “new car park[…] painted ugly yellow” – See image.
  • Corner of Horsmarket and Greyfriars (Google Street View Apr 2009)
    Corner of Horsemarket and Greyfriars (Google Street View Apr 2009)

    “a great bank of thorn-hedge” – At the corner of Horsemarket and Greyfriars (which used to be the corner with Silver Street), there is an expanse of hedge visible which (as of 2009) is “great” in width, but not in height; see image.

Page 103

paragraph 1 (continued)

  • “GENTLEMEN” – In Living Memory says:

    Richard Foreman: I was told there was a public toilet that was always known as ‘Georgie Bumble’s Office’.
    Jim Allard : That were a grey place. I was seeing if I could buy it for scrap iron, but it was bloody made of slate.
    RF: Who was Georgie Bumble? Did he work for the Borough?
    JA: No. Old Georgie never worked for nobody. He were a moocher. Poor old Georgie Bumble. He come out of Spring Lane.

paragraph 2

  • No notes.

    WWII VD poster
    WWII V.D. poster (www.collectionscanada.gc.ca)

paragraph 3

  • “V.D. warning poster” – While I have been unable to find the specific poster mentioned, many similar posters existed, especially during WWII.
  • “an overflowing bowl […] That was the way that people dreamed these sorts of places” – These dreams are indeed quite common.
  • “the sound of someone spitting” – The implication here is that Georgie is spitting out semen, having just given a blowjob.

paragraph 4

  • “the Clooneys or whatever they were called from up St. Andrew’s” – As previously mentioned in the chapter Work in Progress, there was once a Cluniac priory on what is now St Andrews Street.

paragraph 5

  • “doing business” – It would seem that Georgie Bumble (at least the Jerusalem version off him) is a prostitute. And has kept working in his “office” even as a ghost.

paragraph 6

  • “blue-grey foetus shapes that folk said looked like spacemen from another planet” – Possibly meant to suggest a connection to “Grey Aliens“. Many people have drawn connections between fairy folklore and modern urban legends about UFOs, suggesting that they are two facets of the same phenomenon. Puck’s Hats make this connection concrete.

Page 104

paragraph 1 (continued)

  • “been had more ways than one” – At least the senses of “been the receiving partner of a sex act” and “been deceived or cheated”.

paragraph 2

paragraph 3

  • “the unusual acoustics […] in more directions” – Suggesting that the higher dimensions that ghosts perceive affect the properties of sound.

paragraph 4

  • No notes.

paragraph 5

  • “his shiny suit” – Shininess in cloth is often a result of extreme wear, so while the effect can be pretty, it is indicative of poverty. It might be a demob suit; see notes to chapter Hark! the Glad Sound!, Pxxxpx.
  • “moocher” – While the primary meaning of moocher is “someone who takes advantage of another”, it has been suggested that it may also mean prostitute.

paragraph 6

  • “Bedlam” is, of course, the famous insane asylum, referenced briefly in chapter A Host of Angles, P47p1.
  • dancing with the fairies” – A phrase meaning to daydream or be distracted.
  • “Perhaps that was why they were all so bloody pale.” – As previously mentioned (P101p2), Puck’s Hats are one of the only things that ghosts can perceive as colored.

Page 105

paragraph 1 (continued)

  • No notes.

paragraph 2

  • “rosebud lips” – An unusually effeminate word to use for a man’s lips, suggestive of his status as a homosexual “bottom”.

paragraph 3-4

  • No notes.

paragraph 5

  • Rosebay willow-herb and Canadian fleabane in a ruined City church. Photo Eric Hosking. Published in Richard S. R. Fitter London’s natural history (London Collins, 1945)
    Rosebay willow-herb and Canadian fleabane in a ruined City church. Photo: Eric Hosking. Published in Richard S. R. Fitter London’s natural history (London: Collins, 1945)

    Rose Bay Willow Herb” – A tall, fast-growing herb with small violet flowers. Per Wikipedia: “In the United Kingdom it is also known as bombweed, as a result of its rapid appearance on city bomb sites during the Blitz of World War II”. Presumably Georgie thinks the bombweed will similarly take over after Northampton is wiped out by one disaster or another.

