J1.04 Rough Sleepers

Annotations for Jerusalem by Alan Moore

Book 1 – The Boroughs
Rough Sleepers

Page 90 – titled Rough Sleepers

paragraph 1

Page 91

paragraph 1

Page 92

paragraph 1

Page 93

paragraph 1

Page 94

paragraph 1

Page 95

paragraph 1

Page 96

paragraph 1

Page 97

paragraph 1

Page 98

paragraph 1

Page 99

paragraph 1

Page 100

paragraph 1

Page 101

paragraph 1

Page 102

paragraph 1

Page 103

paragraph 1

Page 104

paragraph 1

Page 105

paragraph 1

Page 106

paragraph 1

Page 107

paragraph 1

Page 108

paragraph 1

Page 109

paragraph 1

Page 110

paragraph 1

Page 111

paragraph 1

Page 112

paragraph 1

Page 113

paragraph 1

Page 114

paragraph 1

Page 115

paragraph 1

Page 116

paragraph 1

Page 117

paragraph 1

Page 118

paragraph 1

Page 119

paragraph 1

Page 120

paragraph 1

Page 121

paragraph 1

 

Advertisements

9 thoughts on “J1.04 Rough Sleepers”

  1. OBSERVATIONS/QUESTIONS:

    Wow. To quote Bad Boys 2 (via Hot Fuzz): “Shit just got real.”

    • The Black Lion, where Freddy and Mary Jane (which happens to be slang for marijuana) hang out (p91), was mentioned in chapter 1 (I believe) as having been frequented by the Warren family. The bartender treats them as if they’re invisible, in total parallel to how the homeless are treated, but then it turns out later it’s because they’re ghosts. Nice misdirection plus social commentary there by Moore.

    • This may sound dumb, but it wasn’t until the paragraph on p94 starting with “From Marefair, Freddy drifted up Horsemarket” that I actually flipped back to the map at the beginning to follow a character’s trail!

    • Freddy’s friend on p98 is described as a “septuagenarian,” which means a person who is between the age of 70-79.

    • It’s sweet how genuinely honest Freddy is regarding relatively harmless fibs, like on p99, where now that he told his septuagenarian friend that he’d visit Georgie, he feels he better do so (and also with the priest on p96, whom Freddy tells he’s headed one way, and then feels he has to go that way even though he changed his mind).

    • “But all the pokey little nooks and stairways had their purpose in the builders’ plan,” says the septuagenarian on p100. There are WAY too many corner/angle mentions in this chapter to quote them all, but this is an early (somewhat foreshadowing) one.

    • This is just a damn amazing collection of words (especially since, for me, this is where I started to realize Freddy is traveling through time as well as space): “…through the bramble months and years with thorns made out of painful moments…” (p105)

    • “The Destructor” – first mentioned in chapter 1 as part of Alma and Mick’s conversation, and part of Alma’s motivation regarding her art show (aka THIS BOOK) – is mentioned again here on p106 and on p107 where it states that the Destructor’s tower stands over Bath Street.

    • “Clara, Joe Swan’s missus” (p106), with the push cart are Alma Warren’s maternal grandparents.

    • p109: “Phyllis Painter?” I think she has appeared before? But I’m totally blanking.

    • The dreamer in his underpants/vest on p114 – this scene to confirm that this was indeed where Alma visited during her dream in chapter 1 because apparently living people sometimes end up there in their dreams.

    • “Jacob’s Flight” on p115, which seems to be a ladder/stairs mash-up (at quite a seemingly odd ANGLE, of course) makes me think of Jacob’s Ladder (a movie from the 90s about seeing ghosts/losing sanity – although I haven’t seen it in a while). I would guess the use of the name “Jacob” by both of these stories is referencing the same (probably biblical?) Jacob.

    • The symbols marking the corners of the snooker table (p117) are the same symbols at the beginning of the book on the “Based on a ‘true story’” page (three of which are on each cover of the soft cover edition).

    SPACETIMEY MOMENTS:

    • p97: “Either there had been something happen there a long time back, or there was something going to happen there.”