  • A bollard with a keep-left sign, just outside Georgie Bumble's Office (Google Street View Apr 2009)
    A bollard with a keep-left sign, just outside “Georgie Bumble’s Office” (Google Street View Apr 2009)

    bollards” – Sturdy upright posts, usually of metal or concrete. Here referring to their use as traffic control. The area around the parking garage has many, most of which have directional signs on them; see image.

paragraph 6

  • “how’s-your-father” – British slang for “sexual intercourse”.

Page 106

Freddy's walk, part 5 (Google Maps 2021)
Freddy’s walk, part 5 (Google Maps 2021)

paragraph 1

  • “through the barrier” – Possibly referring to the gap in a short fence; see image below from 2009.

    Looking down Bath Street from the Mayorhold (Google Street View Apr 2009)
    Looking down Bath Street from the Mayorhold (Google Street View Apr 2009)
  • “the deserted avenue between the two halves of the flats” – See image below.

    the deserted avenue between the two halves of the flats (Google Street View Apr 2009)
    “the deserted avenue between the two halves of the flats” (Google Street View Apr 2009)
  • “The scroungey-looking stray that he’d seen in St. Mary’s Street” – Last seen on P94p5. The dog will be making the turd not long from now.

paragraph 2

  • “The Orchard” is described by several people in In Living Memory. A sampling:

    Reg Tero: […] the ‘Orchard’. This was a recreation space in Bath Street with swings, slides. Maypole etc. and below this was the Borough Yard.George Rolfe: Down the top of our street used to be what they called the Orchard, the swings and all that. The old Destructor used to back onto it from Castle Street. So if we were hanking and panking about or doing anything we shouldn’t be doing and the police come, all we used to do (was) climb the railings into the old Destructor and come out into Castle Street.

    Playing cricket in The Orchard (In Living Memory)
    Playing cricket in The Orchard (In Living Memory)

paragraph 3

Elizabeth Clara Mallard, circa 1912
“Clara”, circa 1912
  • “young Clara, Joe Swan’s missus” – This is the former Clara Mallard. The baby daughter in the carriage is Doreen, later mother to Alma and Mick Warren.

Page 107

paragraph 1 (continued)

  • “This was where everyone was still alive.” – This begins to introduce the notion that ghosts can re-inhabit portions of their lives, developed further below.

paragraph 2

  • “in her thirties” – The real person Clara is based on was about 30 when she gave birth to the Doreen analog.
  • the_stair_case_at_althorp_house_1822
    The staircase at Althorp House, 1822

    “Althorp House for the Red Earl” – Althorp is a palatial mansion owned by the Spencer family. Diana Spencer (see chapter ASBOs of Desire) lived their from the time her parents divorce until her marriage. The “Red Earl” (so called for his beard) was John Spencer, 5th Earl Spencer. He died in 1910, and his successor seems to have largely lived in London, which may be why many of the Althorp servants were “let go”.

paragraph 3-9

  • No notes.

Page 108

paragraph 1 (continued) – 3

  • No notes.

paragraph 4

  • dishwater” – When this word is applied to hair, it means a dark blonde color.

paragraph 5-6

  • No notes

Page 109

paragraph 1-6

  • No notes.

paragraph 7

  • “peckish” – Colloquial term for “mildly hungry”, but also suggesting “pecker”, slang for “penis”.

paragraph 8

  • “young Phyllis Painter” – A rare view of the living Phyllis. She is a major character throughout Book 2 of Jerusalem.
  • “length and breadth and depth and whenth” – “Whenth” is a coinage by Moore. From context it means “time considered as a spatial dimension”.
  • “round the twenty-fives” – See chapter Sleepless Swords.
  • vintage-golliwog-soft-toy
    A Golliwog doll (CC0, public domain)

    “golly hair” – Hair like the Golliwog, a black character from a series of late 19th century children’s books. The Golliwog (and derived words) is now generally considered racist and offensive. Moore used a quite strange version of the Golliwog in The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen from Black Dossier onwards.

  • “cut through his mate’s house up to Spring Lane Terrace” – See chapter xxx.
  • “They might well be […] down here around the twenty-eights” – See xxx
  • “scrumping” – Stealing. Usually applied to fruit, but here to the fungal(?) Puck’s Hats.

Page 110

paragraph 1 (continued) – 6

  • No notes.

paragraph 7

  • “the experience had faded with each repetition until almost all the joy was gone” – This recalls Marla’s experience of crack cocaine, as detailed in chapter ASBOs of Desire, P86p2.

Page 111

paragraph 1 (continued) – 4

  • No notes.

paragraph 5

  • “a pretty, skinny little brown girl” – This is Marla, from chapter ASBOs of Desire, P70p2ff.

paragraph 6

  • No notes.

Page 112

paragraph 1 (continued)

Looking SE at St. Peter's Church (visitchurches.org.uk)
The portico of St. Peter’s Church (visitchurches.org.uk)
  • “He’d been under the portico at Peter’s Church” – Marla recalled this scene in ASBOs of Desire, P82p2-3.
  • “There’d been a boy in there” – Den, from the chapter The Jolly Smokers, Pxxx.
  • bumpers” – A colloquial term for sneakers.
  • “She weren’t looking at him[…], but something told him that she might have been, and he decided he’d best leave before she looked again.” – Indeed she had been looking at him, and when she looked a second time, Freddy had left.

paragraph 2-3

  • No notes.

paragraph 4

  • “a much cooler liquid” – Presumably ectoplasm.

paragraph 5-6

No notes.

paragraph 7

  • “the Orchard” – See notes to P106p2, above.

Page 113

paragraph 1 (continued)

  • “the scruffy dog […] hadn’t moved its bowels in quite a time.” – But it will before very long. Marla sees it happen in ASBOS of Desire, P76p1.

paragraph 2

Freddy's walk from Bath Street to pool hall (Google Maps 2021)
Freddy’s walk from Bath Street to pool hall (Google Maps 2021)
  • No notes.

paragraph 3

  • “the […] dog […] jumped back and barked twice at him”- Animals are often thought to be able to perceive ghosts.
  • “where he’d sent that old chaplain earlier.” – See map.

paragraph 4

  • No notes.

paragraph 5

  • “in the Drapery” – A street name. See map, below.

    Julia's (approximate) route (Google Maps 2021)
    Julia’s (approximate) route (Google Maps 2021)

Page 114

paragraph 1 (continued)

  • No notes.

paragraph 2

  • “a tubby chap” – Councilman Jim Cockie, protagonist of chapter Cornered. This encounter is also seen from Cockie’s POV at Pxxx.
  • “some nights ago” – This earlier encounter is also depicted from Cockie’s POV at Pxxx.

paragraph 3

  • No notes.

paragraph 4

  • berk“- British slang, “twit”.
  • pants” – In British idiom, “underpants”.

paragraph 5

Page 115

paragraph 1 (continued)

  • “People shouldn’t just go launching into it if they can’t take a joke.” – A double irony here. People generally believe that they have no choice about entering life. But in the world of Jerusalem, ghosts do have control over when (or if) they “launch” back into their lives.

paragraph 2

Approximate location of pool hall (Google Street View Apr 2009)
Approximate location of pool hall (Google Street View Apr 2009)
  • “the billiard hall” – By April 2009, there was no pool hall in the location described. I’ve included a photo of the location, as the buildings seem old enough that one of them might have formerly been the pool hall.
  • “crook-door” – The term seems to have been invented by Moore. “Crook” is primarily meant as “bend” (in the sense of being in a higher dimension), but we should not overlook that many of the ghosts using these doors are also “crooks” in the sense of petty criminals.
  • lumber room” – A largely British term for “storeroom”.
  • “four-way hinge” – Normal hinges only go two ways, but crook-doors have more dimensions.
  • wenceslas_hollar_-_jacobs_ladder_state_2
    “Jacob’s Ladder” by Wenceslas Hollar. (1607-1677)

    “Jacob Flight” – Another term that seems invented by Moore, at least in the sense he uses it (defined next paragraph). There is a probably deliberate allusion to Jacob’s Ladder, an incident in the Biblical book of Genesis, where Jacob has a vision of a ladder between earth and heaven, with angels traveling up and down.

  • “the Attics of the Breath” – The portion of Mansoul directly “above” Northampton. See Book Two for more on this.
  • “He wouldn’t have to feel he’d got above himself.” – Note that though he might feel “above himself” in Mansoul, the Scarletwell tenant has been trying to convince him that he would be welcome there; see P98-99.

paragraph 3

  • The description of the Jacob Flight is very similar to some stairs in Ern Vernall’s house: A Host of Angles, P44p4. It seems likely that Moore based this on a staircase that he or his sources remembered.

paragraph 4

snooker” – A game similar to Pool, invented by a British officer in 1875. Here used to indicate a somewhat similar game and table, not literally Snooker.

paragraph 5

  • No notes.