    • p103: “The monk had gone, leaving still pictures of himself in black and white behind that faded into nothing within moments.”

    • p105: “Fred considered this as he strode out into the stream of motorcars, dragging grey snapshots of his previous several seconds like a tail behind him.”

    • p118: “Mighty Mike…punched his cue once, hard, into the white ball, sending it at high velocity across the breadth of the tremendous table with its trail behind it like a tight packed string of bright white pearls.”

    • I recently reread an old conversation between Alan Moore and Dave Sim from 1997 in which they discuss the fourth dimension after Moore and Eddie Campbell had completed From Hell. This was because of developments in a recent issue of Providence. However, this quote from that conversation also applies heavily to this chapter of Jerusalem as well (and probably a lot of Moore’s work in general).

    Moore says:

    “Now, moving on to what you actually asked about. which was where I stood on the Free Will vs. Determinism issue: if Stephen Hawking is correct when he suggests that Space-Time itself is a fourth-dimensional solid probably shaped a bit like an egg or an American football, with the Big Bang at one end, the Big Crunch at the other, and all other moments suspended forever somewhere between, then I don’t see how Free Will can possibly exist. Time, while it is not actually the fourth-dimension in the sense that H.G. Wells popularised it as being (after the theories of C. Howard Hinton, funnily enough), is, as I understand it, more properly conceived as the shadow of a fourth spatial dimension perceived by human consciousness.
    What this means is that our view of our own three-dimensional body is limited: if you had fourth-dimensional vision and were standing at a point outside our continuum, you would perceive your human semblance as a form of horrifically long millipede that would wind back and forth over every landscape you have ever or ever will cross during the course of your life. The millipede tapers slightly at both ends. At one end is genetic slime and at the other extreme is dust or ash. Now imagine that each section of the millipede is one instant of your life from birth to death, all fused together. The way our perception of time works in this analogy is like a peristaltic ripple of awareness that starts at one end and passes through every segment in the chain of the millipede’s body in sequence. As each individual segment is lit up by awareness, it only has awareness of what it is, i.e., a segment located at certain co-ordinates. When the awareness moves on to the next segment in the body, it is aware of itself as a nearly identical segment at a new co-ordinate, and it makes the reasonable assumption that it is the same segment and that the segment has moved. In fact, the segment is unwittingly part of a larger organism, and the only movement is the movement of its awareness through that’ organism’s convoluted form.”

    http://www.linkworthy.com/Moore/Correspondence3.htm

    The entire (long) conversation is fascinating. I can’t recommend it enough (and this was from the days before Dave Sim went…well, cornery, I suppose).

    THINGS THAT MADE ME LAUGH:

    • p91: “…looking down, a bit glum, at the empty glasses on the laminated tabletop between them, wishing there was some way they could have a proper drink but knowing as they couldn’t, knowing that instead they’d have to have a proper conversation.”

    • p112: “Ectoplasm”

    • p114: Freddy, who is color blind, standing at the street curb, “waiting for the light to turn from grey to grey.”

    Sorry for the long post, but I didn’t have time to write a short one. (That joke will never get old!)

    Like

    1. The chapter begins: “It had been in one sense forty years since Freddy Allen left the life.” so is kind ovbious that Freddy is dead and it follows that it is the postmortem story as a ghost. Less obvious is why “IN ONE SENSE forty years…” It is that has passed that time, but really, what does the tick-tac means once you have no body that materially records the passage of events? So, as far as the living are concerned, it could have been a week. who knows. Freddy is a floating consciousness inhabiting an attempt of temporary sensation, a sort of “spell” made of memories of what he lived, in the “midle” of the timeless eternity, sort of speak.

      Like

  2. the sex scene with Freddy was pre-visualized (in fact seen at the same time as it’s happenning here, as Freddy also sees Marla) by Marla in the previous chapter.

    Like

  3. I’ll put my dramatis personae and index lists here.
    NOTES:
    Page referrers are for 3 volume paperback edition by Knockabout.
    Dramatis personae-characters in brackets are only mentioned but not in scene.