Page 116

paragraph 1 (continued)

snooker_table_selby
A snooker table (photo by DmitryYakunin , CC-BY-SA 2.0)
  • baize” – The green felt used to cover pool tables.
  • “builders” – As seen in A Work in Progress (P6), these are angels.
  • “alabaster cues” – Pool cues are normally made of wood, not decorative white stone.
  • “twenty-five feet long and twelve feet wide” – A “full-size” snooker table is 12 x 6 feet, though smaller variants exist. American pool tables are usually 7 x 3.5 feet, though again there are variants. A 2:1 ratio is almost universal, however, and the table here, though unusually large, is roughly the traditional proportions.

paragraph 2

  • “Three-fingered Tunk” – Also appears briefly in the chapters Hark! The Glad Sound! and A Cold and Frosty Morning. Presumably based on an actual person Moore remembers.
  • “Nobby Clark” – A real person, described in In Living Memory by Bob Stanton:

    Nobby Clark used to live in Johnsons Row. He entered the hospital Cycle Parade every year and was well known as lots of people used to look for him in the Parade. He went in as Dirty Dick on one occasion, covered in dirt and dust with dirty, worn out clothing, pushing barrow with his dog in it. His slogan was ‘Ten years ago I used your soap, since then I’ve used no other,’ with adverts for Pears soap on the barrow.

  • Dirty Dick” was an 18th/19th century merchant who became somewhat infamous by refusing to wash after the death of his fiancée.
  • “Jem Perrit” – Last seen at P102p3, with his horse carrying him home unconscious drunk. He presumably has had time to sober up a bit.

paragraph 3

  • No notes.

paragraph 4

  • “Aa. I’d bin up the Smokers for me Puck’s ’At Punch. I ’spect it was the work as I’d bin doin’ as ’ad wore me ayt. That’s when yuh seen me on the Merruld.” – “Ah, I’d been to the Jolly Smokers pub for my Puck’s Hat Punch. I exect it was the work I’d been doing that wore me out. That when you saw me on the Mayorhold.”
    • “the work” was presumably “getting drunk”.

paragraph 5

  • “Wood-merchant had been how Jem made his living” – I don’t have any evidence that either of the people Jem seems to be based on was a wood merchant.
  • “a sort of curling alpine horn” – Is this a reference? Suggest??

Page 117

s-l400
A Grenadier jacket circa 1900.

paragraph 1 (continued)

  • Grenadier’s dress jacket” – Grenadiers are elite infantrymen.

paragraph 2

  • moonshine” – Potent alcohol, usually produced by amateurs, with connotations of illegality and danger.
  • barmy” – British colloquial “crazy”.

paragraph 3

  • “the Master Builders” – That is to say, the four Archangels.

paragraph 4

  • “billiard tale” – A typo for “table”? Or it might possibly be used in the archaic sense of “A number of things considered as an aggregate”.

paragraph 5Symbols of the four corners

  • “just four pockets” – Ordinary pool/snooker tables have 6.
  • “a crude style that looked like tramp-marks” – These symbols are depicted on an unnumbered page near the beginning of the book, just after the Table of Contents. Their symbolism is discussed in more detail in the chapter Mental Fights, Pxxx:
    – southwest “a castle-turret”; corresponding to Northampton Castle.
    – northwest “a big prick”; corresponding to the Super Sausage parking lot where prostitutes hang out (
    – northeast “a skull”
    – southeast “a wonky cross”

Page 118

paragraph 1 (continued) – 2

  • No notes.

paragraph 2

  • “the idea being to knock all the balls you could in your own hole” – As will gradually become clear, this represents the death of the person represented by the ball. Which hole they land in corresponds to the state of their soul at the time of death. (Time being a rather different concept “upstairs”, the deaths we see represented here are not all happening today, or even in the same year.)
Statue of Michael atop the Guildhall
Statue of Michael atop the Guildhall

paragraph 3

  • “the other three apparently came more from out of town” – The implication is that the Archangel Michael is, in some sense, a Northampton native. This may have to do with the statue mentioned below.
  • “Mighty Mike” – The Archangel Michael, viewpoint character of the chapter Clouds Unfold.
  • “a statue of him on their Guildhall’s gable roof” – A picture of this statue appears on P804, at the start of Book Three. While this statue is holding a spear, Moore deliberately interprets it as a snooker cue several times during Jerusalem.

paragraph 4

  • “This white ball represented, Freddy understood, somebody white, somebody that Fred didn’t know who more than likely wasn’t from round here.” – Possibly the churchman who Charley George meets in the chapter Blind, but Now I See, Pxxx. His “collision” with Charley deeply affected Charley’s faith, ultimately for the better.

Page 119

paragraph 1 (continued)

paragraph 2

First edition cover, art by Alan Moore
First edition cover, art by Alan Moore
  • “throwing both fists up in the air above his head” – This is depicted on Alan Moore’s cover for Jerusalem.

paragraph 3

  • “Yuri-something” – The Archangel Uriel.
  • “Fred thought might very well be Russian” – Probably because Yuri is a common Russian name. Uriel is an important archangel in Russian Orthodox Christianity.

paragraph 4

  • No notes.

paragraph 5

  • “someone bald, […] grey in a moral sense” – Probably the rapist in the chapter Go Now See This Cursed Woman. His life does have a “collision” with Marla (see next paragraph) just before his death.

paragraph 6

  • “the little brown girl” – Marla Stiles, who we met in the chapter ASBOs of Desire.

Page 120

paragraph 1 (continued)

  • No notes.

paragraph 2

  • “[Marla’s ball] was now itself perched at the northeast pocket’s rim” – After her encounter with the rapist, Marla was near death.
  • Mick McManus” – An English wrestler from the late 1940s through the late 70s. Wrestling is an interesting metaphor to bring in. While there are elements of real competetion to the sport, it is also a highly scripted theatrical experience – and most of the audience knows this.
  • “wrestling villain” – Also known as a “heel“, a wrestler who has the persona of a “bad guy”. (Mick McManus was a heel.)

paragraph 3

  • bugger” – Here used in the sense of “situation that causes dismay”.

paragraph 4 – 7

  • No notes.

Page 121

paragraph 1 (continued) – 2

  • No notes.

paragraph 3

  • “the white ball” – Presumably Freddy himself.
  • “a ball [that] might be red” – Possibly Michael Warren, but more likely Phyllis Painter, who is the one who most directly interacts with Freddy close to the incident with Marla.
  • “The brown ball shot into the southeast pocket” – Again, time is strange here; though the ball drops immediately, Marla will live a good long time before ending up in the Archangel’s “pocket”.

paragraph 4 – 5

  • No notes.

9 thoughts on “J1.04 Rough Sleepers”

  1. OBSERVATIONS/QUESTIONS:

    Wow. To quote Bad Boys 2 (via Hot Fuzz): “Shit just got real.”

    • The Black Lion, where Freddy and Mary Jane (which happens to be slang for marijuana) hang out (p91), was mentioned in chapter 1 (I believe) as having been frequented by the Warren family. The bartender treats them as if they’re invisible, in total parallel to how the homeless are treated, but then it turns out later it’s because they’re ghosts. Nice misdirection plus social commentary there by Moore.

    • This may sound dumb, but it wasn’t until the paragraph on p94 starting with “From Marefair, Freddy drifted up Horsemarket” that I actually flipped back to the map at the beginning to follow a character’s trail!

    • Freddy’s friend on p98 is described as a “septuagenarian,” which means a person who is between the age of 70-79.

    • It’s sweet how genuinely honest Freddy is regarding relatively harmless fibs, like on p99, where now that he told his septuagenarian friend that he’d visit Georgie, he feels he better do so (and also with the priest on p96, whom Freddy tells he’s headed one way, and then feels he has to go that way even though he changed his mind).

    • “But all the pokey little nooks and stairways had their purpose in the builders’ plan,” says the septuagenarian on p100. There are WAY too many corner/angle mentions in this chapter to quote them all, but this is an early (somewhat foreshadowing) one.

    • This is just a damn amazing collection of words (especially since, for me, this is where I started to realize Freddy is traveling through time as well as space): “…through the bramble months and years with thorns made out of painful moments…” (p105)

    • “The Destructor” – first mentioned in chapter 1 as part of Alma and Mick’s conversation, and part of Alma’s motivation regarding her art show (aka THIS BOOK) – is mentioned again here on p106 and on p107 where it states that the Destructor’s tower stands over Bath Street.

    • “Clara, Joe Swan’s missus” (p106), with the push cart are Alma Warren’s maternal grandparents.

    • p109: “Phyllis Painter?” I think she has appeared before? But I’m totally blanking.