    Dramatis Personae
    • Freddy Allen, ghost, POV, died approx. 40 years ago, 1966, born approx. 1898 (see Twenty Five Thousand Nights divided by 365 = 68 years)
    • Old boy tramp
    • (›Black woman with scar‹, works with prostitutes, drug users and refugees)
    • Mary Jane, ghost (died of heart attack), talks with Freddy in Black Lion Pub
    • Two blokes who talk with barkeep (blonde young woman) in Black Lion Pub
    • (Mick Malone, Gang leader, regular in Jolly Smokers Pub)
    • (Lizzie Fawkes, brawled once with Mary about Jean Dove in front of Green Dragon Pub)
    • Joe Ball, ghost, retired superintendent
    • ›Stout clergyman/monk with heavy sack‹ (= Peter from X Marks the Spot)
    • (Joe Swan, acquaintance of Freddy)
    • ›Chum of Freddy‹, lives in corner building Scarlettwell/St. Andrews Street, watches photo album
    • (›old man‹, expected by Freddys chum)
    • (Kid gang of Phyllis Painter)
    • (Fiery Phil, preacher)
    • (Twenty year old woman in photo of album watched by Freddys chum)
    • Jem Perrit, with horse and cart
    • Monk with tonsure, customer of Georgie
    • Georgie Bumble, ghost, of Freddys and Marys gang, worked once in bank office
    • Clara Swan and baby Doreen
    • (›Red Earl‹ von Althrop House, for whom Clara worked in service before she married Joe Swan, see Index)
    • Patsy Clarke, Freddy had spontaneous sex with her in 1928
    • (Frank Clarke, Patsys husband, climbed up the ladder)
    • Phyllis Painter
    • (Mr. Bullock, butcher behind The Destructor)
    • ›Pretty, skinny little brown girl‹, 16-17 years old, watches Freddy and Patsy having sex = Marla, POV of ASBOS of Desire
    • (street boy at St. Peters Church, asleep and drunk)
    • (Julia, daughter of a doctor; eighteen year old Freddy waited to rape her, but did not)
    • ›Dreamer‹, with white hair and glasses, spooked by Freddy
    • Three-fingered Tunk, ghost, audience member at snooker, former fishmonger
    • Nobby Clark, ghost, audience member at Snooker
    • Jem Perrit, ghost, former wood-merchant with horse cart (horse called Bessie); now junkman for phantasma artefacts
    • 4 x Master Builders playing snooker
    • Mighty Mike, Master Builder, white hair, local, plays SE-hole, cross
    • (Charlie George, ›Black Charlie‹, ball on snooker table: see chapter Modern Times, and POV in Blind, But Now I See)
    • ›Yuri-something‹, Master Builder, possible russian, plays NE-hole, skull

    Index
    • Fancy Smith, character from TV serial Z-Cars, played by Brian Blessed: 100
    Z-Cars, BBC TV serial (1962-1978): 100
    • Friar Tuck, character from Robin Hood-legend: 100
    • Earl Spencer = John Poyntz Spencer, 5th Earl Spencer (1835-1910), called ›The Red Earl‹ because of his long red beard: 110
    • Mick McManus (1921-2013), English wrestler: 122

    Like

  4. I’m not sure what the “rules” are about spoilers here, but there’s a lot going on in Freddy’s conversation with the denizen of the house on Scarletwell Street. For example, the talk of “the old man” coming round and apologising (as well he might, once we realise – right at the end of the book – who he actually is).

    Like

  5. The trails/afterimages Freddy describes himself and other otherwordly beings leaving are strongly reminiscent of Palinopsia, a visual condition which is common during LSD trips, but sometimes appears on its own. Here, apparently ghosts leave positive afterimages, while angels leave the negative ones.

    Like

  6. Page 98: “Well, he’s a rogue, old Johnny. I expect he needs forgiving.”

    The characters are talking about Johnny Vernall (Audrey’s father). Why he needs forgiving is made clear in following chapters of the book.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s