    • The dreamer in his underpants/vest on p114 – this scene to confirm that this was indeed where Alma visited during her dream in chapter 1 because apparently living people sometimes end up there in their dreams.

    • “Jacob’s Flight” on p115, which seems to be a ladder/stairs mash-up (at quite a seemingly odd ANGLE, of course) makes me think of Jacob’s Ladder (a movie from the 90s about seeing ghosts/losing sanity – although I haven’t seen it in a while). I would guess the use of the name “Jacob” by both of these stories is referencing the same (probably biblical?) Jacob.

    • The symbols marking the corners of the snooker table (p117) are the same symbols at the beginning of the book on the “Based on a ‘true story’” page (three of which are on each cover of the soft cover edition).

    SPACETIMEY MOMENTS:

    • p97: “Either there had been something happen there a long time back, or there was something going to happen there.”

    • p103: “The monk had gone, leaving still pictures of himself in black and white behind that faded into nothing within moments.”

    • p105: “Fred considered this as he strode out into the stream of motorcars, dragging grey snapshots of his previous several seconds like a tail behind him.”

    • p118: “Mighty Mike…punched his cue once, hard, into the white ball, sending it at high velocity across the breadth of the tremendous table with its trail behind it like a tight packed string of bright white pearls.”

    • I recently reread an old conversation between Alan Moore and Dave Sim from 1997 in which they discuss the fourth dimension after Moore and Eddie Campbell had completed From Hell. This was because of developments in a recent issue of Providence. However, this quote from that conversation also applies heavily to this chapter of Jerusalem as well (and probably a lot of Moore’s work in general).

    Moore says:

    “Now, moving on to what you actually asked about. which was where I stood on the Free Will vs. Determinism issue: if Stephen Hawking is correct when he suggests that Space-Time itself is a fourth-dimensional solid probably shaped a bit like an egg or an American football, with the Big Bang at one end, the Big Crunch at the other, and all other moments suspended forever somewhere between, then I don’t see how Free Will can possibly exist. Time, while it is not actually the fourth-dimension in the sense that H.G. Wells popularised it as being (after the theories of C. Howard Hinton, funnily enough), is, as I understand it, more properly conceived as the shadow of a fourth spatial dimension perceived by human consciousness.
    What this means is that our view of our own three-dimensional body is limited: if you had fourth-dimensional vision and were standing at a point outside our continuum, you would perceive your human semblance as a form of horrifically long millipede that would wind back and forth over every landscape you have ever or ever will cross during the course of your life. The millipede tapers slightly at both ends. At one end is genetic slime and at the other extreme is dust or ash. Now imagine that each section of the millipede is one instant of your life from birth to death, all fused together. The way our perception of time works in this analogy is like a peristaltic ripple of awareness that starts at one end and passes through every segment in the chain of the millipede’s body in sequence. As each individual segment is lit up by awareness, it only has awareness of what it is, i.e., a segment located at certain co-ordinates. When the awareness moves on to the next segment in the body, it is aware of itself as a nearly identical segment at a new co-ordinate, and it makes the reasonable assumption that it is the same segment and that the segment has moved. In fact, the segment is unwittingly part of a larger organism, and the only movement is the movement of its awareness through that’ organism’s convoluted form.”

    http://www.linkworthy.com/Moore/Correspondence3.htm

    The entire (long) conversation is fascinating. I can’t recommend it enough (and this was from the days before Dave Sim went…well, cornery, I suppose).

    THINGS THAT MADE ME LAUGH:

    • p91: “…looking down, a bit glum, at the empty glasses on the laminated tabletop between them, wishing there was some way they could have a proper drink but knowing as they couldn’t, knowing that instead they’d have to have a proper conversation.”

    • p112: “Ectoplasm”

    • p114: Freddy, who is color blind, standing at the street curb, “waiting for the light to turn from grey to grey.”

    Sorry for the long post, but I didn’t have time to write a short one. (That joke will never get old!)

    Like

    1. The chapter begins: “It had been in one sense forty years since Freddy Allen left the life.” so is kind ovbious that Freddy is dead and it follows that it is the postmortem story as a ghost. Less obvious is why “IN ONE SENSE forty years…” It is that has passed that time, but really, what does the tick-tac means once you have no body that materially records the passage of events? So, as far as the living are concerned, it could have been a week. who knows. Freddy is a floating consciousness inhabiting an attempt of temporary sensation, a sort of “spell” made of memories of what he lived, in the “midle” of the timeless eternity, sort of speak.

      Like

  2. the sex scene with Freddy was pre-visualized (in fact seen at the same time as it’s happenning here, as Freddy also sees Marla) by Marla in the previous chapter.

    Like

  3. I’ll put my dramatis personae and index lists here.
    NOTES:
    Page referrers are for 3 volume paperback edition by Knockabout.
    Dramatis personae-characters in brackets are only mentioned but not in scene.

    Dramatis Personae
    • Freddy Allen, ghost, POV, died approx. 40 years ago, 1966, born approx. 1898 (see Twenty Five Thousand Nights divided by 365 = 68 years)
    • Old boy tramp
    • (›Black woman with scar‹, works with prostitutes, drug users and refugees)
    • Mary Jane, ghost (died of heart attack), talks with Freddy in Black Lion Pub
    • Two blokes who talk with barkeep (blonde young woman) in Black Lion Pub
    • (Mick Malone, Gang leader, regular in Jolly Smokers Pub)
    • (Lizzie Fawkes, brawled once with Mary about Jean Dove in front of Green Dragon Pub)
    • Joe Ball, ghost, retired superintendent
    • ›Stout clergyman/monk with heavy sack‹ (= Peter from X Marks the Spot)
    • (Joe Swan, acquaintance of Freddy)
    • ›Chum of Freddy‹, lives in corner building Scarlettwell/St. Andrews Street, watches photo album
    • (›old man‹, expected by Freddys chum)
    • (Kid gang of Phyllis Painter)
    • (Fiery Phil, preacher)
    • (Twenty year old woman in photo of album watched by Freddys chum)
    • Jem Perrit, with horse and cart
    • Monk with tonsure, customer of Georgie
    • Georgie Bumble, ghost, of Freddys and Marys gang, worked once in bank office
    • Clara Swan and baby Doreen
    • (›Red Earl‹ von Althrop House, for whom Clara worked in service before she married Joe Swan, see Index)
    • Patsy Clarke, Freddy had spontaneous sex with her in 1928
    • (Frank Clarke, Patsys husband, climbed up the ladder)
    • Phyllis Painter
    • (Mr. Bullock, butcher behind The Destructor)
    • ›Pretty, skinny little brown girl‹, 16-17 years old, watches Freddy and Patsy having sex = Marla, POV of ASBOS of Desire
    • (street boy at St. Peters Church, asleep and drunk)
    • (Julia, daughter of a doctor; eighteen year old Freddy waited to rape her, but did not)
    • ›Dreamer‹, with white hair and glasses, spooked by Freddy
    • Three-fingered Tunk, ghost, audience member at snooker, former fishmonger
    • Nobby Clark, ghost, audience member at Snooker
    • Jem Perrit, ghost, former wood-merchant with horse cart (horse called Bessie); now junkman for phantasma artefacts
    • 4 x Master Builders playing snooker
    • Mighty Mike, Master Builder, white hair, local, plays SE-hole, cross
    • (Charlie George, ›Black Charlie‹, ball on snooker table: see chapter Modern Times, and POV in Blind, But Now I See)
    • ›Yuri-something‹, Master Builder, possible russian, plays NE-hole, skull

    Index
    • Fancy Smith, character from TV serial Z-Cars, played by Brian Blessed: 100
    Z-Cars, BBC TV serial (1962-1978): 100
    • Friar Tuck, character from Robin Hood-legend: 100
    • Earl Spencer = John Poyntz Spencer, 5th Earl Spencer (1835-1910), called ›The Red Earl‹ because of his long red beard: 110
    • Mick McManus (1921-2013), English wrestler: 122

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  4. I’m not sure what the “rules” are about spoilers here, but there’s a lot going on in Freddy’s conversation with the denizen of the house on Scarletwell Street. For example, the talk of “the old man” coming round and apologising (as well he might, once we realise – right at the end of the book – who he actually is).

    Like

  5. The trails/afterimages Freddy describes himself and other otherwordly beings leaving are strongly reminiscent of Palinopsia, a visual condition which is common during LSD trips, but sometimes appears on its own. Here, apparently ghosts leave positive afterimages, while angels leave the negative ones.

    Like

  6. Page 98: “Well, he’s a rogue, old Johnny. I expect he needs forgiving.”

    The characters are talking about Johnny Vernall (Audrey’s father). Why he needs forgiving is made clear in following chapters of the book.

    Like

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